Dabbling In Art History, Regency Style

CE-avatar Cara/Andrea here,

This weekend officially kicks off summer, a season which lights a bright glow of anticipation for long, lazy afternoons sharing a hammock or a beach blanket with a good book. (If you are like me, your TBR pile is reaching frightening heights!)

TSTAR-final And speaking of books . . . I've a new one, To Surrender To A Rogue,  hitting the shelves in a few days. It's the second in my "Circle of Sin" trilogy, which revolves around a a close-knit group of female scholars who each have a dark secret that comes back to haunt them. This was a really fun series for me—it was both challenging and exhilarating to create three heroines who are incredibly confident intellectually, but incredibly vulnerable emotionally. They are brilliant, brainy scientists (Don't ask me why I chose that field. Maybe it was because in fiction I could make up for my less-than-stellar achievements in real life math and science classes!) And while the first book featured Ciara, the chemistry expert, this current release stars Alessandra, whose specialty is archeology—a subject which is far firmer ground for me.

But actually I am digressing . . . for while I do plan on blogging about Alessandra's interest in antiquities, and why the city of Bath makes a perfect setting for the book, today I'm going to talk about the hero's special interest, which is also a subject near and dear to my heart. Jack is a distinguished military man—and he's also an accomplished watercolor artist. So he, like the ladies, is a contrast of hard and soft edges.

 My background is in art, and having dabbled in watercolor color painting, I was especially excited about exploring its history during the Regency era. So twirl your sable brushes to  fine point, add a wash of pigment to your cold pressed paper and let's sketch in a quick outline of the early nineteenth century art scene in Great Britain!

The country has an incredibly rich heritage in watercolor painting, and, as is true in so many other fields, the Regency was a time of great energy and evolution as artists began to look at their world in a whole new way. In previous centuries, watercolorists were considered more as draftsmen than true artists, and often worked with surveyors and mapmakers. Their work was considered utilitarian,  more a record of topographical information—how a town or a countryside or cathedral looked—than a creative work.


Boats
That began to change as techniques loosened and became more expressive. The traditional style was known as the "stained glass" method, in which ink outlines were carefully colored in with washes of pigment. But watercolors, as opposed to oil paints, are by their very nature spontaneous. They dry very quickly, so an artist must work fast. yet, they are also transparent, so one can build color, change tones, add details, slowly building an organic image  of luminous beauty.

The change in attitude actually began in 1760 when watercolor artists were first allowed to exhibit their painting in the annual public art exhibitions. The Royal Academy, which was founded in 1768,  also recognized the medium, but for the most part, its practitioners were treated like second class citizens. So in 1804, a group of artists banded together and made a bold move, establishing the Society for Painters in Water-Colours. By proclaiming their own special status and organizing their own exhibitions, they in effect through down a gauntlet to the rest of the art world—and won recognition with both their peers and the paying public.

Exhibit The shows were, according to Great British Watercolors, by Matthew Hargraves, "critical, popular and financial successes." Indeed, William Marshall Craig gave a series of lectures at the Royal Institution in London in which he categorically claimed that watercolors were far superior to oil painting. The debate was a heated one throughout the first few decades, with noted periodicals  such as Rudolph Ackermann's monthly Repository of Arts featuring a series of essays on the subject in 1812. Of course no consensus was reached—the important point was that watercolorists had succeeded in establishing themselves as a serious players in the art world.

Turner You may all recognize the name of J.M.W. Turner, who is perhaps the most famous watercolorist of his era. His innovative, impressionist style—which still appears incredible modern—helped revolutionize painting as a whole, but there were also equally talented artists who are less well-known, especially to an American audience. Here are just a few of the notable names:


Cozens Alexander Cozens
(who was really a Georgian, but I'm taking artistic license) taught for years at Eton. In addition to producing hauntingly beautiful works of his own, rendered in an austere, monochromatic palette, he shaped the artistic tastes a whole generation of English aristocrats . Two of his pupils, Sir George Beaumont and William Beckford, are recognized as two of the greatest collectors and connoisseurs of their age.


Girtin Thomas Girtin
trained with Turner at Munro's Academy and while his work appears more traditional than that of Turner, his exploration of texture, shadow and color established him as a leading practitioner of the medium. Unfortunately an early death, at age 27, cut short a brilliant career.


Roberts David Roberts
was one of the leading "travel" artists, a genre which appealed greatly to a Regency audience who were in love with exotic places. His works were most of the East, which seemed to have a special allure to his viewers.

While the majority of watercolorists were landscape artists, Thomas Rowlandson was a luminary of figurative art. A famous satirical printmaker as well as a painter, Rowlandson captured scenes of daily life with a eye for every boisterous, bawdy detail. 

Rowlandson I hope you have enjoyed this oh-so brief peek at the fabulously rich and diverse world of British watercolors. My fictional hero Jack (who is a mix of Girtin and Roberts) feels honored to stand—figuratively speaking of course—alongside such impressive and imaginative men. You can lean a little more about actual paintingtechnique in the scenes with his drawing master . . .Jack does pay attention to detail . . . that is, when he isn't distracted by Alessandra.

What about you? Do you have a favorite artist?  And do you have a preference for either watercolors or oil paintings? Or does the medium matter at all to you? I'll be giving away a signed copy of my new book to one lucky reader, who will be chosen at random from all those who leave a comment here between now and Monday.

Happy Holiday weekend, everyone! And special thanks to all the men and women who have served our country throughout history.

215 thoughts on “Dabbling In Art History, Regency Style”

  1. I fell in love with David Roberts paintings when I travelled through Egypt and the Middle East in the late 1980s. If your hero is based on him, he sounds fascinating. And an archeologist heroine would be a perfect pairing.

    Reply
  2. I fell in love with David Roberts paintings when I travelled through Egypt and the Middle East in the late 1980s. If your hero is based on him, he sounds fascinating. And an archeologist heroine would be a perfect pairing.

    Reply
  3. I fell in love with David Roberts paintings when I travelled through Egypt and the Middle East in the late 1980s. If your hero is based on him, he sounds fascinating. And an archeologist heroine would be a perfect pairing.

    Reply
  4. I fell in love with David Roberts paintings when I travelled through Egypt and the Middle East in the late 1980s. If your hero is based on him, he sounds fascinating. And an archeologist heroine would be a perfect pairing.

    Reply
  5. I fell in love with David Roberts paintings when I travelled through Egypt and the Middle East in the late 1980s. If your hero is based on him, he sounds fascinating. And an archeologist heroine would be a perfect pairing.

    Reply
  6. Thanks, Cara, for educating us on art! I’ve read an advance copy of To Surrender to A Rogue and the romance sizzles with heat! Despite their differences, Jack and Alessandra appreciate fine arts … and who wouldn’t appreciate a war hero with a sensitive side?!?!
    I just heard an interesting “art” story today. Hickam Field is named after an aviation pioneer, Horace Hickam. Mrs. Eglin, a military spouse at Hickam Field, painted his portrait from a picture and it was hung in the Operations Center (both the center and portrait survived December 7). Sadly, Mrs. Elgin’s own husband died in 1937 when his aircraft crashed. The Army Air Corps named its airfield in Florida’s panhanle after him. Today, Eglin AFB is one of the largest Air Force bases and a vital part of our national security. Romance writer Merline Lovelace was the first (and only) female base commander at Eglin AFB.
    Thanks for recognizing history’s military service as we prepare for Memorial Day.

    Reply
  7. Thanks, Cara, for educating us on art! I’ve read an advance copy of To Surrender to A Rogue and the romance sizzles with heat! Despite their differences, Jack and Alessandra appreciate fine arts … and who wouldn’t appreciate a war hero with a sensitive side?!?!
    I just heard an interesting “art” story today. Hickam Field is named after an aviation pioneer, Horace Hickam. Mrs. Eglin, a military spouse at Hickam Field, painted his portrait from a picture and it was hung in the Operations Center (both the center and portrait survived December 7). Sadly, Mrs. Elgin’s own husband died in 1937 when his aircraft crashed. The Army Air Corps named its airfield in Florida’s panhanle after him. Today, Eglin AFB is one of the largest Air Force bases and a vital part of our national security. Romance writer Merline Lovelace was the first (and only) female base commander at Eglin AFB.
    Thanks for recognizing history’s military service as we prepare for Memorial Day.

    Reply
  8. Thanks, Cara, for educating us on art! I’ve read an advance copy of To Surrender to A Rogue and the romance sizzles with heat! Despite their differences, Jack and Alessandra appreciate fine arts … and who wouldn’t appreciate a war hero with a sensitive side?!?!
    I just heard an interesting “art” story today. Hickam Field is named after an aviation pioneer, Horace Hickam. Mrs. Eglin, a military spouse at Hickam Field, painted his portrait from a picture and it was hung in the Operations Center (both the center and portrait survived December 7). Sadly, Mrs. Elgin’s own husband died in 1937 when his aircraft crashed. The Army Air Corps named its airfield in Florida’s panhanle after him. Today, Eglin AFB is one of the largest Air Force bases and a vital part of our national security. Romance writer Merline Lovelace was the first (and only) female base commander at Eglin AFB.
    Thanks for recognizing history’s military service as we prepare for Memorial Day.

    Reply
  9. Thanks, Cara, for educating us on art! I’ve read an advance copy of To Surrender to A Rogue and the romance sizzles with heat! Despite their differences, Jack and Alessandra appreciate fine arts … and who wouldn’t appreciate a war hero with a sensitive side?!?!
    I just heard an interesting “art” story today. Hickam Field is named after an aviation pioneer, Horace Hickam. Mrs. Eglin, a military spouse at Hickam Field, painted his portrait from a picture and it was hung in the Operations Center (both the center and portrait survived December 7). Sadly, Mrs. Elgin’s own husband died in 1937 when his aircraft crashed. The Army Air Corps named its airfield in Florida’s panhanle after him. Today, Eglin AFB is one of the largest Air Force bases and a vital part of our national security. Romance writer Merline Lovelace was the first (and only) female base commander at Eglin AFB.
    Thanks for recognizing history’s military service as we prepare for Memorial Day.

    Reply
  10. Thanks, Cara, for educating us on art! I’ve read an advance copy of To Surrender to A Rogue and the romance sizzles with heat! Despite their differences, Jack and Alessandra appreciate fine arts … and who wouldn’t appreciate a war hero with a sensitive side?!?!
    I just heard an interesting “art” story today. Hickam Field is named after an aviation pioneer, Horace Hickam. Mrs. Eglin, a military spouse at Hickam Field, painted his portrait from a picture and it was hung in the Operations Center (both the center and portrait survived December 7). Sadly, Mrs. Elgin’s own husband died in 1937 when his aircraft crashed. The Army Air Corps named its airfield in Florida’s panhanle after him. Today, Eglin AFB is one of the largest Air Force bases and a vital part of our national security. Romance writer Merline Lovelace was the first (and only) female base commander at Eglin AFB.
    Thanks for recognizing history’s military service as we prepare for Memorial Day.

    Reply
  11. Thanks for the post, Cara. Interesting question. Whilst I love the works of Turner, I prefer oils because of the texture which you just don’t get with watercolours. In this period, John Constable for his incredible stormy skies and evocative depiction of English country life in the late 18th/early 19th century. Happy Memorial Day to all.

    Reply
  12. Thanks for the post, Cara. Interesting question. Whilst I love the works of Turner, I prefer oils because of the texture which you just don’t get with watercolours. In this period, John Constable for his incredible stormy skies and evocative depiction of English country life in the late 18th/early 19th century. Happy Memorial Day to all.

    Reply
  13. Thanks for the post, Cara. Interesting question. Whilst I love the works of Turner, I prefer oils because of the texture which you just don’t get with watercolours. In this period, John Constable for his incredible stormy skies and evocative depiction of English country life in the late 18th/early 19th century. Happy Memorial Day to all.

    Reply
  14. Thanks for the post, Cara. Interesting question. Whilst I love the works of Turner, I prefer oils because of the texture which you just don’t get with watercolours. In this period, John Constable for his incredible stormy skies and evocative depiction of English country life in the late 18th/early 19th century. Happy Memorial Day to all.

    Reply
  15. Thanks for the post, Cara. Interesting question. Whilst I love the works of Turner, I prefer oils because of the texture which you just don’t get with watercolours. In this period, John Constable for his incredible stormy skies and evocative depiction of English country life in the late 18th/early 19th century. Happy Memorial Day to all.

    Reply
  16. Thanks for the post, Cara.
    Does the artist have to be famous? My favorite artist is my mother. She does beautiful oils and I have 9 of her paintings in my house. My fave of hers is a kitchen table scene with lace curtains in the background as if you are sitting at the table. She painted it to look as if it is a circa 1900s farm kitchen scene.
    I also like folksy artists, of which Norman Rockwell is my favorite.

    Reply
  17. Thanks for the post, Cara.
    Does the artist have to be famous? My favorite artist is my mother. She does beautiful oils and I have 9 of her paintings in my house. My fave of hers is a kitchen table scene with lace curtains in the background as if you are sitting at the table. She painted it to look as if it is a circa 1900s farm kitchen scene.
    I also like folksy artists, of which Norman Rockwell is my favorite.

    Reply
  18. Thanks for the post, Cara.
    Does the artist have to be famous? My favorite artist is my mother. She does beautiful oils and I have 9 of her paintings in my house. My fave of hers is a kitchen table scene with lace curtains in the background as if you are sitting at the table. She painted it to look as if it is a circa 1900s farm kitchen scene.
    I also like folksy artists, of which Norman Rockwell is my favorite.

    Reply
  19. Thanks for the post, Cara.
    Does the artist have to be famous? My favorite artist is my mother. She does beautiful oils and I have 9 of her paintings in my house. My fave of hers is a kitchen table scene with lace curtains in the background as if you are sitting at the table. She painted it to look as if it is a circa 1900s farm kitchen scene.
    I also like folksy artists, of which Norman Rockwell is my favorite.

    Reply
  20. Thanks for the post, Cara.
    Does the artist have to be famous? My favorite artist is my mother. She does beautiful oils and I have 9 of her paintings in my house. My fave of hers is a kitchen table scene with lace curtains in the background as if you are sitting at the table. She painted it to look as if it is a circa 1900s farm kitchen scene.
    I also like folksy artists, of which Norman Rockwell is my favorite.

    Reply
  21. Lesley, how ownderful that you know the work of Roberts! His painting of the East really are marevlous. I didn’t base my hero, Jack, on his personality, but used his interest in ancient architecture as a model. I imagined Jack’s paintings to have the same sort of strength, detail and use of light and dark.

    Reply
  22. Lesley, how ownderful that you know the work of Roberts! His painting of the East really are marevlous. I didn’t base my hero, Jack, on his personality, but used his interest in ancient architecture as a model. I imagined Jack’s paintings to have the same sort of strength, detail and use of light and dark.

    Reply
  23. Lesley, how ownderful that you know the work of Roberts! His painting of the East really are marevlous. I didn’t base my hero, Jack, on his personality, but used his interest in ancient architecture as a model. I imagined Jack’s paintings to have the same sort of strength, detail and use of light and dark.

    Reply
  24. Lesley, how ownderful that you know the work of Roberts! His painting of the East really are marevlous. I didn’t base my hero, Jack, on his personality, but used his interest in ancient architecture as a model. I imagined Jack’s paintings to have the same sort of strength, detail and use of light and dark.

    Reply
  25. Lesley, how ownderful that you know the work of Roberts! His painting of the East really are marevlous. I didn’t base my hero, Jack, on his personality, but used his interest in ancient architecture as a model. I imagined Jack’s paintings to have the same sort of strength, detail and use of light and dark.

    Reply
  26. Kim, thanks so much for sharing the Eglin story. How fascinating! I knew Merline was a high ranking AF officer, but I didn’t know she was in charge of the base. What a perfect anecdote for this weekend!
    And thank you so much for your nice words on TSTAR. I really appreciate it.

    Reply
  27. Kim, thanks so much for sharing the Eglin story. How fascinating! I knew Merline was a high ranking AF officer, but I didn’t know she was in charge of the base. What a perfect anecdote for this weekend!
    And thank you so much for your nice words on TSTAR. I really appreciate it.

    Reply
  28. Kim, thanks so much for sharing the Eglin story. How fascinating! I knew Merline was a high ranking AF officer, but I didn’t know she was in charge of the base. What a perfect anecdote for this weekend!
    And thank you so much for your nice words on TSTAR. I really appreciate it.

    Reply
  29. Kim, thanks so much for sharing the Eglin story. How fascinating! I knew Merline was a high ranking AF officer, but I didn’t know she was in charge of the base. What a perfect anecdote for this weekend!
    And thank you so much for your nice words on TSTAR. I really appreciate it.

    Reply
  30. Kim, thanks so much for sharing the Eglin story. How fascinating! I knew Merline was a high ranking AF officer, but I didn’t know she was in charge of the base. What a perfect anecdote for this weekend!
    And thank you so much for your nice words on TSTAR. I really appreciate it.

    Reply
  31. Louise, oils definitely have an incredible texture to them. Watercolorists love the luminiusity of their medium . . .and I love them both.
    Constable is a real favorite of mine too—and BTW, he did beautiful watercolors as well. You are so right that his stormy skies and moody landscapes are amazing!

    Reply
  32. Louise, oils definitely have an incredible texture to them. Watercolorists love the luminiusity of their medium . . .and I love them both.
    Constable is a real favorite of mine too—and BTW, he did beautiful watercolors as well. You are so right that his stormy skies and moody landscapes are amazing!

    Reply
  33. Louise, oils definitely have an incredible texture to them. Watercolorists love the luminiusity of their medium . . .and I love them both.
    Constable is a real favorite of mine too—and BTW, he did beautiful watercolors as well. You are so right that his stormy skies and moody landscapes are amazing!

    Reply
  34. Louise, oils definitely have an incredible texture to them. Watercolorists love the luminiusity of their medium . . .and I love them both.
    Constable is a real favorite of mine too—and BTW, he did beautiful watercolors as well. You are so right that his stormy skies and moody landscapes are amazing!

    Reply
  35. Louise, oils definitely have an incredible texture to them. Watercolorists love the luminiusity of their medium . . .and I love them both.
    Constable is a real favorite of mine too—and BTW, he did beautiful watercolors as well. You are so right that his stormy skies and moody landscapes are amazing!

    Reply
  36. I slightly prefer oil over watercolor. They tend to be richer in color & texture/dimension. I don’t have any one favorite artist but have always loved the impressionists. I’m not big on portraiture; I could enjoy looking at landscapes all day. Congratulations on the upcoming release.

    Reply
  37. I slightly prefer oil over watercolor. They tend to be richer in color & texture/dimension. I don’t have any one favorite artist but have always loved the impressionists. I’m not big on portraiture; I could enjoy looking at landscapes all day. Congratulations on the upcoming release.

    Reply
  38. I slightly prefer oil over watercolor. They tend to be richer in color & texture/dimension. I don’t have any one favorite artist but have always loved the impressionists. I’m not big on portraiture; I could enjoy looking at landscapes all day. Congratulations on the upcoming release.

    Reply
  39. I slightly prefer oil over watercolor. They tend to be richer in color & texture/dimension. I don’t have any one favorite artist but have always loved the impressionists. I’m not big on portraiture; I could enjoy looking at landscapes all day. Congratulations on the upcoming release.

    Reply
  40. I slightly prefer oil over watercolor. They tend to be richer in color & texture/dimension. I don’t have any one favorite artist but have always loved the impressionists. I’m not big on portraiture; I could enjoy looking at landscapes all day. Congratulations on the upcoming release.

    Reply
  41. Hi, Cara! Thank you for a lovely post! If my TBR pile topples, it will be an avalanche! Congratulations on the release of “To Surrender to a Rogue” : ) I am an “art appreciator”. I have always been an art admirer. I became an appreciator during a very difficult time in my life when it suddenly became very soothing and restorative to simply look at wonderful works of art. The Renaissance Era is much about gorgeous, soft golds and reds. The luminousity of the Dutch Masters is quietly compelling–that magical inner light! I also enjoy the bold colors of American Primitive work. My favorites are the Impressionists, who somehow managed to mute the tone, but retain the vivid hues!

    Reply
  42. Hi, Cara! Thank you for a lovely post! If my TBR pile topples, it will be an avalanche! Congratulations on the release of “To Surrender to a Rogue” : ) I am an “art appreciator”. I have always been an art admirer. I became an appreciator during a very difficult time in my life when it suddenly became very soothing and restorative to simply look at wonderful works of art. The Renaissance Era is much about gorgeous, soft golds and reds. The luminousity of the Dutch Masters is quietly compelling–that magical inner light! I also enjoy the bold colors of American Primitive work. My favorites are the Impressionists, who somehow managed to mute the tone, but retain the vivid hues!

    Reply
  43. Hi, Cara! Thank you for a lovely post! If my TBR pile topples, it will be an avalanche! Congratulations on the release of “To Surrender to a Rogue” : ) I am an “art appreciator”. I have always been an art admirer. I became an appreciator during a very difficult time in my life when it suddenly became very soothing and restorative to simply look at wonderful works of art. The Renaissance Era is much about gorgeous, soft golds and reds. The luminousity of the Dutch Masters is quietly compelling–that magical inner light! I also enjoy the bold colors of American Primitive work. My favorites are the Impressionists, who somehow managed to mute the tone, but retain the vivid hues!

    Reply
  44. Hi, Cara! Thank you for a lovely post! If my TBR pile topples, it will be an avalanche! Congratulations on the release of “To Surrender to a Rogue” : ) I am an “art appreciator”. I have always been an art admirer. I became an appreciator during a very difficult time in my life when it suddenly became very soothing and restorative to simply look at wonderful works of art. The Renaissance Era is much about gorgeous, soft golds and reds. The luminousity of the Dutch Masters is quietly compelling–that magical inner light! I also enjoy the bold colors of American Primitive work. My favorites are the Impressionists, who somehow managed to mute the tone, but retain the vivid hues!

    Reply
  45. Hi, Cara! Thank you for a lovely post! If my TBR pile topples, it will be an avalanche! Congratulations on the release of “To Surrender to a Rogue” : ) I am an “art appreciator”. I have always been an art admirer. I became an appreciator during a very difficult time in my life when it suddenly became very soothing and restorative to simply look at wonderful works of art. The Renaissance Era is much about gorgeous, soft golds and reds. The luminousity of the Dutch Masters is quietly compelling–that magical inner light! I also enjoy the bold colors of American Primitive work. My favorites are the Impressionists, who somehow managed to mute the tone, but retain the vivid hues!

    Reply
  46. My sister is an art conservator, specializing in works on paper, so she restores books, photos, documents, and lots of watercolors. It’s fun to go to a museum with her, as she knows so much about art history as well as the science of the works on display.
    The National Gallery here in Washington had a wonderful Turner exhibit last year. I knew his oils but was less familiar with his watercolors, which are just as astonishing.
    Andrea/Cara, the new books sounds interesting and, for bonus points, has an intriguing variation of the standard clinch cover — I like it.

    Reply
  47. My sister is an art conservator, specializing in works on paper, so she restores books, photos, documents, and lots of watercolors. It’s fun to go to a museum with her, as she knows so much about art history as well as the science of the works on display.
    The National Gallery here in Washington had a wonderful Turner exhibit last year. I knew his oils but was less familiar with his watercolors, which are just as astonishing.
    Andrea/Cara, the new books sounds interesting and, for bonus points, has an intriguing variation of the standard clinch cover — I like it.

    Reply
  48. My sister is an art conservator, specializing in works on paper, so she restores books, photos, documents, and lots of watercolors. It’s fun to go to a museum with her, as she knows so much about art history as well as the science of the works on display.
    The National Gallery here in Washington had a wonderful Turner exhibit last year. I knew his oils but was less familiar with his watercolors, which are just as astonishing.
    Andrea/Cara, the new books sounds interesting and, for bonus points, has an intriguing variation of the standard clinch cover — I like it.

    Reply
  49. My sister is an art conservator, specializing in works on paper, so she restores books, photos, documents, and lots of watercolors. It’s fun to go to a museum with her, as she knows so much about art history as well as the science of the works on display.
    The National Gallery here in Washington had a wonderful Turner exhibit last year. I knew his oils but was less familiar with his watercolors, which are just as astonishing.
    Andrea/Cara, the new books sounds interesting and, for bonus points, has an intriguing variation of the standard clinch cover — I like it.

    Reply
  50. My sister is an art conservator, specializing in works on paper, so she restores books, photos, documents, and lots of watercolors. It’s fun to go to a museum with her, as she knows so much about art history as well as the science of the works on display.
    The National Gallery here in Washington had a wonderful Turner exhibit last year. I knew his oils but was less familiar with his watercolors, which are just as astonishing.
    Andrea/Cara, the new books sounds interesting and, for bonus points, has an intriguing variation of the standard clinch cover — I like it.

    Reply
  51. What an interesting article! As a painter and appreciator of art, I enjoyed reading this. So many books have the proper young ladies of yesteryear doodling out their proper young watercolors, that I’ve been curious about when w/c became “legit.”

    Reply
  52. What an interesting article! As a painter and appreciator of art, I enjoyed reading this. So many books have the proper young ladies of yesteryear doodling out their proper young watercolors, that I’ve been curious about when w/c became “legit.”

    Reply
  53. What an interesting article! As a painter and appreciator of art, I enjoyed reading this. So many books have the proper young ladies of yesteryear doodling out their proper young watercolors, that I’ve been curious about when w/c became “legit.”

    Reply
  54. What an interesting article! As a painter and appreciator of art, I enjoyed reading this. So many books have the proper young ladies of yesteryear doodling out their proper young watercolors, that I’ve been curious about when w/c became “legit.”

    Reply
  55. What an interesting article! As a painter and appreciator of art, I enjoyed reading this. So many books have the proper young ladies of yesteryear doodling out their proper young watercolors, that I’ve been curious about when w/c became “legit.”

    Reply
  56. Thanks for a great post! I have lots of “favorites” so I couldn’t name just one! 🙂 I do remember the first time I saw “Nonchaloir” by John Singer Sargent in the National Gallery. It was a snowy day, I remember. I was simply captivated by the colors, textures, shapes, light and by the subject’s pose and facial expression. I bought a small copy of it in the gift shop and have it hanging in my bedroom.
    Amazing what power can come from a brush, a few paints and an artistic mind.
    I look forward to reading you newest!

    Reply
  57. Thanks for a great post! I have lots of “favorites” so I couldn’t name just one! 🙂 I do remember the first time I saw “Nonchaloir” by John Singer Sargent in the National Gallery. It was a snowy day, I remember. I was simply captivated by the colors, textures, shapes, light and by the subject’s pose and facial expression. I bought a small copy of it in the gift shop and have it hanging in my bedroom.
    Amazing what power can come from a brush, a few paints and an artistic mind.
    I look forward to reading you newest!

    Reply
  58. Thanks for a great post! I have lots of “favorites” so I couldn’t name just one! 🙂 I do remember the first time I saw “Nonchaloir” by John Singer Sargent in the National Gallery. It was a snowy day, I remember. I was simply captivated by the colors, textures, shapes, light and by the subject’s pose and facial expression. I bought a small copy of it in the gift shop and have it hanging in my bedroom.
    Amazing what power can come from a brush, a few paints and an artistic mind.
    I look forward to reading you newest!

    Reply
  59. Thanks for a great post! I have lots of “favorites” so I couldn’t name just one! 🙂 I do remember the first time I saw “Nonchaloir” by John Singer Sargent in the National Gallery. It was a snowy day, I remember. I was simply captivated by the colors, textures, shapes, light and by the subject’s pose and facial expression. I bought a small copy of it in the gift shop and have it hanging in my bedroom.
    Amazing what power can come from a brush, a few paints and an artistic mind.
    I look forward to reading you newest!

    Reply
  60. Thanks for a great post! I have lots of “favorites” so I couldn’t name just one! 🙂 I do remember the first time I saw “Nonchaloir” by John Singer Sargent in the National Gallery. It was a snowy day, I remember. I was simply captivated by the colors, textures, shapes, light and by the subject’s pose and facial expression. I bought a small copy of it in the gift shop and have it hanging in my bedroom.
    Amazing what power can come from a brush, a few paints and an artistic mind.
    I look forward to reading you newest!

    Reply
  61. Great post, Andrea, and brought back many happy memories. When I was a kid we lived within bike distance of the Huntington Library and Gallery in Southern California. My sister and I used to ride our bikes over on nice weekends and immerse ourselves in the art of the Georgian and Regency periods (Pinkie and the Blue Boy are there, along with many other wonderful portraits and landscapes). They also had a room full of Turners, including water colors, and a room full of satirical prints (Rowlandson). What bliss for a G. Heyer afficionado to see her favorite characters and settings brought to light. I’m looking forward to reading the new book.
    Peg/DC

    Reply
  62. Great post, Andrea, and brought back many happy memories. When I was a kid we lived within bike distance of the Huntington Library and Gallery in Southern California. My sister and I used to ride our bikes over on nice weekends and immerse ourselves in the art of the Georgian and Regency periods (Pinkie and the Blue Boy are there, along with many other wonderful portraits and landscapes). They also had a room full of Turners, including water colors, and a room full of satirical prints (Rowlandson). What bliss for a G. Heyer afficionado to see her favorite characters and settings brought to light. I’m looking forward to reading the new book.
    Peg/DC

    Reply
  63. Great post, Andrea, and brought back many happy memories. When I was a kid we lived within bike distance of the Huntington Library and Gallery in Southern California. My sister and I used to ride our bikes over on nice weekends and immerse ourselves in the art of the Georgian and Regency periods (Pinkie and the Blue Boy are there, along with many other wonderful portraits and landscapes). They also had a room full of Turners, including water colors, and a room full of satirical prints (Rowlandson). What bliss for a G. Heyer afficionado to see her favorite characters and settings brought to light. I’m looking forward to reading the new book.
    Peg/DC

    Reply
  64. Great post, Andrea, and brought back many happy memories. When I was a kid we lived within bike distance of the Huntington Library and Gallery in Southern California. My sister and I used to ride our bikes over on nice weekends and immerse ourselves in the art of the Georgian and Regency periods (Pinkie and the Blue Boy are there, along with many other wonderful portraits and landscapes). They also had a room full of Turners, including water colors, and a room full of satirical prints (Rowlandson). What bliss for a G. Heyer afficionado to see her favorite characters and settings brought to light. I’m looking forward to reading the new book.
    Peg/DC

    Reply
  65. Great post, Andrea, and brought back many happy memories. When I was a kid we lived within bike distance of the Huntington Library and Gallery in Southern California. My sister and I used to ride our bikes over on nice weekends and immerse ourselves in the art of the Georgian and Regency periods (Pinkie and the Blue Boy are there, along with many other wonderful portraits and landscapes). They also had a room full of Turners, including water colors, and a room full of satirical prints (Rowlandson). What bliss for a G. Heyer afficionado to see her favorite characters and settings brought to light. I’m looking forward to reading the new book.
    Peg/DC

    Reply
  66. Watercolor art has always appealed to me more than oil painting so your small essay on the English artists was very entertaining. Thanks for creating a hero (and heroine) that do more than ride in Hyde Park and go to balls, etc., etc. Let’s hear it for multifaceted characters that I wish I knew!

    Reply
  67. Watercolor art has always appealed to me more than oil painting so your small essay on the English artists was very entertaining. Thanks for creating a hero (and heroine) that do more than ride in Hyde Park and go to balls, etc., etc. Let’s hear it for multifaceted characters that I wish I knew!

    Reply
  68. Watercolor art has always appealed to me more than oil painting so your small essay on the English artists was very entertaining. Thanks for creating a hero (and heroine) that do more than ride in Hyde Park and go to balls, etc., etc. Let’s hear it for multifaceted characters that I wish I knew!

    Reply
  69. Watercolor art has always appealed to me more than oil painting so your small essay on the English artists was very entertaining. Thanks for creating a hero (and heroine) that do more than ride in Hyde Park and go to balls, etc., etc. Let’s hear it for multifaceted characters that I wish I knew!

    Reply
  70. Watercolor art has always appealed to me more than oil painting so your small essay on the English artists was very entertaining. Thanks for creating a hero (and heroine) that do more than ride in Hyde Park and go to balls, etc., etc. Let’s hear it for multifaceted characters that I wish I knew!

    Reply
  71. I think the artist’s name is Morrisseaux. It’s a picture of a people around a campfire. It’s beautiful. I couldn’t say what the medium is. I like Abe Kakepetum’s paintings too.

    Reply
  72. I think the artist’s name is Morrisseaux. It’s a picture of a people around a campfire. It’s beautiful. I couldn’t say what the medium is. I like Abe Kakepetum’s paintings too.

    Reply
  73. I think the artist’s name is Morrisseaux. It’s a picture of a people around a campfire. It’s beautiful. I couldn’t say what the medium is. I like Abe Kakepetum’s paintings too.

    Reply
  74. I think the artist’s name is Morrisseaux. It’s a picture of a people around a campfire. It’s beautiful. I couldn’t say what the medium is. I like Abe Kakepetum’s paintings too.

    Reply
  75. I think the artist’s name is Morrisseaux. It’s a picture of a people around a campfire. It’s beautiful. I couldn’t say what the medium is. I like Abe Kakepetum’s paintings too.

    Reply
  76. My favorite artists are Titian and Van Gogh. “Starry Night” is one of my favorite paintings. The medium doesn’t matter to me.

    Reply
  77. My favorite artists are Titian and Van Gogh. “Starry Night” is one of my favorite paintings. The medium doesn’t matter to me.

    Reply
  78. My favorite artists are Titian and Van Gogh. “Starry Night” is one of my favorite paintings. The medium doesn’t matter to me.

    Reply
  79. My favorite artists are Titian and Van Gogh. “Starry Night” is one of my favorite paintings. The medium doesn’t matter to me.

    Reply
  80. My favorite artists are Titian and Van Gogh. “Starry Night” is one of my favorite paintings. The medium doesn’t matter to me.

    Reply
  81. Wonderful post, Andrea/Cara. I can’t pick a favorite either — the thing that appeals to me in painting is much the same as in writing — the way the voice of the artist shows through, or the glimpse into a life or time it gives us, and then there’s sheer ravishment of the senses.
    We are so lucky to live in this time when images of the most beautiful paintings or any era are available to us over the web. It doesn’t compare with the real thing, of course — but it surely whets the appetite.
    Can’t believe the second book is almost here — I haven’t read the first one yet! It’s in the teetering TBR pile.

    Reply
  82. Wonderful post, Andrea/Cara. I can’t pick a favorite either — the thing that appeals to me in painting is much the same as in writing — the way the voice of the artist shows through, or the glimpse into a life or time it gives us, and then there’s sheer ravishment of the senses.
    We are so lucky to live in this time when images of the most beautiful paintings or any era are available to us over the web. It doesn’t compare with the real thing, of course — but it surely whets the appetite.
    Can’t believe the second book is almost here — I haven’t read the first one yet! It’s in the teetering TBR pile.

    Reply
  83. Wonderful post, Andrea/Cara. I can’t pick a favorite either — the thing that appeals to me in painting is much the same as in writing — the way the voice of the artist shows through, or the glimpse into a life or time it gives us, and then there’s sheer ravishment of the senses.
    We are so lucky to live in this time when images of the most beautiful paintings or any era are available to us over the web. It doesn’t compare with the real thing, of course — but it surely whets the appetite.
    Can’t believe the second book is almost here — I haven’t read the first one yet! It’s in the teetering TBR pile.

    Reply
  84. Wonderful post, Andrea/Cara. I can’t pick a favorite either — the thing that appeals to me in painting is much the same as in writing — the way the voice of the artist shows through, or the glimpse into a life or time it gives us, and then there’s sheer ravishment of the senses.
    We are so lucky to live in this time when images of the most beautiful paintings or any era are available to us over the web. It doesn’t compare with the real thing, of course — but it surely whets the appetite.
    Can’t believe the second book is almost here — I haven’t read the first one yet! It’s in the teetering TBR pile.

    Reply
  85. Wonderful post, Andrea/Cara. I can’t pick a favorite either — the thing that appeals to me in painting is much the same as in writing — the way the voice of the artist shows through, or the glimpse into a life or time it gives us, and then there’s sheer ravishment of the senses.
    We are so lucky to live in this time when images of the most beautiful paintings or any era are available to us over the web. It doesn’t compare with the real thing, of course — but it surely whets the appetite.
    Can’t believe the second book is almost here — I haven’t read the first one yet! It’s in the teetering TBR pile.

    Reply
  86. From Sherrie:
    Art! A subject near and dear to my heart! Every available inch of wall space in my house is covered in art, and every flat surface is littered with more artwork–some of it my own, some of it by other artists. One of my favorite pieces is a folksy hammered metal pitcher I got at Goodwill for a few bucks and which came with the ghost of the artist–or so I’m told by a clairvoyant who’s into that sort of thing. I also have a magnificent oil painting of a woodland waterfall that I got from Goodwill for $15 because it had a little pooch (a pucker, not a dog!) in the canvas. I took it home, dampened the back of the canvas with a sponge, and set it in the sun. By the end of the day the canvas had shunk and the pooch disappeared.
    Some of the artwork on my walls is original–oils, watercolors, acrylic, pen and ink. And some of the art is as simple as a greeting card that I framed because the card was pretty.
    Favorite artists? Oh, goodness, there are so many! One of my absolute favorites is William-Adolphe Bouguereau. I adore the book illustrations of Howard Pyle. I also love the works of N.C. and Andrew Wyeth. And da Vinci’s sketches. I have always admired the horse paintings of George Stubbs. This is driving me nuts, because I know I’m forgetting dozens of favorites!
    I love the cover of your new book, Andrea! And speaking of book covers reminds me of one of my favorite romance cover artists: Pino.

    Reply
  87. From Sherrie:
    Art! A subject near and dear to my heart! Every available inch of wall space in my house is covered in art, and every flat surface is littered with more artwork–some of it my own, some of it by other artists. One of my favorite pieces is a folksy hammered metal pitcher I got at Goodwill for a few bucks and which came with the ghost of the artist–or so I’m told by a clairvoyant who’s into that sort of thing. I also have a magnificent oil painting of a woodland waterfall that I got from Goodwill for $15 because it had a little pooch (a pucker, not a dog!) in the canvas. I took it home, dampened the back of the canvas with a sponge, and set it in the sun. By the end of the day the canvas had shunk and the pooch disappeared.
    Some of the artwork on my walls is original–oils, watercolors, acrylic, pen and ink. And some of the art is as simple as a greeting card that I framed because the card was pretty.
    Favorite artists? Oh, goodness, there are so many! One of my absolute favorites is William-Adolphe Bouguereau. I adore the book illustrations of Howard Pyle. I also love the works of N.C. and Andrew Wyeth. And da Vinci’s sketches. I have always admired the horse paintings of George Stubbs. This is driving me nuts, because I know I’m forgetting dozens of favorites!
    I love the cover of your new book, Andrea! And speaking of book covers reminds me of one of my favorite romance cover artists: Pino.

    Reply
  88. From Sherrie:
    Art! A subject near and dear to my heart! Every available inch of wall space in my house is covered in art, and every flat surface is littered with more artwork–some of it my own, some of it by other artists. One of my favorite pieces is a folksy hammered metal pitcher I got at Goodwill for a few bucks and which came with the ghost of the artist–or so I’m told by a clairvoyant who’s into that sort of thing. I also have a magnificent oil painting of a woodland waterfall that I got from Goodwill for $15 because it had a little pooch (a pucker, not a dog!) in the canvas. I took it home, dampened the back of the canvas with a sponge, and set it in the sun. By the end of the day the canvas had shunk and the pooch disappeared.
    Some of the artwork on my walls is original–oils, watercolors, acrylic, pen and ink. And some of the art is as simple as a greeting card that I framed because the card was pretty.
    Favorite artists? Oh, goodness, there are so many! One of my absolute favorites is William-Adolphe Bouguereau. I adore the book illustrations of Howard Pyle. I also love the works of N.C. and Andrew Wyeth. And da Vinci’s sketches. I have always admired the horse paintings of George Stubbs. This is driving me nuts, because I know I’m forgetting dozens of favorites!
    I love the cover of your new book, Andrea! And speaking of book covers reminds me of one of my favorite romance cover artists: Pino.

    Reply
  89. From Sherrie:
    Art! A subject near and dear to my heart! Every available inch of wall space in my house is covered in art, and every flat surface is littered with more artwork–some of it my own, some of it by other artists. One of my favorite pieces is a folksy hammered metal pitcher I got at Goodwill for a few bucks and which came with the ghost of the artist–or so I’m told by a clairvoyant who’s into that sort of thing. I also have a magnificent oil painting of a woodland waterfall that I got from Goodwill for $15 because it had a little pooch (a pucker, not a dog!) in the canvas. I took it home, dampened the back of the canvas with a sponge, and set it in the sun. By the end of the day the canvas had shunk and the pooch disappeared.
    Some of the artwork on my walls is original–oils, watercolors, acrylic, pen and ink. And some of the art is as simple as a greeting card that I framed because the card was pretty.
    Favorite artists? Oh, goodness, there are so many! One of my absolute favorites is William-Adolphe Bouguereau. I adore the book illustrations of Howard Pyle. I also love the works of N.C. and Andrew Wyeth. And da Vinci’s sketches. I have always admired the horse paintings of George Stubbs. This is driving me nuts, because I know I’m forgetting dozens of favorites!
    I love the cover of your new book, Andrea! And speaking of book covers reminds me of one of my favorite romance cover artists: Pino.

    Reply
  90. From Sherrie:
    Art! A subject near and dear to my heart! Every available inch of wall space in my house is covered in art, and every flat surface is littered with more artwork–some of it my own, some of it by other artists. One of my favorite pieces is a folksy hammered metal pitcher I got at Goodwill for a few bucks and which came with the ghost of the artist–or so I’m told by a clairvoyant who’s into that sort of thing. I also have a magnificent oil painting of a woodland waterfall that I got from Goodwill for $15 because it had a little pooch (a pucker, not a dog!) in the canvas. I took it home, dampened the back of the canvas with a sponge, and set it in the sun. By the end of the day the canvas had shunk and the pooch disappeared.
    Some of the artwork on my walls is original–oils, watercolors, acrylic, pen and ink. And some of the art is as simple as a greeting card that I framed because the card was pretty.
    Favorite artists? Oh, goodness, there are so many! One of my absolute favorites is William-Adolphe Bouguereau. I adore the book illustrations of Howard Pyle. I also love the works of N.C. and Andrew Wyeth. And da Vinci’s sketches. I have always admired the horse paintings of George Stubbs. This is driving me nuts, because I know I’m forgetting dozens of favorites!
    I love the cover of your new book, Andrea! And speaking of book covers reminds me of one of my favorite romance cover artists: Pino.

    Reply
  91. Anne, I agree with you about about the appeal of art and writing. For art does the same thing as a story—it evokes an emotion or makes me see people or a place in a new way. It’s individual creativity, shared with the rest of us, and it’s so inspiring.
    LOL on the second book! After not having a title out there for two years, this feels like a whirlwind. I hope readers won’t get sick of me!

    Reply
  92. Anne, I agree with you about about the appeal of art and writing. For art does the same thing as a story—it evokes an emotion or makes me see people or a place in a new way. It’s individual creativity, shared with the rest of us, and it’s so inspiring.
    LOL on the second book! After not having a title out there for two years, this feels like a whirlwind. I hope readers won’t get sick of me!

    Reply
  93. Anne, I agree with you about about the appeal of art and writing. For art does the same thing as a story—it evokes an emotion or makes me see people or a place in a new way. It’s individual creativity, shared with the rest of us, and it’s so inspiring.
    LOL on the second book! After not having a title out there for two years, this feels like a whirlwind. I hope readers won’t get sick of me!

    Reply
  94. Anne, I agree with you about about the appeal of art and writing. For art does the same thing as a story—it evokes an emotion or makes me see people or a place in a new way. It’s individual creativity, shared with the rest of us, and it’s so inspiring.
    LOL on the second book! After not having a title out there for two years, this feels like a whirlwind. I hope readers won’t get sick of me!

    Reply
  95. Anne, I agree with you about about the appeal of art and writing. For art does the same thing as a story—it evokes an emotion or makes me see people or a place in a new way. It’s individual creativity, shared with the rest of us, and it’s so inspiring.
    LOL on the second book! After not having a title out there for two years, this feels like a whirlwind. I hope readers won’t get sick of me!

    Reply
  96. Sherrie, I knew you have a wonderful comment on art. I love your stories of finding meaningful treasures that speak to you. That’s the essence of art! I’m like you—if I tried to make a list of all the artists I love, I’d quickly run out of paper.

    Reply
  97. Sherrie, I knew you have a wonderful comment on art. I love your stories of finding meaningful treasures that speak to you. That’s the essence of art! I’m like you—if I tried to make a list of all the artists I love, I’d quickly run out of paper.

    Reply
  98. Sherrie, I knew you have a wonderful comment on art. I love your stories of finding meaningful treasures that speak to you. That’s the essence of art! I’m like you—if I tried to make a list of all the artists I love, I’d quickly run out of paper.

    Reply
  99. Sherrie, I knew you have a wonderful comment on art. I love your stories of finding meaningful treasures that speak to you. That’s the essence of art! I’m like you—if I tried to make a list of all the artists I love, I’d quickly run out of paper.

    Reply
  100. Sherrie, I knew you have a wonderful comment on art. I love your stories of finding meaningful treasures that speak to you. That’s the essence of art! I’m like you—if I tried to make a list of all the artists I love, I’d quickly run out of paper.

    Reply
  101. Hi Cara,
    Congratulations on your upcoming release. I haven’t read your CE work but I have read some of your stuff written as Andrea Pickens and loved it. I’m sure I’ll enjoy your latest just as well.
    I’m pretty backward when it comes to art appreciation, history, etc. I could not tell one artist from another although I do recognize the more famous paintings. I think I prefer watercolors. I like the soft, hazy hues.

    Reply
  102. Hi Cara,
    Congratulations on your upcoming release. I haven’t read your CE work but I have read some of your stuff written as Andrea Pickens and loved it. I’m sure I’ll enjoy your latest just as well.
    I’m pretty backward when it comes to art appreciation, history, etc. I could not tell one artist from another although I do recognize the more famous paintings. I think I prefer watercolors. I like the soft, hazy hues.

    Reply
  103. Hi Cara,
    Congratulations on your upcoming release. I haven’t read your CE work but I have read some of your stuff written as Andrea Pickens and loved it. I’m sure I’ll enjoy your latest just as well.
    I’m pretty backward when it comes to art appreciation, history, etc. I could not tell one artist from another although I do recognize the more famous paintings. I think I prefer watercolors. I like the soft, hazy hues.

    Reply
  104. Hi Cara,
    Congratulations on your upcoming release. I haven’t read your CE work but I have read some of your stuff written as Andrea Pickens and loved it. I’m sure I’ll enjoy your latest just as well.
    I’m pretty backward when it comes to art appreciation, history, etc. I could not tell one artist from another although I do recognize the more famous paintings. I think I prefer watercolors. I like the soft, hazy hues.

    Reply
  105. Hi Cara,
    Congratulations on your upcoming release. I haven’t read your CE work but I have read some of your stuff written as Andrea Pickens and loved it. I’m sure I’ll enjoy your latest just as well.
    I’m pretty backward when it comes to art appreciation, history, etc. I could not tell one artist from another although I do recognize the more famous paintings. I think I prefer watercolors. I like the soft, hazy hues.

    Reply
  106. I don’t know much about art, but I do have some favorite authors. Cara is one. I just finished To Sin With a Scoundrel. Loved it. I can’t wait to read more.

    Reply
  107. I don’t know much about art, but I do have some favorite authors. Cara is one. I just finished To Sin With a Scoundrel. Loved it. I can’t wait to read more.

    Reply
  108. I don’t know much about art, but I do have some favorite authors. Cara is one. I just finished To Sin With a Scoundrel. Loved it. I can’t wait to read more.

    Reply
  109. I don’t know much about art, but I do have some favorite authors. Cara is one. I just finished To Sin With a Scoundrel. Loved it. I can’t wait to read more.

    Reply
  110. I don’t know much about art, but I do have some favorite authors. Cara is one. I just finished To Sin With a Scoundrel. Loved it. I can’t wait to read more.

    Reply
  111. Andrea, what a wonderful post. I’ve never been a great fan of watercolour painting, but mainly because the ones I see tend to be wishy-washy. You remind me of the power of the method.
    That picture of coaches! For ages I’ve been trying to find a picture of the sort of public coach Simond describes in his account of his visit to England. One with compartments.
    Do you have a title for that?
    Jo

    Reply
  112. Andrea, what a wonderful post. I’ve never been a great fan of watercolour painting, but mainly because the ones I see tend to be wishy-washy. You remind me of the power of the method.
    That picture of coaches! For ages I’ve been trying to find a picture of the sort of public coach Simond describes in his account of his visit to England. One with compartments.
    Do you have a title for that?
    Jo

    Reply
  113. Andrea, what a wonderful post. I’ve never been a great fan of watercolour painting, but mainly because the ones I see tend to be wishy-washy. You remind me of the power of the method.
    That picture of coaches! For ages I’ve been trying to find a picture of the sort of public coach Simond describes in his account of his visit to England. One with compartments.
    Do you have a title for that?
    Jo

    Reply
  114. Andrea, what a wonderful post. I’ve never been a great fan of watercolour painting, but mainly because the ones I see tend to be wishy-washy. You remind me of the power of the method.
    That picture of coaches! For ages I’ve been trying to find a picture of the sort of public coach Simond describes in his account of his visit to England. One with compartments.
    Do you have a title for that?
    Jo

    Reply
  115. Andrea, what a wonderful post. I’ve never been a great fan of watercolour painting, but mainly because the ones I see tend to be wishy-washy. You remind me of the power of the method.
    That picture of coaches! For ages I’ve been trying to find a picture of the sort of public coach Simond describes in his account of his visit to England. One with compartments.
    Do you have a title for that?
    Jo

    Reply
  116. No particular favorite painter. I like good art and since styles vary so much, I try not to compare works. I think oil offers the artist the ability to present fine details. Watercolors have a more ethereal feel to them.
    No matter what the medium or the subject, I am in awe of anyone who can take anything a create such wonderful paintings.

    Reply
  117. No particular favorite painter. I like good art and since styles vary so much, I try not to compare works. I think oil offers the artist the ability to present fine details. Watercolors have a more ethereal feel to them.
    No matter what the medium or the subject, I am in awe of anyone who can take anything a create such wonderful paintings.

    Reply
  118. No particular favorite painter. I like good art and since styles vary so much, I try not to compare works. I think oil offers the artist the ability to present fine details. Watercolors have a more ethereal feel to them.
    No matter what the medium or the subject, I am in awe of anyone who can take anything a create such wonderful paintings.

    Reply
  119. No particular favorite painter. I like good art and since styles vary so much, I try not to compare works. I think oil offers the artist the ability to present fine details. Watercolors have a more ethereal feel to them.
    No matter what the medium or the subject, I am in awe of anyone who can take anything a create such wonderful paintings.

    Reply
  120. No particular favorite painter. I like good art and since styles vary so much, I try not to compare works. I think oil offers the artist the ability to present fine details. Watercolors have a more ethereal feel to them.
    No matter what the medium or the subject, I am in awe of anyone who can take anything a create such wonderful paintings.

    Reply
  121. I would like to correct my previous comment when I wrote that Mrs. Eglin was at Hickam AFB when she painted a portrait of its namesake, Horace Hickam. Mrs. Eglin was not at Hickam AFB but she did paint a portrait of Horace Hickam. I apologize for any misunderstanding.

    Reply
  122. I would like to correct my previous comment when I wrote that Mrs. Eglin was at Hickam AFB when she painted a portrait of its namesake, Horace Hickam. Mrs. Eglin was not at Hickam AFB but she did paint a portrait of Horace Hickam. I apologize for any misunderstanding.

    Reply
  123. I would like to correct my previous comment when I wrote that Mrs. Eglin was at Hickam AFB when she painted a portrait of its namesake, Horace Hickam. Mrs. Eglin was not at Hickam AFB but she did paint a portrait of Horace Hickam. I apologize for any misunderstanding.

    Reply
  124. I would like to correct my previous comment when I wrote that Mrs. Eglin was at Hickam AFB when she painted a portrait of its namesake, Horace Hickam. Mrs. Eglin was not at Hickam AFB but she did paint a portrait of Horace Hickam. I apologize for any misunderstanding.

    Reply
  125. I would like to correct my previous comment when I wrote that Mrs. Eglin was at Hickam AFB when she painted a portrait of its namesake, Horace Hickam. Mrs. Eglin was not at Hickam AFB but she did paint a portrait of Horace Hickam. I apologize for any misunderstanding.

    Reply

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