Degrees of Separation

109703058.thbSusan here. Last year, my husband and I both did DNA testing, and the results have been fascinating—and somewhat unexpected. I thought I knew my genetic background – French, Italian, English on my father’s side, Irish and Scottish on my mother’s side. My husband thought he was English, Scottish and German. Surprise! The tests revealed lines we hadn’t known about, including ethnicities and haplo groups and neanderthal (I have less than average; my husband a bit more than average). Along with the DNA, a family member has been creating a family tree, and the DNA information is helping to fill out the branches.  

109510739.thbIn considering the results and connections we've found, it's a bit of that six degrees of separation theory–proposed in 1929 by Hungarian author Frigyes Karinthy, it holds that humans are so closely linked in families and activities that it’s possible to connect two people together by some thread or another within six steps. (A more playful version maintains that anyone can find a connection to actor Kevin Bacon within six steps.) 

109515603.thbThe DNA spit test (literally) says I’m mostly British/Irish/Scottish, 25% French, some Italian and German too–and about 2% Ashkenazi Jew. That last is a nice surprise! Not all the info is there–for females, DNA tests track the maternal line more than the paternal (and vice versa, dad genes for guys), so I could have more Italian-origin DNA than these tests showed.

On the genealogy tree, my great-grandparents came directly from Scotland and Ireland, the other set from France and Italy—I knew that, and knew my French great-grandma well, and how interesting to see how far back some of those connections go. While we found no Jewish relatives in the tree, the DNA says it's there, a couple of centuries back. I'd love to know more. 

4318843.thbThe husband, who thought he was English, Scottish and German, is nearly 90% British and Scandinavian (ha, no surprise to me–he looks like a Viking!). His DNA also shows 2% Native American. Genealogy research showed that he had an English ancestor who settled in North America in 1638 and married the daughter of a Piscataway chief. So he's directly descended, on his father's side, from a Native American princess. The English line in his family goes back to William Carey and wife Mary Boleyn, and through many generations to Charlemagne. Nice!!  

Grandma marieBack to Karinthy (and Bacon) and the six steps. I've always loved hearing about my great-grandparents and their families and their lives in other countries, long ago. Some wonderful family stories have been preserved (and photos, see my French great-grandma, age 18 in 1892, left).

So in thinking about the historical context, and those degrees of separation, it is fun to try to link our family tree to some historical people in six steps or less . . . .

** My great-grandmother was born in a farming village in Lorraine, France, a few miles from a little jeanne_d_arcvillage called Domremy. She told stories, when I was little and she very old, of falling to her knees to pray in the wheat fields as the bells rang across the hills.

So . . . Great-Grandma—>a little village in Lorraine, France–>Domremy, Jeanne d’Arc's home village–>Joan of Arc is my confirmation saint–>which links me in a lovely little way to Joan of Arc. I have a shelf filled with books about Joan, and the history of her era, so that's yet another connection.

** Great-grandpa was born beside beautiful Lago Como, Italy, immigrating to America in his 20s. Great-grandpa—>Lake Como—>George Clooney—>me. (Not historical, but who cares!) 

Pocahontas5** The husband has Viking DNA–>I quite like Vikings –> and have written books that involve them. Gap of separation bridged! And he’s descended from a Native American princess–>that's easy, when I was little, I wanted to BE an Indian princess (preferably TigerLily). Close enough for me!  

** A direct ancestor on my father's side was Gov. William Bradford of Plymouth Colony–> one of my favorite books is The Winthrop Woman by Anya Seton. Hop, skip and jump. 

** My maternal grandfather came to America with his Irish parents and became a doctor…in his first year of practice, he delivered a baby boy to a poor Russian-Jewish immigrant family–> that child became Kirk Douglas–> which might connect me to–>Kevin Bacon in one way or another! 

The DNA/genealogy research has been so interesting for our family, and is ongoing as more information comes in. If you haven't tried it yet, I highly recommend DNA testing or family trees or both! We used 23andMe, and Ancestry.com is another resource. They have amassed ginormous databases that can reveal all sorts of fascinating things about you and yours!

Have you done DNA analysis or genealogy trees for you and your family? Can you connect — by six degrees or so — to some historical person (or to Kevin Bacon)?  I'd love to know how you would trace those degrees of separation!

95 thoughts on “Degrees of Separation”

  1. I did the Ancestry.com DNA test and was not surprised to discover I’m almost 50% Eastern European. (My father was 100%.) What was interesting is that I’m also 2% Asian which, when I thought about it, also comes in on that side. All those Mongols etc… who swept across the Steppes into Eastern Europe, raping and pillaging as they went. Well.

    Reply
  2. I did the Ancestry.com DNA test and was not surprised to discover I’m almost 50% Eastern European. (My father was 100%.) What was interesting is that I’m also 2% Asian which, when I thought about it, also comes in on that side. All those Mongols etc… who swept across the Steppes into Eastern Europe, raping and pillaging as they went. Well.

    Reply
  3. I did the Ancestry.com DNA test and was not surprised to discover I’m almost 50% Eastern European. (My father was 100%.) What was interesting is that I’m also 2% Asian which, when I thought about it, also comes in on that side. All those Mongols etc… who swept across the Steppes into Eastern Europe, raping and pillaging as they went. Well.

    Reply
  4. I did the Ancestry.com DNA test and was not surprised to discover I’m almost 50% Eastern European. (My father was 100%.) What was interesting is that I’m also 2% Asian which, when I thought about it, also comes in on that side. All those Mongols etc… who swept across the Steppes into Eastern Europe, raping and pillaging as they went. Well.

    Reply
  5. I did the Ancestry.com DNA test and was not surprised to discover I’m almost 50% Eastern European. (My father was 100%.) What was interesting is that I’m also 2% Asian which, when I thought about it, also comes in on that side. All those Mongols etc… who swept across the Steppes into Eastern Europe, raping and pillaging as they went. Well.

    Reply
  6. Interesting, Joanna! Friends of mine discovered they had a low percentage of Mongol in their DNA with their Eastern European ancestry. Makes sense, Genghis Khan being a common ancestor to millions by now, apparently…

    Reply
  7. Interesting, Joanna! Friends of mine discovered they had a low percentage of Mongol in their DNA with their Eastern European ancestry. Makes sense, Genghis Khan being a common ancestor to millions by now, apparently…

    Reply
  8. Interesting, Joanna! Friends of mine discovered they had a low percentage of Mongol in their DNA with their Eastern European ancestry. Makes sense, Genghis Khan being a common ancestor to millions by now, apparently…

    Reply
  9. Interesting, Joanna! Friends of mine discovered they had a low percentage of Mongol in their DNA with their Eastern European ancestry. Makes sense, Genghis Khan being a common ancestor to millions by now, apparently…

    Reply
  10. Interesting, Joanna! Friends of mine discovered they had a low percentage of Mongol in their DNA with their Eastern European ancestry. Makes sense, Genghis Khan being a common ancestor to millions by now, apparently…

    Reply
  11. Susan, you make the six degrees of connection game into great fun! I’ve had the DNA testing done and a quick overview revealed the surprising news that there were no surprises. *G* I’m mostly British, a moderate chunk of Western European (some German/Alsatian there) and 8% Irish,which I didn’t know about explicitly, but hey, British Isles!
    When I get this !#$&*! book done, I want to delve deeper into the DNA results. Fun.

    Reply
  12. Susan, you make the six degrees of connection game into great fun! I’ve had the DNA testing done and a quick overview revealed the surprising news that there were no surprises. *G* I’m mostly British, a moderate chunk of Western European (some German/Alsatian there) and 8% Irish,which I didn’t know about explicitly, but hey, British Isles!
    When I get this !#$&*! book done, I want to delve deeper into the DNA results. Fun.

    Reply
  13. Susan, you make the six degrees of connection game into great fun! I’ve had the DNA testing done and a quick overview revealed the surprising news that there were no surprises. *G* I’m mostly British, a moderate chunk of Western European (some German/Alsatian there) and 8% Irish,which I didn’t know about explicitly, but hey, British Isles!
    When I get this !#$&*! book done, I want to delve deeper into the DNA results. Fun.

    Reply
  14. Susan, you make the six degrees of connection game into great fun! I’ve had the DNA testing done and a quick overview revealed the surprising news that there were no surprises. *G* I’m mostly British, a moderate chunk of Western European (some German/Alsatian there) and 8% Irish,which I didn’t know about explicitly, but hey, British Isles!
    When I get this !#$&*! book done, I want to delve deeper into the DNA results. Fun.

    Reply
  15. Susan, you make the six degrees of connection game into great fun! I’ve had the DNA testing done and a quick overview revealed the surprising news that there were no surprises. *G* I’m mostly British, a moderate chunk of Western European (some German/Alsatian there) and 8% Irish,which I didn’t know about explicitly, but hey, British Isles!
    When I get this !#$&*! book done, I want to delve deeper into the DNA results. Fun.

    Reply
  16. You know there’s always been a rumor that Mary Boleyn’s eldest child was fathered by Henry VIII. So if this is the Carey descent, your husband may be related to Queen Elizabeth II. Also, you do know that there were not really any Indian “princesses”, except maybe in a film, fictional books or on a father’s knee? I’ve also received my first DNA results – it’s amazing how many cousins I have. So many I haven’t had time to go through all of them.

    Reply
  17. You know there’s always been a rumor that Mary Boleyn’s eldest child was fathered by Henry VIII. So if this is the Carey descent, your husband may be related to Queen Elizabeth II. Also, you do know that there were not really any Indian “princesses”, except maybe in a film, fictional books or on a father’s knee? I’ve also received my first DNA results – it’s amazing how many cousins I have. So many I haven’t had time to go through all of them.

    Reply
  18. You know there’s always been a rumor that Mary Boleyn’s eldest child was fathered by Henry VIII. So if this is the Carey descent, your husband may be related to Queen Elizabeth II. Also, you do know that there were not really any Indian “princesses”, except maybe in a film, fictional books or on a father’s knee? I’ve also received my first DNA results – it’s amazing how many cousins I have. So many I haven’t had time to go through all of them.

    Reply
  19. You know there’s always been a rumor that Mary Boleyn’s eldest child was fathered by Henry VIII. So if this is the Carey descent, your husband may be related to Queen Elizabeth II. Also, you do know that there were not really any Indian “princesses”, except maybe in a film, fictional books or on a father’s knee? I’ve also received my first DNA results – it’s amazing how many cousins I have. So many I haven’t had time to go through all of them.

    Reply
  20. You know there’s always been a rumor that Mary Boleyn’s eldest child was fathered by Henry VIII. So if this is the Carey descent, your husband may be related to Queen Elizabeth II. Also, you do know that there were not really any Indian “princesses”, except maybe in a film, fictional books or on a father’s knee? I’ve also received my first DNA results – it’s amazing how many cousins I have. So many I haven’t had time to go through all of them.

    Reply
  21. Well, i often mention genealogy here, as it’s one of my three favorite activities (two hobbies: genealogy and counted embroidery) and this group’s shared obsession: reading.
    We have had dna tests taken (at Family Tree DNA), with few surprises. Both of us are mostly Northern Europe, German, and the British Isles. I turned up a Jewish connection, not yet validated by a cousin match.
    As to Charlemagne, that is truly very common: he had many children, who had many children. And so on.
    Family stories are fun (and are to be treasured), but I’m sure you know that errors do creep in. I was 16 when I discounted the first one (but I never told my mother and her sisters they were wrong. They loved the story, and it hurt no one that they believed it.) I was 80 when I began my serious genealogy work. I thought of that old story, rechecked it and thought, “Was he even in the army?” He was, I found some records. so even wrong stories have value in genealogy.
    So, my great grandfather didn’t go on a western trip with Jesse Fremont, but he did fight in the Florida wars under Andrew Jackson. I get a (distant) glimpse of a President in my story in place of the distant glimpse of a presidential candidate!
    Maybe I shouldn’t mention it here (you’re welcome to remove this); my only writing is about genealogy and family. If you are interested my blog is called “The Frustrated Genealogist” and can be found if you google it.

    Reply
  22. Well, i often mention genealogy here, as it’s one of my three favorite activities (two hobbies: genealogy and counted embroidery) and this group’s shared obsession: reading.
    We have had dna tests taken (at Family Tree DNA), with few surprises. Both of us are mostly Northern Europe, German, and the British Isles. I turned up a Jewish connection, not yet validated by a cousin match.
    As to Charlemagne, that is truly very common: he had many children, who had many children. And so on.
    Family stories are fun (and are to be treasured), but I’m sure you know that errors do creep in. I was 16 when I discounted the first one (but I never told my mother and her sisters they were wrong. They loved the story, and it hurt no one that they believed it.) I was 80 when I began my serious genealogy work. I thought of that old story, rechecked it and thought, “Was he even in the army?” He was, I found some records. so even wrong stories have value in genealogy.
    So, my great grandfather didn’t go on a western trip with Jesse Fremont, but he did fight in the Florida wars under Andrew Jackson. I get a (distant) glimpse of a President in my story in place of the distant glimpse of a presidential candidate!
    Maybe I shouldn’t mention it here (you’re welcome to remove this); my only writing is about genealogy and family. If you are interested my blog is called “The Frustrated Genealogist” and can be found if you google it.

    Reply
  23. Well, i often mention genealogy here, as it’s one of my three favorite activities (two hobbies: genealogy and counted embroidery) and this group’s shared obsession: reading.
    We have had dna tests taken (at Family Tree DNA), with few surprises. Both of us are mostly Northern Europe, German, and the British Isles. I turned up a Jewish connection, not yet validated by a cousin match.
    As to Charlemagne, that is truly very common: he had many children, who had many children. And so on.
    Family stories are fun (and are to be treasured), but I’m sure you know that errors do creep in. I was 16 when I discounted the first one (but I never told my mother and her sisters they were wrong. They loved the story, and it hurt no one that they believed it.) I was 80 when I began my serious genealogy work. I thought of that old story, rechecked it and thought, “Was he even in the army?” He was, I found some records. so even wrong stories have value in genealogy.
    So, my great grandfather didn’t go on a western trip with Jesse Fremont, but he did fight in the Florida wars under Andrew Jackson. I get a (distant) glimpse of a President in my story in place of the distant glimpse of a presidential candidate!
    Maybe I shouldn’t mention it here (you’re welcome to remove this); my only writing is about genealogy and family. If you are interested my blog is called “The Frustrated Genealogist” and can be found if you google it.

    Reply
  24. Well, i often mention genealogy here, as it’s one of my three favorite activities (two hobbies: genealogy and counted embroidery) and this group’s shared obsession: reading.
    We have had dna tests taken (at Family Tree DNA), with few surprises. Both of us are mostly Northern Europe, German, and the British Isles. I turned up a Jewish connection, not yet validated by a cousin match.
    As to Charlemagne, that is truly very common: he had many children, who had many children. And so on.
    Family stories are fun (and are to be treasured), but I’m sure you know that errors do creep in. I was 16 when I discounted the first one (but I never told my mother and her sisters they were wrong. They loved the story, and it hurt no one that they believed it.) I was 80 when I began my serious genealogy work. I thought of that old story, rechecked it and thought, “Was he even in the army?” He was, I found some records. so even wrong stories have value in genealogy.
    So, my great grandfather didn’t go on a western trip with Jesse Fremont, but he did fight in the Florida wars under Andrew Jackson. I get a (distant) glimpse of a President in my story in place of the distant glimpse of a presidential candidate!
    Maybe I shouldn’t mention it here (you’re welcome to remove this); my only writing is about genealogy and family. If you are interested my blog is called “The Frustrated Genealogist” and can be found if you google it.

    Reply
  25. Well, i often mention genealogy here, as it’s one of my three favorite activities (two hobbies: genealogy and counted embroidery) and this group’s shared obsession: reading.
    We have had dna tests taken (at Family Tree DNA), with few surprises. Both of us are mostly Northern Europe, German, and the British Isles. I turned up a Jewish connection, not yet validated by a cousin match.
    As to Charlemagne, that is truly very common: he had many children, who had many children. And so on.
    Family stories are fun (and are to be treasured), but I’m sure you know that errors do creep in. I was 16 when I discounted the first one (but I never told my mother and her sisters they were wrong. They loved the story, and it hurt no one that they believed it.) I was 80 when I began my serious genealogy work. I thought of that old story, rechecked it and thought, “Was he even in the army?” He was, I found some records. so even wrong stories have value in genealogy.
    So, my great grandfather didn’t go on a western trip with Jesse Fremont, but he did fight in the Florida wars under Andrew Jackson. I get a (distant) glimpse of a President in my story in place of the distant glimpse of a presidential candidate!
    Maybe I shouldn’t mention it here (you’re welcome to remove this); my only writing is about genealogy and family. If you are interested my blog is called “The Frustrated Genealogist” and can be found if you google it.

    Reply
  26. We’ve learned a lot from the DNA info, including some health-related tendencies. Good to know that neither of us have genetic markers for any of the serious diseases that were listed. Some other details were fun — toe length, index finger length, hair color, curly or straight, light eyes or dark, that sort of thing – and it’s amazing to see that the genes that were identified for those little tendencies had mostly expressed themselves.
    And so very useful to know that we can both smell asparagus (??? but it’s on the gene list!).

    Reply
  27. We’ve learned a lot from the DNA info, including some health-related tendencies. Good to know that neither of us have genetic markers for any of the serious diseases that were listed. Some other details were fun — toe length, index finger length, hair color, curly or straight, light eyes or dark, that sort of thing – and it’s amazing to see that the genes that were identified for those little tendencies had mostly expressed themselves.
    And so very useful to know that we can both smell asparagus (??? but it’s on the gene list!).

    Reply
  28. We’ve learned a lot from the DNA info, including some health-related tendencies. Good to know that neither of us have genetic markers for any of the serious diseases that were listed. Some other details were fun — toe length, index finger length, hair color, curly or straight, light eyes or dark, that sort of thing – and it’s amazing to see that the genes that were identified for those little tendencies had mostly expressed themselves.
    And so very useful to know that we can both smell asparagus (??? but it’s on the gene list!).

    Reply
  29. We’ve learned a lot from the DNA info, including some health-related tendencies. Good to know that neither of us have genetic markers for any of the serious diseases that were listed. Some other details were fun — toe length, index finger length, hair color, curly or straight, light eyes or dark, that sort of thing – and it’s amazing to see that the genes that were identified for those little tendencies had mostly expressed themselves.
    And so very useful to know that we can both smell asparagus (??? but it’s on the gene list!).

    Reply
  30. We’ve learned a lot from the DNA info, including some health-related tendencies. Good to know that neither of us have genetic markers for any of the serious diseases that were listed. Some other details were fun — toe length, index finger length, hair color, curly or straight, light eyes or dark, that sort of thing – and it’s amazing to see that the genes that were identified for those little tendencies had mostly expressed themselves.
    And so very useful to know that we can both smell asparagus (??? but it’s on the gene list!).

    Reply
  31. Oh yes, I’ve heard that! I’ll have to tell my husband. I don’t remember which offspring his line comes from, I’ll have to check. Well, his last name is King. *haha*
    And yes, I know there are no “Indian princesses”– that was my seven-year-old self talking, LOL. The chief’s daughter in my husband’s ancestry was called “Princess” in 17th century records regarding her marriage and Christianity conversion, so we can still use it for her!

    Reply
  32. Oh yes, I’ve heard that! I’ll have to tell my husband. I don’t remember which offspring his line comes from, I’ll have to check. Well, his last name is King. *haha*
    And yes, I know there are no “Indian princesses”– that was my seven-year-old self talking, LOL. The chief’s daughter in my husband’s ancestry was called “Princess” in 17th century records regarding her marriage and Christianity conversion, so we can still use it for her!

    Reply
  33. Oh yes, I’ve heard that! I’ll have to tell my husband. I don’t remember which offspring his line comes from, I’ll have to check. Well, his last name is King. *haha*
    And yes, I know there are no “Indian princesses”– that was my seven-year-old self talking, LOL. The chief’s daughter in my husband’s ancestry was called “Princess” in 17th century records regarding her marriage and Christianity conversion, so we can still use it for her!

    Reply
  34. Oh yes, I’ve heard that! I’ll have to tell my husband. I don’t remember which offspring his line comes from, I’ll have to check. Well, his last name is King. *haha*
    And yes, I know there are no “Indian princesses”– that was my seven-year-old self talking, LOL. The chief’s daughter in my husband’s ancestry was called “Princess” in 17th century records regarding her marriage and Christianity conversion, so we can still use it for her!

    Reply
  35. Oh yes, I’ve heard that! I’ll have to tell my husband. I don’t remember which offspring his line comes from, I’ll have to check. Well, his last name is King. *haha*
    And yes, I know there are no “Indian princesses”– that was my seven-year-old self talking, LOL. The chief’s daughter in my husband’s ancestry was called “Princess” in 17th century records regarding her marriage and Christianity conversion, so we can still use it for her!

    Reply
  36. Thanks, Sue, that’s fascinating about your great-grandfather. It’s so true about the genealogy – sometimes we never quite know, or we find more later that changes the story slightly.
    My Italian great-grandfather often said, according to my dad (G-GP was gone before I was born) that the Italian side was descended from a famous Venetian painter whose work is in all the museums. My sisters and I would giggle as kids when we’d go to a museum and seen one or two of his works – because some of the people in the paintings looked just like our dad. Our genealogy-inclined relative is trying to trace it, but those records are very hard to find. Still, it’s been accepted family lore for generations, and it’s an uncommon surname so really could be so. And there is that curious resemblance in those paintings … (we thought that was very funny as kids!).
    Please feel free to mention your genealogy blog! It’s wonderful, and we’re so proud here at Wenches of all that our readers do!
    Here’s a link for those who’d like to know more: http://frustratedgenealogist.blogspot.com/

    Reply
  37. Thanks, Sue, that’s fascinating about your great-grandfather. It’s so true about the genealogy – sometimes we never quite know, or we find more later that changes the story slightly.
    My Italian great-grandfather often said, according to my dad (G-GP was gone before I was born) that the Italian side was descended from a famous Venetian painter whose work is in all the museums. My sisters and I would giggle as kids when we’d go to a museum and seen one or two of his works – because some of the people in the paintings looked just like our dad. Our genealogy-inclined relative is trying to trace it, but those records are very hard to find. Still, it’s been accepted family lore for generations, and it’s an uncommon surname so really could be so. And there is that curious resemblance in those paintings … (we thought that was very funny as kids!).
    Please feel free to mention your genealogy blog! It’s wonderful, and we’re so proud here at Wenches of all that our readers do!
    Here’s a link for those who’d like to know more: http://frustratedgenealogist.blogspot.com/

    Reply
  38. Thanks, Sue, that’s fascinating about your great-grandfather. It’s so true about the genealogy – sometimes we never quite know, or we find more later that changes the story slightly.
    My Italian great-grandfather often said, according to my dad (G-GP was gone before I was born) that the Italian side was descended from a famous Venetian painter whose work is in all the museums. My sisters and I would giggle as kids when we’d go to a museum and seen one or two of his works – because some of the people in the paintings looked just like our dad. Our genealogy-inclined relative is trying to trace it, but those records are very hard to find. Still, it’s been accepted family lore for generations, and it’s an uncommon surname so really could be so. And there is that curious resemblance in those paintings … (we thought that was very funny as kids!).
    Please feel free to mention your genealogy blog! It’s wonderful, and we’re so proud here at Wenches of all that our readers do!
    Here’s a link for those who’d like to know more: http://frustratedgenealogist.blogspot.com/

    Reply
  39. Thanks, Sue, that’s fascinating about your great-grandfather. It’s so true about the genealogy – sometimes we never quite know, or we find more later that changes the story slightly.
    My Italian great-grandfather often said, according to my dad (G-GP was gone before I was born) that the Italian side was descended from a famous Venetian painter whose work is in all the museums. My sisters and I would giggle as kids when we’d go to a museum and seen one or two of his works – because some of the people in the paintings looked just like our dad. Our genealogy-inclined relative is trying to trace it, but those records are very hard to find. Still, it’s been accepted family lore for generations, and it’s an uncommon surname so really could be so. And there is that curious resemblance in those paintings … (we thought that was very funny as kids!).
    Please feel free to mention your genealogy blog! It’s wonderful, and we’re so proud here at Wenches of all that our readers do!
    Here’s a link for those who’d like to know more: http://frustratedgenealogist.blogspot.com/

    Reply
  40. Thanks, Sue, that’s fascinating about your great-grandfather. It’s so true about the genealogy – sometimes we never quite know, or we find more later that changes the story slightly.
    My Italian great-grandfather often said, according to my dad (G-GP was gone before I was born) that the Italian side was descended from a famous Venetian painter whose work is in all the museums. My sisters and I would giggle as kids when we’d go to a museum and seen one or two of his works – because some of the people in the paintings looked just like our dad. Our genealogy-inclined relative is trying to trace it, but those records are very hard to find. Still, it’s been accepted family lore for generations, and it’s an uncommon surname so really could be so. And there is that curious resemblance in those paintings … (we thought that was very funny as kids!).
    Please feel free to mention your genealogy blog! It’s wonderful, and we’re so proud here at Wenches of all that our readers do!
    Here’s a link for those who’d like to know more: http://frustratedgenealogist.blogspot.com/

    Reply
  41. As far as I know being able to smell asparagus isn’t a trait that increases survival but it is interesting that some can’t smell it. Actually it’s the chemical breakdown products of asparagus in the urine that you smell. Another interesting trait that is recessive is the ability to curl your tongue up in a “u” shape.

    Reply
  42. As far as I know being able to smell asparagus isn’t a trait that increases survival but it is interesting that some can’t smell it. Actually it’s the chemical breakdown products of asparagus in the urine that you smell. Another interesting trait that is recessive is the ability to curl your tongue up in a “u” shape.

    Reply
  43. As far as I know being able to smell asparagus isn’t a trait that increases survival but it is interesting that some can’t smell it. Actually it’s the chemical breakdown products of asparagus in the urine that you smell. Another interesting trait that is recessive is the ability to curl your tongue up in a “u” shape.

    Reply
  44. As far as I know being able to smell asparagus isn’t a trait that increases survival but it is interesting that some can’t smell it. Actually it’s the chemical breakdown products of asparagus in the urine that you smell. Another interesting trait that is recessive is the ability to curl your tongue up in a “u” shape.

    Reply
  45. As far as I know being able to smell asparagus isn’t a trait that increases survival but it is interesting that some can’t smell it. Actually it’s the chemical breakdown products of asparagus in the urine that you smell. Another interesting trait that is recessive is the ability to curl your tongue up in a “u” shape.

    Reply
  46. My family and Pres. Kennedy – my dad’s first cousin asked if he could be in the funeral procession for JFK. They said yes; he shook hands with Jackie. 3 degrees from me to JFK.

    Reply
  47. My family and Pres. Kennedy – my dad’s first cousin asked if he could be in the funeral procession for JFK. They said yes; he shook hands with Jackie. 3 degrees from me to JFK.

    Reply
  48. My family and Pres. Kennedy – my dad’s first cousin asked if he could be in the funeral procession for JFK. They said yes; he shook hands with Jackie. 3 degrees from me to JFK.

    Reply
  49. My family and Pres. Kennedy – my dad’s first cousin asked if he could be in the funeral procession for JFK. They said yes; he shook hands with Jackie. 3 degrees from me to JFK.

    Reply
  50. My family and Pres. Kennedy – my dad’s first cousin asked if he could be in the funeral procession for JFK. They said yes; he shook hands with Jackie. 3 degrees from me to JFK.

    Reply
  51. Fascinating blog, Susan — friends of mine had theirs and their siblings done and found quite different percentages of ethnic background in each of them. Some got bigger doses of some than others.
    Sue, I’m so glad you mentioned your blog — a lot of wenchly readers would enjoy it, I’m sure — not to mention a few wenches,

    Reply
  52. Fascinating blog, Susan — friends of mine had theirs and their siblings done and found quite different percentages of ethnic background in each of them. Some got bigger doses of some than others.
    Sue, I’m so glad you mentioned your blog — a lot of wenchly readers would enjoy it, I’m sure — not to mention a few wenches,

    Reply
  53. Fascinating blog, Susan — friends of mine had theirs and their siblings done and found quite different percentages of ethnic background in each of them. Some got bigger doses of some than others.
    Sue, I’m so glad you mentioned your blog — a lot of wenchly readers would enjoy it, I’m sure — not to mention a few wenches,

    Reply
  54. Fascinating blog, Susan — friends of mine had theirs and their siblings done and found quite different percentages of ethnic background in each of them. Some got bigger doses of some than others.
    Sue, I’m so glad you mentioned your blog — a lot of wenchly readers would enjoy it, I’m sure — not to mention a few wenches,

    Reply
  55. Fascinating blog, Susan — friends of mine had theirs and their siblings done and found quite different percentages of ethnic background in each of them. Some got bigger doses of some than others.
    Sue, I’m so glad you mentioned your blog — a lot of wenchly readers would enjoy it, I’m sure — not to mention a few wenches,

    Reply
  56. Fascinating blog piece, Susan, and I love all your varied family connections. I love genealogy research and all that it uncovers. My relatives have dug into my family tree so there isn’t much for me to do there. They have uncovered a number of interesting stories like the ones Sue mentions that aren’t true and some stuff that is! I spend most of my genealogy research looking into connections to the Earls of Craven on behalf of those people who come to Ashdown House because they believe they have a family link. I find it riveting, real life detective stuff!

    Reply
  57. Fascinating blog piece, Susan, and I love all your varied family connections. I love genealogy research and all that it uncovers. My relatives have dug into my family tree so there isn’t much for me to do there. They have uncovered a number of interesting stories like the ones Sue mentions that aren’t true and some stuff that is! I spend most of my genealogy research looking into connections to the Earls of Craven on behalf of those people who come to Ashdown House because they believe they have a family link. I find it riveting, real life detective stuff!

    Reply
  58. Fascinating blog piece, Susan, and I love all your varied family connections. I love genealogy research and all that it uncovers. My relatives have dug into my family tree so there isn’t much for me to do there. They have uncovered a number of interesting stories like the ones Sue mentions that aren’t true and some stuff that is! I spend most of my genealogy research looking into connections to the Earls of Craven on behalf of those people who come to Ashdown House because they believe they have a family link. I find it riveting, real life detective stuff!

    Reply
  59. Fascinating blog piece, Susan, and I love all your varied family connections. I love genealogy research and all that it uncovers. My relatives have dug into my family tree so there isn’t much for me to do there. They have uncovered a number of interesting stories like the ones Sue mentions that aren’t true and some stuff that is! I spend most of my genealogy research looking into connections to the Earls of Craven on behalf of those people who come to Ashdown House because they believe they have a family link. I find it riveting, real life detective stuff!

    Reply
  60. Fascinating blog piece, Susan, and I love all your varied family connections. I love genealogy research and all that it uncovers. My relatives have dug into my family tree so there isn’t much for me to do there. They have uncovered a number of interesting stories like the ones Sue mentions that aren’t true and some stuff that is! I spend most of my genealogy research looking into connections to the Earls of Craven on behalf of those people who come to Ashdown House because they believe they have a family link. I find it riveting, real life detective stuff!

    Reply
  61. My family ancestry stories were often confusing as a child. We “were” Dutch, French, German, Irish, but my father was too dark skinned, dark haired, and had a very specific heterochromia not found among Northern Europeans, as I found out from yet another doctor, as I have the same eyes. And then there was the large variety of hair textures and types not found among completely European people.
    Secondly, I knew our family wasn’t like many European families we lived among. Rarely did we eat heavy, lard, egg noodle and potato based food. We often had dried fruits, nuts for after dinner or snacks. Coffee was often black as pitch and somewhat syrup thick if my father made it, just like his grandmothers recipes. Tea was often Chinese green tea or Indian dark, very strong, flavoured with honey. Coffee could also be flavoured with almond juice, nutmeg, and cinnamon, depending upon family visiting.
    Much of our special family recipes weren’t completely like other European recipes that I had tasted. We didn’t eat shellfish, and I and my father had horrible reactive problems with dairy. Later it was also dairy, shellfish and gluten for me. I can drink goats milk, eat a bit of goat cheese. But don’t have the enzymes to process bovine dairy products. We also ate a very healthy mostly plant based and legumes diet. No, my parents were not hippies at all. They were both born in the 1930s, but raised by generations of people whose diets depended upon made green things, garlic, olive oil, onions, and tomatoes. That made us sort of like the Greek and aitakian neighbors, but we used these basics differently. Bread in our home was often home baked, some times rye, but always full of “things” we now consider healthy- flaxmeal, sunflower seeds, walnuts, and multigrain flours. I think I can count the times we had sweet white bread, and they were always holidays. My father used his mother’s recipe for non yeast, non wheat flour bread, which I adored, because it didn’t make me sick.
    As one of my doctors recently commented, food allergies often show that our ancestry derived from cultures in which these food items didn’t exist. After much extensive reasearch in various ethnic cookbooks, I found our food and I found out why: they were adapted from Central Asian, Turkish, and North African recipes.
    Thirdly, my father’s deep dark brown skin tone, though lighter in the winter, was decidedly not Caucasian. My gold skin tone isn’t either. My eyes have a distinctly Asian slant to them, but not necessarily Chinese. I also have mono fold eyelids of multiracial Asian people. We also have African family members, who come from the “Irish side” of the family that owned them. Supposedly.
    National Geographic was suggested, due to their haplogroup groups work with Central Asia.
    The answer: Central Asian, African/ North African, Franco/ Spanish, Middle Eastern Jewish (Sephardi/Mizrahi), and German, Irish, quite possibly Russian mixed within the Central Asian. Both gene groups are found within a Central Asian population to some degree. But I do not hold a Scandanvian gene. Which means any Russian genetic material dervives from the proto Russian history period, pre Viking times.
    I am ethnically/covertly religiously Jewish on two sides of my family. The various accounts of our ancestry came from the times when my Jewish family were traders on the Silk Road, in the West Indies, and in Europe. My Jewish ancestors were members of communities in places like Uzbekistan, Northern Pakistan/Northern Afghanistan, North Africa, and moved to places such as the Spanish French border where Jews were given sanctuary, to Amsterdam where they sought refuge, from England where they assumed the roles of good French Hugenots escaping persecution from Catholic France, to the American colonies were some landed in 1635, and others landed two hundred years later.
    Had my family not taken every opportunity to trade various goods and flee persecution, I would not be writing this lines now. Those family members who landed in America in the 1830s would later become the living remnants of the German families and their towns completely erased from the historical record by Hitlers regime in WWII.
    Degrees of connection/ separation:
    I have met one of my fellow Sephardi Jewish congregants, and found we have a common northAfrican/Soanish ancestor.
    My husband and I look remarkedly alike some days, particularly when he doesn’t wear a beard. He is also an identical model to the Finnish hunter gatherer found in Finnland, who lived 7,000 years ago. That is roughly the time period pre Viking that Slavic ancestors interacted with Chinese, Central Asians, Scythians from what is now the Middle East. He does not look like the rest of his family, which resembles the French, Scottish, German ancestors. He is bodily dense, well muscled, stocky and just an inch shorter than the average Man in the UK. He has huge bones. And his eyes, which are also slanted it more indigenous looking, are a deep intense North Sea glass green. With darker blue rims. Similiar to mine. Mine are dark Jade green with navy blue rims. He has the Scandanavian gene which I lack.
    I am similiar looking enough to the northern Pakistanit/Afghanistani tribes of the Hindu Cush that a little girl on the internet could’ve been a twin at 4. We have the same nose, eye structure and hair colors.
    When the photographer took a picture of a young girl in early 1980s belonging to the Pashtun tribe during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, it made the front of many newspapers and National Geographic because of her striking looks and bi color heterochromatic eye color. I was in junior high at the time, and had finally, finally! Found someone with my eye colors. Now that my red hair is gone from chemo, and dark black replaced it, I look strikingly similiar to her. When the same photographer found her again in the early 2000’s as and adult in her forties, she looks like the only sister of my father that had the same eye color, features and skin tone.
    My middle son’s unusual orange red hair is also a throwback to the ancient tribes of the Hindu Cush, not modern red hair. It doesn’t look like Scottish orange either. And he was that translucent place skin, but he doesn’t burn, he tans, like me. Susan, he looks like a Viking too. But we need to remember the Vikings founded parts of Russia in Central Asia.
    The word “Rus” derives from a Scandanavian word for Red. All my sons are part Scottish and have bright red beards, no matter the hair color on their head. They are also Cherokee, German and Irish from their father’s side of the family.
    My first husband and I (my son’s father)connected on 16 different points on our medical genetic testing, leading to the medical belief we had more than one common ancestor. His grandmother, the head of the local southern DAR chapter had a heart attack, realizing she must have Jewish ancestry, possibly black ancestry somewhere. Jews were founding parts of Charleston, South Carolina, Savannah Georgia, Pennsylvania before the American Revolution, or before each of the original colonies dealt well with each other. And they signed the Declaration of Independence. Quite possible people intermarried, took what was not theirs (slavery and raping of women) and moved on, often passing for normal Europeans. Or their children did.
    Free Blacks were also in Maryland and Conneticutt, and Boston, the three places my ancestors landed. And my ex’s family helped found Maryland and then Kentucky. One of my ancestors were aboard ship with Paul Revere’s great grandparents. These families have intermarried on the east coast every since both families arrived in 1635.
    Two Irish men, one with an Irish surname, light skin, red hair, but negroid features met and struck up a friendship during their bootlegging exploits of the Prohibition years. They remained friends for many years, but had no idea they were closely related. Seventy years later, their grand daughters meet while attending master degree classes, have similiar Irish grand father stories….their grand fathers were cousins, the Caucasian looking one born to a white legally married mother, in the white side of the family, the other man born to his white father, brother of the white malefamily member and his 3/4 black mistress, who was unknown to the family.
    My grand father was the legitimate son. My great uncles child, the unknown member of the family. We were delighted to find out we were cousins. Our families have spent much time together. She presided over my second wedding. We share the same negroid nose, funky hair texture, and we’re both redheads as children. I retained my red hair and she retained the dark hair, brown skin tone of her father.

    Reply
  62. My family ancestry stories were often confusing as a child. We “were” Dutch, French, German, Irish, but my father was too dark skinned, dark haired, and had a very specific heterochromia not found among Northern Europeans, as I found out from yet another doctor, as I have the same eyes. And then there was the large variety of hair textures and types not found among completely European people.
    Secondly, I knew our family wasn’t like many European families we lived among. Rarely did we eat heavy, lard, egg noodle and potato based food. We often had dried fruits, nuts for after dinner or snacks. Coffee was often black as pitch and somewhat syrup thick if my father made it, just like his grandmothers recipes. Tea was often Chinese green tea or Indian dark, very strong, flavoured with honey. Coffee could also be flavoured with almond juice, nutmeg, and cinnamon, depending upon family visiting.
    Much of our special family recipes weren’t completely like other European recipes that I had tasted. We didn’t eat shellfish, and I and my father had horrible reactive problems with dairy. Later it was also dairy, shellfish and gluten for me. I can drink goats milk, eat a bit of goat cheese. But don’t have the enzymes to process bovine dairy products. We also ate a very healthy mostly plant based and legumes diet. No, my parents were not hippies at all. They were both born in the 1930s, but raised by generations of people whose diets depended upon made green things, garlic, olive oil, onions, and tomatoes. That made us sort of like the Greek and aitakian neighbors, but we used these basics differently. Bread in our home was often home baked, some times rye, but always full of “things” we now consider healthy- flaxmeal, sunflower seeds, walnuts, and multigrain flours. I think I can count the times we had sweet white bread, and they were always holidays. My father used his mother’s recipe for non yeast, non wheat flour bread, which I adored, because it didn’t make me sick.
    As one of my doctors recently commented, food allergies often show that our ancestry derived from cultures in which these food items didn’t exist. After much extensive reasearch in various ethnic cookbooks, I found our food and I found out why: they were adapted from Central Asian, Turkish, and North African recipes.
    Thirdly, my father’s deep dark brown skin tone, though lighter in the winter, was decidedly not Caucasian. My gold skin tone isn’t either. My eyes have a distinctly Asian slant to them, but not necessarily Chinese. I also have mono fold eyelids of multiracial Asian people. We also have African family members, who come from the “Irish side” of the family that owned them. Supposedly.
    National Geographic was suggested, due to their haplogroup groups work with Central Asia.
    The answer: Central Asian, African/ North African, Franco/ Spanish, Middle Eastern Jewish (Sephardi/Mizrahi), and German, Irish, quite possibly Russian mixed within the Central Asian. Both gene groups are found within a Central Asian population to some degree. But I do not hold a Scandanvian gene. Which means any Russian genetic material dervives from the proto Russian history period, pre Viking times.
    I am ethnically/covertly religiously Jewish on two sides of my family. The various accounts of our ancestry came from the times when my Jewish family were traders on the Silk Road, in the West Indies, and in Europe. My Jewish ancestors were members of communities in places like Uzbekistan, Northern Pakistan/Northern Afghanistan, North Africa, and moved to places such as the Spanish French border where Jews were given sanctuary, to Amsterdam where they sought refuge, from England where they assumed the roles of good French Hugenots escaping persecution from Catholic France, to the American colonies were some landed in 1635, and others landed two hundred years later.
    Had my family not taken every opportunity to trade various goods and flee persecution, I would not be writing this lines now. Those family members who landed in America in the 1830s would later become the living remnants of the German families and their towns completely erased from the historical record by Hitlers regime in WWII.
    Degrees of connection/ separation:
    I have met one of my fellow Sephardi Jewish congregants, and found we have a common northAfrican/Soanish ancestor.
    My husband and I look remarkedly alike some days, particularly when he doesn’t wear a beard. He is also an identical model to the Finnish hunter gatherer found in Finnland, who lived 7,000 years ago. That is roughly the time period pre Viking that Slavic ancestors interacted with Chinese, Central Asians, Scythians from what is now the Middle East. He does not look like the rest of his family, which resembles the French, Scottish, German ancestors. He is bodily dense, well muscled, stocky and just an inch shorter than the average Man in the UK. He has huge bones. And his eyes, which are also slanted it more indigenous looking, are a deep intense North Sea glass green. With darker blue rims. Similiar to mine. Mine are dark Jade green with navy blue rims. He has the Scandanavian gene which I lack.
    I am similiar looking enough to the northern Pakistanit/Afghanistani tribes of the Hindu Cush that a little girl on the internet could’ve been a twin at 4. We have the same nose, eye structure and hair colors.
    When the photographer took a picture of a young girl in early 1980s belonging to the Pashtun tribe during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, it made the front of many newspapers and National Geographic because of her striking looks and bi color heterochromatic eye color. I was in junior high at the time, and had finally, finally! Found someone with my eye colors. Now that my red hair is gone from chemo, and dark black replaced it, I look strikingly similiar to her. When the same photographer found her again in the early 2000’s as and adult in her forties, she looks like the only sister of my father that had the same eye color, features and skin tone.
    My middle son’s unusual orange red hair is also a throwback to the ancient tribes of the Hindu Cush, not modern red hair. It doesn’t look like Scottish orange either. And he was that translucent place skin, but he doesn’t burn, he tans, like me. Susan, he looks like a Viking too. But we need to remember the Vikings founded parts of Russia in Central Asia.
    The word “Rus” derives from a Scandanavian word for Red. All my sons are part Scottish and have bright red beards, no matter the hair color on their head. They are also Cherokee, German and Irish from their father’s side of the family.
    My first husband and I (my son’s father)connected on 16 different points on our medical genetic testing, leading to the medical belief we had more than one common ancestor. His grandmother, the head of the local southern DAR chapter had a heart attack, realizing she must have Jewish ancestry, possibly black ancestry somewhere. Jews were founding parts of Charleston, South Carolina, Savannah Georgia, Pennsylvania before the American Revolution, or before each of the original colonies dealt well with each other. And they signed the Declaration of Independence. Quite possible people intermarried, took what was not theirs (slavery and raping of women) and moved on, often passing for normal Europeans. Or their children did.
    Free Blacks were also in Maryland and Conneticutt, and Boston, the three places my ancestors landed. And my ex’s family helped found Maryland and then Kentucky. One of my ancestors were aboard ship with Paul Revere’s great grandparents. These families have intermarried on the east coast every since both families arrived in 1635.
    Two Irish men, one with an Irish surname, light skin, red hair, but negroid features met and struck up a friendship during their bootlegging exploits of the Prohibition years. They remained friends for many years, but had no idea they were closely related. Seventy years later, their grand daughters meet while attending master degree classes, have similiar Irish grand father stories….their grand fathers were cousins, the Caucasian looking one born to a white legally married mother, in the white side of the family, the other man born to his white father, brother of the white malefamily member and his 3/4 black mistress, who was unknown to the family.
    My grand father was the legitimate son. My great uncles child, the unknown member of the family. We were delighted to find out we were cousins. Our families have spent much time together. She presided over my second wedding. We share the same negroid nose, funky hair texture, and we’re both redheads as children. I retained my red hair and she retained the dark hair, brown skin tone of her father.

    Reply
  63. My family ancestry stories were often confusing as a child. We “were” Dutch, French, German, Irish, but my father was too dark skinned, dark haired, and had a very specific heterochromia not found among Northern Europeans, as I found out from yet another doctor, as I have the same eyes. And then there was the large variety of hair textures and types not found among completely European people.
    Secondly, I knew our family wasn’t like many European families we lived among. Rarely did we eat heavy, lard, egg noodle and potato based food. We often had dried fruits, nuts for after dinner or snacks. Coffee was often black as pitch and somewhat syrup thick if my father made it, just like his grandmothers recipes. Tea was often Chinese green tea or Indian dark, very strong, flavoured with honey. Coffee could also be flavoured with almond juice, nutmeg, and cinnamon, depending upon family visiting.
    Much of our special family recipes weren’t completely like other European recipes that I had tasted. We didn’t eat shellfish, and I and my father had horrible reactive problems with dairy. Later it was also dairy, shellfish and gluten for me. I can drink goats milk, eat a bit of goat cheese. But don’t have the enzymes to process bovine dairy products. We also ate a very healthy mostly plant based and legumes diet. No, my parents were not hippies at all. They were both born in the 1930s, but raised by generations of people whose diets depended upon made green things, garlic, olive oil, onions, and tomatoes. That made us sort of like the Greek and aitakian neighbors, but we used these basics differently. Bread in our home was often home baked, some times rye, but always full of “things” we now consider healthy- flaxmeal, sunflower seeds, walnuts, and multigrain flours. I think I can count the times we had sweet white bread, and they were always holidays. My father used his mother’s recipe for non yeast, non wheat flour bread, which I adored, because it didn’t make me sick.
    As one of my doctors recently commented, food allergies often show that our ancestry derived from cultures in which these food items didn’t exist. After much extensive reasearch in various ethnic cookbooks, I found our food and I found out why: they were adapted from Central Asian, Turkish, and North African recipes.
    Thirdly, my father’s deep dark brown skin tone, though lighter in the winter, was decidedly not Caucasian. My gold skin tone isn’t either. My eyes have a distinctly Asian slant to them, but not necessarily Chinese. I also have mono fold eyelids of multiracial Asian people. We also have African family members, who come from the “Irish side” of the family that owned them. Supposedly.
    National Geographic was suggested, due to their haplogroup groups work with Central Asia.
    The answer: Central Asian, African/ North African, Franco/ Spanish, Middle Eastern Jewish (Sephardi/Mizrahi), and German, Irish, quite possibly Russian mixed within the Central Asian. Both gene groups are found within a Central Asian population to some degree. But I do not hold a Scandanvian gene. Which means any Russian genetic material dervives from the proto Russian history period, pre Viking times.
    I am ethnically/covertly religiously Jewish on two sides of my family. The various accounts of our ancestry came from the times when my Jewish family were traders on the Silk Road, in the West Indies, and in Europe. My Jewish ancestors were members of communities in places like Uzbekistan, Northern Pakistan/Northern Afghanistan, North Africa, and moved to places such as the Spanish French border where Jews were given sanctuary, to Amsterdam where they sought refuge, from England where they assumed the roles of good French Hugenots escaping persecution from Catholic France, to the American colonies were some landed in 1635, and others landed two hundred years later.
    Had my family not taken every opportunity to trade various goods and flee persecution, I would not be writing this lines now. Those family members who landed in America in the 1830s would later become the living remnants of the German families and their towns completely erased from the historical record by Hitlers regime in WWII.
    Degrees of connection/ separation:
    I have met one of my fellow Sephardi Jewish congregants, and found we have a common northAfrican/Soanish ancestor.
    My husband and I look remarkedly alike some days, particularly when he doesn’t wear a beard. He is also an identical model to the Finnish hunter gatherer found in Finnland, who lived 7,000 years ago. That is roughly the time period pre Viking that Slavic ancestors interacted with Chinese, Central Asians, Scythians from what is now the Middle East. He does not look like the rest of his family, which resembles the French, Scottish, German ancestors. He is bodily dense, well muscled, stocky and just an inch shorter than the average Man in the UK. He has huge bones. And his eyes, which are also slanted it more indigenous looking, are a deep intense North Sea glass green. With darker blue rims. Similiar to mine. Mine are dark Jade green with navy blue rims. He has the Scandanavian gene which I lack.
    I am similiar looking enough to the northern Pakistanit/Afghanistani tribes of the Hindu Cush that a little girl on the internet could’ve been a twin at 4. We have the same nose, eye structure and hair colors.
    When the photographer took a picture of a young girl in early 1980s belonging to the Pashtun tribe during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, it made the front of many newspapers and National Geographic because of her striking looks and bi color heterochromatic eye color. I was in junior high at the time, and had finally, finally! Found someone with my eye colors. Now that my red hair is gone from chemo, and dark black replaced it, I look strikingly similiar to her. When the same photographer found her again in the early 2000’s as and adult in her forties, she looks like the only sister of my father that had the same eye color, features and skin tone.
    My middle son’s unusual orange red hair is also a throwback to the ancient tribes of the Hindu Cush, not modern red hair. It doesn’t look like Scottish orange either. And he was that translucent place skin, but he doesn’t burn, he tans, like me. Susan, he looks like a Viking too. But we need to remember the Vikings founded parts of Russia in Central Asia.
    The word “Rus” derives from a Scandanavian word for Red. All my sons are part Scottish and have bright red beards, no matter the hair color on their head. They are also Cherokee, German and Irish from their father’s side of the family.
    My first husband and I (my son’s father)connected on 16 different points on our medical genetic testing, leading to the medical belief we had more than one common ancestor. His grandmother, the head of the local southern DAR chapter had a heart attack, realizing she must have Jewish ancestry, possibly black ancestry somewhere. Jews were founding parts of Charleston, South Carolina, Savannah Georgia, Pennsylvania before the American Revolution, or before each of the original colonies dealt well with each other. And they signed the Declaration of Independence. Quite possible people intermarried, took what was not theirs (slavery and raping of women) and moved on, often passing for normal Europeans. Or their children did.
    Free Blacks were also in Maryland and Conneticutt, and Boston, the three places my ancestors landed. And my ex’s family helped found Maryland and then Kentucky. One of my ancestors were aboard ship with Paul Revere’s great grandparents. These families have intermarried on the east coast every since both families arrived in 1635.
    Two Irish men, one with an Irish surname, light skin, red hair, but negroid features met and struck up a friendship during their bootlegging exploits of the Prohibition years. They remained friends for many years, but had no idea they were closely related. Seventy years later, their grand daughters meet while attending master degree classes, have similiar Irish grand father stories….their grand fathers were cousins, the Caucasian looking one born to a white legally married mother, in the white side of the family, the other man born to his white father, brother of the white malefamily member and his 3/4 black mistress, who was unknown to the family.
    My grand father was the legitimate son. My great uncles child, the unknown member of the family. We were delighted to find out we were cousins. Our families have spent much time together. She presided over my second wedding. We share the same negroid nose, funky hair texture, and we’re both redheads as children. I retained my red hair and she retained the dark hair, brown skin tone of her father.

    Reply
  64. My family ancestry stories were often confusing as a child. We “were” Dutch, French, German, Irish, but my father was too dark skinned, dark haired, and had a very specific heterochromia not found among Northern Europeans, as I found out from yet another doctor, as I have the same eyes. And then there was the large variety of hair textures and types not found among completely European people.
    Secondly, I knew our family wasn’t like many European families we lived among. Rarely did we eat heavy, lard, egg noodle and potato based food. We often had dried fruits, nuts for after dinner or snacks. Coffee was often black as pitch and somewhat syrup thick if my father made it, just like his grandmothers recipes. Tea was often Chinese green tea or Indian dark, very strong, flavoured with honey. Coffee could also be flavoured with almond juice, nutmeg, and cinnamon, depending upon family visiting.
    Much of our special family recipes weren’t completely like other European recipes that I had tasted. We didn’t eat shellfish, and I and my father had horrible reactive problems with dairy. Later it was also dairy, shellfish and gluten for me. I can drink goats milk, eat a bit of goat cheese. But don’t have the enzymes to process bovine dairy products. We also ate a very healthy mostly plant based and legumes diet. No, my parents were not hippies at all. They were both born in the 1930s, but raised by generations of people whose diets depended upon made green things, garlic, olive oil, onions, and tomatoes. That made us sort of like the Greek and aitakian neighbors, but we used these basics differently. Bread in our home was often home baked, some times rye, but always full of “things” we now consider healthy- flaxmeal, sunflower seeds, walnuts, and multigrain flours. I think I can count the times we had sweet white bread, and they were always holidays. My father used his mother’s recipe for non yeast, non wheat flour bread, which I adored, because it didn’t make me sick.
    As one of my doctors recently commented, food allergies often show that our ancestry derived from cultures in which these food items didn’t exist. After much extensive reasearch in various ethnic cookbooks, I found our food and I found out why: they were adapted from Central Asian, Turkish, and North African recipes.
    Thirdly, my father’s deep dark brown skin tone, though lighter in the winter, was decidedly not Caucasian. My gold skin tone isn’t either. My eyes have a distinctly Asian slant to them, but not necessarily Chinese. I also have mono fold eyelids of multiracial Asian people. We also have African family members, who come from the “Irish side” of the family that owned them. Supposedly.
    National Geographic was suggested, due to their haplogroup groups work with Central Asia.
    The answer: Central Asian, African/ North African, Franco/ Spanish, Middle Eastern Jewish (Sephardi/Mizrahi), and German, Irish, quite possibly Russian mixed within the Central Asian. Both gene groups are found within a Central Asian population to some degree. But I do not hold a Scandanvian gene. Which means any Russian genetic material dervives from the proto Russian history period, pre Viking times.
    I am ethnically/covertly religiously Jewish on two sides of my family. The various accounts of our ancestry came from the times when my Jewish family were traders on the Silk Road, in the West Indies, and in Europe. My Jewish ancestors were members of communities in places like Uzbekistan, Northern Pakistan/Northern Afghanistan, North Africa, and moved to places such as the Spanish French border where Jews were given sanctuary, to Amsterdam where they sought refuge, from England where they assumed the roles of good French Hugenots escaping persecution from Catholic France, to the American colonies were some landed in 1635, and others landed two hundred years later.
    Had my family not taken every opportunity to trade various goods and flee persecution, I would not be writing this lines now. Those family members who landed in America in the 1830s would later become the living remnants of the German families and their towns completely erased from the historical record by Hitlers regime in WWII.
    Degrees of connection/ separation:
    I have met one of my fellow Sephardi Jewish congregants, and found we have a common northAfrican/Soanish ancestor.
    My husband and I look remarkedly alike some days, particularly when he doesn’t wear a beard. He is also an identical model to the Finnish hunter gatherer found in Finnland, who lived 7,000 years ago. That is roughly the time period pre Viking that Slavic ancestors interacted with Chinese, Central Asians, Scythians from what is now the Middle East. He does not look like the rest of his family, which resembles the French, Scottish, German ancestors. He is bodily dense, well muscled, stocky and just an inch shorter than the average Man in the UK. He has huge bones. And his eyes, which are also slanted it more indigenous looking, are a deep intense North Sea glass green. With darker blue rims. Similiar to mine. Mine are dark Jade green with navy blue rims. He has the Scandanavian gene which I lack.
    I am similiar looking enough to the northern Pakistanit/Afghanistani tribes of the Hindu Cush that a little girl on the internet could’ve been a twin at 4. We have the same nose, eye structure and hair colors.
    When the photographer took a picture of a young girl in early 1980s belonging to the Pashtun tribe during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, it made the front of many newspapers and National Geographic because of her striking looks and bi color heterochromatic eye color. I was in junior high at the time, and had finally, finally! Found someone with my eye colors. Now that my red hair is gone from chemo, and dark black replaced it, I look strikingly similiar to her. When the same photographer found her again in the early 2000’s as and adult in her forties, she looks like the only sister of my father that had the same eye color, features and skin tone.
    My middle son’s unusual orange red hair is also a throwback to the ancient tribes of the Hindu Cush, not modern red hair. It doesn’t look like Scottish orange either. And he was that translucent place skin, but he doesn’t burn, he tans, like me. Susan, he looks like a Viking too. But we need to remember the Vikings founded parts of Russia in Central Asia.
    The word “Rus” derives from a Scandanavian word for Red. All my sons are part Scottish and have bright red beards, no matter the hair color on their head. They are also Cherokee, German and Irish from their father’s side of the family.
    My first husband and I (my son’s father)connected on 16 different points on our medical genetic testing, leading to the medical belief we had more than one common ancestor. His grandmother, the head of the local southern DAR chapter had a heart attack, realizing she must have Jewish ancestry, possibly black ancestry somewhere. Jews were founding parts of Charleston, South Carolina, Savannah Georgia, Pennsylvania before the American Revolution, or before each of the original colonies dealt well with each other. And they signed the Declaration of Independence. Quite possible people intermarried, took what was not theirs (slavery and raping of women) and moved on, often passing for normal Europeans. Or their children did.
    Free Blacks were also in Maryland and Conneticutt, and Boston, the three places my ancestors landed. And my ex’s family helped found Maryland and then Kentucky. One of my ancestors were aboard ship with Paul Revere’s great grandparents. These families have intermarried on the east coast every since both families arrived in 1635.
    Two Irish men, one with an Irish surname, light skin, red hair, but negroid features met and struck up a friendship during their bootlegging exploits of the Prohibition years. They remained friends for many years, but had no idea they were closely related. Seventy years later, their grand daughters meet while attending master degree classes, have similiar Irish grand father stories….their grand fathers were cousins, the Caucasian looking one born to a white legally married mother, in the white side of the family, the other man born to his white father, brother of the white malefamily member and his 3/4 black mistress, who was unknown to the family.
    My grand father was the legitimate son. My great uncles child, the unknown member of the family. We were delighted to find out we were cousins. Our families have spent much time together. She presided over my second wedding. We share the same negroid nose, funky hair texture, and we’re both redheads as children. I retained my red hair and she retained the dark hair, brown skin tone of her father.

    Reply
  65. My family ancestry stories were often confusing as a child. We “were” Dutch, French, German, Irish, but my father was too dark skinned, dark haired, and had a very specific heterochromia not found among Northern Europeans, as I found out from yet another doctor, as I have the same eyes. And then there was the large variety of hair textures and types not found among completely European people.
    Secondly, I knew our family wasn’t like many European families we lived among. Rarely did we eat heavy, lard, egg noodle and potato based food. We often had dried fruits, nuts for after dinner or snacks. Coffee was often black as pitch and somewhat syrup thick if my father made it, just like his grandmothers recipes. Tea was often Chinese green tea or Indian dark, very strong, flavoured with honey. Coffee could also be flavoured with almond juice, nutmeg, and cinnamon, depending upon family visiting.
    Much of our special family recipes weren’t completely like other European recipes that I had tasted. We didn’t eat shellfish, and I and my father had horrible reactive problems with dairy. Later it was also dairy, shellfish and gluten for me. I can drink goats milk, eat a bit of goat cheese. But don’t have the enzymes to process bovine dairy products. We also ate a very healthy mostly plant based and legumes diet. No, my parents were not hippies at all. They were both born in the 1930s, but raised by generations of people whose diets depended upon made green things, garlic, olive oil, onions, and tomatoes. That made us sort of like the Greek and aitakian neighbors, but we used these basics differently. Bread in our home was often home baked, some times rye, but always full of “things” we now consider healthy- flaxmeal, sunflower seeds, walnuts, and multigrain flours. I think I can count the times we had sweet white bread, and they were always holidays. My father used his mother’s recipe for non yeast, non wheat flour bread, which I adored, because it didn’t make me sick.
    As one of my doctors recently commented, food allergies often show that our ancestry derived from cultures in which these food items didn’t exist. After much extensive reasearch in various ethnic cookbooks, I found our food and I found out why: they were adapted from Central Asian, Turkish, and North African recipes.
    Thirdly, my father’s deep dark brown skin tone, though lighter in the winter, was decidedly not Caucasian. My gold skin tone isn’t either. My eyes have a distinctly Asian slant to them, but not necessarily Chinese. I also have mono fold eyelids of multiracial Asian people. We also have African family members, who come from the “Irish side” of the family that owned them. Supposedly.
    National Geographic was suggested, due to their haplogroup groups work with Central Asia.
    The answer: Central Asian, African/ North African, Franco/ Spanish, Middle Eastern Jewish (Sephardi/Mizrahi), and German, Irish, quite possibly Russian mixed within the Central Asian. Both gene groups are found within a Central Asian population to some degree. But I do not hold a Scandanvian gene. Which means any Russian genetic material dervives from the proto Russian history period, pre Viking times.
    I am ethnically/covertly religiously Jewish on two sides of my family. The various accounts of our ancestry came from the times when my Jewish family were traders on the Silk Road, in the West Indies, and in Europe. My Jewish ancestors were members of communities in places like Uzbekistan, Northern Pakistan/Northern Afghanistan, North Africa, and moved to places such as the Spanish French border where Jews were given sanctuary, to Amsterdam where they sought refuge, from England where they assumed the roles of good French Hugenots escaping persecution from Catholic France, to the American colonies were some landed in 1635, and others landed two hundred years later.
    Had my family not taken every opportunity to trade various goods and flee persecution, I would not be writing this lines now. Those family members who landed in America in the 1830s would later become the living remnants of the German families and their towns completely erased from the historical record by Hitlers regime in WWII.
    Degrees of connection/ separation:
    I have met one of my fellow Sephardi Jewish congregants, and found we have a common northAfrican/Soanish ancestor.
    My husband and I look remarkedly alike some days, particularly when he doesn’t wear a beard. He is also an identical model to the Finnish hunter gatherer found in Finnland, who lived 7,000 years ago. That is roughly the time period pre Viking that Slavic ancestors interacted with Chinese, Central Asians, Scythians from what is now the Middle East. He does not look like the rest of his family, which resembles the French, Scottish, German ancestors. He is bodily dense, well muscled, stocky and just an inch shorter than the average Man in the UK. He has huge bones. And his eyes, which are also slanted it more indigenous looking, are a deep intense North Sea glass green. With darker blue rims. Similiar to mine. Mine are dark Jade green with navy blue rims. He has the Scandanavian gene which I lack.
    I am similiar looking enough to the northern Pakistanit/Afghanistani tribes of the Hindu Cush that a little girl on the internet could’ve been a twin at 4. We have the same nose, eye structure and hair colors.
    When the photographer took a picture of a young girl in early 1980s belonging to the Pashtun tribe during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, it made the front of many newspapers and National Geographic because of her striking looks and bi color heterochromatic eye color. I was in junior high at the time, and had finally, finally! Found someone with my eye colors. Now that my red hair is gone from chemo, and dark black replaced it, I look strikingly similiar to her. When the same photographer found her again in the early 2000’s as and adult in her forties, she looks like the only sister of my father that had the same eye color, features and skin tone.
    My middle son’s unusual orange red hair is also a throwback to the ancient tribes of the Hindu Cush, not modern red hair. It doesn’t look like Scottish orange either. And he was that translucent place skin, but he doesn’t burn, he tans, like me. Susan, he looks like a Viking too. But we need to remember the Vikings founded parts of Russia in Central Asia.
    The word “Rus” derives from a Scandanavian word for Red. All my sons are part Scottish and have bright red beards, no matter the hair color on their head. They are also Cherokee, German and Irish from their father’s side of the family.
    My first husband and I (my son’s father)connected on 16 different points on our medical genetic testing, leading to the medical belief we had more than one common ancestor. His grandmother, the head of the local southern DAR chapter had a heart attack, realizing she must have Jewish ancestry, possibly black ancestry somewhere. Jews were founding parts of Charleston, South Carolina, Savannah Georgia, Pennsylvania before the American Revolution, or before each of the original colonies dealt well with each other. And they signed the Declaration of Independence. Quite possible people intermarried, took what was not theirs (slavery and raping of women) and moved on, often passing for normal Europeans. Or their children did.
    Free Blacks were also in Maryland and Conneticutt, and Boston, the three places my ancestors landed. And my ex’s family helped found Maryland and then Kentucky. One of my ancestors were aboard ship with Paul Revere’s great grandparents. These families have intermarried on the east coast every since both families arrived in 1635.
    Two Irish men, one with an Irish surname, light skin, red hair, but negroid features met and struck up a friendship during their bootlegging exploits of the Prohibition years. They remained friends for many years, but had no idea they were closely related. Seventy years later, their grand daughters meet while attending master degree classes, have similiar Irish grand father stories….their grand fathers were cousins, the Caucasian looking one born to a white legally married mother, in the white side of the family, the other man born to his white father, brother of the white malefamily member and his 3/4 black mistress, who was unknown to the family.
    My grand father was the legitimate son. My great uncles child, the unknown member of the family. We were delighted to find out we were cousins. Our families have spent much time together. She presided over my second wedding. We share the same negroid nose, funky hair texture, and we’re both redheads as children. I retained my red hair and she retained the dark hair, brown skin tone of her father.

    Reply
  66. What a fascinating post! I’ve considered doing the test myself. My Mother has told me lots about the family over the years and she can go back quite far but I’d love to know more. Hearing about your experience had definitely set me thinking again. Oh and to the Irish part of you, welcome indeed :):)

    Reply
  67. What a fascinating post! I’ve considered doing the test myself. My Mother has told me lots about the family over the years and she can go back quite far but I’d love to know more. Hearing about your experience had definitely set me thinking again. Oh and to the Irish part of you, welcome indeed :):)

    Reply
  68. What a fascinating post! I’ve considered doing the test myself. My Mother has told me lots about the family over the years and she can go back quite far but I’d love to know more. Hearing about your experience had definitely set me thinking again. Oh and to the Irish part of you, welcome indeed :):)

    Reply
  69. What a fascinating post! I’ve considered doing the test myself. My Mother has told me lots about the family over the years and she can go back quite far but I’d love to know more. Hearing about your experience had definitely set me thinking again. Oh and to the Irish part of you, welcome indeed :):)

    Reply
  70. What a fascinating post! I’ve considered doing the test myself. My Mother has told me lots about the family over the years and she can go back quite far but I’d love to know more. Hearing about your experience had definitely set me thinking again. Oh and to the Irish part of you, welcome indeed :):)

    Reply

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