Cruising the Chesapeake part 2

Cruising the Chesapeake 2

by Mary Jo

I chronicled the first part of our April Chesapeake Bay Revolutionary War themed IMG_0217 (1) here.  Now for the second exciting installment!

Washington, DC:

After leaving Yorktown, Virginia, the site of the British surrender to the new United States in the Revolutionary war, we headed north. Next stop: Washington, DC.!

As usual, there were several excursions available to passengers.  The Mayhem Consultant and I are fond of taking coach tour overviews because they give a broader sense of the area and show both highlights and lesser lights. Also, the guides are generally specialists in local history and have many interesting things to say. 

Our Washington coach tour was of this type, and because it was in DC, there were a number of monuments and memorials.  We saw a nice assortment of these, but the one that impressed me the most was the Marine War Memorial which is adjacent to the Arlington National Military Cemetery.

 

The memorial is a bronze statue of the flag raising at Iwo Jima, one of the most iconic images of World War II.  I've seen the picture any number of times, but nothing prepared me for the impact of the memorial's size and solemnity.  It's huge–the figures of the six Map_american_revolution_071417-01individual marines are about 32 feet tall. Engraved around the edge of the in gold are the names of battles where the Marine Corps earned its reputation.  One of the inscriptions says "Uncommon Valor was a Common Virtue." The effect was moving and powerful. 

As a side note, one of my uncles was a Sea Bee, one of the Navy builders who were first onto the Pacific islands to pave the way for the Marines.  He survived to come home and have a long and honorable life, though I don't recall him ever discussing his war experiences.  He had been a teenager when he joined the war effort. 

We also drove along Embassy Row, where there was much color and pride shown by the different nations.  My favorite bit was a relatively recent statue of South Africa's national hero Nelson Mandela cheerfully waving across the street to an older statue of Winston Churchill on the grounds of the British embassy.  Two icons enjoying each other's company. 

Mt. Vernon, Virginia:

The next day we sailed a little south along the Potomac to Mount Vernon, home of George Washington.  A National Historic Landmark, I believe that it's the most visited historic home in the US.   It's well worth reading the Wikipedia article about Mt. Vernon, which includes all kinds of interesting information. 

For example, George Washington had one of the largest distilleries in the Colonies.  It's been rebuilt and by special license, it produces a modest amount of whisky that is sold only in the Mt. Vernon gift shop.  <G>  One day on the ship, there was a demonstration of Martha Washington's Famous Rum Punch.  Enough was made to pass out samples and it was really good, with a fruity flavor and not heavily alcoholic. Copies of the recipe were handed out and the Mayhem Consultant is looking forward to me making some for Christmas. <G>

IMG_0212Entertainment:

Besides visiting historic sites and running historical movies on the ship's channel, there were evening performances that enhanced the themes of the cruise.  One evening we heard living history performer Nathan Richardson in the role of Frederick Douglass, who escaped from slavery in Maryland to become a towering figure as an abolitionist, writer, orator, and social reformer.  Richardson used Douglass's own words to tell his compelling story.  

In a similar vein, Robert Yonskie, the ship's multitalented director of entertainment, gave a rousing performance as King George III IMG_0222complaining about those ungrateful colonials in his majesty's own words. <G>

Cambridge, Maryland:

The next day we cruised down the Potomac River and into the Chesapeake Bay again, heading north to Cambridge, a small historic city on the Eastern Shore of the bay.  This time we chose the Harriet Tubman tour.  She was perhaps the most famous of the 'conductors' who led people to freedom along the perilous trails of the Underground IMG_0226Railroad.  Born enslaved, she escaped to the north, then made many return trips to the area to lead groups of friends and family to freedom in the North.  She was called "Moses." During the Civil War, she was a scout and spy for the Union Army.  Despite her adventurous life, she lived to be 90 or 91. 

Besides visiting several sites associated with her, we also visited the Harriet Tubman Museum.  I talked to a volunteer who was one of a group of Black women who recently hiked along one of the routes that Harriet Tubman had used. I'd read about their journey, and the volunteer told me what a profoundly moving experience it was for all the participants.  In her case, life-changing.

This magnificent mural of Harriet Tubman extending her hand to offer freedom is painted IMG_0233 on a rear wall on the outside of the museum.  She is a great American heroine.

Saint Michael's, Maryland:

Next stop was the small Eastern Shore community of Saint Michael's.  A charming town that was founded in 1677, it has a lot of history and a terrific Maritime Museum right on the waterfront.   The low hexagonal lighthouse that resembles an alien space ship is part of the museum and is the characteristic Chesapeake By Erikmadsen at English Wikipedia  CC BY 3.0Bay style.  

The town was known for shipbuilding and seafood.  Many of the ships built there were the kind of sleek schooners that came to be known as Baltimore Clippers. They excelled at blockade running and privateering.  Naturally, Captain Gabriel Hawkins, hero of my book Once a Scoundrel, sailed this kind of ship. <G> (Lighthouse photo by Erikmadsen.)

Saint Michaels was the home of an important secondary character in Once a Scoundrel and OnceARebelMMthe town was mentioned again in Once a Rebel, my War of 1812 book, where it provided refuge and ship repairs to my protagonists.  Researching the town was great fun!

Annapolis:

The small city of Annapolis is the capitol of Maryland and one of the jewels of the Chesapeake.  The Maryland State House isn't large, but it is mighty in history.  Not only is it the oldest capitol in continuous legislative use in the US, but between November 1783 and August 1784 it was the capital of the new United States.  The Treaty of Paris which ended the Revolutionary War was ratified there, and George Washington famously resigned his military commission in the State House.  The walls hum with history and for a fun fact, the Maryland_State_House_from_College_Avedome is the largest wooden dome built in this country without nails. <G>   (State House picture by Martin Falbisoner.)

The US Naval Academy is situated in Annapolis, and in a less security conscious time, it was possible to stroll from the City Dock onto the Academy campus. (Two of my characters in my contemporary The Burning Point did exactly that.)  The historic district is wonderful for walking, which is pretty much required because the parking situation there is abysmal. <G>  But it’s a wonderful and profoundly historic town IMG_0234

From Annapolis, we sailed home to Baltimore, having been well fed, well entertained, and immersed in wonderful history.  Everything a holiday should be!

Have you visited any of the sites I mentioned in these two blogs?  And surely you have wonderful history where you live.  Please tell me about it!

Mary Jo

90 thoughts on “Cruising the Chesapeake part 2”

  1. I have NOT seen Cambridge and St. Michaels. So thank you for taking me there. I would have loved to see the Harriet Tubman information, as I did know about her, just not that we could have visited with her.

    Reply
  2. I have NOT seen Cambridge and St. Michaels. So thank you for taking me there. I would have loved to see the Harriet Tubman information, as I did know about her, just not that we could have visited with her.

    Reply
  3. I have NOT seen Cambridge and St. Michaels. So thank you for taking me there. I would have loved to see the Harriet Tubman information, as I did know about her, just not that we could have visited with her.

    Reply
  4. I have NOT seen Cambridge and St. Michaels. So thank you for taking me there. I would have loved to see the Harriet Tubman information, as I did know about her, just not that we could have visited with her.

    Reply
  5. I have NOT seen Cambridge and St. Michaels. So thank you for taking me there. I would have loved to see the Harriet Tubman information, as I did know about her, just not that we could have visited with her.

    Reply
  6. Having family from Baltimore County for whom I needed to find documentary evidence brought my husband and me to the Baltimore area around our third wedding anniversary (Sept. 11, 2002, we married in 1999). Our search took us into Annapolis. After searching the archives we walked over downtown, visited the capital, and the Naval Academy. On that trip we also explored downtown Baltimore. The Constellation was being restored in Boston, so we missed that. Our favorite place on that trip was the National Aquarium. It was an incredible experience. As for my search for family documents, we found those in York, Pennsylvania. They lived just south of the Mason Dixon Line, while their church Bethlehem (Steltz Union) Lutheran Reformed Church sits just on the other side of the line (Shrewsbury Rd). Their cemetery is full of slate tombstone written in German are easily read. It is divided by that infamous bit of history. We spent the rest of the week with our reenacting friends on a farm out side of Hagerstown, MD recreating the battle of Antietam. Through out that trip were memorials to the fallen in New York and at the Pentagon, and firetrucks on bridges displaying American Flags. It reminded us that history isn’t just hidden in books, graveyards, and documents; it is happening around us as we pass through it.

    Reply
  7. Having family from Baltimore County for whom I needed to find documentary evidence brought my husband and me to the Baltimore area around our third wedding anniversary (Sept. 11, 2002, we married in 1999). Our search took us into Annapolis. After searching the archives we walked over downtown, visited the capital, and the Naval Academy. On that trip we also explored downtown Baltimore. The Constellation was being restored in Boston, so we missed that. Our favorite place on that trip was the National Aquarium. It was an incredible experience. As for my search for family documents, we found those in York, Pennsylvania. They lived just south of the Mason Dixon Line, while their church Bethlehem (Steltz Union) Lutheran Reformed Church sits just on the other side of the line (Shrewsbury Rd). Their cemetery is full of slate tombstone written in German are easily read. It is divided by that infamous bit of history. We spent the rest of the week with our reenacting friends on a farm out side of Hagerstown, MD recreating the battle of Antietam. Through out that trip were memorials to the fallen in New York and at the Pentagon, and firetrucks on bridges displaying American Flags. It reminded us that history isn’t just hidden in books, graveyards, and documents; it is happening around us as we pass through it.

    Reply
  8. Having family from Baltimore County for whom I needed to find documentary evidence brought my husband and me to the Baltimore area around our third wedding anniversary (Sept. 11, 2002, we married in 1999). Our search took us into Annapolis. After searching the archives we walked over downtown, visited the capital, and the Naval Academy. On that trip we also explored downtown Baltimore. The Constellation was being restored in Boston, so we missed that. Our favorite place on that trip was the National Aquarium. It was an incredible experience. As for my search for family documents, we found those in York, Pennsylvania. They lived just south of the Mason Dixon Line, while their church Bethlehem (Steltz Union) Lutheran Reformed Church sits just on the other side of the line (Shrewsbury Rd). Their cemetery is full of slate tombstone written in German are easily read. It is divided by that infamous bit of history. We spent the rest of the week with our reenacting friends on a farm out side of Hagerstown, MD recreating the battle of Antietam. Through out that trip were memorials to the fallen in New York and at the Pentagon, and firetrucks on bridges displaying American Flags. It reminded us that history isn’t just hidden in books, graveyards, and documents; it is happening around us as we pass through it.

    Reply
  9. Having family from Baltimore County for whom I needed to find documentary evidence brought my husband and me to the Baltimore area around our third wedding anniversary (Sept. 11, 2002, we married in 1999). Our search took us into Annapolis. After searching the archives we walked over downtown, visited the capital, and the Naval Academy. On that trip we also explored downtown Baltimore. The Constellation was being restored in Boston, so we missed that. Our favorite place on that trip was the National Aquarium. It was an incredible experience. As for my search for family documents, we found those in York, Pennsylvania. They lived just south of the Mason Dixon Line, while their church Bethlehem (Steltz Union) Lutheran Reformed Church sits just on the other side of the line (Shrewsbury Rd). Their cemetery is full of slate tombstone written in German are easily read. It is divided by that infamous bit of history. We spent the rest of the week with our reenacting friends on a farm out side of Hagerstown, MD recreating the battle of Antietam. Through out that trip were memorials to the fallen in New York and at the Pentagon, and firetrucks on bridges displaying American Flags. It reminded us that history isn’t just hidden in books, graveyards, and documents; it is happening around us as we pass through it.

    Reply
  10. Having family from Baltimore County for whom I needed to find documentary evidence brought my husband and me to the Baltimore area around our third wedding anniversary (Sept. 11, 2002, we married in 1999). Our search took us into Annapolis. After searching the archives we walked over downtown, visited the capital, and the Naval Academy. On that trip we also explored downtown Baltimore. The Constellation was being restored in Boston, so we missed that. Our favorite place on that trip was the National Aquarium. It was an incredible experience. As for my search for family documents, we found those in York, Pennsylvania. They lived just south of the Mason Dixon Line, while their church Bethlehem (Steltz Union) Lutheran Reformed Church sits just on the other side of the line (Shrewsbury Rd). Their cemetery is full of slate tombstone written in German are easily read. It is divided by that infamous bit of history. We spent the rest of the week with our reenacting friends on a farm out side of Hagerstown, MD recreating the battle of Antietam. Through out that trip were memorials to the fallen in New York and at the Pentagon, and firetrucks on bridges displaying American Flags. It reminded us that history isn’t just hidden in books, graveyards, and documents; it is happening around us as we pass through it.

    Reply
  11. Thank you for another fascinating post, Mary Jo. What a full trip you took!
    Of the places you mentioned, I’ve been to Washington, DC. I didn’t see the Marine War Memorial, but I did visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial which was sobering. We also toured the Bureau of Engraving and Printing; my then eight year old called it ‘the money factory’!

    Reply
  12. Thank you for another fascinating post, Mary Jo. What a full trip you took!
    Of the places you mentioned, I’ve been to Washington, DC. I didn’t see the Marine War Memorial, but I did visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial which was sobering. We also toured the Bureau of Engraving and Printing; my then eight year old called it ‘the money factory’!

    Reply
  13. Thank you for another fascinating post, Mary Jo. What a full trip you took!
    Of the places you mentioned, I’ve been to Washington, DC. I didn’t see the Marine War Memorial, but I did visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial which was sobering. We also toured the Bureau of Engraving and Printing; my then eight year old called it ‘the money factory’!

    Reply
  14. Thank you for another fascinating post, Mary Jo. What a full trip you took!
    Of the places you mentioned, I’ve been to Washington, DC. I didn’t see the Marine War Memorial, but I did visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial which was sobering. We also toured the Bureau of Engraving and Printing; my then eight year old called it ‘the money factory’!

    Reply
  15. Thank you for another fascinating post, Mary Jo. What a full trip you took!
    Of the places you mentioned, I’ve been to Washington, DC. I didn’t see the Marine War Memorial, but I did visit the Vietnam Veterans Memorial which was sobering. We also toured the Bureau of Engraving and Printing; my then eight year old called it ‘the money factory’!

    Reply
  16. Thanks for taking us along on the rest of your trip. Loving museums as I do, I would love to take a tour of the Harriet Tubman museum. In school, way, way back in the day, I remember reading about the underground railroad. And I even remember seeing a picture Ms. Tubman in my history book. But my interest in such things is so much more profound now.
    Thank you (and the Mayhem Consultant) for taking us armchair travelers along with you.

    Reply
  17. Thanks for taking us along on the rest of your trip. Loving museums as I do, I would love to take a tour of the Harriet Tubman museum. In school, way, way back in the day, I remember reading about the underground railroad. And I even remember seeing a picture Ms. Tubman in my history book. But my interest in such things is so much more profound now.
    Thank you (and the Mayhem Consultant) for taking us armchair travelers along with you.

    Reply
  18. Thanks for taking us along on the rest of your trip. Loving museums as I do, I would love to take a tour of the Harriet Tubman museum. In school, way, way back in the day, I remember reading about the underground railroad. And I even remember seeing a picture Ms. Tubman in my history book. But my interest in such things is so much more profound now.
    Thank you (and the Mayhem Consultant) for taking us armchair travelers along with you.

    Reply
  19. Thanks for taking us along on the rest of your trip. Loving museums as I do, I would love to take a tour of the Harriet Tubman museum. In school, way, way back in the day, I remember reading about the underground railroad. And I even remember seeing a picture Ms. Tubman in my history book. But my interest in such things is so much more profound now.
    Thank you (and the Mayhem Consultant) for taking us armchair travelers along with you.

    Reply
  20. Thanks for taking us along on the rest of your trip. Loving museums as I do, I would love to take a tour of the Harriet Tubman museum. In school, way, way back in the day, I remember reading about the underground railroad. And I even remember seeing a picture Ms. Tubman in my history book. But my interest in such things is so much more profound now.
    Thank you (and the Mayhem Consultant) for taking us armchair travelers along with you.

    Reply
  21. WOW! Thanks so much for two posts. I have never had the good fortune to see any of the sites you describe, but I wish I were able to do so.
    I live in Texas. I was born in Indiana. Indiana had quite a few Native American issues. And the writers James Whitcomb Riley and George Ade were born and lived there….the reason I know that is because when I was little we took drives to see various sites.
    Texas also has had some issues with Native Americans. one of the most interesting stories – Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnapped by Comanches. During her captivity, she had a son, Quanah Parker who became a very famous war chief. He also then became a representative for his tribe with the government.
    We also had a difference of opinion with Mexico. We wanted our independence and Mexico did not like the idea. “Remember the Alamo” was a result of our differences, among other things. I have visited the Alamo twice and both times, stood in line with people from European countries. They were very excited and interested to see the Alamo. At the time of the Battle there was at least one representative from every state in existence at the time. A lot of people supported Texas’ independence.
    The only other place I have had the same sense of sorrow and heartache was when I visited Gettysburg. I had family who were at the battle of Gettysburg. And during the French and Indian War, the Revolution, the War of 1812, and WWI and WWII and Korea and Viet Nam. Evidently my family cannot get along with much of anybody.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  22. WOW! Thanks so much for two posts. I have never had the good fortune to see any of the sites you describe, but I wish I were able to do so.
    I live in Texas. I was born in Indiana. Indiana had quite a few Native American issues. And the writers James Whitcomb Riley and George Ade were born and lived there….the reason I know that is because when I was little we took drives to see various sites.
    Texas also has had some issues with Native Americans. one of the most interesting stories – Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnapped by Comanches. During her captivity, she had a son, Quanah Parker who became a very famous war chief. He also then became a representative for his tribe with the government.
    We also had a difference of opinion with Mexico. We wanted our independence and Mexico did not like the idea. “Remember the Alamo” was a result of our differences, among other things. I have visited the Alamo twice and both times, stood in line with people from European countries. They were very excited and interested to see the Alamo. At the time of the Battle there was at least one representative from every state in existence at the time. A lot of people supported Texas’ independence.
    The only other place I have had the same sense of sorrow and heartache was when I visited Gettysburg. I had family who were at the battle of Gettysburg. And during the French and Indian War, the Revolution, the War of 1812, and WWI and WWII and Korea and Viet Nam. Evidently my family cannot get along with much of anybody.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  23. WOW! Thanks so much for two posts. I have never had the good fortune to see any of the sites you describe, but I wish I were able to do so.
    I live in Texas. I was born in Indiana. Indiana had quite a few Native American issues. And the writers James Whitcomb Riley and George Ade were born and lived there….the reason I know that is because when I was little we took drives to see various sites.
    Texas also has had some issues with Native Americans. one of the most interesting stories – Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnapped by Comanches. During her captivity, she had a son, Quanah Parker who became a very famous war chief. He also then became a representative for his tribe with the government.
    We also had a difference of opinion with Mexico. We wanted our independence and Mexico did not like the idea. “Remember the Alamo” was a result of our differences, among other things. I have visited the Alamo twice and both times, stood in line with people from European countries. They were very excited and interested to see the Alamo. At the time of the Battle there was at least one representative from every state in existence at the time. A lot of people supported Texas’ independence.
    The only other place I have had the same sense of sorrow and heartache was when I visited Gettysburg. I had family who were at the battle of Gettysburg. And during the French and Indian War, the Revolution, the War of 1812, and WWI and WWII and Korea and Viet Nam. Evidently my family cannot get along with much of anybody.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  24. WOW! Thanks so much for two posts. I have never had the good fortune to see any of the sites you describe, but I wish I were able to do so.
    I live in Texas. I was born in Indiana. Indiana had quite a few Native American issues. And the writers James Whitcomb Riley and George Ade were born and lived there….the reason I know that is because when I was little we took drives to see various sites.
    Texas also has had some issues with Native Americans. one of the most interesting stories – Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnapped by Comanches. During her captivity, she had a son, Quanah Parker who became a very famous war chief. He also then became a representative for his tribe with the government.
    We also had a difference of opinion with Mexico. We wanted our independence and Mexico did not like the idea. “Remember the Alamo” was a result of our differences, among other things. I have visited the Alamo twice and both times, stood in line with people from European countries. They were very excited and interested to see the Alamo. At the time of the Battle there was at least one representative from every state in existence at the time. A lot of people supported Texas’ independence.
    The only other place I have had the same sense of sorrow and heartache was when I visited Gettysburg. I had family who were at the battle of Gettysburg. And during the French and Indian War, the Revolution, the War of 1812, and WWI and WWII and Korea and Viet Nam. Evidently my family cannot get along with much of anybody.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  25. WOW! Thanks so much for two posts. I have never had the good fortune to see any of the sites you describe, but I wish I were able to do so.
    I live in Texas. I was born in Indiana. Indiana had quite a few Native American issues. And the writers James Whitcomb Riley and George Ade were born and lived there….the reason I know that is because when I was little we took drives to see various sites.
    Texas also has had some issues with Native Americans. one of the most interesting stories – Cynthia Ann Parker was kidnapped by Comanches. During her captivity, she had a son, Quanah Parker who became a very famous war chief. He also then became a representative for his tribe with the government.
    We also had a difference of opinion with Mexico. We wanted our independence and Mexico did not like the idea. “Remember the Alamo” was a result of our differences, among other things. I have visited the Alamo twice and both times, stood in line with people from European countries. They were very excited and interested to see the Alamo. At the time of the Battle there was at least one representative from every state in existence at the time. A lot of people supported Texas’ independence.
    The only other place I have had the same sense of sorrow and heartache was when I visited Gettysburg. I had family who were at the battle of Gettysburg. And during the French and Indian War, the Revolution, the War of 1812, and WWI and WWII and Korea and Viet Nam. Evidently my family cannot get along with much of anybody.
    Hope everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  26. I have been to Washington any number of times, and also Baltimore. The Iwo Jima monument is impressive, but my favorite is still the Grant memorial outside the U.S. Capital. The other places you mention are within easy driving distance of New Jersey, so I hope to see them sometime; I love small historic towns.
    I have not been to the Tubman site in Maryland, but I have been to Harriet Tubman’s home in Auburn, NY. This is where she stayed in between her trips down South, and she lived there for many years after the Civil War, until her death in 1913. My father was born in 1913, and I find it so amazing that their lifespans almost overlapped!
    The home is now a national historic landmark, it has a fascinating little museum, and you can tour the house. Tubman bought the property with the assistance of William Seward, who also lived in Auburn. He was a staunch abolitionist, a Governor of New York, A U.S. Senator, and U.S. Secretary of State during and after the Civil War. He’s most well known for negotiating the U.S. purchase of Alaska from Russia. I recommend a visit if you are ever in the Finger Lakes region of New York.

    Reply
  27. I have been to Washington any number of times, and also Baltimore. The Iwo Jima monument is impressive, but my favorite is still the Grant memorial outside the U.S. Capital. The other places you mention are within easy driving distance of New Jersey, so I hope to see them sometime; I love small historic towns.
    I have not been to the Tubman site in Maryland, but I have been to Harriet Tubman’s home in Auburn, NY. This is where she stayed in between her trips down South, and she lived there for many years after the Civil War, until her death in 1913. My father was born in 1913, and I find it so amazing that their lifespans almost overlapped!
    The home is now a national historic landmark, it has a fascinating little museum, and you can tour the house. Tubman bought the property with the assistance of William Seward, who also lived in Auburn. He was a staunch abolitionist, a Governor of New York, A U.S. Senator, and U.S. Secretary of State during and after the Civil War. He’s most well known for negotiating the U.S. purchase of Alaska from Russia. I recommend a visit if you are ever in the Finger Lakes region of New York.

    Reply
  28. I have been to Washington any number of times, and also Baltimore. The Iwo Jima monument is impressive, but my favorite is still the Grant memorial outside the U.S. Capital. The other places you mention are within easy driving distance of New Jersey, so I hope to see them sometime; I love small historic towns.
    I have not been to the Tubman site in Maryland, but I have been to Harriet Tubman’s home in Auburn, NY. This is where she stayed in between her trips down South, and she lived there for many years after the Civil War, until her death in 1913. My father was born in 1913, and I find it so amazing that their lifespans almost overlapped!
    The home is now a national historic landmark, it has a fascinating little museum, and you can tour the house. Tubman bought the property with the assistance of William Seward, who also lived in Auburn. He was a staunch abolitionist, a Governor of New York, A U.S. Senator, and U.S. Secretary of State during and after the Civil War. He’s most well known for negotiating the U.S. purchase of Alaska from Russia. I recommend a visit if you are ever in the Finger Lakes region of New York.

    Reply
  29. I have been to Washington any number of times, and also Baltimore. The Iwo Jima monument is impressive, but my favorite is still the Grant memorial outside the U.S. Capital. The other places you mention are within easy driving distance of New Jersey, so I hope to see them sometime; I love small historic towns.
    I have not been to the Tubman site in Maryland, but I have been to Harriet Tubman’s home in Auburn, NY. This is where she stayed in between her trips down South, and she lived there for many years after the Civil War, until her death in 1913. My father was born in 1913, and I find it so amazing that their lifespans almost overlapped!
    The home is now a national historic landmark, it has a fascinating little museum, and you can tour the house. Tubman bought the property with the assistance of William Seward, who also lived in Auburn. He was a staunch abolitionist, a Governor of New York, A U.S. Senator, and U.S. Secretary of State during and after the Civil War. He’s most well known for negotiating the U.S. purchase of Alaska from Russia. I recommend a visit if you are ever in the Finger Lakes region of New York.

    Reply
  30. I have been to Washington any number of times, and also Baltimore. The Iwo Jima monument is impressive, but my favorite is still the Grant memorial outside the U.S. Capital. The other places you mention are within easy driving distance of New Jersey, so I hope to see them sometime; I love small historic towns.
    I have not been to the Tubman site in Maryland, but I have been to Harriet Tubman’s home in Auburn, NY. This is where she stayed in between her trips down South, and she lived there for many years after the Civil War, until her death in 1913. My father was born in 1913, and I find it so amazing that their lifespans almost overlapped!
    The home is now a national historic landmark, it has a fascinating little museum, and you can tour the house. Tubman bought the property with the assistance of William Seward, who also lived in Auburn. He was a staunch abolitionist, a Governor of New York, A U.S. Senator, and U.S. Secretary of State during and after the Civil War. He’s most well known for negotiating the U.S. purchase of Alaska from Russia. I recommend a visit if you are ever in the Finger Lakes region of New York.

    Reply
  31. Sue, I’m happy you enjoyed the virtual tour. Harriet Tubman was an amazing woman. I think there are a couple of other museums dedicated to her, but this is the one from where she grew up.

    Reply
  32. Sue, I’m happy you enjoyed the virtual tour. Harriet Tubman was an amazing woman. I think there are a couple of other museums dedicated to her, but this is the one from where she grew up.

    Reply
  33. Sue, I’m happy you enjoyed the virtual tour. Harriet Tubman was an amazing woman. I think there are a couple of other museums dedicated to her, but this is the one from where she grew up.

    Reply
  34. Sue, I’m happy you enjoyed the virtual tour. Harriet Tubman was an amazing woman. I think there are a couple of other museums dedicated to her, but this is the one from where she grew up.

    Reply
  35. Sue, I’m happy you enjoyed the virtual tour. Harriet Tubman was an amazing woman. I think there are a couple of other museums dedicated to her, but this is the one from where she grew up.

    Reply
  36. Pamela, that sounds like an amazing trip! Annapolis is lovely for rambling around in, and restored Constellation is back where it belongs now. But as you say, history keeps happening around us. It’s been almost 20 years since 9/11, but I vividly remember the shock and horror.

    Reply
  37. Pamela, that sounds like an amazing trip! Annapolis is lovely for rambling around in, and restored Constellation is back where it belongs now. But as you say, history keeps happening around us. It’s been almost 20 years since 9/11, but I vividly remember the shock and horror.

    Reply
  38. Pamela, that sounds like an amazing trip! Annapolis is lovely for rambling around in, and restored Constellation is back where it belongs now. But as you say, history keeps happening around us. It’s been almost 20 years since 9/11, but I vividly remember the shock and horror.

    Reply
  39. Pamela, that sounds like an amazing trip! Annapolis is lovely for rambling around in, and restored Constellation is back where it belongs now. But as you say, history keeps happening around us. It’s been almost 20 years since 9/11, but I vividly remember the shock and horror.

    Reply
  40. Pamela, that sounds like an amazing trip! Annapolis is lovely for rambling around in, and restored Constellation is back where it belongs now. But as you say, history keeps happening around us. It’s been almost 20 years since 9/11, but I vividly remember the shock and horror.

    Reply
  41. Kareni, I’ve been to the Vietnam Memorial, though not on this journey. As you say, it’s profoundly moving. I’ve also visited the Jefferson and Lincoln Memorials, and the power of their words that are engraved on the walls bring me to tears every time.
    Haven’t made it to the Money Factory, though!

    Reply
  42. Kareni, I’ve been to the Vietnam Memorial, though not on this journey. As you say, it’s profoundly moving. I’ve also visited the Jefferson and Lincoln Memorials, and the power of their words that are engraved on the walls bring me to tears every time.
    Haven’t made it to the Money Factory, though!

    Reply
  43. Kareni, I’ve been to the Vietnam Memorial, though not on this journey. As you say, it’s profoundly moving. I’ve also visited the Jefferson and Lincoln Memorials, and the power of their words that are engraved on the walls bring me to tears every time.
    Haven’t made it to the Money Factory, though!

    Reply
  44. Kareni, I’ve been to the Vietnam Memorial, though not on this journey. As you say, it’s profoundly moving. I’ve also visited the Jefferson and Lincoln Memorials, and the power of their words that are engraved on the walls bring me to tears every time.
    Haven’t made it to the Money Factory, though!

    Reply
  45. Kareni, I’ve been to the Vietnam Memorial, though not on this journey. As you say, it’s profoundly moving. I’ve also visited the Jefferson and Lincoln Memorials, and the power of their words that are engraved on the walls bring me to tears every time.
    Haven’t made it to the Money Factory, though!

    Reply
  46. WE’re always happy to have company, Mary T! I’ve always been fascinated by the Underground Railroad. In the rural area of Western New York where I grew up, there was a substantial older house that allegedly was a stop on the Underground Railroad. I wish I’d known more about it.

    Reply
  47. WE’re always happy to have company, Mary T! I’ve always been fascinated by the Underground Railroad. In the rural area of Western New York where I grew up, there was a substantial older house that allegedly was a stop on the Underground Railroad. I wish I’d known more about it.

    Reply
  48. WE’re always happy to have company, Mary T! I’ve always been fascinated by the Underground Railroad. In the rural area of Western New York where I grew up, there was a substantial older house that allegedly was a stop on the Underground Railroad. I wish I’d known more about it.

    Reply
  49. WE’re always happy to have company, Mary T! I’ve always been fascinated by the Underground Railroad. In the rural area of Western New York where I grew up, there was a substantial older house that allegedly was a stop on the Underground Railroad. I wish I’d known more about it.

    Reply
  50. WE’re always happy to have company, Mary T! I’ve always been fascinated by the Underground Railroad. In the rural area of Western New York where I grew up, there was a substantial older house that allegedly was a stop on the Underground Railroad. I wish I’d known more about it.

    Reply
  51. Annette, there are layers of history everywhere! I’ve certainly heard of Cynthia Ann Parker and Quanah Parker.
    It sounds like you come from a military family! Probably better to think of them as brave warriors than people who can’t get along with anyone. *G*

    Reply
  52. Annette, there are layers of history everywhere! I’ve certainly heard of Cynthia Ann Parker and Quanah Parker.
    It sounds like you come from a military family! Probably better to think of them as brave warriors than people who can’t get along with anyone. *G*

    Reply
  53. Annette, there are layers of history everywhere! I’ve certainly heard of Cynthia Ann Parker and Quanah Parker.
    It sounds like you come from a military family! Probably better to think of them as brave warriors than people who can’t get along with anyone. *G*

    Reply
  54. Annette, there are layers of history everywhere! I’ve certainly heard of Cynthia Ann Parker and Quanah Parker.
    It sounds like you come from a military family! Probably better to think of them as brave warriors than people who can’t get along with anyone. *G*

    Reply
  55. Annette, there are layers of history everywhere! I’ve certainly heard of Cynthia Ann Parker and Quanah Parker.
    It sounds like you come from a military family! Probably better to think of them as brave warriors than people who can’t get along with anyone. *G*

    Reply
  56. Karin, I’ve not visited the Grant memorial–didn’t even know of its existence. Better put it on my bucket list! I knew that Tubman spent her latter years on her property in Auburn, NY, but I didn’t know of the William Seward connection. I love the Finger Lakes (I went to college in Syracuse, not far away.) Clearly I need to learn more about Seward!

    Reply
  57. Karin, I’ve not visited the Grant memorial–didn’t even know of its existence. Better put it on my bucket list! I knew that Tubman spent her latter years on her property in Auburn, NY, but I didn’t know of the William Seward connection. I love the Finger Lakes (I went to college in Syracuse, not far away.) Clearly I need to learn more about Seward!

    Reply
  58. Karin, I’ve not visited the Grant memorial–didn’t even know of its existence. Better put it on my bucket list! I knew that Tubman spent her latter years on her property in Auburn, NY, but I didn’t know of the William Seward connection. I love the Finger Lakes (I went to college in Syracuse, not far away.) Clearly I need to learn more about Seward!

    Reply
  59. Karin, I’ve not visited the Grant memorial–didn’t even know of its existence. Better put it on my bucket list! I knew that Tubman spent her latter years on her property in Auburn, NY, but I didn’t know of the William Seward connection. I love the Finger Lakes (I went to college in Syracuse, not far away.) Clearly I need to learn more about Seward!

    Reply
  60. Karin, I’ve not visited the Grant memorial–didn’t even know of its existence. Better put it on my bucket list! I knew that Tubman spent her latter years on her property in Auburn, NY, but I didn’t know of the William Seward connection. I love the Finger Lakes (I went to college in Syracuse, not far away.) Clearly I need to learn more about Seward!

    Reply
  61. Thank you, Karin! I was not familiar with this statue, but it is very imposing and very suitable as a tribute to Grant. He was a very cool guy; among other things, I believe he founded the US weather service by utilizing the new telegraph network. Thanks!

    Reply
  62. Thank you, Karin! I was not familiar with this statue, but it is very imposing and very suitable as a tribute to Grant. He was a very cool guy; among other things, I believe he founded the US weather service by utilizing the new telegraph network. Thanks!

    Reply
  63. Thank you, Karin! I was not familiar with this statue, but it is very imposing and very suitable as a tribute to Grant. He was a very cool guy; among other things, I believe he founded the US weather service by utilizing the new telegraph network. Thanks!

    Reply
  64. Thank you, Karin! I was not familiar with this statue, but it is very imposing and very suitable as a tribute to Grant. He was a very cool guy; among other things, I believe he founded the US weather service by utilizing the new telegraph network. Thanks!

    Reply
  65. Thank you, Karin! I was not familiar with this statue, but it is very imposing and very suitable as a tribute to Grant. He was a very cool guy; among other things, I believe he founded the US weather service by utilizing the new telegraph network. Thanks!

    Reply
  66. I’ve been to Washington DC 3 times…once in High School, once in the early 80’s and again after I got married. I’ve been to the Iwo Jima memorial and seeing it at the end of the day makes it very atmospheric. The Lincoln Memorial is also very solemn and inspiring.
    Also been to the Vietnam Memorial and the Nurses Memorial. Those are very moving because they are so recent and people still leave momento’s behind.
    Visited Mt. Vernon as well – I can’t remember which trip but I think it was after I got married.
    Your History cruise sounds fabulous. Like something I would enjoy doing – a mix of talks, tours of places and sightseeing. The Harriet Tubman museum sounds wonderful as well.

    Reply
  67. I’ve been to Washington DC 3 times…once in High School, once in the early 80’s and again after I got married. I’ve been to the Iwo Jima memorial and seeing it at the end of the day makes it very atmospheric. The Lincoln Memorial is also very solemn and inspiring.
    Also been to the Vietnam Memorial and the Nurses Memorial. Those are very moving because they are so recent and people still leave momento’s behind.
    Visited Mt. Vernon as well – I can’t remember which trip but I think it was after I got married.
    Your History cruise sounds fabulous. Like something I would enjoy doing – a mix of talks, tours of places and sightseeing. The Harriet Tubman museum sounds wonderful as well.

    Reply
  68. I’ve been to Washington DC 3 times…once in High School, once in the early 80’s and again after I got married. I’ve been to the Iwo Jima memorial and seeing it at the end of the day makes it very atmospheric. The Lincoln Memorial is also very solemn and inspiring.
    Also been to the Vietnam Memorial and the Nurses Memorial. Those are very moving because they are so recent and people still leave momento’s behind.
    Visited Mt. Vernon as well – I can’t remember which trip but I think it was after I got married.
    Your History cruise sounds fabulous. Like something I would enjoy doing – a mix of talks, tours of places and sightseeing. The Harriet Tubman museum sounds wonderful as well.

    Reply
  69. I’ve been to Washington DC 3 times…once in High School, once in the early 80’s and again after I got married. I’ve been to the Iwo Jima memorial and seeing it at the end of the day makes it very atmospheric. The Lincoln Memorial is also very solemn and inspiring.
    Also been to the Vietnam Memorial and the Nurses Memorial. Those are very moving because they are so recent and people still leave momento’s behind.
    Visited Mt. Vernon as well – I can’t remember which trip but I think it was after I got married.
    Your History cruise sounds fabulous. Like something I would enjoy doing – a mix of talks, tours of places and sightseeing. The Harriet Tubman museum sounds wonderful as well.

    Reply
  70. I’ve been to Washington DC 3 times…once in High School, once in the early 80’s and again after I got married. I’ve been to the Iwo Jima memorial and seeing it at the end of the day makes it very atmospheric. The Lincoln Memorial is also very solemn and inspiring.
    Also been to the Vietnam Memorial and the Nurses Memorial. Those are very moving because they are so recent and people still leave momento’s behind.
    Visited Mt. Vernon as well – I can’t remember which trip but I think it was after I got married.
    Your History cruise sounds fabulous. Like something I would enjoy doing – a mix of talks, tours of places and sightseeing. The Harriet Tubman museum sounds wonderful as well.

    Reply
  71. Sounds like a wonderful trip Mary Jo – full of history and wonderful sights! I’d love to go there some time!

    Reply
  72. Sounds like a wonderful trip Mary Jo – full of history and wonderful sights! I’d love to go there some time!

    Reply
  73. Sounds like a wonderful trip Mary Jo – full of history and wonderful sights! I’d love to go there some time!

    Reply
  74. Sounds like a wonderful trip Mary Jo – full of history and wonderful sights! I’d love to go there some time!

    Reply
  75. Sounds like a wonderful trip Mary Jo – full of history and wonderful sights! I’d love to go there some time!

    Reply
  76. Christina, since you’re a historian, I think you’d love all this, and you’d learn a lot about American history along the way! I learned a fair amount about Sweden during a wonderful Stockholm harbor cruises several years ago. SO much world and history, so little time….

    Reply
  77. Christina, since you’re a historian, I think you’d love all this, and you’d learn a lot about American history along the way! I learned a fair amount about Sweden during a wonderful Stockholm harbor cruises several years ago. SO much world and history, so little time….

    Reply
  78. Christina, since you’re a historian, I think you’d love all this, and you’d learn a lot about American history along the way! I learned a fair amount about Sweden during a wonderful Stockholm harbor cruises several years ago. SO much world and history, so little time….

    Reply
  79. Christina, since you’re a historian, I think you’d love all this, and you’d learn a lot about American history along the way! I learned a fair amount about Sweden during a wonderful Stockholm harbor cruises several years ago. SO much world and history, so little time….

    Reply
  80. Christina, since you’re a historian, I think you’d love all this, and you’d learn a lot about American history along the way! I learned a fair amount about Sweden during a wonderful Stockholm harbor cruises several years ago. SO much world and history, so little time….

    Reply

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