Craft and Character

Lady's-faceCara/Andrea here, thinking about the craft of writing today . . .

In the normal scheme of publishing, a linked series—such as a trilogy or quartet of books that features a closeknit group of family or friends—usually comes out in a leisurely fashion, with perhaps 9 months or a year between the stories. In some ways that timing allows the secondary characters to take root in the minds of readers and rather organically “grow” into their starring roles.

Heroine 3My publisher decided to turn that trope on its ear and do a consecutive release—three books in three months, starting in January. (So yes, the final story is out this month—Passionately Yours goes live on March 5th! You can read an excerpt here.) In many ways, it’s very exciting. Readers don’t have to wait very long to find out the answers to such questions as, “Ooooh, what’s going to happen between Anna and the Devil Davenport!” or “Please tell me that McClellan is going to be Caro’s hero?” But it can also present intriguing challenges for a writer. At least, it did for me.  

The stories are the heart of the series, but the craft of creating the character arcs is elemental to having the books work together. Sometimes, that’s not so hard—in the past, I’ve often written about three friends, who have well-formed characters from the start. It’s simply a matter of how to slowly reveal their essence as they move from the perimeter of the ballroom out to the center of the polished parquet when its their turn to shine in the light of the glittering chandeliers.

Heroine 4But in my latest trilogy, I wrote about a trio of sisters, so it was a different sort of process. And with the books coming out so close together, I found myself far more aware of the nuances in character of Caro, the youngest sister and how to develop her over the first two books into someone with enough emotional depth and complexity to be an interesting heroine.

Heroine 1In the first book, she’s hovering on the cusp of womanhood, not quite out in Society, and longing for entree into the real world. She’s a budding poet, with an active imagination untempered by experience, so she tends to be dramatic, which amuses her older sisters.  They see her as the baby of the family, and thus so do readers. Which is all very well for her secondary role in Scandalously Yours, but she has to change in order to come into her own and be an appealing heroine.

Perhaps I’m wrong about this, but it seems to me that having, say, a 9 month interlude before the next book helps make readers feel that a character is “growing up.” It’s a subtle message to be sure, but time softens perception. Change seems more natural—after all, we all change over time! But with the second book coming out in the following month, it sharpened my sense that I had to be very attuned to how I moved her along in her growth arc.

Regency sisters 1It helped that in Sinfully Yours, Olivia, the oldest sister and heroine of Scandalously Yours, was away on her marriage trip, so the dynamics of the relationship between Anna and Caro were already cast in a different light. As Anna struggles with inner conflicts, she cautiously begins to confide in her “baby” sister—and in turn Caro is eager to prove she can be a thoughtful listener and offer some words of wisdom rather than merely react with schoolgirl theatrics. And the truth is, she has changed—having played a part, albeit a small one, in Olivia’s adventure, she’s seen that deadly serious consequences can result from impulsive decisions. It’s matured her, and given her some of the life experiences she had been yearning for.

Heroine 2Over the course of the story, I try to show her biting back her first impulsive reactions and taking a moment to ponder a problem.  That’s not to say I take the spark out of her. Caro remains Caro—the most romantic, emotional of the sisters, She‘ll always be fighting the battle between reacting with her head and with her heart. But that, I hope, is at the essence of her charm.

And now, in a few days, it’s her turn to step to the center of the stage and play the leading role her own story, Passionately Yours. Is she ready for the chandelier’s diamond-bright lights? After all, bright lights tend to magnify and accentuate every flaw. Well, she still has much to lea
rn about herself . . . and about men. (Though we all know THAT subject takes two lifetimes to figure out!) However, I think she’s ready for the challenge . . .

Regency sisters 2aSo I’m curious—how do you feel about the quick release of a series? Do you like having all the stories come out over a short period of time? Or do you prefer the traditional release pattern of having 9 months or a year between books? And while I’m asking publishing questions, how do you feel about the e-book first release? How do you prefer to read your romance novels? One lucky winner will be selected at random from among those who leave comments here between now and Tuesday evening to win a digital copy of Passionately Yours.

135 thoughts on “Craft and Character”

  1. I’m a huge fun of the new quick release of series, the stories feel connected. I spend less time re-reading. In romance, the traditional release pattern is fairly predictable, but in sci-fi/fantasy, there are famous author who don’t release a book for a two-three years after the previous installment. I’m loving the idea I’ll see Passionately Yours right away.
    I used to hate e-book release. I didn’t have a Kindle or e-reader, and I felt very left out. I now own a Kindle and do 90% of my reading on it. My attitude is that there’s a risk of alienating print only people, but as a e-reader, I’m pretty clueless if it is only a e-release. I’ve got the book!
    The only draw back of e-readers is that one cannot loan books without really violating the copyright, so I have to tell friends to look at the library or buy their own copy.

    Reply
  2. I’m a huge fun of the new quick release of series, the stories feel connected. I spend less time re-reading. In romance, the traditional release pattern is fairly predictable, but in sci-fi/fantasy, there are famous author who don’t release a book for a two-three years after the previous installment. I’m loving the idea I’ll see Passionately Yours right away.
    I used to hate e-book release. I didn’t have a Kindle or e-reader, and I felt very left out. I now own a Kindle and do 90% of my reading on it. My attitude is that there’s a risk of alienating print only people, but as a e-reader, I’m pretty clueless if it is only a e-release. I’ve got the book!
    The only draw back of e-readers is that one cannot loan books without really violating the copyright, so I have to tell friends to look at the library or buy their own copy.

    Reply
  3. I’m a huge fun of the new quick release of series, the stories feel connected. I spend less time re-reading. In romance, the traditional release pattern is fairly predictable, but in sci-fi/fantasy, there are famous author who don’t release a book for a two-three years after the previous installment. I’m loving the idea I’ll see Passionately Yours right away.
    I used to hate e-book release. I didn’t have a Kindle or e-reader, and I felt very left out. I now own a Kindle and do 90% of my reading on it. My attitude is that there’s a risk of alienating print only people, but as a e-reader, I’m pretty clueless if it is only a e-release. I’ve got the book!
    The only draw back of e-readers is that one cannot loan books without really violating the copyright, so I have to tell friends to look at the library or buy their own copy.

    Reply
  4. I’m a huge fun of the new quick release of series, the stories feel connected. I spend less time re-reading. In romance, the traditional release pattern is fairly predictable, but in sci-fi/fantasy, there are famous author who don’t release a book for a two-three years after the previous installment. I’m loving the idea I’ll see Passionately Yours right away.
    I used to hate e-book release. I didn’t have a Kindle or e-reader, and I felt very left out. I now own a Kindle and do 90% of my reading on it. My attitude is that there’s a risk of alienating print only people, but as a e-reader, I’m pretty clueless if it is only a e-release. I’ve got the book!
    The only draw back of e-readers is that one cannot loan books without really violating the copyright, so I have to tell friends to look at the library or buy their own copy.

    Reply
  5. I’m a huge fun of the new quick release of series, the stories feel connected. I spend less time re-reading. In romance, the traditional release pattern is fairly predictable, but in sci-fi/fantasy, there are famous author who don’t release a book for a two-three years after the previous installment. I’m loving the idea I’ll see Passionately Yours right away.
    I used to hate e-book release. I didn’t have a Kindle or e-reader, and I felt very left out. I now own a Kindle and do 90% of my reading on it. My attitude is that there’s a risk of alienating print only people, but as a e-reader, I’m pretty clueless if it is only a e-release. I’ve got the book!
    The only draw back of e-readers is that one cannot loan books without really violating the copyright, so I have to tell friends to look at the library or buy their own copy.

    Reply
  6. Shannon, I love being able to read connected stories quickly too. When I discover a new-to-me series and can glom all the books one after another, it’s great fun. (And for some reason I have an awful retention on stories, so yes, when there’s a gap, I often have to re-read the first book to remember what’s what!)
    My publisher’s testing the waters of e-only at first is a little scary, as I worry about alienating people who love print. But I find I’m reading more on my Kindle, even though I adore paper. So I’m hoping most people are beginning to embrace both mediums and it won’t be a problem. (Fingers crossed.)

    Reply
  7. Shannon, I love being able to read connected stories quickly too. When I discover a new-to-me series and can glom all the books one after another, it’s great fun. (And for some reason I have an awful retention on stories, so yes, when there’s a gap, I often have to re-read the first book to remember what’s what!)
    My publisher’s testing the waters of e-only at first is a little scary, as I worry about alienating people who love print. But I find I’m reading more on my Kindle, even though I adore paper. So I’m hoping most people are beginning to embrace both mediums and it won’t be a problem. (Fingers crossed.)

    Reply
  8. Shannon, I love being able to read connected stories quickly too. When I discover a new-to-me series and can glom all the books one after another, it’s great fun. (And for some reason I have an awful retention on stories, so yes, when there’s a gap, I often have to re-read the first book to remember what’s what!)
    My publisher’s testing the waters of e-only at first is a little scary, as I worry about alienating people who love print. But I find I’m reading more on my Kindle, even though I adore paper. So I’m hoping most people are beginning to embrace both mediums and it won’t be a problem. (Fingers crossed.)

    Reply
  9. Shannon, I love being able to read connected stories quickly too. When I discover a new-to-me series and can glom all the books one after another, it’s great fun. (And for some reason I have an awful retention on stories, so yes, when there’s a gap, I often have to re-read the first book to remember what’s what!)
    My publisher’s testing the waters of e-only at first is a little scary, as I worry about alienating people who love print. But I find I’m reading more on my Kindle, even though I adore paper. So I’m hoping most people are beginning to embrace both mediums and it won’t be a problem. (Fingers crossed.)

    Reply
  10. Shannon, I love being able to read connected stories quickly too. When I discover a new-to-me series and can glom all the books one after another, it’s great fun. (And for some reason I have an awful retention on stories, so yes, when there’s a gap, I often have to re-read the first book to remember what’s what!)
    My publisher’s testing the waters of e-only at first is a little scary, as I worry about alienating people who love print. But I find I’m reading more on my Kindle, even though I adore paper. So I’m hoping most people are beginning to embrace both mediums and it won’t be a problem. (Fingers crossed.)

    Reply
  11. I too love the back-to-back releases. I sometimes buy the books as they are released but wait for the final book and read them in one marathon session–the way I read series books as a child when I spent so many hours on Prince Edward Island or Deep Valley, Minnesota, that my own world seemed a blur when I first returned to it.
    I do most of my reading on my ereader now. I love the convenience of having hundreds of books available at a touch, and my aging eyes love adjusting the font. I also love the immediate gratification of ebooks. My preorders are on my Kindle before I awake on release day. So e-first releases are fine with me.
    Not being able to share books is a drawback, but my sister and I overcome that by having a joint Kindle on which we download books we both plan to read, splitting the costs and passing the Kindle back and forth.

    Reply
  12. I too love the back-to-back releases. I sometimes buy the books as they are released but wait for the final book and read them in one marathon session–the way I read series books as a child when I spent so many hours on Prince Edward Island or Deep Valley, Minnesota, that my own world seemed a blur when I first returned to it.
    I do most of my reading on my ereader now. I love the convenience of having hundreds of books available at a touch, and my aging eyes love adjusting the font. I also love the immediate gratification of ebooks. My preorders are on my Kindle before I awake on release day. So e-first releases are fine with me.
    Not being able to share books is a drawback, but my sister and I overcome that by having a joint Kindle on which we download books we both plan to read, splitting the costs and passing the Kindle back and forth.

    Reply
  13. I too love the back-to-back releases. I sometimes buy the books as they are released but wait for the final book and read them in one marathon session–the way I read series books as a child when I spent so many hours on Prince Edward Island or Deep Valley, Minnesota, that my own world seemed a blur when I first returned to it.
    I do most of my reading on my ereader now. I love the convenience of having hundreds of books available at a touch, and my aging eyes love adjusting the font. I also love the immediate gratification of ebooks. My preorders are on my Kindle before I awake on release day. So e-first releases are fine with me.
    Not being able to share books is a drawback, but my sister and I overcome that by having a joint Kindle on which we download books we both plan to read, splitting the costs and passing the Kindle back and forth.

    Reply
  14. I too love the back-to-back releases. I sometimes buy the books as they are released but wait for the final book and read them in one marathon session–the way I read series books as a child when I spent so many hours on Prince Edward Island or Deep Valley, Minnesota, that my own world seemed a blur when I first returned to it.
    I do most of my reading on my ereader now. I love the convenience of having hundreds of books available at a touch, and my aging eyes love adjusting the font. I also love the immediate gratification of ebooks. My preorders are on my Kindle before I awake on release day. So e-first releases are fine with me.
    Not being able to share books is a drawback, but my sister and I overcome that by having a joint Kindle on which we download books we both plan to read, splitting the costs and passing the Kindle back and forth.

    Reply
  15. I too love the back-to-back releases. I sometimes buy the books as they are released but wait for the final book and read them in one marathon session–the way I read series books as a child when I spent so many hours on Prince Edward Island or Deep Valley, Minnesota, that my own world seemed a blur when I first returned to it.
    I do most of my reading on my ereader now. I love the convenience of having hundreds of books available at a touch, and my aging eyes love adjusting the font. I also love the immediate gratification of ebooks. My preorders are on my Kindle before I awake on release day. So e-first releases are fine with me.
    Not being able to share books is a drawback, but my sister and I overcome that by having a joint Kindle on which we download books we both plan to read, splitting the costs and passing the Kindle back and forth.

    Reply
  16. Janga, I’m dighted to hear you love reading series all together AND that you’re happy reading on an e-reader. I’m hoping more and more people are getting comfortable with both paper and digital. I certainly am finding my habits are changing. As you say, having so many titles at you fingertips is wonderful, and for travel it’s a godsend. I moe put it in my purse for any unexpected delays, so I’ll always have something interesting to read when I need it!

    Reply
  17. Janga, I’m dighted to hear you love reading series all together AND that you’re happy reading on an e-reader. I’m hoping more and more people are getting comfortable with both paper and digital. I certainly am finding my habits are changing. As you say, having so many titles at you fingertips is wonderful, and for travel it’s a godsend. I moe put it in my purse for any unexpected delays, so I’ll always have something interesting to read when I need it!

    Reply
  18. Janga, I’m dighted to hear you love reading series all together AND that you’re happy reading on an e-reader. I’m hoping more and more people are getting comfortable with both paper and digital. I certainly am finding my habits are changing. As you say, having so many titles at you fingertips is wonderful, and for travel it’s a godsend. I moe put it in my purse for any unexpected delays, so I’ll always have something interesting to read when I need it!

    Reply
  19. Janga, I’m dighted to hear you love reading series all together AND that you’re happy reading on an e-reader. I’m hoping more and more people are getting comfortable with both paper and digital. I certainly am finding my habits are changing. As you say, having so many titles at you fingertips is wonderful, and for travel it’s a godsend. I moe put it in my purse for any unexpected delays, so I’ll always have something interesting to read when I need it!

    Reply
  20. Janga, I’m dighted to hear you love reading series all together AND that you’re happy reading on an e-reader. I’m hoping more and more people are getting comfortable with both paper and digital. I certainly am finding my habits are changing. As you say, having so many titles at you fingertips is wonderful, and for travel it’s a godsend. I moe put it in my purse for any unexpected delays, so I’ll always have something interesting to read when I need it!

    Reply
  21. I like back-to-back releases.(For instance, I didn’t read the first Lady Arianna mystery until I saw the release date for the second and third.) I like to know I can binge — once I get invested in a world and characters, I like to stay for awhile. Plus, it reassures me that there is a complete series. I hate being left dangling wondering if the series has been dropped by the publisher, if the author been hit by a truck, or if some other life catastrophe has occurred to the poor writer. I like to know there’s a plan. This was one of the reasons I jumped wholeheartedly into EmmaJane Holloway’s Baskerville series (– that and the steampunk and Sherlock Holmes). I could see the release dates for the entire series, which I believe was over a 4 month period. I was more willing to get the first book because I knew the rest were coming — and soon — if I wanted to continue the series.
    I do most of my reading on an e-reader as well. I can get the book more quickly, and I can buy them at any time of the day or night. I can buy them from home, on vacation, etc. (And yes, many of my comments are indicating a decided lack of self-control where books are concerned — can’t wait to buy or read. That’s not a bad thing, right? RIGHT??) I also like the fact that I can adjust font settings and styles. My mother — who adores the feel of books — has moved to an e-reader for precisely that reason. She can read an e-reader longer than she can a print book.

    Reply
  22. I like back-to-back releases.(For instance, I didn’t read the first Lady Arianna mystery until I saw the release date for the second and third.) I like to know I can binge — once I get invested in a world and characters, I like to stay for awhile. Plus, it reassures me that there is a complete series. I hate being left dangling wondering if the series has been dropped by the publisher, if the author been hit by a truck, or if some other life catastrophe has occurred to the poor writer. I like to know there’s a plan. This was one of the reasons I jumped wholeheartedly into EmmaJane Holloway’s Baskerville series (– that and the steampunk and Sherlock Holmes). I could see the release dates for the entire series, which I believe was over a 4 month period. I was more willing to get the first book because I knew the rest were coming — and soon — if I wanted to continue the series.
    I do most of my reading on an e-reader as well. I can get the book more quickly, and I can buy them at any time of the day or night. I can buy them from home, on vacation, etc. (And yes, many of my comments are indicating a decided lack of self-control where books are concerned — can’t wait to buy or read. That’s not a bad thing, right? RIGHT??) I also like the fact that I can adjust font settings and styles. My mother — who adores the feel of books — has moved to an e-reader for precisely that reason. She can read an e-reader longer than she can a print book.

    Reply
  23. I like back-to-back releases.(For instance, I didn’t read the first Lady Arianna mystery until I saw the release date for the second and third.) I like to know I can binge — once I get invested in a world and characters, I like to stay for awhile. Plus, it reassures me that there is a complete series. I hate being left dangling wondering if the series has been dropped by the publisher, if the author been hit by a truck, or if some other life catastrophe has occurred to the poor writer. I like to know there’s a plan. This was one of the reasons I jumped wholeheartedly into EmmaJane Holloway’s Baskerville series (– that and the steampunk and Sherlock Holmes). I could see the release dates for the entire series, which I believe was over a 4 month period. I was more willing to get the first book because I knew the rest were coming — and soon — if I wanted to continue the series.
    I do most of my reading on an e-reader as well. I can get the book more quickly, and I can buy them at any time of the day or night. I can buy them from home, on vacation, etc. (And yes, many of my comments are indicating a decided lack of self-control where books are concerned — can’t wait to buy or read. That’s not a bad thing, right? RIGHT??) I also like the fact that I can adjust font settings and styles. My mother — who adores the feel of books — has moved to an e-reader for precisely that reason. She can read an e-reader longer than she can a print book.

    Reply
  24. I like back-to-back releases.(For instance, I didn’t read the first Lady Arianna mystery until I saw the release date for the second and third.) I like to know I can binge — once I get invested in a world and characters, I like to stay for awhile. Plus, it reassures me that there is a complete series. I hate being left dangling wondering if the series has been dropped by the publisher, if the author been hit by a truck, or if some other life catastrophe has occurred to the poor writer. I like to know there’s a plan. This was one of the reasons I jumped wholeheartedly into EmmaJane Holloway’s Baskerville series (– that and the steampunk and Sherlock Holmes). I could see the release dates for the entire series, which I believe was over a 4 month period. I was more willing to get the first book because I knew the rest were coming — and soon — if I wanted to continue the series.
    I do most of my reading on an e-reader as well. I can get the book more quickly, and I can buy them at any time of the day or night. I can buy them from home, on vacation, etc. (And yes, many of my comments are indicating a decided lack of self-control where books are concerned — can’t wait to buy or read. That’s not a bad thing, right? RIGHT??) I also like the fact that I can adjust font settings and styles. My mother — who adores the feel of books — has moved to an e-reader for precisely that reason. She can read an e-reader longer than she can a print book.

    Reply
  25. I like back-to-back releases.(For instance, I didn’t read the first Lady Arianna mystery until I saw the release date for the second and third.) I like to know I can binge — once I get invested in a world and characters, I like to stay for awhile. Plus, it reassures me that there is a complete series. I hate being left dangling wondering if the series has been dropped by the publisher, if the author been hit by a truck, or if some other life catastrophe has occurred to the poor writer. I like to know there’s a plan. This was one of the reasons I jumped wholeheartedly into EmmaJane Holloway’s Baskerville series (– that and the steampunk and Sherlock Holmes). I could see the release dates for the entire series, which I believe was over a 4 month period. I was more willing to get the first book because I knew the rest were coming — and soon — if I wanted to continue the series.
    I do most of my reading on an e-reader as well. I can get the book more quickly, and I can buy them at any time of the day or night. I can buy them from home, on vacation, etc. (And yes, many of my comments are indicating a decided lack of self-control where books are concerned — can’t wait to buy or read. That’s not a bad thing, right? RIGHT??) I also like the fact that I can adjust font settings and styles. My mother — who adores the feel of books — has moved to an e-reader for precisely that reason. She can read an e-reader longer than she can a print book.

    Reply
  26. I like the idea of a series coming out close together.If there is too big a gap between releases I find I have forgotten parts of the previous stories and then when there are references to past action I am frantically sorting thru the book heap in the hope I still have the previous book to sort out who is who or what is what – if you see what I mean!!
    I still love print but am very tempted to get an e – reader for when I am on holiday – the husband complains long and loud if I have a bag full of books with me – which I invariably do !

    Reply
  27. I like the idea of a series coming out close together.If there is too big a gap between releases I find I have forgotten parts of the previous stories and then when there are references to past action I am frantically sorting thru the book heap in the hope I still have the previous book to sort out who is who or what is what – if you see what I mean!!
    I still love print but am very tempted to get an e – reader for when I am on holiday – the husband complains long and loud if I have a bag full of books with me – which I invariably do !

    Reply
  28. I like the idea of a series coming out close together.If there is too big a gap between releases I find I have forgotten parts of the previous stories and then when there are references to past action I am frantically sorting thru the book heap in the hope I still have the previous book to sort out who is who or what is what – if you see what I mean!!
    I still love print but am very tempted to get an e – reader for when I am on holiday – the husband complains long and loud if I have a bag full of books with me – which I invariably do !

    Reply
  29. I like the idea of a series coming out close together.If there is too big a gap between releases I find I have forgotten parts of the previous stories and then when there are references to past action I am frantically sorting thru the book heap in the hope I still have the previous book to sort out who is who or what is what – if you see what I mean!!
    I still love print but am very tempted to get an e – reader for when I am on holiday – the husband complains long and loud if I have a bag full of books with me – which I invariably do !

    Reply
  30. I like the idea of a series coming out close together.If there is too big a gap between releases I find I have forgotten parts of the previous stories and then when there are references to past action I am frantically sorting thru the book heap in the hope I still have the previous book to sort out who is who or what is what – if you see what I mean!!
    I still love print but am very tempted to get an e – reader for when I am on holiday – the husband complains long and loud if I have a bag full of books with me – which I invariably do !

    Reply
  31. It depends if the plot follows one couple through a series of books, or if each book has a separate hero and heroine who get an HEA at the end. In the former case, for example the Lady Arianna mysteries, or C.S. Harris’s Sebastian St. Cyr books, as soon as I finish one I’m dying to read the next one, so I would enjoy a back to back release. If it’s the more traditional series with different couples in each book, I like to take a break and read other authors, other time periods and genres for variety before going back to it. As long as not more than a year or two goes by, in which case I forget too much about the setting and characters, and need to start the series all over again!
    I am also a fairly recent convert to Kindle. I was a die hard paperback fan, but those sale prices for e-books were just too good to pass up. Now I really enjoy the ability to impulse buy in the middle of the night without leaving my house.

    Reply
  32. It depends if the plot follows one couple through a series of books, or if each book has a separate hero and heroine who get an HEA at the end. In the former case, for example the Lady Arianna mysteries, or C.S. Harris’s Sebastian St. Cyr books, as soon as I finish one I’m dying to read the next one, so I would enjoy a back to back release. If it’s the more traditional series with different couples in each book, I like to take a break and read other authors, other time periods and genres for variety before going back to it. As long as not more than a year or two goes by, in which case I forget too much about the setting and characters, and need to start the series all over again!
    I am also a fairly recent convert to Kindle. I was a die hard paperback fan, but those sale prices for e-books were just too good to pass up. Now I really enjoy the ability to impulse buy in the middle of the night without leaving my house.

    Reply
  33. It depends if the plot follows one couple through a series of books, or if each book has a separate hero and heroine who get an HEA at the end. In the former case, for example the Lady Arianna mysteries, or C.S. Harris’s Sebastian St. Cyr books, as soon as I finish one I’m dying to read the next one, so I would enjoy a back to back release. If it’s the more traditional series with different couples in each book, I like to take a break and read other authors, other time periods and genres for variety before going back to it. As long as not more than a year or two goes by, in which case I forget too much about the setting and characters, and need to start the series all over again!
    I am also a fairly recent convert to Kindle. I was a die hard paperback fan, but those sale prices for e-books were just too good to pass up. Now I really enjoy the ability to impulse buy in the middle of the night without leaving my house.

    Reply
  34. It depends if the plot follows one couple through a series of books, or if each book has a separate hero and heroine who get an HEA at the end. In the former case, for example the Lady Arianna mysteries, or C.S. Harris’s Sebastian St. Cyr books, as soon as I finish one I’m dying to read the next one, so I would enjoy a back to back release. If it’s the more traditional series with different couples in each book, I like to take a break and read other authors, other time periods and genres for variety before going back to it. As long as not more than a year or two goes by, in which case I forget too much about the setting and characters, and need to start the series all over again!
    I am also a fairly recent convert to Kindle. I was a die hard paperback fan, but those sale prices for e-books were just too good to pass up. Now I really enjoy the ability to impulse buy in the middle of the night without leaving my house.

    Reply
  35. It depends if the plot follows one couple through a series of books, or if each book has a separate hero and heroine who get an HEA at the end. In the former case, for example the Lady Arianna mysteries, or C.S. Harris’s Sebastian St. Cyr books, as soon as I finish one I’m dying to read the next one, so I would enjoy a back to back release. If it’s the more traditional series with different couples in each book, I like to take a break and read other authors, other time periods and genres for variety before going back to it. As long as not more than a year or two goes by, in which case I forget too much about the setting and characters, and need to start the series all over again!
    I am also a fairly recent convert to Kindle. I was a die hard paperback fan, but those sale prices for e-books were just too good to pass up. Now I really enjoy the ability to impulse buy in the middle of the night without leaving my house.

    Reply
  36. Tempest, I know exactly what you mean about having a series you like, only to have it disappear after one or two books. I’ve had a few mysteries that went off the reader and it was disappointing.
    It’s very interesting to hear that e- readers are popular even with appear and ink aficionados . IMO, having both is great.

    Reply
  37. Tempest, I know exactly what you mean about having a series you like, only to have it disappear after one or two books. I’ve had a few mysteries that went off the reader and it was disappointing.
    It’s very interesting to hear that e- readers are popular even with appear and ink aficionados . IMO, having both is great.

    Reply
  38. Tempest, I know exactly what you mean about having a series you like, only to have it disappear after one or two books. I’ve had a few mysteries that went off the reader and it was disappointing.
    It’s very interesting to hear that e- readers are popular even with appear and ink aficionados . IMO, having both is great.

    Reply
  39. Tempest, I know exactly what you mean about having a series you like, only to have it disappear after one or two books. I’ve had a few mysteries that went off the reader and it was disappointing.
    It’s very interesting to hear that e- readers are popular even with appear and ink aficionados . IMO, having both is great.

    Reply
  40. Tempest, I know exactly what you mean about having a series you like, only to have it disappear after one or two books. I’ve had a few mysteries that went off the reader and it was disappointing.
    It’s very interesting to hear that e- readers are popular even with appear and ink aficionados . IMO, having both is great.

    Reply
  41. Loved this very thoughtful discussion of writing and revealing character, Cara. Looking forward to reading it, too. As for rapid release books, yes if I love a series I love to get them close together. I just wish I could write faster.

    Reply
  42. Loved this very thoughtful discussion of writing and revealing character, Cara. Looking forward to reading it, too. As for rapid release books, yes if I love a series I love to get them close together. I just wish I could write faster.

    Reply
  43. Loved this very thoughtful discussion of writing and revealing character, Cara. Looking forward to reading it, too. As for rapid release books, yes if I love a series I love to get them close together. I just wish I could write faster.

    Reply
  44. Loved this very thoughtful discussion of writing and revealing character, Cara. Looking forward to reading it, too. As for rapid release books, yes if I love a series I love to get them close together. I just wish I could write faster.

    Reply
  45. Loved this very thoughtful discussion of writing and revealing character, Cara. Looking forward to reading it, too. As for rapid release books, yes if I love a series I love to get them close together. I just wish I could write faster.

    Reply
  46. Hi, Cara! I loved your art6icle about writing and characrer, I own a Kindle and have many books on it that I haven’t read yet. I also still love print books as well Thanks for the giveaway!

    Reply
  47. Hi, Cara! I loved your art6icle about writing and characrer, I own a Kindle and have many books on it that I haven’t read yet. I also still love print books as well Thanks for the giveaway!

    Reply
  48. Hi, Cara! I loved your art6icle about writing and characrer, I own a Kindle and have many books on it that I haven’t read yet. I also still love print books as well Thanks for the giveaway!

    Reply
  49. Hi, Cara! I loved your art6icle about writing and characrer, I own a Kindle and have many books on it that I haven’t read yet. I also still love print books as well Thanks for the giveaway!

    Reply
  50. Hi, Cara! I loved your art6icle about writing and characrer, I own a Kindle and have many books on it that I haven’t read yet. I also still love print books as well Thanks for the giveaway!

    Reply
  51. PS: I forgot the most important question. I love it when books come out during a short timespan. I read them as they come out and usually reread them as the next one comes out.

    Reply
  52. PS: I forgot the most important question. I love it when books come out during a short timespan. I read them as they come out and usually reread them as the next one comes out.

    Reply
  53. PS: I forgot the most important question. I love it when books come out during a short timespan. I read them as they come out and usually reread them as the next one comes out.

    Reply
  54. PS: I forgot the most important question. I love it when books come out during a short timespan. I read them as they come out and usually reread them as the next one comes out.

    Reply
  55. PS: I forgot the most important question. I love it when books come out during a short timespan. I read them as they come out and usually reread them as the next one comes out.

    Reply
  56. Jo, I’m like you in needing to refresh my recollection of previous books/characters if there is too big a gap between books. If I love a story line, I want to jump right to the next one.
    And I definitely recommend an E- reader. I love paper, but it’s so convenient for traveling.

    Reply
  57. Jo, I’m like you in needing to refresh my recollection of previous books/characters if there is too big a gap between books. If I love a story line, I want to jump right to the next one.
    And I definitely recommend an E- reader. I love paper, but it’s so convenient for traveling.

    Reply
  58. Jo, I’m like you in needing to refresh my recollection of previous books/characters if there is too big a gap between books. If I love a story line, I want to jump right to the next one.
    And I definitely recommend an E- reader. I love paper, but it’s so convenient for traveling.

    Reply
  59. Jo, I’m like you in needing to refresh my recollection of previous books/characters if there is too big a gap between books. If I love a story line, I want to jump right to the next one.
    And I definitely recommend an E- reader. I love paper, but it’s so convenient for traveling.

    Reply
  60. Jo, I’m like you in needing to refresh my recollection of previous books/characters if there is too big a gap between books. If I love a story line, I want to jump right to the next one.
    And I definitely recommend an E- reader. I love paper, but it’s so convenient for traveling.

    Reply
  61. First of all, thank you for the mention of the Lady Arianna series! (I’m a huge fan of the Sebastian St. Cyr series too) it does make a difference in a series if each book is a stand alone with different main characters. But as they have usually been introduced in the previous book, I am eager to read about how they are going develop.
    The great prices on many terrific books is a huge plus for an e- reader, as is the chance to get older out of print titles. IMP, anything that broadens our reading experience is a Good Thing!

    Reply
  62. First of all, thank you for the mention of the Lady Arianna series! (I’m a huge fan of the Sebastian St. Cyr series too) it does make a difference in a series if each book is a stand alone with different main characters. But as they have usually been introduced in the previous book, I am eager to read about how they are going develop.
    The great prices on many terrific books is a huge plus for an e- reader, as is the chance to get older out of print titles. IMP, anything that broadens our reading experience is a Good Thing!

    Reply
  63. First of all, thank you for the mention of the Lady Arianna series! (I’m a huge fan of the Sebastian St. Cyr series too) it does make a difference in a series if each book is a stand alone with different main characters. But as they have usually been introduced in the previous book, I am eager to read about how they are going develop.
    The great prices on many terrific books is a huge plus for an e- reader, as is the chance to get older out of print titles. IMP, anything that broadens our reading experience is a Good Thing!

    Reply
  64. First of all, thank you for the mention of the Lady Arianna series! (I’m a huge fan of the Sebastian St. Cyr series too) it does make a difference in a series if each book is a stand alone with different main characters. But as they have usually been introduced in the previous book, I am eager to read about how they are going develop.
    The great prices on many terrific books is a huge plus for an e- reader, as is the chance to get older out of print titles. IMP, anything that broadens our reading experience is a Good Thing!

    Reply
  65. First of all, thank you for the mention of the Lady Arianna series! (I’m a huge fan of the Sebastian St. Cyr series too) it does make a difference in a series if each book is a stand alone with different main characters. But as they have usually been introduced in the previous book, I am eager to read about how they are going develop.
    The great prices on many terrific books is a huge plus for an e- reader, as is the chance to get older out of print titles. IMP, anything that broadens our reading experience is a Good Thing!

    Reply
  66. What a wonderful discussion, Cara! I actually prefer to have the books come out closer together. I read so much, that I often times forget the characters, and don’t always have time to go back and read the previous books.
    As to ebooks, I recently had to read several books in print additions, and found my eyes tired more easily. So, I’ve become an ebook advocate. Also, I can’t tell you how happy I am that your book will magically download to my Kindle tonight. We don’t have a bookstore here any more, and if I had to wait for the post, it would be at least another few days.
    I tweeted and shared.

    Reply
  67. What a wonderful discussion, Cara! I actually prefer to have the books come out closer together. I read so much, that I often times forget the characters, and don’t always have time to go back and read the previous books.
    As to ebooks, I recently had to read several books in print additions, and found my eyes tired more easily. So, I’ve become an ebook advocate. Also, I can’t tell you how happy I am that your book will magically download to my Kindle tonight. We don’t have a bookstore here any more, and if I had to wait for the post, it would be at least another few days.
    I tweeted and shared.

    Reply
  68. What a wonderful discussion, Cara! I actually prefer to have the books come out closer together. I read so much, that I often times forget the characters, and don’t always have time to go back and read the previous books.
    As to ebooks, I recently had to read several books in print additions, and found my eyes tired more easily. So, I’ve become an ebook advocate. Also, I can’t tell you how happy I am that your book will magically download to my Kindle tonight. We don’t have a bookstore here any more, and if I had to wait for the post, it would be at least another few days.
    I tweeted and shared.

    Reply
  69. What a wonderful discussion, Cara! I actually prefer to have the books come out closer together. I read so much, that I often times forget the characters, and don’t always have time to go back and read the previous books.
    As to ebooks, I recently had to read several books in print additions, and found my eyes tired more easily. So, I’ve become an ebook advocate. Also, I can’t tell you how happy I am that your book will magically download to my Kindle tonight. We don’t have a bookstore here any more, and if I had to wait for the post, it would be at least another few days.
    I tweeted and shared.

    Reply
  70. What a wonderful discussion, Cara! I actually prefer to have the books come out closer together. I read so much, that I often times forget the characters, and don’t always have time to go back and read the previous books.
    As to ebooks, I recently had to read several books in print additions, and found my eyes tired more easily. So, I’ve become an ebook advocate. Also, I can’t tell you how happy I am that your book will magically download to my Kindle tonight. We don’t have a bookstore here any more, and if I had to wait for the post, it would be at least another few days.
    I tweeted and shared.

    Reply
  71. Thank you, Ella! I hope you enjoy PY!
    Like you, I read a lot and do tend to get a little fuzzy in trying to remember all the characters, so I really do like close releases too. I’ve become more and more a fan of my Kindle, for both the type size, and—to be honest—the physical space it saves. I truly am running out of book shelves, and my work room already has books stacked on the floor. I am trying now to get more mass market paperbacks on my Kindle and save the shelves for my hardback research and art book. (But I will always have the Keepers shelves too!)

    Reply
  72. Thank you, Ella! I hope you enjoy PY!
    Like you, I read a lot and do tend to get a little fuzzy in trying to remember all the characters, so I really do like close releases too. I’ve become more and more a fan of my Kindle, for both the type size, and—to be honest—the physical space it saves. I truly am running out of book shelves, and my work room already has books stacked on the floor. I am trying now to get more mass market paperbacks on my Kindle and save the shelves for my hardback research and art book. (But I will always have the Keepers shelves too!)

    Reply
  73. Thank you, Ella! I hope you enjoy PY!
    Like you, I read a lot and do tend to get a little fuzzy in trying to remember all the characters, so I really do like close releases too. I’ve become more and more a fan of my Kindle, for both the type size, and—to be honest—the physical space it saves. I truly am running out of book shelves, and my work room already has books stacked on the floor. I am trying now to get more mass market paperbacks on my Kindle and save the shelves for my hardback research and art book. (But I will always have the Keepers shelves too!)

    Reply
  74. Thank you, Ella! I hope you enjoy PY!
    Like you, I read a lot and do tend to get a little fuzzy in trying to remember all the characters, so I really do like close releases too. I’ve become more and more a fan of my Kindle, for both the type size, and—to be honest—the physical space it saves. I truly am running out of book shelves, and my work room already has books stacked on the floor. I am trying now to get more mass market paperbacks on my Kindle and save the shelves for my hardback research and art book. (But I will always have the Keepers shelves too!)

    Reply
  75. Thank you, Ella! I hope you enjoy PY!
    Like you, I read a lot and do tend to get a little fuzzy in trying to remember all the characters, so I really do like close releases too. I’ve become more and more a fan of my Kindle, for both the type size, and—to be honest—the physical space it saves. I truly am running out of book shelves, and my work room already has books stacked on the floor. I am trying now to get more mass market paperbacks on my Kindle and save the shelves for my hardback research and art book. (But I will always have the Keepers shelves too!)

    Reply
  76. I’m sorry, but if I really WANT to read a book — and I really want to read your books — I WANT TO READ A BOOK. Ebooks may be all the rage, but THEY ARE NOT BOOKS. I spend most of the day working on a computer. I want to relax with a BOOK. Sigh. Yes, I’ve read a few things via ebook, usually when they aren’t available otherwise, but the experience is just not the same. 😛 Maybe I’ll get around to this series, but …

    Reply
  77. I’m sorry, but if I really WANT to read a book — and I really want to read your books — I WANT TO READ A BOOK. Ebooks may be all the rage, but THEY ARE NOT BOOKS. I spend most of the day working on a computer. I want to relax with a BOOK. Sigh. Yes, I’ve read a few things via ebook, usually when they aren’t available otherwise, but the experience is just not the same. 😛 Maybe I’ll get around to this series, but …

    Reply
  78. I’m sorry, but if I really WANT to read a book — and I really want to read your books — I WANT TO READ A BOOK. Ebooks may be all the rage, but THEY ARE NOT BOOKS. I spend most of the day working on a computer. I want to relax with a BOOK. Sigh. Yes, I’ve read a few things via ebook, usually when they aren’t available otherwise, but the experience is just not the same. 😛 Maybe I’ll get around to this series, but …

    Reply
  79. I’m sorry, but if I really WANT to read a book — and I really want to read your books — I WANT TO READ A BOOK. Ebooks may be all the rage, but THEY ARE NOT BOOKS. I spend most of the day working on a computer. I want to relax with a BOOK. Sigh. Yes, I’ve read a few things via ebook, usually when they aren’t available otherwise, but the experience is just not the same. 😛 Maybe I’ll get around to this series, but …

    Reply
  80. I’m sorry, but if I really WANT to read a book — and I really want to read your books — I WANT TO READ A BOOK. Ebooks may be all the rage, but THEY ARE NOT BOOKS. I spend most of the day working on a computer. I want to relax with a BOOK. Sigh. Yes, I’ve read a few things via ebook, usually when they aren’t available otherwise, but the experience is just not the same. 😛 Maybe I’ll get around to this series, but …

    Reply
  81. If the series is one which makes me love the characters, the quicker the better. I do not want to miss a minute of their lives.
    I have a ton of ebooks on my Kindle. If I have a choice, I prefer an actual book…..they feel and smell and look so beautiful. I have loved books since I was 4 and to me they are one of the loveliest things in the world.

    Reply
  82. If the series is one which makes me love the characters, the quicker the better. I do not want to miss a minute of their lives.
    I have a ton of ebooks on my Kindle. If I have a choice, I prefer an actual book…..they feel and smell and look so beautiful. I have loved books since I was 4 and to me they are one of the loveliest things in the world.

    Reply
  83. If the series is one which makes me love the characters, the quicker the better. I do not want to miss a minute of their lives.
    I have a ton of ebooks on my Kindle. If I have a choice, I prefer an actual book…..they feel and smell and look so beautiful. I have loved books since I was 4 and to me they are one of the loveliest things in the world.

    Reply
  84. If the series is one which makes me love the characters, the quicker the better. I do not want to miss a minute of their lives.
    I have a ton of ebooks on my Kindle. If I have a choice, I prefer an actual book…..they feel and smell and look so beautiful. I have loved books since I was 4 and to me they are one of the loveliest things in the world.

    Reply
  85. If the series is one which makes me love the characters, the quicker the better. I do not want to miss a minute of their lives.
    I have a ton of ebooks on my Kindle. If I have a choice, I prefer an actual book…..they feel and smell and look so beautiful. I have loved books since I was 4 and to me they are one of the loveliest things in the world.

    Reply
  86. I really love being able to read a whole series without long gaps between books; I get frustrated when either the next in a series hasn’t been published or isn’t available as a Kindle edition (as I’ve found with some US publications). As someone who works with books and medieval manuscripts, I am passionate about books as objects in themselves, but I am now also passionate about my Kindle; I spend two hours a day travelling to and from work – two hours that I spend reading, so I get through a lot of books! As soon as I finish one I can download another, which, as far as I’m concerned, is fantastic!

    Reply
  87. I really love being able to read a whole series without long gaps between books; I get frustrated when either the next in a series hasn’t been published or isn’t available as a Kindle edition (as I’ve found with some US publications). As someone who works with books and medieval manuscripts, I am passionate about books as objects in themselves, but I am now also passionate about my Kindle; I spend two hours a day travelling to and from work – two hours that I spend reading, so I get through a lot of books! As soon as I finish one I can download another, which, as far as I’m concerned, is fantastic!

    Reply
  88. I really love being able to read a whole series without long gaps between books; I get frustrated when either the next in a series hasn’t been published or isn’t available as a Kindle edition (as I’ve found with some US publications). As someone who works with books and medieval manuscripts, I am passionate about books as objects in themselves, but I am now also passionate about my Kindle; I spend two hours a day travelling to and from work – two hours that I spend reading, so I get through a lot of books! As soon as I finish one I can download another, which, as far as I’m concerned, is fantastic!

    Reply
  89. I really love being able to read a whole series without long gaps between books; I get frustrated when either the next in a series hasn’t been published or isn’t available as a Kindle edition (as I’ve found with some US publications). As someone who works with books and medieval manuscripts, I am passionate about books as objects in themselves, but I am now also passionate about my Kindle; I spend two hours a day travelling to and from work – two hours that I spend reading, so I get through a lot of books! As soon as I finish one I can download another, which, as far as I’m concerned, is fantastic!

    Reply
  90. I really love being able to read a whole series without long gaps between books; I get frustrated when either the next in a series hasn’t been published or isn’t available as a Kindle edition (as I’ve found with some US publications). As someone who works with books and medieval manuscripts, I am passionate about books as objects in themselves, but I am now also passionate about my Kindle; I spend two hours a day travelling to and from work – two hours that I spend reading, so I get through a lot of books! As soon as I finish one I can download another, which, as far as I’m concerned, is fantastic!

    Reply
  91. Sue, I totally understand your feelings. I love paper too. But I’ve also found that the e-reader experience has been growing on me. And in this modern era of publishing, I truly think more and more books are going to be e-only. So I hope you’ll give digital a little more of a chance. You may find yourself changing your mind . . .

    Reply
  92. Sue, I totally understand your feelings. I love paper too. But I’ve also found that the e-reader experience has been growing on me. And in this modern era of publishing, I truly think more and more books are going to be e-only. So I hope you’ll give digital a little more of a chance. You may find yourself changing your mind . . .

    Reply
  93. Sue, I totally understand your feelings. I love paper too. But I’ve also found that the e-reader experience has been growing on me. And in this modern era of publishing, I truly think more and more books are going to be e-only. So I hope you’ll give digital a little more of a chance. You may find yourself changing your mind . . .

    Reply
  94. Sue, I totally understand your feelings. I love paper too. But I’ve also found that the e-reader experience has been growing on me. And in this modern era of publishing, I truly think more and more books are going to be e-only. So I hope you’ll give digital a little more of a chance. You may find yourself changing your mind . . .

    Reply
  95. Sue, I totally understand your feelings. I love paper too. But I’ve also found that the e-reader experience has been growing on me. And in this modern era of publishing, I truly think more and more books are going to be e-only. So I hope you’ll give digital a little more of a chance. You may find yourself changing your mind . . .

    Reply
  96. Tricia, first of all, how fascinating that you work with old books and Medieval manuscripts! As you say, they are truly works of art. I will always love the the smell and feel of books, but I also really like my Kindle for the convenience, and the instant downloading. Both form enhance my reading experience, which is all to the good!

    Reply
  97. Tricia, first of all, how fascinating that you work with old books and Medieval manuscripts! As you say, they are truly works of art. I will always love the the smell and feel of books, but I also really like my Kindle for the convenience, and the instant downloading. Both form enhance my reading experience, which is all to the good!

    Reply
  98. Tricia, first of all, how fascinating that you work with old books and Medieval manuscripts! As you say, they are truly works of art. I will always love the the smell and feel of books, but I also really like my Kindle for the convenience, and the instant downloading. Both form enhance my reading experience, which is all to the good!

    Reply
  99. Tricia, first of all, how fascinating that you work with old books and Medieval manuscripts! As you say, they are truly works of art. I will always love the the smell and feel of books, but I also really like my Kindle for the convenience, and the instant downloading. Both form enhance my reading experience, which is all to the good!

    Reply
  100. Tricia, first of all, how fascinating that you work with old books and Medieval manuscripts! As you say, they are truly works of art. I will always love the the smell and feel of books, but I also really like my Kindle for the convenience, and the instant downloading. Both form enhance my reading experience, which is all to the good!

    Reply
  101. i kind of like having the books in a series released close to each other. it feeds the impatient part of me. 🙂
    I honestly despised the idea of ebooks, but then my husband bought me a kindle. I realized I could get a new book almost instantly and that I could afford to buy more books since ebooks cost less! There’s also the out of print books being released in ebook format — a wonderful thing!
    Sadly, one of the best things about ebooks is that it is more difficult to skip to the ending and then go back to where you are reading than with a ‘real’ paper book. 😉

    Reply
  102. i kind of like having the books in a series released close to each other. it feeds the impatient part of me. 🙂
    I honestly despised the idea of ebooks, but then my husband bought me a kindle. I realized I could get a new book almost instantly and that I could afford to buy more books since ebooks cost less! There’s also the out of print books being released in ebook format — a wonderful thing!
    Sadly, one of the best things about ebooks is that it is more difficult to skip to the ending and then go back to where you are reading than with a ‘real’ paper book. 😉

    Reply
  103. i kind of like having the books in a series released close to each other. it feeds the impatient part of me. 🙂
    I honestly despised the idea of ebooks, but then my husband bought me a kindle. I realized I could get a new book almost instantly and that I could afford to buy more books since ebooks cost less! There’s also the out of print books being released in ebook format — a wonderful thing!
    Sadly, one of the best things about ebooks is that it is more difficult to skip to the ending and then go back to where you are reading than with a ‘real’ paper book. 😉

    Reply
  104. i kind of like having the books in a series released close to each other. it feeds the impatient part of me. 🙂
    I honestly despised the idea of ebooks, but then my husband bought me a kindle. I realized I could get a new book almost instantly and that I could afford to buy more books since ebooks cost less! There’s also the out of print books being released in ebook format — a wonderful thing!
    Sadly, one of the best things about ebooks is that it is more difficult to skip to the ending and then go back to where you are reading than with a ‘real’ paper book. 😉

    Reply
  105. i kind of like having the books in a series released close to each other. it feeds the impatient part of me. 🙂
    I honestly despised the idea of ebooks, but then my husband bought me a kindle. I realized I could get a new book almost instantly and that I could afford to buy more books since ebooks cost less! There’s also the out of print books being released in ebook format — a wonderful thing!
    Sadly, one of the best things about ebooks is that it is more difficult to skip to the ending and then go back to where you are reading than with a ‘real’ paper book. 😉

    Reply
  106. Hallo, Hallo Ms. Elliott,
    I want to compose my reply for your question, but before I do that, I thought for sure it was through a past Word Wenches blog post where I first learnt of “Murder at Hatfield House”!? Reason I’m enquiring tonight (your search box came up empty!), is because I wanted to say ‘thank you!’ as I’m about to duck into it! My library accepted my purchase REQ for it and its only just arrived! 🙂 Therefore, I am not sure which Wench highlighted the story, but ooh! I am too keen to start to soak into the novel! 🙂

    Reply
  107. Hallo, Hallo Ms. Elliott,
    I want to compose my reply for your question, but before I do that, I thought for sure it was through a past Word Wenches blog post where I first learnt of “Murder at Hatfield House”!? Reason I’m enquiring tonight (your search box came up empty!), is because I wanted to say ‘thank you!’ as I’m about to duck into it! My library accepted my purchase REQ for it and its only just arrived! 🙂 Therefore, I am not sure which Wench highlighted the story, but ooh! I am too keen to start to soak into the novel! 🙂

    Reply
  108. Hallo, Hallo Ms. Elliott,
    I want to compose my reply for your question, but before I do that, I thought for sure it was through a past Word Wenches blog post where I first learnt of “Murder at Hatfield House”!? Reason I’m enquiring tonight (your search box came up empty!), is because I wanted to say ‘thank you!’ as I’m about to duck into it! My library accepted my purchase REQ for it and its only just arrived! 🙂 Therefore, I am not sure which Wench highlighted the story, but ooh! I am too keen to start to soak into the novel! 🙂

    Reply
  109. Hallo, Hallo Ms. Elliott,
    I want to compose my reply for your question, but before I do that, I thought for sure it was through a past Word Wenches blog post where I first learnt of “Murder at Hatfield House”!? Reason I’m enquiring tonight (your search box came up empty!), is because I wanted to say ‘thank you!’ as I’m about to duck into it! My library accepted my purchase REQ for it and its only just arrived! 🙂 Therefore, I am not sure which Wench highlighted the story, but ooh! I am too keen to start to soak into the novel! 🙂

    Reply
  110. Hallo, Hallo Ms. Elliott,
    I want to compose my reply for your question, but before I do that, I thought for sure it was through a past Word Wenches blog post where I first learnt of “Murder at Hatfield House”!? Reason I’m enquiring tonight (your search box came up empty!), is because I wanted to say ‘thank you!’ as I’m about to duck into it! My library accepted my purchase REQ for it and its only just arrived! 🙂 Therefore, I am not sure which Wench highlighted the story, but ooh! I am too keen to start to soak into the novel! 🙂

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