Daft Days

Susan here, putting finishing touches on a new novel set in Scotland in the summer of 1822, with a story centered on the king’s visit to Scotland that August. 

Nasmyth  View of Edinburgh CastleTwo hundred years ago this very week, King George IV arrived in Edinburgh to huge fanfare and celebration. George IV, the first English king since Charles II’s brief visit in 1651 to visit Scotland without waging war, spent his whirlwind visit meeting prominent Scots, including Sir Walter Scott, government officials, peers, Highland chiefs and their entourages, and so many ladies, particularly at an assembly held to honor Scottish ladies, that he was said to have kissed thousands of women in one afternoon. The king was guest of honor at receptions, dinners, parades, and balls, celebrated, lauded, toasted, cheered—and was the subject of comical satire, caricatures, and tittery laughter from the Scots. While George IV made a real effort to connect with the Scots and admire and experience the Scottish culture, now and then he bumbled along, one event to another. 

Wilkie, King George IV, 1822

David Wilkie's flattering portrait of King George in Scotland did not include the king's pink tights.

Although very excited to welcome King George to the north, historically the Scots were not the biggest fans of the English. Some were skeptical about the visit, given the long cultural memory of centuries of conflict and oppression under pressure from the English – and eventually English rule with the Acts of Union in 1707, which joined the Scottish and English Parliaments and placed Scotland under English rule with the formation of Great Britain. That was followed by the Jacobite wars and Culloden in 1745, with Jacobite sympathies lingering among some for generations – fueling political and ideological differences between the Tories and the Whigs – and the Highland Clearances, spanning more than a century of struggle primarily for Highland people tossed out of their homes as lands were sold or leased to those who preferred using vast, beautiful Highland acreage for hunting and country houses rather than raising sheep and cattle.

In this political atmosphere, during the hot, steamy, rainy August of 1822, King George IV arrived on a ship that sat outside Leith Harbor for days until rough waters abated to allow him and his enormous party of courtiers and support people to land. The crowds were immense, the cheers uproarious, the heat intense and the rains incessant. The streets of Edinburgh were so congested that the throngs of people could hardly move. For weeks, the city had been preparing for the momentous arrival of the monarch; there was hardly a corner left for city visitors to sleep, with rooms renting out for a week at the outrageous price of a year’s lease.

 

Sir Walter Scott was deeply involved in organizing the visit, having met the king on several occasions. He paid Sirwalterscott1822 attention to every detail, working closely with a newly formed Celtic Society, a sort of royal visit committee, as well as with Scottish government officials. He was so determined to showcase the Scottish culture and create a magnificent spectacle at every opportunity that he was referred to as “the Pageant Master”—not in the nicest way—and his elaborate plans to present every aspect of Highland and Scottish culture was described by skeptical peers as the “Celtification of Scotland”—again not the most flattering. His plans and suggestions were elaborate, expensive, and sometimes over the top. He wrote an anonymous booklet (although his authorship was no secret, like his supposedly anonymous and wildly popular novels) with everything laid out in deep detail. Gentleman, for example, were encouraged to wear a sort of uniform of bright blue jacket and white trousers, the colors of the Scottish saltire flag, to the exclusive events and receptions to honor the king—although many opted to wear either more elegant formal evening attire, or military uniform if they carried a rank, or full Highland dress, which many Highland men chose to wear to the many events.

1822 - Portrait of Sir Evan Macgregor we

Sir Evan MacGregor, chief of the Gregorach, led the Highland contingent.

The contingent of Highlanders flooding into the city in full Highland gear was massive. Highland chiefs from most clans–MacGregor, MacDonald, Campbell, Gordon, Grant, Stewart, MacDougall, and many more–arrived with chieftains and a tail of Highlanders limited, due to space concerns, to 50 men each. Sir Walter encouraged Highlanders to appear in complete Highland gear, including plaids (either the belted plaid or the newer pleated kilt), with tartan stockings, jackets, bonnets with feathers (three for a chief, one for a chieftain), badges, sporran—and weapons. Pistols, dirks, swords, even targe shields were recommended to be carried in the presence of the king and courtiers to give the visiting English a full-blast dose of Highland spirit, pride, and what can only be called theatre, given Scott’s enthusiastic plans.

Ladies were not forgotten in the festivities or in Scott’s elaborate vision. The king was to host an assembly for the ladies, and Scott’s pamphlet defined their wardrobe recommendations as Court-dress_1822_lacma well—including nine ostrich feathers in the headdresses, and trains several feet long. Just imagine being in the midst of a gathering of ladies and escorts numbering in the thousands, crammed into Holyrood Palace on a hot summer day, with feathered headdresses waving and silken trains sweeping the ground as guests waited hours to be introduced to the king so briefly that it included only a rapid greeting and a smacking, slobbery kiss (described as such by some). 

To his credit, King George was eager to celebrate the Scots and
appreciate their culture. He even dressed on one occasion in full DownloadHighland kit himself—including a ludicrous pair of salmon-pink silk pantaloons beneath his red Stewart tartan kilt and tartan stockings, as he would not bare his legs like the Highlanders. Even worse, his kilt hem was too short. One Scottish duchess commented that as the king was there so short a time, it would do to see more of him . . . Critics of the whole over-the-top, overly Celtified pageantry of the royal visit poked fun at the king's unfortunate fashion choice and made merciless jokes at his expense. George’s beefy physique did him no favors in Highland dress–some Scots referred to him as “Fat Geordie,” and caricaturists had a field day representing the absurdity of it all.

800px-Erskine_Nicol _A_Nip_against_the_Cold_(1869)King George did not know much about Scotland, but he loved its whisky. He was exceptionally fond of Highland malt whisky, and by habit took a dram every night. When he came to Scotland, he requested to meet the maker of one of his favorite whiskies, Glenlivet. Its maker, one George Smith, was hastily found and presented to the king as requested. At this point in time, most Highland uisge beatha, or water of life, was illicit and subject to harsh laws and taxation that resulted in an effect quite opposite the law—smuggling was the only way to get Highland whisky, an exceptional liquor far superior to Lowland and English make, out of the country at a profit. Ironically, the whisky King George so favored was likely smuggled into London, making the very king marginally complicit in the smuggling trade that his own laws condemned. The Scots, always up for a good joke, had a great snicker over this.

The king’s visit—described by one contemporary wag as “twenty-one daft days”—became the historical basis for my upcoming book, Laird of Rogues, Book 3 of The Whisky Lairds series. I'm in the revision process and it will be available early next year. 

Laird of rogues_Kim coverRonan MacGregor, distiller of a Highland whisky favored by King George, is invited to meet the king, but for one hurdle: MacGregor is in prison on smuggling charges. Though he appears to be a rough Highlander, he hides his identity as a lawyer and viscount's heir, he has a good reason for misbehaving—and he’s not keen on meeting the king. But the Lord Provost Mayor insists, so the notorious rogue is released into the custody of the deputy provost mayor and his daughter, Ellison Grant, who is required to turn this frog into a prince quickly, unaware he is more a gentleman than some around her. Spending time with a Highland smuggler suits Ellison just fine, as she is secretly writing a romantic adventure novel. Soon she discovers the man is a Highland peer searching for the scoundrels who stole his valued whisky stash–and then both are pulled into an adventure and a love that neither expects.

More about Laird of Rogues soon – and I hope you’ll look for it! 

 

Have you heard of King George's visit to Edinburgh? Have you visited Edinburgh yourself? Can you imagine the streets crammed with cheering crowds, with not a bed or chair to spare in the city? In this August heat, it's unfathomable! 

135 thoughts on “Daft Days”

  1. Thank you Susan, I had never heard of King George’s visit to Scotland. What a spectacle it must have been, I would loved to have seen the reception of the clan chiefs in all their regalia. I have been to Scotland for two glorious weeks several years ago. We only spent three days in Edinburgh mainly for the Tattoo (talk about men in kilts) but also going on was the Fringe Festival. I had heard if the Festival, for several years the theater department at the high school where I worked was invited to participate, they were very honored to attend. Edinburgh was jam packed with people and Festival street performances and theatre presentations everywhere, day and night. The crowd was very eclectic probably not much different from the King’s visit. The rest of the visit we spent driving all over the county, I would love to go back.

    Reply
  2. Thank you Susan, I had never heard of King George’s visit to Scotland. What a spectacle it must have been, I would loved to have seen the reception of the clan chiefs in all their regalia. I have been to Scotland for two glorious weeks several years ago. We only spent three days in Edinburgh mainly for the Tattoo (talk about men in kilts) but also going on was the Fringe Festival. I had heard if the Festival, for several years the theater department at the high school where I worked was invited to participate, they were very honored to attend. Edinburgh was jam packed with people and Festival street performances and theatre presentations everywhere, day and night. The crowd was very eclectic probably not much different from the King’s visit. The rest of the visit we spent driving all over the county, I would love to go back.

    Reply
  3. Thank you Susan, I had never heard of King George’s visit to Scotland. What a spectacle it must have been, I would loved to have seen the reception of the clan chiefs in all their regalia. I have been to Scotland for two glorious weeks several years ago. We only spent three days in Edinburgh mainly for the Tattoo (talk about men in kilts) but also going on was the Fringe Festival. I had heard if the Festival, for several years the theater department at the high school where I worked was invited to participate, they were very honored to attend. Edinburgh was jam packed with people and Festival street performances and theatre presentations everywhere, day and night. The crowd was very eclectic probably not much different from the King’s visit. The rest of the visit we spent driving all over the county, I would love to go back.

    Reply
  4. Thank you Susan, I had never heard of King George’s visit to Scotland. What a spectacle it must have been, I would loved to have seen the reception of the clan chiefs in all their regalia. I have been to Scotland for two glorious weeks several years ago. We only spent three days in Edinburgh mainly for the Tattoo (talk about men in kilts) but also going on was the Fringe Festival. I had heard if the Festival, for several years the theater department at the high school where I worked was invited to participate, they were very honored to attend. Edinburgh was jam packed with people and Festival street performances and theatre presentations everywhere, day and night. The crowd was very eclectic probably not much different from the King’s visit. The rest of the visit we spent driving all over the county, I would love to go back.

    Reply
  5. Thank you Susan, I had never heard of King George’s visit to Scotland. What a spectacle it must have been, I would loved to have seen the reception of the clan chiefs in all their regalia. I have been to Scotland for two glorious weeks several years ago. We only spent three days in Edinburgh mainly for the Tattoo (talk about men in kilts) but also going on was the Fringe Festival. I had heard if the Festival, for several years the theater department at the high school where I worked was invited to participate, they were very honored to attend. Edinburgh was jam packed with people and Festival street performances and theatre presentations everywhere, day and night. The crowd was very eclectic probably not much different from the King’s visit. The rest of the visit we spent driving all over the county, I would love to go back.

    Reply
  6. Good heavens, Susan, I knew that the king visited by I had NO IDEA! Clearly celebrity culture is nothing new! Just reading about it makes me feel claustrophobic, but I can see why you couldn’t resist placing a book then. *G*

    Reply
  7. Good heavens, Susan, I knew that the king visited by I had NO IDEA! Clearly celebrity culture is nothing new! Just reading about it makes me feel claustrophobic, but I can see why you couldn’t resist placing a book then. *G*

    Reply
  8. Good heavens, Susan, I knew that the king visited by I had NO IDEA! Clearly celebrity culture is nothing new! Just reading about it makes me feel claustrophobic, but I can see why you couldn’t resist placing a book then. *G*

    Reply
  9. Good heavens, Susan, I knew that the king visited by I had NO IDEA! Clearly celebrity culture is nothing new! Just reading about it makes me feel claustrophobic, but I can see why you couldn’t resist placing a book then. *G*

    Reply
  10. Good heavens, Susan, I knew that the king visited by I had NO IDEA! Clearly celebrity culture is nothing new! Just reading about it makes me feel claustrophobic, but I can see why you couldn’t resist placing a book then. *G*

    Reply
  11. It’s hard to imagine that anything Sir Walter Scott dreamed up could be too over-the-top for George IV, he of the Brighton Pavillion. But I suppose that visit is at east partly to blame for the romantic image of the highlanders perpetuated by Queen Victoria and so many others. (I remember falling in love with Alan Breck Stewart in Kidnapped back when I was 12, and I’ve been a loyal Jacobite ever since.)
    Although I’ve never been to Edinburgh, I’ve often been told how beautiful it is, and my granddaughter will be starting at the University there in a few weeks. She’ll be studying history—I can’t imagine where she got that interest. 🙂

    Reply
  12. It’s hard to imagine that anything Sir Walter Scott dreamed up could be too over-the-top for George IV, he of the Brighton Pavillion. But I suppose that visit is at east partly to blame for the romantic image of the highlanders perpetuated by Queen Victoria and so many others. (I remember falling in love with Alan Breck Stewart in Kidnapped back when I was 12, and I’ve been a loyal Jacobite ever since.)
    Although I’ve never been to Edinburgh, I’ve often been told how beautiful it is, and my granddaughter will be starting at the University there in a few weeks. She’ll be studying history—I can’t imagine where she got that interest. 🙂

    Reply
  13. It’s hard to imagine that anything Sir Walter Scott dreamed up could be too over-the-top for George IV, he of the Brighton Pavillion. But I suppose that visit is at east partly to blame for the romantic image of the highlanders perpetuated by Queen Victoria and so many others. (I remember falling in love with Alan Breck Stewart in Kidnapped back when I was 12, and I’ve been a loyal Jacobite ever since.)
    Although I’ve never been to Edinburgh, I’ve often been told how beautiful it is, and my granddaughter will be starting at the University there in a few weeks. She’ll be studying history—I can’t imagine where she got that interest. 🙂

    Reply
  14. It’s hard to imagine that anything Sir Walter Scott dreamed up could be too over-the-top for George IV, he of the Brighton Pavillion. But I suppose that visit is at east partly to blame for the romantic image of the highlanders perpetuated by Queen Victoria and so many others. (I remember falling in love with Alan Breck Stewart in Kidnapped back when I was 12, and I’ve been a loyal Jacobite ever since.)
    Although I’ve never been to Edinburgh, I’ve often been told how beautiful it is, and my granddaughter will be starting at the University there in a few weeks. She’ll be studying history—I can’t imagine where she got that interest. 🙂

    Reply
  15. It’s hard to imagine that anything Sir Walter Scott dreamed up could be too over-the-top for George IV, he of the Brighton Pavillion. But I suppose that visit is at east partly to blame for the romantic image of the highlanders perpetuated by Queen Victoria and so many others. (I remember falling in love with Alan Breck Stewart in Kidnapped back when I was 12, and I’ve been a loyal Jacobite ever since.)
    Although I’ve never been to Edinburgh, I’ve often been told how beautiful it is, and my granddaughter will be starting at the University there in a few weeks. She’ll be studying history—I can’t imagine where she got that interest. 🙂

    Reply
  16. I too have never been to Edinburgh, but I’d definitely be in favor of a visit (preferably when there are no queens or kings also visiting!) Thanks for a wonderful post, Susan.

    Reply
  17. I too have never been to Edinburgh, but I’d definitely be in favor of a visit (preferably when there are no queens or kings also visiting!) Thanks for a wonderful post, Susan.

    Reply
  18. I too have never been to Edinburgh, but I’d definitely be in favor of a visit (preferably when there are no queens or kings also visiting!) Thanks for a wonderful post, Susan.

    Reply
  19. I too have never been to Edinburgh, but I’d definitely be in favor of a visit (preferably when there are no queens or kings also visiting!) Thanks for a wonderful post, Susan.

    Reply
  20. I too have never been to Edinburgh, but I’d definitely be in favor of a visit (preferably when there are no queens or kings also visiting!) Thanks for a wonderful post, Susan.

    Reply
  21. I’ve been meaning for ages to set a story during George IV’s visit to Edinburgh in 1822. And yes, it was just as OTT as Susan says. I’m looking forward to reading it when it comes out though possibly NOT till I’ve written my own story?
    One small point, Susan. You mention the Lord Provost Mayor of Edinburgh. I think that’s not quite right. The normal term in both Edinburgh and Glasgow is simply Lord Provost though he/she is, effectively, the mayor. Just another of those odd Scottish quirks (says Joanna, native of Glasgow).

    Reply
  22. I’ve been meaning for ages to set a story during George IV’s visit to Edinburgh in 1822. And yes, it was just as OTT as Susan says. I’m looking forward to reading it when it comes out though possibly NOT till I’ve written my own story?
    One small point, Susan. You mention the Lord Provost Mayor of Edinburgh. I think that’s not quite right. The normal term in both Edinburgh and Glasgow is simply Lord Provost though he/she is, effectively, the mayor. Just another of those odd Scottish quirks (says Joanna, native of Glasgow).

    Reply
  23. I’ve been meaning for ages to set a story during George IV’s visit to Edinburgh in 1822. And yes, it was just as OTT as Susan says. I’m looking forward to reading it when it comes out though possibly NOT till I’ve written my own story?
    One small point, Susan. You mention the Lord Provost Mayor of Edinburgh. I think that’s not quite right. The normal term in both Edinburgh and Glasgow is simply Lord Provost though he/she is, effectively, the mayor. Just another of those odd Scottish quirks (says Joanna, native of Glasgow).

    Reply
  24. I’ve been meaning for ages to set a story during George IV’s visit to Edinburgh in 1822. And yes, it was just as OTT as Susan says. I’m looking forward to reading it when it comes out though possibly NOT till I’ve written my own story?
    One small point, Susan. You mention the Lord Provost Mayor of Edinburgh. I think that’s not quite right. The normal term in both Edinburgh and Glasgow is simply Lord Provost though he/she is, effectively, the mayor. Just another of those odd Scottish quirks (says Joanna, native of Glasgow).

    Reply
  25. I’ve been meaning for ages to set a story during George IV’s visit to Edinburgh in 1822. And yes, it was just as OTT as Susan says. I’m looking forward to reading it when it comes out though possibly NOT till I’ve written my own story?
    One small point, Susan. You mention the Lord Provost Mayor of Edinburgh. I think that’s not quite right. The normal term in both Edinburgh and Glasgow is simply Lord Provost though he/she is, effectively, the mayor. Just another of those odd Scottish quirks (says Joanna, native of Glasgow).

    Reply
  26. And I thought the Tattoo was crowded! I am lucky to have been to Edinburgh three times, but must admit that the crowded streets during the Tattoo and Festival drove us to leave for the Highlands several days earlier than planned! But the other trips, one in June and one in September, were lovely – lots of people but very few ostrich feathers on display and, regrettably, far too few men in full Highland dress! As long as one has good walking shoes, Edinburgh can be a never ending source of wonderful discoveries—with maybe a wee dram or two along the way! I wonder if Sir Walter was as helpful in the cleanup as he was in the planning! Such an interesting post, Susan and thanks for a glimpse of your new book!

    Reply
  27. And I thought the Tattoo was crowded! I am lucky to have been to Edinburgh three times, but must admit that the crowded streets during the Tattoo and Festival drove us to leave for the Highlands several days earlier than planned! But the other trips, one in June and one in September, were lovely – lots of people but very few ostrich feathers on display and, regrettably, far too few men in full Highland dress! As long as one has good walking shoes, Edinburgh can be a never ending source of wonderful discoveries—with maybe a wee dram or two along the way! I wonder if Sir Walter was as helpful in the cleanup as he was in the planning! Such an interesting post, Susan and thanks for a glimpse of your new book!

    Reply
  28. And I thought the Tattoo was crowded! I am lucky to have been to Edinburgh three times, but must admit that the crowded streets during the Tattoo and Festival drove us to leave for the Highlands several days earlier than planned! But the other trips, one in June and one in September, were lovely – lots of people but very few ostrich feathers on display and, regrettably, far too few men in full Highland dress! As long as one has good walking shoes, Edinburgh can be a never ending source of wonderful discoveries—with maybe a wee dram or two along the way! I wonder if Sir Walter was as helpful in the cleanup as he was in the planning! Such an interesting post, Susan and thanks for a glimpse of your new book!

    Reply
  29. And I thought the Tattoo was crowded! I am lucky to have been to Edinburgh three times, but must admit that the crowded streets during the Tattoo and Festival drove us to leave for the Highlands several days earlier than planned! But the other trips, one in June and one in September, were lovely – lots of people but very few ostrich feathers on display and, regrettably, far too few men in full Highland dress! As long as one has good walking shoes, Edinburgh can be a never ending source of wonderful discoveries—with maybe a wee dram or two along the way! I wonder if Sir Walter was as helpful in the cleanup as he was in the planning! Such an interesting post, Susan and thanks for a glimpse of your new book!

    Reply
  30. And I thought the Tattoo was crowded! I am lucky to have been to Edinburgh three times, but must admit that the crowded streets during the Tattoo and Festival drove us to leave for the Highlands several days earlier than planned! But the other trips, one in June and one in September, were lovely – lots of people but very few ostrich feathers on display and, regrettably, far too few men in full Highland dress! As long as one has good walking shoes, Edinburgh can be a never ending source of wonderful discoveries—with maybe a wee dram or two along the way! I wonder if Sir Walter was as helpful in the cleanup as he was in the planning! Such an interesting post, Susan and thanks for a glimpse of your new book!

    Reply
  31. I had heard of the visit, and knew Scott had much to do with it, but you provided unknown details. I have been to Edinburgh but one can rarely learn enough about a places in one or even two short visits. I, too, doubt that George IV thought anything over the top about that visit. Many wore tartans just because the wearing of such had been banned for some time after 1745. Like giving the King banned in England, quite a bit of that visit featured customs, clothes, and even songs that had been banned. AS for Scot’s pamphlet outlining what people were to wear– they were accustomed to being told the dress expected at an event at court or where royalty was expected.

    Reply
  32. I had heard of the visit, and knew Scott had much to do with it, but you provided unknown details. I have been to Edinburgh but one can rarely learn enough about a places in one or even two short visits. I, too, doubt that George IV thought anything over the top about that visit. Many wore tartans just because the wearing of such had been banned for some time after 1745. Like giving the King banned in England, quite a bit of that visit featured customs, clothes, and even songs that had been banned. AS for Scot’s pamphlet outlining what people were to wear– they were accustomed to being told the dress expected at an event at court or where royalty was expected.

    Reply
  33. I had heard of the visit, and knew Scott had much to do with it, but you provided unknown details. I have been to Edinburgh but one can rarely learn enough about a places in one or even two short visits. I, too, doubt that George IV thought anything over the top about that visit. Many wore tartans just because the wearing of such had been banned for some time after 1745. Like giving the King banned in England, quite a bit of that visit featured customs, clothes, and even songs that had been banned. AS for Scot’s pamphlet outlining what people were to wear– they were accustomed to being told the dress expected at an event at court or where royalty was expected.

    Reply
  34. I had heard of the visit, and knew Scott had much to do with it, but you provided unknown details. I have been to Edinburgh but one can rarely learn enough about a places in one or even two short visits. I, too, doubt that George IV thought anything over the top about that visit. Many wore tartans just because the wearing of such had been banned for some time after 1745. Like giving the King banned in England, quite a bit of that visit featured customs, clothes, and even songs that had been banned. AS for Scot’s pamphlet outlining what people were to wear– they were accustomed to being told the dress expected at an event at court or where royalty was expected.

    Reply
  35. I had heard of the visit, and knew Scott had much to do with it, but you provided unknown details. I have been to Edinburgh but one can rarely learn enough about a places in one or even two short visits. I, too, doubt that George IV thought anything over the top about that visit. Many wore tartans just because the wearing of such had been banned for some time after 1745. Like giving the King banned in England, quite a bit of that visit featured customs, clothes, and even songs that had been banned. AS for Scot’s pamphlet outlining what people were to wear– they were accustomed to being told the dress expected at an event at court or where royalty was expected.

    Reply
  36. It sounds as though Sir Walter Scott would have made a great producer of Broadway shows, Olympic Events, or any old gala. I bet the Scots had a great time snickering in the background.
    But, I think it is wonderful that the King was open to visiting. And don’t you think that the King was there to have a good time, whether everyone was thrilled or not?
    When you think about it, from 1745 to 1822 was not such a very long time….not long enough to erase memories.

    Reply
  37. It sounds as though Sir Walter Scott would have made a great producer of Broadway shows, Olympic Events, or any old gala. I bet the Scots had a great time snickering in the background.
    But, I think it is wonderful that the King was open to visiting. And don’t you think that the King was there to have a good time, whether everyone was thrilled or not?
    When you think about it, from 1745 to 1822 was not such a very long time….not long enough to erase memories.

    Reply
  38. It sounds as though Sir Walter Scott would have made a great producer of Broadway shows, Olympic Events, or any old gala. I bet the Scots had a great time snickering in the background.
    But, I think it is wonderful that the King was open to visiting. And don’t you think that the King was there to have a good time, whether everyone was thrilled or not?
    When you think about it, from 1745 to 1822 was not such a very long time….not long enough to erase memories.

    Reply
  39. It sounds as though Sir Walter Scott would have made a great producer of Broadway shows, Olympic Events, or any old gala. I bet the Scots had a great time snickering in the background.
    But, I think it is wonderful that the King was open to visiting. And don’t you think that the King was there to have a good time, whether everyone was thrilled or not?
    When you think about it, from 1745 to 1822 was not such a very long time….not long enough to erase memories.

    Reply
  40. It sounds as though Sir Walter Scott would have made a great producer of Broadway shows, Olympic Events, or any old gala. I bet the Scots had a great time snickering in the background.
    But, I think it is wonderful that the King was open to visiting. And don’t you think that the King was there to have a good time, whether everyone was thrilled or not?
    When you think about it, from 1745 to 1822 was not such a very long time….not long enough to erase memories.

    Reply
  41. I hadn’t heard of George’s visit but I can imagine in my minds eye the spectacle having read your post! I visited Edinburgh once many moons ago and only for a day. I would love to go back their again.
    Talking about the caricatures of the day, Andrea’s A J Quill would have had a field day :):)

    Reply
  42. I hadn’t heard of George’s visit but I can imagine in my minds eye the spectacle having read your post! I visited Edinburgh once many moons ago and only for a day. I would love to go back their again.
    Talking about the caricatures of the day, Andrea’s A J Quill would have had a field day :):)

    Reply
  43. I hadn’t heard of George’s visit but I can imagine in my minds eye the spectacle having read your post! I visited Edinburgh once many moons ago and only for a day. I would love to go back their again.
    Talking about the caricatures of the day, Andrea’s A J Quill would have had a field day :):)

    Reply
  44. I hadn’t heard of George’s visit but I can imagine in my minds eye the spectacle having read your post! I visited Edinburgh once many moons ago and only for a day. I would love to go back their again.
    Talking about the caricatures of the day, Andrea’s A J Quill would have had a field day :):)

    Reply
  45. I hadn’t heard of George’s visit but I can imagine in my minds eye the spectacle having read your post! I visited Edinburgh once many moons ago and only for a day. I would love to go back their again.
    Talking about the caricatures of the day, Andrea’s A J Quill would have had a field day :):)

    Reply
  46. Denise, that sounds like such fun. And the crowds during the Fringe Fest are probably similar to the crazy crowds of 1822 – at least today there are enough rooms and restaurants to accommodate the guests, lol!

    Reply
  47. Denise, that sounds like such fun. And the crowds during the Fringe Fest are probably similar to the crazy crowds of 1822 – at least today there are enough rooms and restaurants to accommodate the guests, lol!

    Reply
  48. Denise, that sounds like such fun. And the crowds during the Fringe Fest are probably similar to the crazy crowds of 1822 – at least today there are enough rooms and restaurants to accommodate the guests, lol!

    Reply
  49. Denise, that sounds like such fun. And the crowds during the Fringe Fest are probably similar to the crazy crowds of 1822 – at least today there are enough rooms and restaurants to accommodate the guests, lol!

    Reply
  50. Denise, that sounds like such fun. And the crowds during the Fringe Fest are probably similar to the crazy crowds of 1822 – at least today there are enough rooms and restaurants to accommodate the guests, lol!

    Reply
  51. Lil, you’re so right, Scott did lay the groundwork (and deserves the blame, haha) for the romantic ideal of the Highlands and Highlanders – and a big part of it was the work he did to organize the pageantry of the Scottish character for the benefit of King George, who I think didn’t fully appreciate or get it.
    And congrats to your granddaughter, how cool is that! Here’s hoping you have a chance to visit her there.

    Reply
  52. Lil, you’re so right, Scott did lay the groundwork (and deserves the blame, haha) for the romantic ideal of the Highlands and Highlanders – and a big part of it was the work he did to organize the pageantry of the Scottish character for the benefit of King George, who I think didn’t fully appreciate or get it.
    And congrats to your granddaughter, how cool is that! Here’s hoping you have a chance to visit her there.

    Reply
  53. Lil, you’re so right, Scott did lay the groundwork (and deserves the blame, haha) for the romantic ideal of the Highlands and Highlanders – and a big part of it was the work he did to organize the pageantry of the Scottish character for the benefit of King George, who I think didn’t fully appreciate or get it.
    And congrats to your granddaughter, how cool is that! Here’s hoping you have a chance to visit her there.

    Reply
  54. Lil, you’re so right, Scott did lay the groundwork (and deserves the blame, haha) for the romantic ideal of the Highlands and Highlanders – and a big part of it was the work he did to organize the pageantry of the Scottish character for the benefit of King George, who I think didn’t fully appreciate or get it.
    And congrats to your granddaughter, how cool is that! Here’s hoping you have a chance to visit her there.

    Reply
  55. Lil, you’re so right, Scott did lay the groundwork (and deserves the blame, haha) for the romantic ideal of the Highlands and Highlanders – and a big part of it was the work he did to organize the pageantry of the Scottish character for the benefit of King George, who I think didn’t fully appreciate or get it.
    And congrats to your granddaughter, how cool is that! Here’s hoping you have a chance to visit her there.

    Reply
  56. Joanna, it was so very OTT, and a lot of juicy detail is available, and very entertaining to research – truly daft days.
    Oops, you’re right, Lord Provost it is. That’s what I get for writing a blog quickly late in the night. It’s correct throughout the book, just glitched in my tired American brain the other night, haha.

    Reply
  57. Joanna, it was so very OTT, and a lot of juicy detail is available, and very entertaining to research – truly daft days.
    Oops, you’re right, Lord Provost it is. That’s what I get for writing a blog quickly late in the night. It’s correct throughout the book, just glitched in my tired American brain the other night, haha.

    Reply
  58. Joanna, it was so very OTT, and a lot of juicy detail is available, and very entertaining to research – truly daft days.
    Oops, you’re right, Lord Provost it is. That’s what I get for writing a blog quickly late in the night. It’s correct throughout the book, just glitched in my tired American brain the other night, haha.

    Reply
  59. Joanna, it was so very OTT, and a lot of juicy detail is available, and very entertaining to research – truly daft days.
    Oops, you’re right, Lord Provost it is. That’s what I get for writing a blog quickly late in the night. It’s correct throughout the book, just glitched in my tired American brain the other night, haha.

    Reply
  60. Joanna, it was so very OTT, and a lot of juicy detail is available, and very entertaining to research – truly daft days.
    Oops, you’re right, Lord Provost it is. That’s what I get for writing a blog quickly late in the night. It’s correct throughout the book, just glitched in my tired American brain the other night, haha.

    Reply
  61. Constance, I’m sure Sir Walter became scarce once the partying was over! I can’t imagine the mess in those streets when all was done. I’ve never seen the Tattoo or the Fringe, my trips over there haven’t coincided with those, but I hope so next time!
    And oh, kilts. I saw young guys in kilts and denim jackets and buzz cuts riding buses to school – and once when we were driving through the Highlands, we saw a lone bagpiper in full Highland dress standing by the roadside just playing away. Probably hanging out strategically for tourists, but it was great fun to see him and to stop to say hi and take some photos.

    Reply
  62. Constance, I’m sure Sir Walter became scarce once the partying was over! I can’t imagine the mess in those streets when all was done. I’ve never seen the Tattoo or the Fringe, my trips over there haven’t coincided with those, but I hope so next time!
    And oh, kilts. I saw young guys in kilts and denim jackets and buzz cuts riding buses to school – and once when we were driving through the Highlands, we saw a lone bagpiper in full Highland dress standing by the roadside just playing away. Probably hanging out strategically for tourists, but it was great fun to see him and to stop to say hi and take some photos.

    Reply
  63. Constance, I’m sure Sir Walter became scarce once the partying was over! I can’t imagine the mess in those streets when all was done. I’ve never seen the Tattoo or the Fringe, my trips over there haven’t coincided with those, but I hope so next time!
    And oh, kilts. I saw young guys in kilts and denim jackets and buzz cuts riding buses to school – and once when we were driving through the Highlands, we saw a lone bagpiper in full Highland dress standing by the roadside just playing away. Probably hanging out strategically for tourists, but it was great fun to see him and to stop to say hi and take some photos.

    Reply
  64. Constance, I’m sure Sir Walter became scarce once the partying was over! I can’t imagine the mess in those streets when all was done. I’ve never seen the Tattoo or the Fringe, my trips over there haven’t coincided with those, but I hope so next time!
    And oh, kilts. I saw young guys in kilts and denim jackets and buzz cuts riding buses to school – and once when we were driving through the Highlands, we saw a lone bagpiper in full Highland dress standing by the roadside just playing away. Probably hanging out strategically for tourists, but it was great fun to see him and to stop to say hi and take some photos.

    Reply
  65. Constance, I’m sure Sir Walter became scarce once the partying was over! I can’t imagine the mess in those streets when all was done. I’ve never seen the Tattoo or the Fringe, my trips over there haven’t coincided with those, but I hope so next time!
    And oh, kilts. I saw young guys in kilts and denim jackets and buzz cuts riding buses to school – and once when we were driving through the Highlands, we saw a lone bagpiper in full Highland dress standing by the roadside just playing away. Probably hanging out strategically for tourists, but it was great fun to see him and to stop to say hi and take some photos.

    Reply
  66. Nancy, that’s a good point, so many men then made sure to wear full Highland kit after the ban was lifted, and it became a point of pride. The codification of tartan was going on then as well, with the tartan books being created for weavers – even though they weren’t accurate, it was all part of the rebirth of Scottish identity and pride – and it’s still strong today.

    Reply
  67. Nancy, that’s a good point, so many men then made sure to wear full Highland kit after the ban was lifted, and it became a point of pride. The codification of tartan was going on then as well, with the tartan books being created for weavers – even though they weren’t accurate, it was all part of the rebirth of Scottish identity and pride – and it’s still strong today.

    Reply
  68. Nancy, that’s a good point, so many men then made sure to wear full Highland kit after the ban was lifted, and it became a point of pride. The codification of tartan was going on then as well, with the tartan books being created for weavers – even though they weren’t accurate, it was all part of the rebirth of Scottish identity and pride – and it’s still strong today.

    Reply
  69. Nancy, that’s a good point, so many men then made sure to wear full Highland kit after the ban was lifted, and it became a point of pride. The codification of tartan was going on then as well, with the tartan books being created for weavers – even though they weren’t accurate, it was all part of the rebirth of Scottish identity and pride – and it’s still strong today.

    Reply
  70. Nancy, that’s a good point, so many men then made sure to wear full Highland kit after the ban was lifted, and it became a point of pride. The codification of tartan was going on then as well, with the tartan books being created for weavers – even though they weren’t accurate, it was all part of the rebirth of Scottish identity and pride – and it’s still strong today.

    Reply
  71. Annette, true, the Scots had a great sense of humor about the king’s ego and faux pas, and everyone had a great time, more or less. You’re right, it was not such a long time – Jacobite rebels were still around, and now and then there were still underground rumblings. But the punch had gone out of it by the 19th century.

    Reply
  72. Annette, true, the Scots had a great sense of humor about the king’s ego and faux pas, and everyone had a great time, more or less. You’re right, it was not such a long time – Jacobite rebels were still around, and now and then there were still underground rumblings. But the punch had gone out of it by the 19th century.

    Reply
  73. Annette, true, the Scots had a great sense of humor about the king’s ego and faux pas, and everyone had a great time, more or less. You’re right, it was not such a long time – Jacobite rebels were still around, and now and then there were still underground rumblings. But the punch had gone out of it by the 19th century.

    Reply
  74. Annette, true, the Scots had a great sense of humor about the king’s ego and faux pas, and everyone had a great time, more or less. You’re right, it was not such a long time – Jacobite rebels were still around, and now and then there were still underground rumblings. But the punch had gone out of it by the 19th century.

    Reply
  75. Annette, true, the Scots had a great sense of humor about the king’s ego and faux pas, and everyone had a great time, more or less. You’re right, it was not such a long time – Jacobite rebels were still around, and now and then there were still underground rumblings. But the punch had gone out of it by the 19th century.

    Reply
  76. Susan, I really enjoyed this post. I hadn’t heard about the King’s visit in detail so enjoyed all the inside information.
    Your book set during that visit sounds quite intriguing…

    Reply
  77. Susan, I really enjoyed this post. I hadn’t heard about the King’s visit in detail so enjoyed all the inside information.
    Your book set during that visit sounds quite intriguing…

    Reply
  78. Susan, I really enjoyed this post. I hadn’t heard about the King’s visit in detail so enjoyed all the inside information.
    Your book set during that visit sounds quite intriguing…

    Reply
  79. Susan, I really enjoyed this post. I hadn’t heard about the King’s visit in detail so enjoyed all the inside information.
    Your book set during that visit sounds quite intriguing…

    Reply
  80. Susan, I really enjoyed this post. I hadn’t heard about the King’s visit in detail so enjoyed all the inside information.
    Your book set during that visit sounds quite intriguing…

    Reply
  81. I knew of the king’s visit but not how crazy it was! About 75% of my ancestors were in Scotland, but they lived in Perthshire, Forfarshire, and Lanarkshire, and I’m sure none was important enough to be invited! I’ve read somewhere that this visit prompted the revival of clan and family tartans as everyone rushed to get new clothes. I believe there were two brothers who facilitated the process by “discovering” all kinds of “lost” family patterns and producing them.

    Reply
  82. I knew of the king’s visit but not how crazy it was! About 75% of my ancestors were in Scotland, but they lived in Perthshire, Forfarshire, and Lanarkshire, and I’m sure none was important enough to be invited! I’ve read somewhere that this visit prompted the revival of clan and family tartans as everyone rushed to get new clothes. I believe there were two brothers who facilitated the process by “discovering” all kinds of “lost” family patterns and producing them.

    Reply
  83. I knew of the king’s visit but not how crazy it was! About 75% of my ancestors were in Scotland, but they lived in Perthshire, Forfarshire, and Lanarkshire, and I’m sure none was important enough to be invited! I’ve read somewhere that this visit prompted the revival of clan and family tartans as everyone rushed to get new clothes. I believe there were two brothers who facilitated the process by “discovering” all kinds of “lost” family patterns and producing them.

    Reply
  84. I knew of the king’s visit but not how crazy it was! About 75% of my ancestors were in Scotland, but they lived in Perthshire, Forfarshire, and Lanarkshire, and I’m sure none was important enough to be invited! I’ve read somewhere that this visit prompted the revival of clan and family tartans as everyone rushed to get new clothes. I believe there were two brothers who facilitated the process by “discovering” all kinds of “lost” family patterns and producing them.

    Reply
  85. I knew of the king’s visit but not how crazy it was! About 75% of my ancestors were in Scotland, but they lived in Perthshire, Forfarshire, and Lanarkshire, and I’m sure none was important enough to be invited! I’ve read somewhere that this visit prompted the revival of clan and family tartans as everyone rushed to get new clothes. I believe there were two brothers who facilitated the process by “discovering” all kinds of “lost” family patterns and producing them.

    Reply
  86. I recently learned about this reading The Fair Botanists by Sara Sheridan, which I would highly recommend. So I am looking forward to your take on it Susan

    Reply
  87. I recently learned about this reading The Fair Botanists by Sara Sheridan, which I would highly recommend. So I am looking forward to your take on it Susan

    Reply
  88. I recently learned about this reading The Fair Botanists by Sara Sheridan, which I would highly recommend. So I am looking forward to your take on it Susan

    Reply
  89. I recently learned about this reading The Fair Botanists by Sara Sheridan, which I would highly recommend. So I am looking forward to your take on it Susan

    Reply
  90. I recently learned about this reading The Fair Botanists by Sara Sheridan, which I would highly recommend. So I am looking forward to your take on it Susan

    Reply

Leave a Comment