Creative Process Redux

Young_woman_writing2
Pat here:

As I mentioned last time, I have been madly spilling pages from my pen these last few months, totally enjoying my mismatched Regency couple. When I first draft a story, it comes straight from the right side of my brain, my subconscious, or some creative vortex that spills directly into my fingers, bypassing my conscious mind.  This is where the metaphors and similes—and a lot of nonsense—emerge, not from any careful plotting or planning.  I see the scene in my head, feel the emotions, and I use whatever words that spill out to capture those scenes on paper.  Later, when I re-read, those words connect me directly to the vision and emotions I’d earlier experienced, even though I shudder in horror at how they’re phrased. At that point, the editor in my head steps in, and writing shifts to the ugly, dreary left side of my brain that fusses over commas and dangling modifiers and excess verbiage. (I love this blog that calls the final stage of the creative process Obsession (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kimberly-brooks/the-creative-process-in-e_b_71909.html). Unfortunately, I don’t have the patience to carry my editing obsession to the extreme of rewriting the same book forever!

Right now, I’m fifty pages from THE END, and I’ve run smack dab into the wall of word count. Word_count
I’ve read lots of reviews where the critic claims the ending of a book “feels rushed.”  Well, yeah, and I can tell you why.  It’s because it’s utterly impossible to be creative, to let your characters grow and become strong, and rein them in with word counts! I feel sorry for the authors who run into deadline frenzy at the same time.  I plan ahead enough to know all my plot points and conflicts and ending, and I try to work far in advance of of my deadline, but it’s still impossible to always make everything come together right.

In the case of this book, I know exactly where I want my characters to go and how to get there.  I have the perfect ending in mind. But it will take 5000 more words than I’m allowed to write it to my satisfaction, which rather Couple
puts a damper on my creative process.

So now I have the choice of “rushing” my planned ending, or going back and whacking out a heap of verbiage elsewhere, or jettisoning my creative process and moving into editor mode to figure out how I can pull together the conflicts, explode them on the page, and satisfy the reader while preventing my publisher from having hysterics over the size of the manuscript. The next time you hear anyone say that writing a book is easy, shoot them for me, please.  Or better yet, hand them a pen and tell them to try it.

For those among you who are more interested in practical process than creative, because I know you’re out there, I try to keep my boisterous creativity within word count by tricking my subconscious into thinking it’s written more than it has.  Obviously, that’s not working so well any more, but when my word counts were 100,000, I learned to set my draft margins at 1.2” instead of 1”, and I use Bookman Old Style font for my draft because it’s proportionally larger than the Times Roman that my publisher prefers in the finished product.  That way, I can time my pacing by planning an emotional turning point around page 100, 200, and 300. Theoretically.  And I know I need to wrap the book up by page 400.  Proposal
Which, as I’ve just said, isn’t working so hot, because that technique pulls me in at 90,000 words, and that’s the new standard in mass market.  I need to develop a new trick because my editing will add to those 90k words, not subtract. Arggghhhh!

Kids
If I can’t come up with a 50 page ending, I’ll need to cut out the sex. Or maybe the cute kid scenes. Or the secondary characters. At this rate, I’ll have lots of snippets to post on my website!  And a book full of holes.

Y’know, there’s something to be said about e-books—I bet they don’t have tight word counts! But that leads us to the question—do readers really want a book that goes on forever?  I know we used to buy the biggest book we could find for our dime, but these days, there are so many other things to occupy us, does anyone really want to read a book the size of WAR AND PEACE anymore?  Tolstoy

Which also leads to the question—in these dangerous economic times—are books good value for their cost? 

70 thoughts on “Creative Process Redux”

  1. **begin snip **
    The next time you hear anyone say that writing a book is easy, shoot them for me, please. Or better yet, hand them a pen and tell them to try it.
    **end snip**
    The only people who say “Writing is easy” are the same ones who say “xxx is easy”. They are also the same people who never try anything. Most worthwhile things take a LOT of effort. The effort doesn’t show because of the skill and dedication of the people who do it. How many people start NaNoWriMo and don’t finish?
    *snip*
    something to be said about e-books—I bet they don’t have tight word counts!
    *end snip*
    It depends on the e-publisher, but in most cases, they don’t. You’ll generally get a range of word counts. You’ll find a lot of short stories and novellas (less than 40,000 words, computer-count) in e-books.
    But some e-pubs want only novels-40,000 to 200,000 computer word count, which, you know, is longer than paper word count.
    **begin snip **
    do readers really want a book that goes on forever?
    **end snip**
    I like a long book. I want the characters’ feelings, descriptions, and multiple POV. I want the feel of the time and place, and not just pages and pages of dialog. Since most single titles are about the same physical size, the longer books have smaller type. I’m disappointed with type so large you can read it from across the room. That kind of book is too short for my money, because they tend to be costume dramas–short on detail and conversation and long on sex.
    One thing I do NOT want more of are sex scenes starring the villain.
    And yes, please post the snips you had to cut from your novel. I’d love to read them.

    Reply
  2. **begin snip **
    The next time you hear anyone say that writing a book is easy, shoot them for me, please. Or better yet, hand them a pen and tell them to try it.
    **end snip**
    The only people who say “Writing is easy” are the same ones who say “xxx is easy”. They are also the same people who never try anything. Most worthwhile things take a LOT of effort. The effort doesn’t show because of the skill and dedication of the people who do it. How many people start NaNoWriMo and don’t finish?
    *snip*
    something to be said about e-books—I bet they don’t have tight word counts!
    *end snip*
    It depends on the e-publisher, but in most cases, they don’t. You’ll generally get a range of word counts. You’ll find a lot of short stories and novellas (less than 40,000 words, computer-count) in e-books.
    But some e-pubs want only novels-40,000 to 200,000 computer word count, which, you know, is longer than paper word count.
    **begin snip **
    do readers really want a book that goes on forever?
    **end snip**
    I like a long book. I want the characters’ feelings, descriptions, and multiple POV. I want the feel of the time and place, and not just pages and pages of dialog. Since most single titles are about the same physical size, the longer books have smaller type. I’m disappointed with type so large you can read it from across the room. That kind of book is too short for my money, because they tend to be costume dramas–short on detail and conversation and long on sex.
    One thing I do NOT want more of are sex scenes starring the villain.
    And yes, please post the snips you had to cut from your novel. I’d love to read them.

    Reply
  3. **begin snip **
    The next time you hear anyone say that writing a book is easy, shoot them for me, please. Or better yet, hand them a pen and tell them to try it.
    **end snip**
    The only people who say “Writing is easy” are the same ones who say “xxx is easy”. They are also the same people who never try anything. Most worthwhile things take a LOT of effort. The effort doesn’t show because of the skill and dedication of the people who do it. How many people start NaNoWriMo and don’t finish?
    *snip*
    something to be said about e-books—I bet they don’t have tight word counts!
    *end snip*
    It depends on the e-publisher, but in most cases, they don’t. You’ll generally get a range of word counts. You’ll find a lot of short stories and novellas (less than 40,000 words, computer-count) in e-books.
    But some e-pubs want only novels-40,000 to 200,000 computer word count, which, you know, is longer than paper word count.
    **begin snip **
    do readers really want a book that goes on forever?
    **end snip**
    I like a long book. I want the characters’ feelings, descriptions, and multiple POV. I want the feel of the time and place, and not just pages and pages of dialog. Since most single titles are about the same physical size, the longer books have smaller type. I’m disappointed with type so large you can read it from across the room. That kind of book is too short for my money, because they tend to be costume dramas–short on detail and conversation and long on sex.
    One thing I do NOT want more of are sex scenes starring the villain.
    And yes, please post the snips you had to cut from your novel. I’d love to read them.

    Reply
  4. **begin snip **
    The next time you hear anyone say that writing a book is easy, shoot them for me, please. Or better yet, hand them a pen and tell them to try it.
    **end snip**
    The only people who say “Writing is easy” are the same ones who say “xxx is easy”. They are also the same people who never try anything. Most worthwhile things take a LOT of effort. The effort doesn’t show because of the skill and dedication of the people who do it. How many people start NaNoWriMo and don’t finish?
    *snip*
    something to be said about e-books—I bet they don’t have tight word counts!
    *end snip*
    It depends on the e-publisher, but in most cases, they don’t. You’ll generally get a range of word counts. You’ll find a lot of short stories and novellas (less than 40,000 words, computer-count) in e-books.
    But some e-pubs want only novels-40,000 to 200,000 computer word count, which, you know, is longer than paper word count.
    **begin snip **
    do readers really want a book that goes on forever?
    **end snip**
    I like a long book. I want the characters’ feelings, descriptions, and multiple POV. I want the feel of the time and place, and not just pages and pages of dialog. Since most single titles are about the same physical size, the longer books have smaller type. I’m disappointed with type so large you can read it from across the room. That kind of book is too short for my money, because they tend to be costume dramas–short on detail and conversation and long on sex.
    One thing I do NOT want more of are sex scenes starring the villain.
    And yes, please post the snips you had to cut from your novel. I’d love to read them.

    Reply
  5. **begin snip **
    The next time you hear anyone say that writing a book is easy, shoot them for me, please. Or better yet, hand them a pen and tell them to try it.
    **end snip**
    The only people who say “Writing is easy” are the same ones who say “xxx is easy”. They are also the same people who never try anything. Most worthwhile things take a LOT of effort. The effort doesn’t show because of the skill and dedication of the people who do it. How many people start NaNoWriMo and don’t finish?
    *snip*
    something to be said about e-books—I bet they don’t have tight word counts!
    *end snip*
    It depends on the e-publisher, but in most cases, they don’t. You’ll generally get a range of word counts. You’ll find a lot of short stories and novellas (less than 40,000 words, computer-count) in e-books.
    But some e-pubs want only novels-40,000 to 200,000 computer word count, which, you know, is longer than paper word count.
    **begin snip **
    do readers really want a book that goes on forever?
    **end snip**
    I like a long book. I want the characters’ feelings, descriptions, and multiple POV. I want the feel of the time and place, and not just pages and pages of dialog. Since most single titles are about the same physical size, the longer books have smaller type. I’m disappointed with type so large you can read it from across the room. That kind of book is too short for my money, because they tend to be costume dramas–short on detail and conversation and long on sex.
    One thing I do NOT want more of are sex scenes starring the villain.
    And yes, please post the snips you had to cut from your novel. I’d love to read them.

    Reply
  6. It may depend on the genre. All I can really contribute is that sf/fantasy/alternate history readers certainly do want to read great bit thick books that go on and on and on.
    Occasionally they’ll get a bit impatient if a multi-volume epic like Robert Jordan’s starts to drag, but most of them want over 500 pages per volume, feel cheated if they getless, and aren’t unhappy with 650-700 pages.
    Mysteries, though, are generally even shorter than romances.

    Reply
  7. It may depend on the genre. All I can really contribute is that sf/fantasy/alternate history readers certainly do want to read great bit thick books that go on and on and on.
    Occasionally they’ll get a bit impatient if a multi-volume epic like Robert Jordan’s starts to drag, but most of them want over 500 pages per volume, feel cheated if they getless, and aren’t unhappy with 650-700 pages.
    Mysteries, though, are generally even shorter than romances.

    Reply
  8. It may depend on the genre. All I can really contribute is that sf/fantasy/alternate history readers certainly do want to read great bit thick books that go on and on and on.
    Occasionally they’ll get a bit impatient if a multi-volume epic like Robert Jordan’s starts to drag, but most of them want over 500 pages per volume, feel cheated if they getless, and aren’t unhappy with 650-700 pages.
    Mysteries, though, are generally even shorter than romances.

    Reply
  9. It may depend on the genre. All I can really contribute is that sf/fantasy/alternate history readers certainly do want to read great bit thick books that go on and on and on.
    Occasionally they’ll get a bit impatient if a multi-volume epic like Robert Jordan’s starts to drag, but most of them want over 500 pages per volume, feel cheated if they getless, and aren’t unhappy with 650-700 pages.
    Mysteries, though, are generally even shorter than romances.

    Reply
  10. It may depend on the genre. All I can really contribute is that sf/fantasy/alternate history readers certainly do want to read great bit thick books that go on and on and on.
    Occasionally they’ll get a bit impatient if a multi-volume epic like Robert Jordan’s starts to drag, but most of them want over 500 pages per volume, feel cheated if they getless, and aren’t unhappy with 650-700 pages.
    Mysteries, though, are generally even shorter than romances.

    Reply
  11. I have a little more than 20,000 words to go on my current WIP. The last time I thought that, I wound up with another 10,000 on top of it, LOL.
    I have definitely noticed books are shorter and print is larger. Sometimes I feel like I’m back in elementary school.

    Reply
  12. I have a little more than 20,000 words to go on my current WIP. The last time I thought that, I wound up with another 10,000 on top of it, LOL.
    I have definitely noticed books are shorter and print is larger. Sometimes I feel like I’m back in elementary school.

    Reply
  13. I have a little more than 20,000 words to go on my current WIP. The last time I thought that, I wound up with another 10,000 on top of it, LOL.
    I have definitely noticed books are shorter and print is larger. Sometimes I feel like I’m back in elementary school.

    Reply
  14. I have a little more than 20,000 words to go on my current WIP. The last time I thought that, I wound up with another 10,000 on top of it, LOL.
    I have definitely noticed books are shorter and print is larger. Sometimes I feel like I’m back in elementary school.

    Reply
  15. I have a little more than 20,000 words to go on my current WIP. The last time I thought that, I wound up with another 10,000 on top of it, LOL.
    I have definitely noticed books are shorter and print is larger. Sometimes I feel like I’m back in elementary school.

    Reply
  16. I don’t mind shorter novels, but it only works…if it works. *grin* If the conflict is minor, or if it’s a comedy of manners (many older Regencies that I love are of this type), fewer words are needed because you don’t need to get into everyone’s heads or show everything.
    I might be in the minority because a long novel can make me delay reading it. It doesn’t bother me once I start, but it will take longer for me to start because I feel I need a big chunk of time for it.
    Really though, if it takes that long to satisfyingly describe the action and characters, I’d rather a novel be longer. I’d much rather read an extra 50-100 pages than a rushed ending.

    Reply
  17. I don’t mind shorter novels, but it only works…if it works. *grin* If the conflict is minor, or if it’s a comedy of manners (many older Regencies that I love are of this type), fewer words are needed because you don’t need to get into everyone’s heads or show everything.
    I might be in the minority because a long novel can make me delay reading it. It doesn’t bother me once I start, but it will take longer for me to start because I feel I need a big chunk of time for it.
    Really though, if it takes that long to satisfyingly describe the action and characters, I’d rather a novel be longer. I’d much rather read an extra 50-100 pages than a rushed ending.

    Reply
  18. I don’t mind shorter novels, but it only works…if it works. *grin* If the conflict is minor, or if it’s a comedy of manners (many older Regencies that I love are of this type), fewer words are needed because you don’t need to get into everyone’s heads or show everything.
    I might be in the minority because a long novel can make me delay reading it. It doesn’t bother me once I start, but it will take longer for me to start because I feel I need a big chunk of time for it.
    Really though, if it takes that long to satisfyingly describe the action and characters, I’d rather a novel be longer. I’d much rather read an extra 50-100 pages than a rushed ending.

    Reply
  19. I don’t mind shorter novels, but it only works…if it works. *grin* If the conflict is minor, or if it’s a comedy of manners (many older Regencies that I love are of this type), fewer words are needed because you don’t need to get into everyone’s heads or show everything.
    I might be in the minority because a long novel can make me delay reading it. It doesn’t bother me once I start, but it will take longer for me to start because I feel I need a big chunk of time for it.
    Really though, if it takes that long to satisfyingly describe the action and characters, I’d rather a novel be longer. I’d much rather read an extra 50-100 pages than a rushed ending.

    Reply
  20. I don’t mind shorter novels, but it only works…if it works. *grin* If the conflict is minor, or if it’s a comedy of manners (many older Regencies that I love are of this type), fewer words are needed because you don’t need to get into everyone’s heads or show everything.
    I might be in the minority because a long novel can make me delay reading it. It doesn’t bother me once I start, but it will take longer for me to start because I feel I need a big chunk of time for it.
    Really though, if it takes that long to satisfyingly describe the action and characters, I’d rather a novel be longer. I’d much rather read an extra 50-100 pages than a rushed ending.

    Reply
  21. Prof Pat said…”The next time you hear anyone say that writing a book is easy, shoot them for me, please.”
    OMW, Prof Pat, if I only could. Last week, I was curled up in my comfy chair at Starbucks, fingers burning up the keyboard. Caught between word count, market trend and trying to make my plot points turn, I didn’t notice a middle aged “Suit” had folded into the matching chair across from me until I heard a newspaper a snap. “What are you doing?” he asked, puzzling at me over the top of his Wall Street Journal. Trying to write a book, I told him, having learned long ago never to say what kind of book. He shook his head. “You’ve got an easy life kid.” I could have hit him, but I had too much work to do.

    Reply
  22. Prof Pat said…”The next time you hear anyone say that writing a book is easy, shoot them for me, please.”
    OMW, Prof Pat, if I only could. Last week, I was curled up in my comfy chair at Starbucks, fingers burning up the keyboard. Caught between word count, market trend and trying to make my plot points turn, I didn’t notice a middle aged “Suit” had folded into the matching chair across from me until I heard a newspaper a snap. “What are you doing?” he asked, puzzling at me over the top of his Wall Street Journal. Trying to write a book, I told him, having learned long ago never to say what kind of book. He shook his head. “You’ve got an easy life kid.” I could have hit him, but I had too much work to do.

    Reply
  23. Prof Pat said…”The next time you hear anyone say that writing a book is easy, shoot them for me, please.”
    OMW, Prof Pat, if I only could. Last week, I was curled up in my comfy chair at Starbucks, fingers burning up the keyboard. Caught between word count, market trend and trying to make my plot points turn, I didn’t notice a middle aged “Suit” had folded into the matching chair across from me until I heard a newspaper a snap. “What are you doing?” he asked, puzzling at me over the top of his Wall Street Journal. Trying to write a book, I told him, having learned long ago never to say what kind of book. He shook his head. “You’ve got an easy life kid.” I could have hit him, but I had too much work to do.

    Reply
  24. Prof Pat said…”The next time you hear anyone say that writing a book is easy, shoot them for me, please.”
    OMW, Prof Pat, if I only could. Last week, I was curled up in my comfy chair at Starbucks, fingers burning up the keyboard. Caught between word count, market trend and trying to make my plot points turn, I didn’t notice a middle aged “Suit” had folded into the matching chair across from me until I heard a newspaper a snap. “What are you doing?” he asked, puzzling at me over the top of his Wall Street Journal. Trying to write a book, I told him, having learned long ago never to say what kind of book. He shook his head. “You’ve got an easy life kid.” I could have hit him, but I had too much work to do.

    Reply
  25. Prof Pat said…”The next time you hear anyone say that writing a book is easy, shoot them for me, please.”
    OMW, Prof Pat, if I only could. Last week, I was curled up in my comfy chair at Starbucks, fingers burning up the keyboard. Caught between word count, market trend and trying to make my plot points turn, I didn’t notice a middle aged “Suit” had folded into the matching chair across from me until I heard a newspaper a snap. “What are you doing?” he asked, puzzling at me over the top of his Wall Street Journal. Trying to write a book, I told him, having learned long ago never to say what kind of book. He shook his head. “You’ve got an easy life kid.” I could have hit him, but I had too much work to do.

    Reply
  26. Linda, you may be right about the idiots who are all talk and no action, but I’ve met the kind Nina mentions, too, especially if I say I write “romance.” They’re often successful lawyers, and I understand that they are good with words and are forced to stick to researched dry facts, so what we do may sound easy to them. Maybe we should amend the phrase to say “making a living at writing isn’t easy.”
    And it is interesting that sf/f loves the longer books but mysteries are often tight and short. I often want the mysteries to be longer, but I suppose coming up with clues and conflicts for a lot of pages would be exhausting.
    And yeah, the dreaded Small Font is one of the reasons I try very hard to write tight and keep within word count. What I hate even worse is the type that bleeds into the middle of the book so I have to break the back to read it.
    And I think Jill has the right of it–we ought to have all sizes, according to story and not to what fits best in a paperback rack. Personally, I just want a good, satisfying read, but I do understand the publisher’s difficulty. It’s a puzzle how to balance everyone’s desires!

    Reply
  27. Linda, you may be right about the idiots who are all talk and no action, but I’ve met the kind Nina mentions, too, especially if I say I write “romance.” They’re often successful lawyers, and I understand that they are good with words and are forced to stick to researched dry facts, so what we do may sound easy to them. Maybe we should amend the phrase to say “making a living at writing isn’t easy.”
    And it is interesting that sf/f loves the longer books but mysteries are often tight and short. I often want the mysteries to be longer, but I suppose coming up with clues and conflicts for a lot of pages would be exhausting.
    And yeah, the dreaded Small Font is one of the reasons I try very hard to write tight and keep within word count. What I hate even worse is the type that bleeds into the middle of the book so I have to break the back to read it.
    And I think Jill has the right of it–we ought to have all sizes, according to story and not to what fits best in a paperback rack. Personally, I just want a good, satisfying read, but I do understand the publisher’s difficulty. It’s a puzzle how to balance everyone’s desires!

    Reply
  28. Linda, you may be right about the idiots who are all talk and no action, but I’ve met the kind Nina mentions, too, especially if I say I write “romance.” They’re often successful lawyers, and I understand that they are good with words and are forced to stick to researched dry facts, so what we do may sound easy to them. Maybe we should amend the phrase to say “making a living at writing isn’t easy.”
    And it is interesting that sf/f loves the longer books but mysteries are often tight and short. I often want the mysteries to be longer, but I suppose coming up with clues and conflicts for a lot of pages would be exhausting.
    And yeah, the dreaded Small Font is one of the reasons I try very hard to write tight and keep within word count. What I hate even worse is the type that bleeds into the middle of the book so I have to break the back to read it.
    And I think Jill has the right of it–we ought to have all sizes, according to story and not to what fits best in a paperback rack. Personally, I just want a good, satisfying read, but I do understand the publisher’s difficulty. It’s a puzzle how to balance everyone’s desires!

    Reply
  29. Linda, you may be right about the idiots who are all talk and no action, but I’ve met the kind Nina mentions, too, especially if I say I write “romance.” They’re often successful lawyers, and I understand that they are good with words and are forced to stick to researched dry facts, so what we do may sound easy to them. Maybe we should amend the phrase to say “making a living at writing isn’t easy.”
    And it is interesting that sf/f loves the longer books but mysteries are often tight and short. I often want the mysteries to be longer, but I suppose coming up with clues and conflicts for a lot of pages would be exhausting.
    And yeah, the dreaded Small Font is one of the reasons I try very hard to write tight and keep within word count. What I hate even worse is the type that bleeds into the middle of the book so I have to break the back to read it.
    And I think Jill has the right of it–we ought to have all sizes, according to story and not to what fits best in a paperback rack. Personally, I just want a good, satisfying read, but I do understand the publisher’s difficulty. It’s a puzzle how to balance everyone’s desires!

    Reply
  30. Linda, you may be right about the idiots who are all talk and no action, but I’ve met the kind Nina mentions, too, especially if I say I write “romance.” They’re often successful lawyers, and I understand that they are good with words and are forced to stick to researched dry facts, so what we do may sound easy to them. Maybe we should amend the phrase to say “making a living at writing isn’t easy.”
    And it is interesting that sf/f loves the longer books but mysteries are often tight and short. I often want the mysteries to be longer, but I suppose coming up with clues and conflicts for a lot of pages would be exhausting.
    And yeah, the dreaded Small Font is one of the reasons I try very hard to write tight and keep within word count. What I hate even worse is the type that bleeds into the middle of the book so I have to break the back to read it.
    And I think Jill has the right of it–we ought to have all sizes, according to story and not to what fits best in a paperback rack. Personally, I just want a good, satisfying read, but I do understand the publisher’s difficulty. It’s a puzzle how to balance everyone’s desires!

    Reply
  31. Well, I’m the kind of reader who wants a complete, satisfying story. I don’t care if it’s 50K or 150K as long as I’m happy at the end of the read. It’s too bad though that TPTB don’t always feel that way and constrain an author thereby rushing *some* aspect of the story.
    Absolutely post your snippets!! I want to read them!

    Reply
  32. Well, I’m the kind of reader who wants a complete, satisfying story. I don’t care if it’s 50K or 150K as long as I’m happy at the end of the read. It’s too bad though that TPTB don’t always feel that way and constrain an author thereby rushing *some* aspect of the story.
    Absolutely post your snippets!! I want to read them!

    Reply
  33. Well, I’m the kind of reader who wants a complete, satisfying story. I don’t care if it’s 50K or 150K as long as I’m happy at the end of the read. It’s too bad though that TPTB don’t always feel that way and constrain an author thereby rushing *some* aspect of the story.
    Absolutely post your snippets!! I want to read them!

    Reply
  34. Well, I’m the kind of reader who wants a complete, satisfying story. I don’t care if it’s 50K or 150K as long as I’m happy at the end of the read. It’s too bad though that TPTB don’t always feel that way and constrain an author thereby rushing *some* aspect of the story.
    Absolutely post your snippets!! I want to read them!

    Reply
  35. Well, I’m the kind of reader who wants a complete, satisfying story. I don’t care if it’s 50K or 150K as long as I’m happy at the end of the read. It’s too bad though that TPTB don’t always feel that way and constrain an author thereby rushing *some* aspect of the story.
    Absolutely post your snippets!! I want to read them!

    Reply
  36. How long should a book be? I refer you to Abraham Lincoln. When asked “How long should a man’s legs be?” he replied, of course, “Long enough to reach the ground.” The same, I submit, is (or ought to be) true of books: long enough to tell the story, and neither longer nor shorter.

    Reply
  37. How long should a book be? I refer you to Abraham Lincoln. When asked “How long should a man’s legs be?” he replied, of course, “Long enough to reach the ground.” The same, I submit, is (or ought to be) true of books: long enough to tell the story, and neither longer nor shorter.

    Reply
  38. How long should a book be? I refer you to Abraham Lincoln. When asked “How long should a man’s legs be?” he replied, of course, “Long enough to reach the ground.” The same, I submit, is (or ought to be) true of books: long enough to tell the story, and neither longer nor shorter.

    Reply
  39. How long should a book be? I refer you to Abraham Lincoln. When asked “How long should a man’s legs be?” he replied, of course, “Long enough to reach the ground.” The same, I submit, is (or ought to be) true of books: long enough to tell the story, and neither longer nor shorter.

    Reply
  40. How long should a book be? I refer you to Abraham Lincoln. When asked “How long should a man’s legs be?” he replied, of course, “Long enough to reach the ground.” The same, I submit, is (or ought to be) true of books: long enough to tell the story, and neither longer nor shorter.

    Reply
  41. Ahhh Judi, will you be my publisher? Such a lovely concept! But I fear writers tend to be pigs and the more leeway we’re allowed, the more we’ll take. And pay us by the word, and the story will never end.

    Reply
  42. Ahhh Judi, will you be my publisher? Such a lovely concept! But I fear writers tend to be pigs and the more leeway we’re allowed, the more we’ll take. And pay us by the word, and the story will never end.

    Reply
  43. Ahhh Judi, will you be my publisher? Such a lovely concept! But I fear writers tend to be pigs and the more leeway we’re allowed, the more we’ll take. And pay us by the word, and the story will never end.

    Reply
  44. Ahhh Judi, will you be my publisher? Such a lovely concept! But I fear writers tend to be pigs and the more leeway we’re allowed, the more we’ll take. And pay us by the word, and the story will never end.

    Reply
  45. Ahhh Judi, will you be my publisher? Such a lovely concept! But I fear writers tend to be pigs and the more leeway we’re allowed, the more we’ll take. And pay us by the word, and the story will never end.

    Reply
  46. I plead guilty to complaining about the “rushed endings.” I used to champion categories, but I read few of them these days because so many seem to be story lite.
    I think I have said before that I think one reason for the popularity of series books is that they satisfy some readers’ desire for a longer story. And J. K. Rowling surely showed that even children will read very long books when the story is compelling.

    Reply
  47. I plead guilty to complaining about the “rushed endings.” I used to champion categories, but I read few of them these days because so many seem to be story lite.
    I think I have said before that I think one reason for the popularity of series books is that they satisfy some readers’ desire for a longer story. And J. K. Rowling surely showed that even children will read very long books when the story is compelling.

    Reply
  48. I plead guilty to complaining about the “rushed endings.” I used to champion categories, but I read few of them these days because so many seem to be story lite.
    I think I have said before that I think one reason for the popularity of series books is that they satisfy some readers’ desire for a longer story. And J. K. Rowling surely showed that even children will read very long books when the story is compelling.

    Reply
  49. I plead guilty to complaining about the “rushed endings.” I used to champion categories, but I read few of them these days because so many seem to be story lite.
    I think I have said before that I think one reason for the popularity of series books is that they satisfy some readers’ desire for a longer story. And J. K. Rowling surely showed that even children will read very long books when the story is compelling.

    Reply
  50. I plead guilty to complaining about the “rushed endings.” I used to champion categories, but I read few of them these days because so many seem to be story lite.
    I think I have said before that I think one reason for the popularity of series books is that they satisfy some readers’ desire for a longer story. And J. K. Rowling surely showed that even children will read very long books when the story is compelling.

    Reply
  51. Are you kidding? A good book is the best value for its cost I can imagine. When I divide the cost of a book I love by the number of times I’ve reread it — it’s the cheapest form of entertainment going. A bad book, on the other hand — well, maybe somebody else will think it’s a good book and swap it off my hands. You can’t win if you never bet, can you?
    Now going back to A Critique of Criminal Reason, which is a good book, but not one I will be rereading; on the other hand it was half price and will be traded off for some more old regencies, so it’s already a steal.

    Reply
  52. Are you kidding? A good book is the best value for its cost I can imagine. When I divide the cost of a book I love by the number of times I’ve reread it — it’s the cheapest form of entertainment going. A bad book, on the other hand — well, maybe somebody else will think it’s a good book and swap it off my hands. You can’t win if you never bet, can you?
    Now going back to A Critique of Criminal Reason, which is a good book, but not one I will be rereading; on the other hand it was half price and will be traded off for some more old regencies, so it’s already a steal.

    Reply
  53. Are you kidding? A good book is the best value for its cost I can imagine. When I divide the cost of a book I love by the number of times I’ve reread it — it’s the cheapest form of entertainment going. A bad book, on the other hand — well, maybe somebody else will think it’s a good book and swap it off my hands. You can’t win if you never bet, can you?
    Now going back to A Critique of Criminal Reason, which is a good book, but not one I will be rereading; on the other hand it was half price and will be traded off for some more old regencies, so it’s already a steal.

    Reply
  54. Are you kidding? A good book is the best value for its cost I can imagine. When I divide the cost of a book I love by the number of times I’ve reread it — it’s the cheapest form of entertainment going. A bad book, on the other hand — well, maybe somebody else will think it’s a good book and swap it off my hands. You can’t win if you never bet, can you?
    Now going back to A Critique of Criminal Reason, which is a good book, but not one I will be rereading; on the other hand it was half price and will be traded off for some more old regencies, so it’s already a steal.

    Reply
  55. Are you kidding? A good book is the best value for its cost I can imagine. When I divide the cost of a book I love by the number of times I’ve reread it — it’s the cheapest form of entertainment going. A bad book, on the other hand — well, maybe somebody else will think it’s a good book and swap it off my hands. You can’t win if you never bet, can you?
    Now going back to A Critique of Criminal Reason, which is a good book, but not one I will be rereading; on the other hand it was half price and will be traded off for some more old regencies, so it’s already a steal.

    Reply
  56. Good point, Janga, although what a connected series does is force the consumer to pay more to get the whole story. As an author, I’m fine with that. “G” As a reader… It’s a touch irritating, especially on the romance “lite” side.
    And thank you, Janice, for leaving us with that bit of inspiration. You are definitely, totally right! When I can find good books, that is. My reading tastes have become very jaded of late. But I can always go back to my lovely collection of Regency Keepers.

    Reply
  57. Good point, Janga, although what a connected series does is force the consumer to pay more to get the whole story. As an author, I’m fine with that. “G” As a reader… It’s a touch irritating, especially on the romance “lite” side.
    And thank you, Janice, for leaving us with that bit of inspiration. You are definitely, totally right! When I can find good books, that is. My reading tastes have become very jaded of late. But I can always go back to my lovely collection of Regency Keepers.

    Reply
  58. Good point, Janga, although what a connected series does is force the consumer to pay more to get the whole story. As an author, I’m fine with that. “G” As a reader… It’s a touch irritating, especially on the romance “lite” side.
    And thank you, Janice, for leaving us with that bit of inspiration. You are definitely, totally right! When I can find good books, that is. My reading tastes have become very jaded of late. But I can always go back to my lovely collection of Regency Keepers.

    Reply
  59. Good point, Janga, although what a connected series does is force the consumer to pay more to get the whole story. As an author, I’m fine with that. “G” As a reader… It’s a touch irritating, especially on the romance “lite” side.
    And thank you, Janice, for leaving us with that bit of inspiration. You are definitely, totally right! When I can find good books, that is. My reading tastes have become very jaded of late. But I can always go back to my lovely collection of Regency Keepers.

    Reply
  60. Good point, Janga, although what a connected series does is force the consumer to pay more to get the whole story. As an author, I’m fine with that. “G” As a reader… It’s a touch irritating, especially on the romance “lite” side.
    And thank you, Janice, for leaving us with that bit of inspiration. You are definitely, totally right! When I can find good books, that is. My reading tastes have become very jaded of late. But I can always go back to my lovely collection of Regency Keepers.

    Reply

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