Dragons Are a Girl’s Best Friend

Mom_thumbnail_21I thought I was done with my contributions about dragons, and then I remembered the dragon I love that is teaching me Spanish. …Sort of.

See, early one morning, as I was flipping around the TV dial, looking for something, anything other than the same twenty minute loops of news, and basketball, football and golf, roller derby, wrestling, ski jumping, hockey and ice dancing. Saturday morning/afternoons are the TV Sports Ghetto; just as early Sunday mornings are religious, followed by political analysis.

There were also infomercials and innumerable chances to buy stained glass lamps, jewelry, make-up, handbags, and plus sized clothing being shown. I was about to five up when I found a beautifully produced children’s show, and paused. It was called “Jane and the Dragon.” Jane2_1It’s about a medieval girl, Jane, the neat castle she lives in and a knight and child prince and princess and a king and his guard and a jester, blacksmith and others, from menial to top drawer. And Jane’s best friend: her Dragon. She’s wise, and solves problems with the help of the Dragon. The technique of the production is somewhere between ‘toon and digital, the characters are loveable, and the music is medieval sounding, and I love that show! It’s a Canadian production.

But I never found it again. And believe me, I looked. Until one morning this past winter, I discovered it on a Spanish-speaking network. I took French for six years and still am laughed at in Paris and Montreal. English is mine, but foreign languages are not my strong suit. But there was “Jane and the Dragon” in Spanish. Every Sunday morning. I wanted to see it. So undaunted, I watched it. Now I watch it every week.

I learned to read before I went to school by having comic books read to me. And now, I think I’m learning Spanish. Hola!

So I conclude three things:
1) The Canadians can produce something wonderful besides lower price drugs.
2) Dragons are universally admired, and these days we like to believe them to be good. (I bridle at that new bank commercial, which while very funny, shows a decapitated dragon.)
3) If you want something bad enough, you can learn how to get it, and in learning, learn something else too.

So, have you seen “Jane and the Dragon”? (I don’t know anyone connected to the show, believe me.) And have you every pursued something frivolous only to find you’ve found gold in other ways too?

32 thoughts on “Dragons Are a Girl’s Best Friend”

  1. Edith, I checked out the link for Jane and the Dragon and I was Completely Charmed!
    Would makeup count as Something Frivolous? Of course, I have always had my mind on More Serious Matters than my appearance, but I tried a new kind of makeup about 6 months ago and was so captivated that now I have Sparkly Eyelids all the time just like a teenager.
    I am having so much fun with it, it makes me so Happy, and strangely it has made me feel so much more Beautiful and Confident about my Appearance than ever, and here I am in my 40’s! Weird, huh?

    Reply
  2. Edith, I checked out the link for Jane and the Dragon and I was Completely Charmed!
    Would makeup count as Something Frivolous? Of course, I have always had my mind on More Serious Matters than my appearance, but I tried a new kind of makeup about 6 months ago and was so captivated that now I have Sparkly Eyelids all the time just like a teenager.
    I am having so much fun with it, it makes me so Happy, and strangely it has made me feel so much more Beautiful and Confident about my Appearance than ever, and here I am in my 40’s! Weird, huh?

    Reply
  3. Edith, I checked out the link for Jane and the Dragon and I was Completely Charmed!
    Would makeup count as Something Frivolous? Of course, I have always had my mind on More Serious Matters than my appearance, but I tried a new kind of makeup about 6 months ago and was so captivated that now I have Sparkly Eyelids all the time just like a teenager.
    I am having so much fun with it, it makes me so Happy, and strangely it has made me feel so much more Beautiful and Confident about my Appearance than ever, and here I am in my 40’s! Weird, huh?

    Reply
  4. Edith, I checked out the link for Jane and the Dragon and I was Completely Charmed!
    Would makeup count as Something Frivolous? Of course, I have always had my mind on More Serious Matters than my appearance, but I tried a new kind of makeup about 6 months ago and was so captivated that now I have Sparkly Eyelids all the time just like a teenager.
    I am having so much fun with it, it makes me so Happy, and strangely it has made me feel so much more Beautiful and Confident about my Appearance than ever, and here I am in my 40’s! Weird, huh?

    Reply
  5. Happy Sunday Wench Edith!
    Would getting acrylics count as Something Frivolous? I did so in November, at my 12 year old daughter’s behest. As a birthday gift, I’d given her a gift certificate to get hers done and when we got to the solon, she insisted I join her. Reluctantly, I did. And now, rather than hiding multiple hang nails and over dry cuticles, I actually like the way my hands look. Makes me feel more confident.
    Another somewhat frivolous thing I did was ask my mom to make me a Regency Corset. I figured if I was going to write about heroines doing heroic things in their stays, I should know what that feels like. Of course, my mom was quite game. And now I own, and wear, a corset. I love it! Makes me sit straight. Stand tall. Changes my entire silhouette. Though getting in and out of it can be quite the devil. And, of course, as frivolous things go, I now have a use for it. I’m off to a Ladies’ Regency Weekend in April. In full costume. (Thanks to Kalen’s guidance and my mom’s talent at the sewing machine.)
    But, the most frivolous thing I’ve ever did my 40 years on this earth, I did about 18 months ago. The tiny action was life changing. The kind of change that sits right up there with getting married and giving birth. I bought my first romance novel. And my life has never been the same since. Funny what a little book can do. 🙂
    Nina, thinking Sparkly Eyelids would be fun too.

    Reply
  6. Happy Sunday Wench Edith!
    Would getting acrylics count as Something Frivolous? I did so in November, at my 12 year old daughter’s behest. As a birthday gift, I’d given her a gift certificate to get hers done and when we got to the solon, she insisted I join her. Reluctantly, I did. And now, rather than hiding multiple hang nails and over dry cuticles, I actually like the way my hands look. Makes me feel more confident.
    Another somewhat frivolous thing I did was ask my mom to make me a Regency Corset. I figured if I was going to write about heroines doing heroic things in their stays, I should know what that feels like. Of course, my mom was quite game. And now I own, and wear, a corset. I love it! Makes me sit straight. Stand tall. Changes my entire silhouette. Though getting in and out of it can be quite the devil. And, of course, as frivolous things go, I now have a use for it. I’m off to a Ladies’ Regency Weekend in April. In full costume. (Thanks to Kalen’s guidance and my mom’s talent at the sewing machine.)
    But, the most frivolous thing I’ve ever did my 40 years on this earth, I did about 18 months ago. The tiny action was life changing. The kind of change that sits right up there with getting married and giving birth. I bought my first romance novel. And my life has never been the same since. Funny what a little book can do. 🙂
    Nina, thinking Sparkly Eyelids would be fun too.

    Reply
  7. Happy Sunday Wench Edith!
    Would getting acrylics count as Something Frivolous? I did so in November, at my 12 year old daughter’s behest. As a birthday gift, I’d given her a gift certificate to get hers done and when we got to the solon, she insisted I join her. Reluctantly, I did. And now, rather than hiding multiple hang nails and over dry cuticles, I actually like the way my hands look. Makes me feel more confident.
    Another somewhat frivolous thing I did was ask my mom to make me a Regency Corset. I figured if I was going to write about heroines doing heroic things in their stays, I should know what that feels like. Of course, my mom was quite game. And now I own, and wear, a corset. I love it! Makes me sit straight. Stand tall. Changes my entire silhouette. Though getting in and out of it can be quite the devil. And, of course, as frivolous things go, I now have a use for it. I’m off to a Ladies’ Regency Weekend in April. In full costume. (Thanks to Kalen’s guidance and my mom’s talent at the sewing machine.)
    But, the most frivolous thing I’ve ever did my 40 years on this earth, I did about 18 months ago. The tiny action was life changing. The kind of change that sits right up there with getting married and giving birth. I bought my first romance novel. And my life has never been the same since. Funny what a little book can do. 🙂
    Nina, thinking Sparkly Eyelids would be fun too.

    Reply
  8. Happy Sunday Wench Edith!
    Would getting acrylics count as Something Frivolous? I did so in November, at my 12 year old daughter’s behest. As a birthday gift, I’d given her a gift certificate to get hers done and when we got to the solon, she insisted I join her. Reluctantly, I did. And now, rather than hiding multiple hang nails and over dry cuticles, I actually like the way my hands look. Makes me feel more confident.
    Another somewhat frivolous thing I did was ask my mom to make me a Regency Corset. I figured if I was going to write about heroines doing heroic things in their stays, I should know what that feels like. Of course, my mom was quite game. And now I own, and wear, a corset. I love it! Makes me sit straight. Stand tall. Changes my entire silhouette. Though getting in and out of it can be quite the devil. And, of course, as frivolous things go, I now have a use for it. I’m off to a Ladies’ Regency Weekend in April. In full costume. (Thanks to Kalen’s guidance and my mom’s talent at the sewing machine.)
    But, the most frivolous thing I’ve ever did my 40 years on this earth, I did about 18 months ago. The tiny action was life changing. The kind of change that sits right up there with getting married and giving birth. I bought my first romance novel. And my life has never been the same since. Funny what a little book can do. 🙂
    Nina, thinking Sparkly Eyelids would be fun too.

    Reply
  9. RevMelinda, I love sparkly eyelids and do not consider them frivolous at all. My goodness, how else would people know where my eyes were?
    and Nina – buying romantic novels frivolous? GASP!
    But really, it’s the little sparkly things in our lives that help us cope with all the rest, isn’t it?

    Reply
  10. RevMelinda, I love sparkly eyelids and do not consider them frivolous at all. My goodness, how else would people know where my eyes were?
    and Nina – buying romantic novels frivolous? GASP!
    But really, it’s the little sparkly things in our lives that help us cope with all the rest, isn’t it?

    Reply
  11. RevMelinda, I love sparkly eyelids and do not consider them frivolous at all. My goodness, how else would people know where my eyes were?
    and Nina – buying romantic novels frivolous? GASP!
    But really, it’s the little sparkly things in our lives that help us cope with all the rest, isn’t it?

    Reply
  12. RevMelinda, I love sparkly eyelids and do not consider them frivolous at all. My goodness, how else would people know where my eyes were?
    and Nina – buying romantic novels frivolous? GASP!
    But really, it’s the little sparkly things in our lives that help us cope with all the rest, isn’t it?

    Reply
  13. “But really, it’s the little sparkly things in our lives that help us cope with all the rest, isn’t it?”
    Edith, this made me think of that amazing song from the 1912 (or so) strike of the Lawrence, Mass. textile workers, called “Bread and Roses”:
    As we come marching, marching
    in the beauty of the day,
    A million darkened kitchens,
    a thousand mill lofts gray,
    Are touched with all the radiance
    that a sudden sun discloses,
    For the people hear us singing:
    “Bread and roses! Bread and roses!”
    As we come marching, marching,
    we battle too for men,
    For they are women’s children,
    and we mother them again.
    Our lives shall not be sweated
    from birth until life closes;
    Hearts starve as well as bodies;
    give us bread, but give us roses!
    As we come marching, marching,
    unnumbered women dead
    Go crying through our singing
    their ancient cry for bread.
    Small art and love and beauty
    their drudging spirits knew.
    Yes, it is bread we fight for —
    but we fight for roses, too!
    As we come marching, marching,
    we bring the greater days.
    The rising of the women means
    the rising of the (human) race.
    No more the drudge and idler —
    ten that toil where one reposes,
    But a sharing of life’s glories:
    Bread and roses! Bread and roses!

    Reply
  14. “But really, it’s the little sparkly things in our lives that help us cope with all the rest, isn’t it?”
    Edith, this made me think of that amazing song from the 1912 (or so) strike of the Lawrence, Mass. textile workers, called “Bread and Roses”:
    As we come marching, marching
    in the beauty of the day,
    A million darkened kitchens,
    a thousand mill lofts gray,
    Are touched with all the radiance
    that a sudden sun discloses,
    For the people hear us singing:
    “Bread and roses! Bread and roses!”
    As we come marching, marching,
    we battle too for men,
    For they are women’s children,
    and we mother them again.
    Our lives shall not be sweated
    from birth until life closes;
    Hearts starve as well as bodies;
    give us bread, but give us roses!
    As we come marching, marching,
    unnumbered women dead
    Go crying through our singing
    their ancient cry for bread.
    Small art and love and beauty
    their drudging spirits knew.
    Yes, it is bread we fight for —
    but we fight for roses, too!
    As we come marching, marching,
    we bring the greater days.
    The rising of the women means
    the rising of the (human) race.
    No more the drudge and idler —
    ten that toil where one reposes,
    But a sharing of life’s glories:
    Bread and roses! Bread and roses!

    Reply
  15. “But really, it’s the little sparkly things in our lives that help us cope with all the rest, isn’t it?”
    Edith, this made me think of that amazing song from the 1912 (or so) strike of the Lawrence, Mass. textile workers, called “Bread and Roses”:
    As we come marching, marching
    in the beauty of the day,
    A million darkened kitchens,
    a thousand mill lofts gray,
    Are touched with all the radiance
    that a sudden sun discloses,
    For the people hear us singing:
    “Bread and roses! Bread and roses!”
    As we come marching, marching,
    we battle too for men,
    For they are women’s children,
    and we mother them again.
    Our lives shall not be sweated
    from birth until life closes;
    Hearts starve as well as bodies;
    give us bread, but give us roses!
    As we come marching, marching,
    unnumbered women dead
    Go crying through our singing
    their ancient cry for bread.
    Small art and love and beauty
    their drudging spirits knew.
    Yes, it is bread we fight for —
    but we fight for roses, too!
    As we come marching, marching,
    we bring the greater days.
    The rising of the women means
    the rising of the (human) race.
    No more the drudge and idler —
    ten that toil where one reposes,
    But a sharing of life’s glories:
    Bread and roses! Bread and roses!

    Reply
  16. “But really, it’s the little sparkly things in our lives that help us cope with all the rest, isn’t it?”
    Edith, this made me think of that amazing song from the 1912 (or so) strike of the Lawrence, Mass. textile workers, called “Bread and Roses”:
    As we come marching, marching
    in the beauty of the day,
    A million darkened kitchens,
    a thousand mill lofts gray,
    Are touched with all the radiance
    that a sudden sun discloses,
    For the people hear us singing:
    “Bread and roses! Bread and roses!”
    As we come marching, marching,
    we battle too for men,
    For they are women’s children,
    and we mother them again.
    Our lives shall not be sweated
    from birth until life closes;
    Hearts starve as well as bodies;
    give us bread, but give us roses!
    As we come marching, marching,
    unnumbered women dead
    Go crying through our singing
    their ancient cry for bread.
    Small art and love and beauty
    their drudging spirits knew.
    Yes, it is bread we fight for —
    but we fight for roses, too!
    As we come marching, marching,
    we bring the greater days.
    The rising of the women means
    the rising of the (human) race.
    No more the drudge and idler —
    ten that toil where one reposes,
    But a sharing of life’s glories:
    Bread and roses! Bread and roses!

    Reply
  17. What a wonderful find, Edith! Sounds like the sort of storyline that inspired my story, except that my princess has to wear all the princessy froo-froo stuff.
    Melinda, I’ve loved that bread and roses song and concept for ages. Thanks for posting it here.
    Jo

    Reply
  18. What a wonderful find, Edith! Sounds like the sort of storyline that inspired my story, except that my princess has to wear all the princessy froo-froo stuff.
    Melinda, I’ve loved that bread and roses song and concept for ages. Thanks for posting it here.
    Jo

    Reply
  19. What a wonderful find, Edith! Sounds like the sort of storyline that inspired my story, except that my princess has to wear all the princessy froo-froo stuff.
    Melinda, I’ve loved that bread and roses song and concept for ages. Thanks for posting it here.
    Jo

    Reply
  20. What a wonderful find, Edith! Sounds like the sort of storyline that inspired my story, except that my princess has to wear all the princessy froo-froo stuff.
    Melinda, I’ve loved that bread and roses song and concept for ages. Thanks for posting it here.
    Jo

    Reply
  21. Edith, you truly know when you’re in the tv sports doldrums when all you can find on ESPN is poker or fishing. Seedy guys in dark glasses and funny hats whispering among themselves (which covers both groups, now that I think about it) are neither Sports nor Entertainment.
    But not much longer until baseball’s opening day! I’m warning you: my Phillies believe this year that they’re better than your Mets…..(not that I believe it myself)
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  22. Edith, you truly know when you’re in the tv sports doldrums when all you can find on ESPN is poker or fishing. Seedy guys in dark glasses and funny hats whispering among themselves (which covers both groups, now that I think about it) are neither Sports nor Entertainment.
    But not much longer until baseball’s opening day! I’m warning you: my Phillies believe this year that they’re better than your Mets…..(not that I believe it myself)
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  23. Edith, you truly know when you’re in the tv sports doldrums when all you can find on ESPN is poker or fishing. Seedy guys in dark glasses and funny hats whispering among themselves (which covers both groups, now that I think about it) are neither Sports nor Entertainment.
    But not much longer until baseball’s opening day! I’m warning you: my Phillies believe this year that they’re better than your Mets…..(not that I believe it myself)
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  24. Edith, you truly know when you’re in the tv sports doldrums when all you can find on ESPN is poker or fishing. Seedy guys in dark glasses and funny hats whispering among themselves (which covers both groups, now that I think about it) are neither Sports nor Entertainment.
    But not much longer until baseball’s opening day! I’m warning you: my Phillies believe this year that they’re better than your Mets…..(not that I believe it myself)
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  25. >>your Mets>>>
    ermmm…. no, Susan/Miranda. My Yankees~!
    And congrats to Canada for producing you, meardaba.
    (They also make great ginger ale!)
    And thanks for the so emotional song, RevMelinda, Wish I knew the tune.

    Reply
  26. >>your Mets>>>
    ermmm…. no, Susan/Miranda. My Yankees~!
    And congrats to Canada for producing you, meardaba.
    (They also make great ginger ale!)
    And thanks for the so emotional song, RevMelinda, Wish I knew the tune.

    Reply
  27. >>your Mets>>>
    ermmm…. no, Susan/Miranda. My Yankees~!
    And congrats to Canada for producing you, meardaba.
    (They also make great ginger ale!)
    And thanks for the so emotional song, RevMelinda, Wish I knew the tune.

    Reply
  28. >>your Mets>>>
    ermmm…. no, Susan/Miranda. My Yankees~!
    And congrats to Canada for producing you, meardaba.
    (They also make great ginger ale!)
    And thanks for the so emotional song, RevMelinda, Wish I knew the tune.

    Reply

Leave a Comment