Creatures great and small

Wench Marguerite GérardJoanna here, talking about one of the minor constants in my books.

I love me some animals. All kinds, from wild tigers to tame kitty cats. Lions and tigers and bears, oh my. Also parrots and penguins. The feistier they are, the better I like them. I try to put a pet as a character in each of my books because they are arguably an improvement over humans.

Spymaster’s Lady introduces us to Tiny, the huge black dog that guards the house. Annique calls him that "monster dog that stalks the halls, slavering and famished, seeking human flesh." She considers Tiny, not so much a dog, as "a wolf and possibly also part elephant." Annique is not one of the world's dog fanciers. But then, she spent her innocent girlhood sneaking into houses and stealing secrets. This gives one an ambivalent relationship with guard dogs.Wench Mrs. D. le B. Bennett

Doyle found Tiny wandering by the London docks. "We think it's part wolfhound." Perhaps Tiny is the result of a mésalliance between an Irish wolfhound and a Newfoundland. They're both ancient breeds, becoming fairly widespread by the early Nineteenth Century. A cross between the two could plausibly have shown up in a cosmopolitan seaport like London. It would be one formidable dog.

Mr-pares-coachman-with-a-newfoundland-dog

period Newfoundland

A description of the Irish Wolfhound in 1790 calls them “the largest and most beautiful of the dog  kind” and says “their aspect is mild, their disposition peaceful, their strength greater than that of the mastiff or bulldog.” That's Tiny.

Wench ferret

 

 

 

 

 

 

In My Lord and Spymaster we meet Kedger the ferret, Jess' pet. He's a survivor, that ferret. A world traveller. A ship’s ferret. A canny small fellow who's seen everything, from the slums of London to the souks of the Middle East, and taken it all in stride. The word Kedger, by the way, is Cockney underworld slang for beggar.

Jess carries Kedger around with her in a pocket sewed in her cloak. Sometimes he rides along on her shoulder, keeping an eye out, warning her of danger. When we meet him, he's in her office.

Kedger slipped down to her desk and sniffed at the letters. He grabbed a quill, launched off, and plopped to the floor with a little grunt. He didn't make a sound on the rug, but she heard the skittering as soon as he hit the bare boards. He took the quill under the bookcase to devour it.

Forbidden Rose introduces us to the pack donkeys Dulce and Decorum. They're an eccentric pair. Wench John Constable  Hawker has been given the task of wrangling these two. Doyle, the hero of Forbidden Rose, thinks:

Dulce snaked out to bite Hawker. Missed him by a hair. The boy was getting downright nimble, wasn’t he?

The donkeys were what he’d call a pointed lesson in how to deal with a problem you couldn’t out talk and couldn’t stab in the jugular. Sometimes it was a real pleasure to educate the lad.

Later, Doyle and my heroine Maggie discuss the animals.

“I will go slightly upstream,” she said, “to avoid the donkeys. I am as fond of donkeys as anyone, but—I will be utterly candid—they attempt to bite me. It is the heat, I believe, that makes them irritable.”

“They always do that. Remarkably even temperament in those animals.”

I admire those donkeys. They got attitude.

Black Hawk introduces us to the new House Dog at Meeks Street in 1818, a successor to Tiny. This is Muffin, “a dog the size of a small pony, his rough, gray, untidy coat glazed with drops of water”

Wench My Lady Sleeps 1905We don’t know much about Muffin’s past. He’s probably another stray Doyle took in. He sounds like an Irish Wolfhound, doesn't he? Although I suppose he could be a mastiff.

Muffin came over, looking worried, and nosed in under an elbow to stick his big square head up to the pillow to sniff over Justine’s hair, memorizing her. He approved of the Justine smell. Didn’t like the blood and antiseptic of the bandage.

A few more whuffles up and down the bedcovers and he was satisfied. He clicked across the room to assist Doyle who was hunkered down to lay coal on the fire, piece by piece, acting like his hands didn’t feel flame.

When he was through and stood up, Muffin took his place and thumped down in front of the fire, taking one end of the hearth to the other. The coal scuttle rattled. He stretched his chin on his paws and curled the great plumed tail to his side.

These Meeks Street guard dogs retire to Doyle’s house when they get old. We meet Muffin again some months later in Beauty Like the Night. The heroine Cami thinks:

She’d turned down Anna and Anson’s offer of the dog Muffin to accompany her to work. That was not altogether childish fancy. Muffin was retired from years at Meeks Street. Ten stone of fighting dog, gray-muzzled and a little stiff, but with six-inch fangs, was protection not to be despised.
Wench Boxer Bullenbeissers by Otto Eerelman
That was why she left him in the front hall, guarding her home.

In Rogue Spy the Baldoni "favored a breed of ugly, brown-and-white dogs with a calm, deliberate temperament and a well-toothed underbite." Our hero has a small encounter with a trio of Baldoni dogs while he’s breaking into the house. Fortunately, he'd sneaked them sausages at dinner.

 

Wench 1790 Philip_Reinagle_-_BulldogOn the rug in the hall, in a line, three dogs sat and looked up at him.

He squatted down, murmured, "Signora," and offered the rightmost bitch his fingers to sniff. "Buonasera, mia dolce." He pulled the soft ears. Scratched the high-domed head. He went down the line, doing the same for Caterina, Lucrezia, and Bianca, giving a few words to each. Curved lower fangs gleamed in the light of the little candle at the end of the hall. He didn't let himself imagine what that trio would do to housebreakers.

When he got up and walked away, not looking back, the three padded off in the opposite direction, patrolling, doing their job.

 

That’s the animal contingent, playing an important part in my stories. Romance would be a poorer place without them.

Do you have a favorite story animal from a Romance or other book?

225 thoughts on “Creatures great and small”

  1. I once thought it would be cool to have an Irish wolfhound—until I discovered that my entire food budget would be required to feed the dog. We settled for a small mutt.
    Kedger is one of my favorite fictional pets—he takes a nice active part in the story. And it’s a plausibly active part. I confess that I am not particularly fond of cats who solve mysteries. A bit too anthropomorphic,
    A fictional cat that I do enjoy is the rabbit-cat of Hesse in Jo Beverley’s The Secret Wedding. Nicely nutty.

    Reply
  2. I once thought it would be cool to have an Irish wolfhound—until I discovered that my entire food budget would be required to feed the dog. We settled for a small mutt.
    Kedger is one of my favorite fictional pets—he takes a nice active part in the story. And it’s a plausibly active part. I confess that I am not particularly fond of cats who solve mysteries. A bit too anthropomorphic,
    A fictional cat that I do enjoy is the rabbit-cat of Hesse in Jo Beverley’s The Secret Wedding. Nicely nutty.

    Reply
  3. I once thought it would be cool to have an Irish wolfhound—until I discovered that my entire food budget would be required to feed the dog. We settled for a small mutt.
    Kedger is one of my favorite fictional pets—he takes a nice active part in the story. And it’s a plausibly active part. I confess that I am not particularly fond of cats who solve mysteries. A bit too anthropomorphic,
    A fictional cat that I do enjoy is the rabbit-cat of Hesse in Jo Beverley’s The Secret Wedding. Nicely nutty.

    Reply
  4. I once thought it would be cool to have an Irish wolfhound—until I discovered that my entire food budget would be required to feed the dog. We settled for a small mutt.
    Kedger is one of my favorite fictional pets—he takes a nice active part in the story. And it’s a plausibly active part. I confess that I am not particularly fond of cats who solve mysteries. A bit too anthropomorphic,
    A fictional cat that I do enjoy is the rabbit-cat of Hesse in Jo Beverley’s The Secret Wedding. Nicely nutty.

    Reply
  5. I once thought it would be cool to have an Irish wolfhound—until I discovered that my entire food budget would be required to feed the dog. We settled for a small mutt.
    Kedger is one of my favorite fictional pets—he takes a nice active part in the story. And it’s a plausibly active part. I confess that I am not particularly fond of cats who solve mysteries. A bit too anthropomorphic,
    A fictional cat that I do enjoy is the rabbit-cat of Hesse in Jo Beverley’s The Secret Wedding. Nicely nutty.

    Reply
  6. LOL, Jo! You’ve certainly spent your share of time observing canine-kind. *G* But I do sense a lack of cats. Ferrets are all very well in their ferrety way, but they are not cats.

    Reply
  7. LOL, Jo! You’ve certainly spent your share of time observing canine-kind. *G* But I do sense a lack of cats. Ferrets are all very well in their ferrety way, but they are not cats.

    Reply
  8. LOL, Jo! You’ve certainly spent your share of time observing canine-kind. *G* But I do sense a lack of cats. Ferrets are all very well in their ferrety way, but they are not cats.

    Reply
  9. LOL, Jo! You’ve certainly spent your share of time observing canine-kind. *G* But I do sense a lack of cats. Ferrets are all very well in their ferrety way, but they are not cats.

    Reply
  10. LOL, Jo! You’ve certainly spent your share of time observing canine-kind. *G* But I do sense a lack of cats. Ferrets are all very well in their ferrety way, but they are not cats.

    Reply
  11. No individual animal stands out, but back in the 90’s I discovered the classic Regency series “The Cats of Mayfair” by Rosemary Stevens. 4 books of kitty assisted romance. I found one of the books in a box of paperbacks last year which I didn’t remember keeping. Score!

    Reply
  12. No individual animal stands out, but back in the 90’s I discovered the classic Regency series “The Cats of Mayfair” by Rosemary Stevens. 4 books of kitty assisted romance. I found one of the books in a box of paperbacks last year which I didn’t remember keeping. Score!

    Reply
  13. No individual animal stands out, but back in the 90’s I discovered the classic Regency series “The Cats of Mayfair” by Rosemary Stevens. 4 books of kitty assisted romance. I found one of the books in a box of paperbacks last year which I didn’t remember keeping. Score!

    Reply
  14. No individual animal stands out, but back in the 90’s I discovered the classic Regency series “The Cats of Mayfair” by Rosemary Stevens. 4 books of kitty assisted romance. I found one of the books in a box of paperbacks last year which I didn’t remember keeping. Score!

    Reply
  15. No individual animal stands out, but back in the 90’s I discovered the classic Regency series “The Cats of Mayfair” by Rosemary Stevens. 4 books of kitty assisted romance. I found one of the books in a box of paperbacks last year which I didn’t remember keeping. Score!

    Reply
  16. I’ve got cats, at least half a dozen black ones, two solid gray ones, and a gray and white striped long-haired one.

    Reply
  17. I’ve got cats, at least half a dozen black ones, two solid gray ones, and a gray and white striped long-haired one.

    Reply
  18. I’ve got cats, at least half a dozen black ones, two solid gray ones, and a gray and white striped long-haired one.

    Reply
  19. I’ve got cats, at least half a dozen black ones, two solid gray ones, and a gray and white striped long-haired one.

    Reply
  20. I’ve got cats, at least half a dozen black ones, two solid gray ones, and a gray and white striped long-haired one.

    Reply
  21. I adore giant dogs, the two wolf dogs I had being the most fun, with their sly, naughty sense of humor.
    (cats, too…in fact my cats have always loved, and loved to tease and harass, my giant dogs, and vice versa).
    I’ve always wanted to have a Newfie, but only ever lived in a climate that would work with that thick coat while I had the two wolf dogs, one of whom/which was a cross between a St. Bernard and a timber wolf. Talk about a heavy coat! (and a heavy dog…140 pounds)
    Fun column!
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  22. I adore giant dogs, the two wolf dogs I had being the most fun, with their sly, naughty sense of humor.
    (cats, too…in fact my cats have always loved, and loved to tease and harass, my giant dogs, and vice versa).
    I’ve always wanted to have a Newfie, but only ever lived in a climate that would work with that thick coat while I had the two wolf dogs, one of whom/which was a cross between a St. Bernard and a timber wolf. Talk about a heavy coat! (and a heavy dog…140 pounds)
    Fun column!
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  23. I adore giant dogs, the two wolf dogs I had being the most fun, with their sly, naughty sense of humor.
    (cats, too…in fact my cats have always loved, and loved to tease and harass, my giant dogs, and vice versa).
    I’ve always wanted to have a Newfie, but only ever lived in a climate that would work with that thick coat while I had the two wolf dogs, one of whom/which was a cross between a St. Bernard and a timber wolf. Talk about a heavy coat! (and a heavy dog…140 pounds)
    Fun column!
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  24. I adore giant dogs, the two wolf dogs I had being the most fun, with their sly, naughty sense of humor.
    (cats, too…in fact my cats have always loved, and loved to tease and harass, my giant dogs, and vice versa).
    I’ve always wanted to have a Newfie, but only ever lived in a climate that would work with that thick coat while I had the two wolf dogs, one of whom/which was a cross between a St. Bernard and a timber wolf. Talk about a heavy coat! (and a heavy dog…140 pounds)
    Fun column!
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  25. I adore giant dogs, the two wolf dogs I had being the most fun, with their sly, naughty sense of humor.
    (cats, too…in fact my cats have always loved, and loved to tease and harass, my giant dogs, and vice versa).
    I’ve always wanted to have a Newfie, but only ever lived in a climate that would work with that thick coat while I had the two wolf dogs, one of whom/which was a cross between a St. Bernard and a timber wolf. Talk about a heavy coat! (and a heavy dog…140 pounds)
    Fun column!
    Cheers, Faith

    Reply
  26. Fun post Joanna. I love when children or animals are included in romance. While there are many authors who include animals in stories, two of my favorites are Emily March and Barbara Metzger. Every book I have read by Emily March includes a dog of some sort who is featured prominently in the story.
    My all time favorite author who includes animals in her stories is Barbara Metzger. She doesn’t limit herself to just dogs and cats either. I recently re-read MINOR INDISCRETIONS which includes a set of very young, female identical twins who adopt a litter of piglets and provide some very funny moments.
    I also just remembered a favorite short story by Edith Layton called PEACHES AND THE QUEEN. It’s about a young boy who believes his cat has been kidnapped by Queen Victoria. Lovely holiday reading.

    Reply
  27. Fun post Joanna. I love when children or animals are included in romance. While there are many authors who include animals in stories, two of my favorites are Emily March and Barbara Metzger. Every book I have read by Emily March includes a dog of some sort who is featured prominently in the story.
    My all time favorite author who includes animals in her stories is Barbara Metzger. She doesn’t limit herself to just dogs and cats either. I recently re-read MINOR INDISCRETIONS which includes a set of very young, female identical twins who adopt a litter of piglets and provide some very funny moments.
    I also just remembered a favorite short story by Edith Layton called PEACHES AND THE QUEEN. It’s about a young boy who believes his cat has been kidnapped by Queen Victoria. Lovely holiday reading.

    Reply
  28. Fun post Joanna. I love when children or animals are included in romance. While there are many authors who include animals in stories, two of my favorites are Emily March and Barbara Metzger. Every book I have read by Emily March includes a dog of some sort who is featured prominently in the story.
    My all time favorite author who includes animals in her stories is Barbara Metzger. She doesn’t limit herself to just dogs and cats either. I recently re-read MINOR INDISCRETIONS which includes a set of very young, female identical twins who adopt a litter of piglets and provide some very funny moments.
    I also just remembered a favorite short story by Edith Layton called PEACHES AND THE QUEEN. It’s about a young boy who believes his cat has been kidnapped by Queen Victoria. Lovely holiday reading.

    Reply
  29. Fun post Joanna. I love when children or animals are included in romance. While there are many authors who include animals in stories, two of my favorites are Emily March and Barbara Metzger. Every book I have read by Emily March includes a dog of some sort who is featured prominently in the story.
    My all time favorite author who includes animals in her stories is Barbara Metzger. She doesn’t limit herself to just dogs and cats either. I recently re-read MINOR INDISCRETIONS which includes a set of very young, female identical twins who adopt a litter of piglets and provide some very funny moments.
    I also just remembered a favorite short story by Edith Layton called PEACHES AND THE QUEEN. It’s about a young boy who believes his cat has been kidnapped by Queen Victoria. Lovely holiday reading.

    Reply
  30. Fun post Joanna. I love when children or animals are included in romance. While there are many authors who include animals in stories, two of my favorites are Emily March and Barbara Metzger. Every book I have read by Emily March includes a dog of some sort who is featured prominently in the story.
    My all time favorite author who includes animals in her stories is Barbara Metzger. She doesn’t limit herself to just dogs and cats either. I recently re-read MINOR INDISCRETIONS which includes a set of very young, female identical twins who adopt a litter of piglets and provide some very funny moments.
    I also just remembered a favorite short story by Edith Layton called PEACHES AND THE QUEEN. It’s about a young boy who believes his cat has been kidnapped by Queen Victoria. Lovely holiday reading.

    Reply
  31. I love the donkeys in Forbidden Rose, being a donkey owner for most of my life. Did you know that tomorrow, Mai 8th, is World Donkey Day?

    Reply
  32. I love the donkeys in Forbidden Rose, being a donkey owner for most of my life. Did you know that tomorrow, Mai 8th, is World Donkey Day?

    Reply
  33. I love the donkeys in Forbidden Rose, being a donkey owner for most of my life. Did you know that tomorrow, Mai 8th, is World Donkey Day?

    Reply
  34. I love the donkeys in Forbidden Rose, being a donkey owner for most of my life. Did you know that tomorrow, Mai 8th, is World Donkey Day?

    Reply
  35. I love the donkeys in Forbidden Rose, being a donkey owner for most of my life. Did you know that tomorrow, Mai 8th, is World Donkey Day?

    Reply
  36. What a fun post. I think we met Tiny’s descendant on the High Street in Hampstead whilst waiting for a taxi to take us to The Spaniard’s Inn. He was tied out in front of a bookstore patiently awaiting his master’s return. He was a HUGE black dog, definitely had the look of a wolfhound / Newfoundland cross. Very sweet and very attentive to the door of the bookstore until his master came out.
    I must admit I am inordinately fond of Kedger. Ferrets are such wondrous creatures!

    Reply
  37. What a fun post. I think we met Tiny’s descendant on the High Street in Hampstead whilst waiting for a taxi to take us to The Spaniard’s Inn. He was tied out in front of a bookstore patiently awaiting his master’s return. He was a HUGE black dog, definitely had the look of a wolfhound / Newfoundland cross. Very sweet and very attentive to the door of the bookstore until his master came out.
    I must admit I am inordinately fond of Kedger. Ferrets are such wondrous creatures!

    Reply
  38. What a fun post. I think we met Tiny’s descendant on the High Street in Hampstead whilst waiting for a taxi to take us to The Spaniard’s Inn. He was tied out in front of a bookstore patiently awaiting his master’s return. He was a HUGE black dog, definitely had the look of a wolfhound / Newfoundland cross. Very sweet and very attentive to the door of the bookstore until his master came out.
    I must admit I am inordinately fond of Kedger. Ferrets are such wondrous creatures!

    Reply
  39. What a fun post. I think we met Tiny’s descendant on the High Street in Hampstead whilst waiting for a taxi to take us to The Spaniard’s Inn. He was tied out in front of a bookstore patiently awaiting his master’s return. He was a HUGE black dog, definitely had the look of a wolfhound / Newfoundland cross. Very sweet and very attentive to the door of the bookstore until his master came out.
    I must admit I am inordinately fond of Kedger. Ferrets are such wondrous creatures!

    Reply
  40. What a fun post. I think we met Tiny’s descendant on the High Street in Hampstead whilst waiting for a taxi to take us to The Spaniard’s Inn. He was tied out in front of a bookstore patiently awaiting his master’s return. He was a HUGE black dog, definitely had the look of a wolfhound / Newfoundland cross. Very sweet and very attentive to the door of the bookstore until his master came out.
    I must admit I am inordinately fond of Kedger. Ferrets are such wondrous creatures!

    Reply
  41. I remember the rabbit-cat. Still makes me smile.
    I like a landscape dotted with cats. They decorate the place.
    Meeks Street has a succession of cats over the years, as well as a succession of dogs. We meet a cat at the breakfast table in Beauty Like the Night — sitting on the table, expecting bits of sliced ham.

    Reply
  42. I remember the rabbit-cat. Still makes me smile.
    I like a landscape dotted with cats. They decorate the place.
    Meeks Street has a succession of cats over the years, as well as a succession of dogs. We meet a cat at the breakfast table in Beauty Like the Night — sitting on the table, expecting bits of sliced ham.

    Reply
  43. I remember the rabbit-cat. Still makes me smile.
    I like a landscape dotted with cats. They decorate the place.
    Meeks Street has a succession of cats over the years, as well as a succession of dogs. We meet a cat at the breakfast table in Beauty Like the Night — sitting on the table, expecting bits of sliced ham.

    Reply
  44. I remember the rabbit-cat. Still makes me smile.
    I like a landscape dotted with cats. They decorate the place.
    Meeks Street has a succession of cats over the years, as well as a succession of dogs. We meet a cat at the breakfast table in Beauty Like the Night — sitting on the table, expecting bits of sliced ham.

    Reply
  45. I remember the rabbit-cat. Still makes me smile.
    I like a landscape dotted with cats. They decorate the place.
    Meeks Street has a succession of cats over the years, as well as a succession of dogs. We meet a cat at the breakfast table in Beauty Like the Night — sitting on the table, expecting bits of sliced ham.

    Reply
  46. I’m not quite sure why the cat doesn’t show up more. I really like cats, as a matter of fact.
    There’s a feline on premises at all times, Adrian’s contribution to the household rather than Doyle’s.
    We see Cat in Beauty Like the Night as Doyle arrives for breakfast:
    “They’d built the fire high. The curtains were drawn back to let in the light when it chose to arrive.
    Coffee and tea and food was spread out on the sideboard. More food on the table. The rangy, ragged-eared house cat — named Cat — sat squarely on a copy of the Morning Herald, eyeing the sliced ham, biding his time.”

    Reply
  47. I’m not quite sure why the cat doesn’t show up more. I really like cats, as a matter of fact.
    There’s a feline on premises at all times, Adrian’s contribution to the household rather than Doyle’s.
    We see Cat in Beauty Like the Night as Doyle arrives for breakfast:
    “They’d built the fire high. The curtains were drawn back to let in the light when it chose to arrive.
    Coffee and tea and food was spread out on the sideboard. More food on the table. The rangy, ragged-eared house cat — named Cat — sat squarely on a copy of the Morning Herald, eyeing the sliced ham, biding his time.”

    Reply
  48. I’m not quite sure why the cat doesn’t show up more. I really like cats, as a matter of fact.
    There’s a feline on premises at all times, Adrian’s contribution to the household rather than Doyle’s.
    We see Cat in Beauty Like the Night as Doyle arrives for breakfast:
    “They’d built the fire high. The curtains were drawn back to let in the light when it chose to arrive.
    Coffee and tea and food was spread out on the sideboard. More food on the table. The rangy, ragged-eared house cat — named Cat — sat squarely on a copy of the Morning Herald, eyeing the sliced ham, biding his time.”

    Reply
  49. I’m not quite sure why the cat doesn’t show up more. I really like cats, as a matter of fact.
    There’s a feline on premises at all times, Adrian’s contribution to the household rather than Doyle’s.
    We see Cat in Beauty Like the Night as Doyle arrives for breakfast:
    “They’d built the fire high. The curtains were drawn back to let in the light when it chose to arrive.
    Coffee and tea and food was spread out on the sideboard. More food on the table. The rangy, ragged-eared house cat — named Cat — sat squarely on a copy of the Morning Herald, eyeing the sliced ham, biding his time.”

    Reply
  50. I’m not quite sure why the cat doesn’t show up more. I really like cats, as a matter of fact.
    There’s a feline on premises at all times, Adrian’s contribution to the household rather than Doyle’s.
    We see Cat in Beauty Like the Night as Doyle arrives for breakfast:
    “They’d built the fire high. The curtains were drawn back to let in the light when it chose to arrive.
    Coffee and tea and food was spread out on the sideboard. More food on the table. The rangy, ragged-eared house cat — named Cat — sat squarely on a copy of the Morning Herald, eyeing the sliced ham, biding his time.”

    Reply
  51. What a fun post as I recall reading all of those snippets. In the category of created animals, I like Jayne Ann Krentz’s dustbunnies.

    Reply
  52. What a fun post as I recall reading all of those snippets. In the category of created animals, I like Jayne Ann Krentz’s dustbunnies.

    Reply
  53. What a fun post as I recall reading all of those snippets. In the category of created animals, I like Jayne Ann Krentz’s dustbunnies.

    Reply
  54. What a fun post as I recall reading all of those snippets. In the category of created animals, I like Jayne Ann Krentz’s dustbunnies.

    Reply
  55. What a fun post as I recall reading all of those snippets. In the category of created animals, I like Jayne Ann Krentz’s dustbunnies.

    Reply
  56. There’s nothing funnier or more dear than the interaction of a large, patient dog with its cat. They are so careful with them, (the dogs with the cats,) and so often bewildered at cat behavior.

    Reply
  57. There’s nothing funnier or more dear than the interaction of a large, patient dog with its cat. They are so careful with them, (the dogs with the cats,) and so often bewildered at cat behavior.

    Reply
  58. There’s nothing funnier or more dear than the interaction of a large, patient dog with its cat. They are so careful with them, (the dogs with the cats,) and so often bewildered at cat behavior.

    Reply
  59. There’s nothing funnier or more dear than the interaction of a large, patient dog with its cat. They are so careful with them, (the dogs with the cats,) and so often bewildered at cat behavior.

    Reply
  60. There’s nothing funnier or more dear than the interaction of a large, patient dog with its cat. They are so careful with them, (the dogs with the cats,) and so often bewildered at cat behavior.

    Reply
  61. I haven’t read those. Sounds interesting.
    I look through the cozy mysteries at the library and it looks like many of them have important cats in them. They have cats on the covers, which I rather like.

    Reply
  62. I haven’t read those. Sounds interesting.
    I look through the cozy mysteries at the library and it looks like many of them have important cats in them. They have cats on the covers, which I rather like.

    Reply
  63. I haven’t read those. Sounds interesting.
    I look through the cozy mysteries at the library and it looks like many of them have important cats in them. They have cats on the covers, which I rather like.

    Reply
  64. I haven’t read those. Sounds interesting.
    I look through the cozy mysteries at the library and it looks like many of them have important cats in them. They have cats on the covers, which I rather like.

    Reply
  65. I haven’t read those. Sounds interesting.
    I look through the cozy mysteries at the library and it looks like many of them have important cats in them. They have cats on the covers, which I rather like.

    Reply
  66. I did not know this. Happy donkey day to you.
    My father grew up on a farm and I have an old photo of him as a child, riding a donkey.
    I talked to a number of donkey keepers while I was writing the book, hoping to get my donkeys right.

    Reply
  67. I did not know this. Happy donkey day to you.
    My father grew up on a farm and I have an old photo of him as a child, riding a donkey.
    I talked to a number of donkey keepers while I was writing the book, hoping to get my donkeys right.

    Reply
  68. I did not know this. Happy donkey day to you.
    My father grew up on a farm and I have an old photo of him as a child, riding a donkey.
    I talked to a number of donkey keepers while I was writing the book, hoping to get my donkeys right.

    Reply
  69. I did not know this. Happy donkey day to you.
    My father grew up on a farm and I have an old photo of him as a child, riding a donkey.
    I talked to a number of donkey keepers while I was writing the book, hoping to get my donkeys right.

    Reply
  70. I did not know this. Happy donkey day to you.
    My father grew up on a farm and I have an old photo of him as a child, riding a donkey.
    I talked to a number of donkey keepers while I was writing the book, hoping to get my donkeys right.

    Reply
  71. When I was writing, I lurked in ferret forums and spent a lot of time at the local pet shop playing with the ferret collection there.
    I don’t think I really got to understand ferrets, though. I think you don’t know your ferret till you’ve interacted with it in wide open spaces.

    Reply
  72. When I was writing, I lurked in ferret forums and spent a lot of time at the local pet shop playing with the ferret collection there.
    I don’t think I really got to understand ferrets, though. I think you don’t know your ferret till you’ve interacted with it in wide open spaces.

    Reply
  73. When I was writing, I lurked in ferret forums and spent a lot of time at the local pet shop playing with the ferret collection there.
    I don’t think I really got to understand ferrets, though. I think you don’t know your ferret till you’ve interacted with it in wide open spaces.

    Reply
  74. When I was writing, I lurked in ferret forums and spent a lot of time at the local pet shop playing with the ferret collection there.
    I don’t think I really got to understand ferrets, though. I think you don’t know your ferret till you’ve interacted with it in wide open spaces.

    Reply
  75. When I was writing, I lurked in ferret forums and spent a lot of time at the local pet shop playing with the ferret collection there.
    I don’t think I really got to understand ferrets, though. I think you don’t know your ferret till you’ve interacted with it in wide open spaces.

    Reply
  76. I’m not sure I have any individual favorite pets, but I agree with the already mentioned Rabbits Cats of Jo Beverly and the Krentz (Castle) Dust bunnies.
    A side note: most people with animal dander sensitivities react to cats. Our family is the opposite; we’re fine with cats but react to dogs (blinding headaches and so on)
    I have often wondered in that is a part of why dogs appear to be more favored that cats — fewer folk are allergic to them?

    Reply
  77. I’m not sure I have any individual favorite pets, but I agree with the already mentioned Rabbits Cats of Jo Beverly and the Krentz (Castle) Dust bunnies.
    A side note: most people with animal dander sensitivities react to cats. Our family is the opposite; we’re fine with cats but react to dogs (blinding headaches and so on)
    I have often wondered in that is a part of why dogs appear to be more favored that cats — fewer folk are allergic to them?

    Reply
  78. I’m not sure I have any individual favorite pets, but I agree with the already mentioned Rabbits Cats of Jo Beverly and the Krentz (Castle) Dust bunnies.
    A side note: most people with animal dander sensitivities react to cats. Our family is the opposite; we’re fine with cats but react to dogs (blinding headaches and so on)
    I have often wondered in that is a part of why dogs appear to be more favored that cats — fewer folk are allergic to them?

    Reply
  79. I’m not sure I have any individual favorite pets, but I agree with the already mentioned Rabbits Cats of Jo Beverly and the Krentz (Castle) Dust bunnies.
    A side note: most people with animal dander sensitivities react to cats. Our family is the opposite; we’re fine with cats but react to dogs (blinding headaches and so on)
    I have often wondered in that is a part of why dogs appear to be more favored that cats — fewer folk are allergic to them?

    Reply
  80. I’m not sure I have any individual favorite pets, but I agree with the already mentioned Rabbits Cats of Jo Beverly and the Krentz (Castle) Dust bunnies.
    A side note: most people with animal dander sensitivities react to cats. Our family is the opposite; we’re fine with cats but react to dogs (blinding headaches and so on)
    I have often wondered in that is a part of why dogs appear to be more favored that cats — fewer folk are allergic to them?

    Reply
  81. I think Finn is a lovely name for a wolfhound. Or Finn MacCool to be formal.
    Heyer — the Baluchistan hound! Yes! I loved that dog. Perhaps my big dogs derive their inspiration from him.

    Reply
  82. I think Finn is a lovely name for a wolfhound. Or Finn MacCool to be formal.
    Heyer — the Baluchistan hound! Yes! I loved that dog. Perhaps my big dogs derive their inspiration from him.

    Reply
  83. I think Finn is a lovely name for a wolfhound. Or Finn MacCool to be formal.
    Heyer — the Baluchistan hound! Yes! I loved that dog. Perhaps my big dogs derive their inspiration from him.

    Reply
  84. I think Finn is a lovely name for a wolfhound. Or Finn MacCool to be formal.
    Heyer — the Baluchistan hound! Yes! I loved that dog. Perhaps my big dogs derive their inspiration from him.

    Reply
  85. I think Finn is a lovely name for a wolfhound. Or Finn MacCool to be formal.
    Heyer — the Baluchistan hound! Yes! I loved that dog. Perhaps my big dogs derive their inspiration from him.

    Reply
  86. I never thought about the allergy aspects …
    I’m lucky enough to like both cats and dogs. For me the allergy is birds.
    The deciding factor of animal keeping is that dogs are harder to take care of. You can’t leave them an automatic feeder and a big bowl of water and go off for the weekend. They need long exercise-y walks. And many apartments won’t allow animals larger than thirty or so pounds.
    So it’s only been in the last few years I was able to have a dog.
    I do like it.

    Reply
  87. I never thought about the allergy aspects …
    I’m lucky enough to like both cats and dogs. For me the allergy is birds.
    The deciding factor of animal keeping is that dogs are harder to take care of. You can’t leave them an automatic feeder and a big bowl of water and go off for the weekend. They need long exercise-y walks. And many apartments won’t allow animals larger than thirty or so pounds.
    So it’s only been in the last few years I was able to have a dog.
    I do like it.

    Reply
  88. I never thought about the allergy aspects …
    I’m lucky enough to like both cats and dogs. For me the allergy is birds.
    The deciding factor of animal keeping is that dogs are harder to take care of. You can’t leave them an automatic feeder and a big bowl of water and go off for the weekend. They need long exercise-y walks. And many apartments won’t allow animals larger than thirty or so pounds.
    So it’s only been in the last few years I was able to have a dog.
    I do like it.

    Reply
  89. I never thought about the allergy aspects …
    I’m lucky enough to like both cats and dogs. For me the allergy is birds.
    The deciding factor of animal keeping is that dogs are harder to take care of. You can’t leave them an automatic feeder and a big bowl of water and go off for the weekend. They need long exercise-y walks. And many apartments won’t allow animals larger than thirty or so pounds.
    So it’s only been in the last few years I was able to have a dog.
    I do like it.

    Reply
  90. I never thought about the allergy aspects …
    I’m lucky enough to like both cats and dogs. For me the allergy is birds.
    The deciding factor of animal keeping is that dogs are harder to take care of. You can’t leave them an automatic feeder and a big bowl of water and go off for the weekend. They need long exercise-y walks. And many apartments won’t allow animals larger than thirty or so pounds.
    So it’s only been in the last few years I was able to have a dog.
    I do like it.

    Reply
  91. What a fun walk down Memory Lane, Joanne!. I’ll throw in Lord Nightengale, the parrot that’s the key to family treasure in a Judith Lansdowne series (which I will now have to seek out for a reread).
    My favorite animal reference in all Regencydom, though, is more of a lack-of-animal one from Barbara Metzger’s Miss Lockharte’s Letters: “I’m dying, and I never (even?) had a dog.” Maybe my favorite Regency of all times. Guess I’ll have to (ahem) ferret that one out, too!

    Reply
  92. What a fun walk down Memory Lane, Joanne!. I’ll throw in Lord Nightengale, the parrot that’s the key to family treasure in a Judith Lansdowne series (which I will now have to seek out for a reread).
    My favorite animal reference in all Regencydom, though, is more of a lack-of-animal one from Barbara Metzger’s Miss Lockharte’s Letters: “I’m dying, and I never (even?) had a dog.” Maybe my favorite Regency of all times. Guess I’ll have to (ahem) ferret that one out, too!

    Reply
  93. What a fun walk down Memory Lane, Joanne!. I’ll throw in Lord Nightengale, the parrot that’s the key to family treasure in a Judith Lansdowne series (which I will now have to seek out for a reread).
    My favorite animal reference in all Regencydom, though, is more of a lack-of-animal one from Barbara Metzger’s Miss Lockharte’s Letters: “I’m dying, and I never (even?) had a dog.” Maybe my favorite Regency of all times. Guess I’ll have to (ahem) ferret that one out, too!

    Reply
  94. What a fun walk down Memory Lane, Joanne!. I’ll throw in Lord Nightengale, the parrot that’s the key to family treasure in a Judith Lansdowne series (which I will now have to seek out for a reread).
    My favorite animal reference in all Regencydom, though, is more of a lack-of-animal one from Barbara Metzger’s Miss Lockharte’s Letters: “I’m dying, and I never (even?) had a dog.” Maybe my favorite Regency of all times. Guess I’ll have to (ahem) ferret that one out, too!

    Reply
  95. What a fun walk down Memory Lane, Joanne!. I’ll throw in Lord Nightengale, the parrot that’s the key to family treasure in a Judith Lansdowne series (which I will now have to seek out for a reread).
    My favorite animal reference in all Regencydom, though, is more of a lack-of-animal one from Barbara Metzger’s Miss Lockharte’s Letters: “I’m dying, and I never (even?) had a dog.” Maybe my favorite Regency of all times. Guess I’ll have to (ahem) ferret that one out, too!

    Reply
  96. Such a lovely post. I have lived with dogs for a very long time, cats nearly as long. At one point, we had several Cocker Spaniels – we were showing in confirmation classes. We had a wonderful Manx cat named Bunny. She liked the dogs – they were considered just part of the scenery to her. I believe we could have had 100 dogs and she would not have cared.
    Mr Wonderful brought home a kitten to keep her company. She became a feline professional hit cat. The kitten had to find another home for her own well being.
    Bunny did not consider the dogs competition for affection from the family -a kitten was another case altogether. She was a white long haired cat who could sit on a tree branch and catch birds.
    She also believed that bringing me treasures was the highest form of admiration. She was wrong.

    Reply
  97. Such a lovely post. I have lived with dogs for a very long time, cats nearly as long. At one point, we had several Cocker Spaniels – we were showing in confirmation classes. We had a wonderful Manx cat named Bunny. She liked the dogs – they were considered just part of the scenery to her. I believe we could have had 100 dogs and she would not have cared.
    Mr Wonderful brought home a kitten to keep her company. She became a feline professional hit cat. The kitten had to find another home for her own well being.
    Bunny did not consider the dogs competition for affection from the family -a kitten was another case altogether. She was a white long haired cat who could sit on a tree branch and catch birds.
    She also believed that bringing me treasures was the highest form of admiration. She was wrong.

    Reply
  98. Such a lovely post. I have lived with dogs for a very long time, cats nearly as long. At one point, we had several Cocker Spaniels – we were showing in confirmation classes. We had a wonderful Manx cat named Bunny. She liked the dogs – they were considered just part of the scenery to her. I believe we could have had 100 dogs and she would not have cared.
    Mr Wonderful brought home a kitten to keep her company. She became a feline professional hit cat. The kitten had to find another home for her own well being.
    Bunny did not consider the dogs competition for affection from the family -a kitten was another case altogether. She was a white long haired cat who could sit on a tree branch and catch birds.
    She also believed that bringing me treasures was the highest form of admiration. She was wrong.

    Reply
  99. Such a lovely post. I have lived with dogs for a very long time, cats nearly as long. At one point, we had several Cocker Spaniels – we were showing in confirmation classes. We had a wonderful Manx cat named Bunny. She liked the dogs – they were considered just part of the scenery to her. I believe we could have had 100 dogs and she would not have cared.
    Mr Wonderful brought home a kitten to keep her company. She became a feline professional hit cat. The kitten had to find another home for her own well being.
    Bunny did not consider the dogs competition for affection from the family -a kitten was another case altogether. She was a white long haired cat who could sit on a tree branch and catch birds.
    She also believed that bringing me treasures was the highest form of admiration. She was wrong.

    Reply
  100. Such a lovely post. I have lived with dogs for a very long time, cats nearly as long. At one point, we had several Cocker Spaniels – we were showing in confirmation classes. We had a wonderful Manx cat named Bunny. She liked the dogs – they were considered just part of the scenery to her. I believe we could have had 100 dogs and she would not have cared.
    Mr Wonderful brought home a kitten to keep her company. She became a feline professional hit cat. The kitten had to find another home for her own well being.
    Bunny did not consider the dogs competition for affection from the family -a kitten was another case altogether. She was a white long haired cat who could sit on a tree branch and catch birds.
    She also believed that bringing me treasures was the highest form of admiration. She was wrong.

    Reply
  101. When you mentioned animals in books I immediately went to Timmy from the Famous Five. I grew up on those books and always loved Timmy and his devotion to George. I’ve had pets all my life. I too love all animals. In our home at the moment we have two dogs and a cat. One of the dogs is an Irish Wolfhound. Called Fionn after the Irish legend, he’s very large and also now getting very old. He has very bad arthritis in his back legs and is not as mobile as he was. However, he recently started new medication and some days he’s like a puppy again, prancing around after our (smaller) Labrador Cross. He then has to sleep for about four hours to recover:-)
    Great post, great fun.

    Reply
  102. When you mentioned animals in books I immediately went to Timmy from the Famous Five. I grew up on those books and always loved Timmy and his devotion to George. I’ve had pets all my life. I too love all animals. In our home at the moment we have two dogs and a cat. One of the dogs is an Irish Wolfhound. Called Fionn after the Irish legend, he’s very large and also now getting very old. He has very bad arthritis in his back legs and is not as mobile as he was. However, he recently started new medication and some days he’s like a puppy again, prancing around after our (smaller) Labrador Cross. He then has to sleep for about four hours to recover:-)
    Great post, great fun.

    Reply
  103. When you mentioned animals in books I immediately went to Timmy from the Famous Five. I grew up on those books and always loved Timmy and his devotion to George. I’ve had pets all my life. I too love all animals. In our home at the moment we have two dogs and a cat. One of the dogs is an Irish Wolfhound. Called Fionn after the Irish legend, he’s very large and also now getting very old. He has very bad arthritis in his back legs and is not as mobile as he was. However, he recently started new medication and some days he’s like a puppy again, prancing around after our (smaller) Labrador Cross. He then has to sleep for about four hours to recover:-)
    Great post, great fun.

    Reply
  104. When you mentioned animals in books I immediately went to Timmy from the Famous Five. I grew up on those books and always loved Timmy and his devotion to George. I’ve had pets all my life. I too love all animals. In our home at the moment we have two dogs and a cat. One of the dogs is an Irish Wolfhound. Called Fionn after the Irish legend, he’s very large and also now getting very old. He has very bad arthritis in his back legs and is not as mobile as he was. However, he recently started new medication and some days he’s like a puppy again, prancing around after our (smaller) Labrador Cross. He then has to sleep for about four hours to recover:-)
    Great post, great fun.

    Reply
  105. When you mentioned animals in books I immediately went to Timmy from the Famous Five. I grew up on those books and always loved Timmy and his devotion to George. I’ve had pets all my life. I too love all animals. In our home at the moment we have two dogs and a cat. One of the dogs is an Irish Wolfhound. Called Fionn after the Irish legend, he’s very large and also now getting very old. He has very bad arthritis in his back legs and is not as mobile as he was. However, he recently started new medication and some days he’s like a puppy again, prancing around after our (smaller) Labrador Cross. He then has to sleep for about four hours to recover:-)
    Great post, great fun.

    Reply
  106. Black Beauty of course..and the Black Stallion. And, even though I am not cat person, I have a fondness for Leaf in Patricia Veryan’s “The Mistress of Willowvale”.
    As for dogs…I read Albert Payson Terhune’s Sunnybank books when I was in my early teens and fell in love with the Sunnybank collies. It was only when I reread them again at Rutgers (for a New Jersey author’s class) tat I realized that while I still loved the collies, I had serious problems with APT’s attitude toward his fellow humans!

    Reply
  107. Black Beauty of course..and the Black Stallion. And, even though I am not cat person, I have a fondness for Leaf in Patricia Veryan’s “The Mistress of Willowvale”.
    As for dogs…I read Albert Payson Terhune’s Sunnybank books when I was in my early teens and fell in love with the Sunnybank collies. It was only when I reread them again at Rutgers (for a New Jersey author’s class) tat I realized that while I still loved the collies, I had serious problems with APT’s attitude toward his fellow humans!

    Reply
  108. Black Beauty of course..and the Black Stallion. And, even though I am not cat person, I have a fondness for Leaf in Patricia Veryan’s “The Mistress of Willowvale”.
    As for dogs…I read Albert Payson Terhune’s Sunnybank books when I was in my early teens and fell in love with the Sunnybank collies. It was only when I reread them again at Rutgers (for a New Jersey author’s class) tat I realized that while I still loved the collies, I had serious problems with APT’s attitude toward his fellow humans!

    Reply
  109. Black Beauty of course..and the Black Stallion. And, even though I am not cat person, I have a fondness for Leaf in Patricia Veryan’s “The Mistress of Willowvale”.
    As for dogs…I read Albert Payson Terhune’s Sunnybank books when I was in my early teens and fell in love with the Sunnybank collies. It was only when I reread them again at Rutgers (for a New Jersey author’s class) tat I realized that while I still loved the collies, I had serious problems with APT’s attitude toward his fellow humans!

    Reply
  110. Black Beauty of course..and the Black Stallion. And, even though I am not cat person, I have a fondness for Leaf in Patricia Veryan’s “The Mistress of Willowvale”.
    As for dogs…I read Albert Payson Terhune’s Sunnybank books when I was in my early teens and fell in love with the Sunnybank collies. It was only when I reread them again at Rutgers (for a New Jersey author’s class) tat I realized that while I still loved the collies, I had serious problems with APT’s attitude toward his fellow humans!

    Reply
  111. Scottish Deerhounds are my very favorite. They actually have a subtle sense of humor. Isak Dinesen wrote about hers in Out of Africa.
    These days I live with an elderly Whippet and was delighted to discover that Lucinda Brandt’s Roxton family all have them.

    Reply
  112. Scottish Deerhounds are my very favorite. They actually have a subtle sense of humor. Isak Dinesen wrote about hers in Out of Africa.
    These days I live with an elderly Whippet and was delighted to discover that Lucinda Brandt’s Roxton family all have them.

    Reply
  113. Scottish Deerhounds are my very favorite. They actually have a subtle sense of humor. Isak Dinesen wrote about hers in Out of Africa.
    These days I live with an elderly Whippet and was delighted to discover that Lucinda Brandt’s Roxton family all have them.

    Reply
  114. Scottish Deerhounds are my very favorite. They actually have a subtle sense of humor. Isak Dinesen wrote about hers in Out of Africa.
    These days I live with an elderly Whippet and was delighted to discover that Lucinda Brandt’s Roxton family all have them.

    Reply
  115. Scottish Deerhounds are my very favorite. They actually have a subtle sense of humor. Isak Dinesen wrote about hers in Out of Africa.
    These days I live with an elderly Whippet and was delighted to discover that Lucinda Brandt’s Roxton family all have them.

    Reply
  116. Leaf! I was just talking about Patricia Veryan the other day. This must be a sign that I should reread, don’t you think? I love animals in books!

    Reply
  117. Leaf! I was just talking about Patricia Veryan the other day. This must be a sign that I should reread, don’t you think? I love animals in books!

    Reply
  118. Leaf! I was just talking about Patricia Veryan the other day. This must be a sign that I should reread, don’t you think? I love animals in books!

    Reply
  119. Leaf! I was just talking about Patricia Veryan the other day. This must be a sign that I should reread, don’t you think? I love animals in books!

    Reply
  120. Leaf! I was just talking about Patricia Veryan the other day. This must be a sign that I should reread, don’t you think? I love animals in books!

    Reply
  121. I remember when I had a cat — Singie –for some years and brought home a dog.
    My cat took to sitting upon the top of high bookcases and sneering down. You could just hear her saying “Die, canine scum.”

    Reply
  122. I remember when I had a cat — Singie –for some years and brought home a dog.
    My cat took to sitting upon the top of high bookcases and sneering down. You could just hear her saying “Die, canine scum.”

    Reply
  123. I remember when I had a cat — Singie –for some years and brought home a dog.
    My cat took to sitting upon the top of high bookcases and sneering down. You could just hear her saying “Die, canine scum.”

    Reply
  124. I remember when I had a cat — Singie –for some years and brought home a dog.
    My cat took to sitting upon the top of high bookcases and sneering down. You could just hear her saying “Die, canine scum.”

    Reply
  125. I remember when I had a cat — Singie –for some years and brought home a dog.
    My cat took to sitting upon the top of high bookcases and sneering down. You could just hear her saying “Die, canine scum.”

    Reply
  126. I never read the Famous Five. I will put it on my mental list and keep and eye out for it.
    And you have an Irish Wolf Hound! I did a bit of research on them. Fascinating history,

    Reply
  127. I never read the Famous Five. I will put it on my mental list and keep and eye out for it.
    And you have an Irish Wolf Hound! I did a bit of research on them. Fascinating history,

    Reply
  128. I never read the Famous Five. I will put it on my mental list and keep and eye out for it.
    And you have an Irish Wolf Hound! I did a bit of research on them. Fascinating history,

    Reply
  129. I never read the Famous Five. I will put it on my mental list and keep and eye out for it.
    And you have an Irish Wolf Hound! I did a bit of research on them. Fascinating history,

    Reply
  130. I never read the Famous Five. I will put it on my mental list and keep and eye out for it.
    And you have an Irish Wolf Hound! I did a bit of research on them. Fascinating history,

    Reply
  131. I loved Black Beauty. I will admit most of my very scanty knowledge of horses comes from that book.
    I sort of envy writers who actually know horses. Gives them a leg up on understanding historical everydays.

    Reply
  132. I loved Black Beauty. I will admit most of my very scanty knowledge of horses comes from that book.
    I sort of envy writers who actually know horses. Gives them a leg up on understanding historical everydays.

    Reply
  133. I loved Black Beauty. I will admit most of my very scanty knowledge of horses comes from that book.
    I sort of envy writers who actually know horses. Gives them a leg up on understanding historical everydays.

    Reply
  134. I loved Black Beauty. I will admit most of my very scanty knowledge of horses comes from that book.
    I sort of envy writers who actually know horses. Gives them a leg up on understanding historical everydays.

    Reply
  135. I loved Black Beauty. I will admit most of my very scanty knowledge of horses comes from that book.
    I sort of envy writers who actually know horses. Gives them a leg up on understanding historical everydays.

    Reply
  136. Dogs, wonderful dogs!
    Recently I read a book where there was a huge dog that could easily be mistaken for a wolf, or so the book said. But it was also called a Wolfhound. It made me wonder if the author actually knew what wolfhounds look like. Tall and lanky. Yes, very big. But nobody would mistake one for a wolf.
    Our beloved Norwegian Elkhounds, however–they were not huge so also wouldn’t have fit the bill. But they come a lot closer to looking like wolves.
    Sidenote: Perhaps you already know this but it is a recent bit of knowledge for me. Dog breed are not capitalized unless they have a proper name–like a nationality–in their breed name. Thus we have poodles and Chihuahuas, bulldogs and Newfoundlands, golden retrievers and Labrador Retrievers. I am not certain whether anybody follows that or not. The unknowing might think the author was sloppy if they sometimes capped dog breeds and others didn’t, but now that I know I have a feeling I will be a pedant about it.

    Reply
  137. Dogs, wonderful dogs!
    Recently I read a book where there was a huge dog that could easily be mistaken for a wolf, or so the book said. But it was also called a Wolfhound. It made me wonder if the author actually knew what wolfhounds look like. Tall and lanky. Yes, very big. But nobody would mistake one for a wolf.
    Our beloved Norwegian Elkhounds, however–they were not huge so also wouldn’t have fit the bill. But they come a lot closer to looking like wolves.
    Sidenote: Perhaps you already know this but it is a recent bit of knowledge for me. Dog breed are not capitalized unless they have a proper name–like a nationality–in their breed name. Thus we have poodles and Chihuahuas, bulldogs and Newfoundlands, golden retrievers and Labrador Retrievers. I am not certain whether anybody follows that or not. The unknowing might think the author was sloppy if they sometimes capped dog breeds and others didn’t, but now that I know I have a feeling I will be a pedant about it.

    Reply
  138. Dogs, wonderful dogs!
    Recently I read a book where there was a huge dog that could easily be mistaken for a wolf, or so the book said. But it was also called a Wolfhound. It made me wonder if the author actually knew what wolfhounds look like. Tall and lanky. Yes, very big. But nobody would mistake one for a wolf.
    Our beloved Norwegian Elkhounds, however–they were not huge so also wouldn’t have fit the bill. But they come a lot closer to looking like wolves.
    Sidenote: Perhaps you already know this but it is a recent bit of knowledge for me. Dog breed are not capitalized unless they have a proper name–like a nationality–in their breed name. Thus we have poodles and Chihuahuas, bulldogs and Newfoundlands, golden retrievers and Labrador Retrievers. I am not certain whether anybody follows that or not. The unknowing might think the author was sloppy if they sometimes capped dog breeds and others didn’t, but now that I know I have a feeling I will be a pedant about it.

    Reply
  139. Dogs, wonderful dogs!
    Recently I read a book where there was a huge dog that could easily be mistaken for a wolf, or so the book said. But it was also called a Wolfhound. It made me wonder if the author actually knew what wolfhounds look like. Tall and lanky. Yes, very big. But nobody would mistake one for a wolf.
    Our beloved Norwegian Elkhounds, however–they were not huge so also wouldn’t have fit the bill. But they come a lot closer to looking like wolves.
    Sidenote: Perhaps you already know this but it is a recent bit of knowledge for me. Dog breed are not capitalized unless they have a proper name–like a nationality–in their breed name. Thus we have poodles and Chihuahuas, bulldogs and Newfoundlands, golden retrievers and Labrador Retrievers. I am not certain whether anybody follows that or not. The unknowing might think the author was sloppy if they sometimes capped dog breeds and others didn’t, but now that I know I have a feeling I will be a pedant about it.

    Reply
  140. Dogs, wonderful dogs!
    Recently I read a book where there was a huge dog that could easily be mistaken for a wolf, or so the book said. But it was also called a Wolfhound. It made me wonder if the author actually knew what wolfhounds look like. Tall and lanky. Yes, very big. But nobody would mistake one for a wolf.
    Our beloved Norwegian Elkhounds, however–they were not huge so also wouldn’t have fit the bill. But they come a lot closer to looking like wolves.
    Sidenote: Perhaps you already know this but it is a recent bit of knowledge for me. Dog breed are not capitalized unless they have a proper name–like a nationality–in their breed name. Thus we have poodles and Chihuahuas, bulldogs and Newfoundlands, golden retrievers and Labrador Retrievers. I am not certain whether anybody follows that or not. The unknowing might think the author was sloppy if they sometimes capped dog breeds and others didn’t, but now that I know I have a feeling I will be a pedant about it.

    Reply
  141. I’m more apt to cap things than the Chicago Manual of Style likes, I’m afraid. I disagree with CMOS and feel their aggressive lack of caps makes for reader confusion.
    I’m waiting for the rest of the world to catch up with me. *g*
    ***
    The thing about a dog looking like a wolf “because” the dog is very, very big,
    is that wolves are not very very big.
    Wolves are standard sedans of the canine world rather than the Chevy Suburbans.
    If you were looking at a dog that struck you as oh-my-god-that-is-huge, it might be:
    Irish Wolf Hound male 130 pounds. Female 105 pounds.
    Newfoundland male 140. Female, 100.
    Mastiff male 200. Female 160.
    Yer North American male gray wolf averages 36 kg (79 lb). Females 33 kg (70 pounds)
    European wolves are maybe 85 pound males, 75 females.
    Dog/wolf lookalikes would be
    German Shepherd male 78 lbs. Female 60.
    Alaskan Malamute male, 85. Female 78.
    If you think about the Shepherds and Malamutes you have known … you probably consider them more upper mid-range dogs than huge monsters, basically.
    So if you want to make your story dog a huge monster dog (he’s maybe and Irish Wolf Hound) you don’t make him more like a wolf
    because you’d have to shrink him a good bit.

    Reply
  142. I’m more apt to cap things than the Chicago Manual of Style likes, I’m afraid. I disagree with CMOS and feel their aggressive lack of caps makes for reader confusion.
    I’m waiting for the rest of the world to catch up with me. *g*
    ***
    The thing about a dog looking like a wolf “because” the dog is very, very big,
    is that wolves are not very very big.
    Wolves are standard sedans of the canine world rather than the Chevy Suburbans.
    If you were looking at a dog that struck you as oh-my-god-that-is-huge, it might be:
    Irish Wolf Hound male 130 pounds. Female 105 pounds.
    Newfoundland male 140. Female, 100.
    Mastiff male 200. Female 160.
    Yer North American male gray wolf averages 36 kg (79 lb). Females 33 kg (70 pounds)
    European wolves are maybe 85 pound males, 75 females.
    Dog/wolf lookalikes would be
    German Shepherd male 78 lbs. Female 60.
    Alaskan Malamute male, 85. Female 78.
    If you think about the Shepherds and Malamutes you have known … you probably consider them more upper mid-range dogs than huge monsters, basically.
    So if you want to make your story dog a huge monster dog (he’s maybe and Irish Wolf Hound) you don’t make him more like a wolf
    because you’d have to shrink him a good bit.

    Reply
  143. I’m more apt to cap things than the Chicago Manual of Style likes, I’m afraid. I disagree with CMOS and feel their aggressive lack of caps makes for reader confusion.
    I’m waiting for the rest of the world to catch up with me. *g*
    ***
    The thing about a dog looking like a wolf “because” the dog is very, very big,
    is that wolves are not very very big.
    Wolves are standard sedans of the canine world rather than the Chevy Suburbans.
    If you were looking at a dog that struck you as oh-my-god-that-is-huge, it might be:
    Irish Wolf Hound male 130 pounds. Female 105 pounds.
    Newfoundland male 140. Female, 100.
    Mastiff male 200. Female 160.
    Yer North American male gray wolf averages 36 kg (79 lb). Females 33 kg (70 pounds)
    European wolves are maybe 85 pound males, 75 females.
    Dog/wolf lookalikes would be
    German Shepherd male 78 lbs. Female 60.
    Alaskan Malamute male, 85. Female 78.
    If you think about the Shepherds and Malamutes you have known … you probably consider them more upper mid-range dogs than huge monsters, basically.
    So if you want to make your story dog a huge monster dog (he’s maybe and Irish Wolf Hound) you don’t make him more like a wolf
    because you’d have to shrink him a good bit.

    Reply
  144. I’m more apt to cap things than the Chicago Manual of Style likes, I’m afraid. I disagree with CMOS and feel their aggressive lack of caps makes for reader confusion.
    I’m waiting for the rest of the world to catch up with me. *g*
    ***
    The thing about a dog looking like a wolf “because” the dog is very, very big,
    is that wolves are not very very big.
    Wolves are standard sedans of the canine world rather than the Chevy Suburbans.
    If you were looking at a dog that struck you as oh-my-god-that-is-huge, it might be:
    Irish Wolf Hound male 130 pounds. Female 105 pounds.
    Newfoundland male 140. Female, 100.
    Mastiff male 200. Female 160.
    Yer North American male gray wolf averages 36 kg (79 lb). Females 33 kg (70 pounds)
    European wolves are maybe 85 pound males, 75 females.
    Dog/wolf lookalikes would be
    German Shepherd male 78 lbs. Female 60.
    Alaskan Malamute male, 85. Female 78.
    If you think about the Shepherds and Malamutes you have known … you probably consider them more upper mid-range dogs than huge monsters, basically.
    So if you want to make your story dog a huge monster dog (he’s maybe and Irish Wolf Hound) you don’t make him more like a wolf
    because you’d have to shrink him a good bit.

    Reply
  145. I’m more apt to cap things than the Chicago Manual of Style likes, I’m afraid. I disagree with CMOS and feel their aggressive lack of caps makes for reader confusion.
    I’m waiting for the rest of the world to catch up with me. *g*
    ***
    The thing about a dog looking like a wolf “because” the dog is very, very big,
    is that wolves are not very very big.
    Wolves are standard sedans of the canine world rather than the Chevy Suburbans.
    If you were looking at a dog that struck you as oh-my-god-that-is-huge, it might be:
    Irish Wolf Hound male 130 pounds. Female 105 pounds.
    Newfoundland male 140. Female, 100.
    Mastiff male 200. Female 160.
    Yer North American male gray wolf averages 36 kg (79 lb). Females 33 kg (70 pounds)
    European wolves are maybe 85 pound males, 75 females.
    Dog/wolf lookalikes would be
    German Shepherd male 78 lbs. Female 60.
    Alaskan Malamute male, 85. Female 78.
    If you think about the Shepherds and Malamutes you have known … you probably consider them more upper mid-range dogs than huge monsters, basically.
    So if you want to make your story dog a huge monster dog (he’s maybe and Irish Wolf Hound) you don’t make him more like a wolf
    because you’d have to shrink him a good bit.

    Reply

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