Cozy Criminal Ladies

Mrs. Pollifax Unveiled

by Mary Jo

I'm not a major mystery reader. I'm not especially interested in puzzle solving, I want interesting, likable characters, and wit is always good. I absolutely do NOT want gory stories and high body counts. In short, I tend to like cozy mysteries if they're well written and have good characters.

So every now and then I go on a cozy mystery binge with some of my favorite authors, so I thought I'd chat a bit about what I've been reading.

Mrs. Pollifax

The oldest series is Dorothy Gilman's Mrs. Pollifax books, which started in the '70s and went up to 2000, I think.  (Mrs. Pollifax Unveiled)  Emily Pollifax is a sweet white-haired widow who raises prize geraniums and was really bored with her life. So naturally she went to the CIA and volunteered to work for them. <G>

 

Carstairs at the CIA was startled at Mrs. Pollifax on the China Stationfirst, but realized how good Mrs. Pollifax would be as a courier or doing undercover work as a tourist because who would suspect a sweet little white-haired widow? So she was off and running. <g>

Her missions took her all over the world: Africa, the Middle East, Europe, China, Latin America. (As a writer myself, I'm convinced that Dorothy Gilman chose her settings so she could write off her travels. <G>)

 Mrs. Pollifax's supposedly easy missions invariably turn dangerous and she proves to be clever and resilient. She emerges triumphant at the end and makes friends along the way–including a charming and age appropriate love interest.

DunnDeadintheWater

Daisy Dalrymple

The long running Daisy Dalymple series is by Carola Dunn, who has been a guest of the Word Wenches. Set shortly after the First World War, the series is generally light-hearted but there are darker undercurrents reflecting the way the England was changed by the war. The Honourable Daisy was the daughter of a viscount, but her brother, the heir, and her fiancé were both killed in the war. The title goes to a cousin and Daisy is no longer a wealthy young aristocrat

Instead of living with her widowed mother and bemoaning her fate, Daisy rather shockingly goes to work as a freelance writer specializing in articles about British society and heritage that she writes for an American magazine. Her aristocratic connections give her entrée to all sorts of interesting place–where she discovers an unnerving tendency to find dead bodies. <G>

She also discovers a handsome widowed Scotland Yard chief inspector, and their Dunn.SuperflouosWomenromance and evolving life are a strong element of the series. I just reread one of the earlier books, Dead in the Water, which is set at the famous Henley on Thames Regatta, where rowing teams from Oxford and Cambridge and other places race, and yes, a body turns up. Instead of a romantic weekend, Daisy and her DCI are drawn into investigating murder. I learned a lot about Henley and rowing and had a fine time. <G> 

Superfluous Women is based on the fact that with so many young men killed in the war, there are numerous "superfluous women."  And some are Daisy's friends. Things Happen. <G>

The Southern Sisters

This series by Anne George is indeed about Southern Sisters and is set in Birmingham, Alabama. Narrator Patricia Anne is petite and quiet, a retired English teacher who has been happily married to the same man for forty years.

George.MurderGirlsNightOutHer big sister Mary Alice, often called just Sister, is five years older, a foot taller, has married and buried three rich older husbands, has a brassy appetite for life, and she's always dragging her little sister into places where dead bodies may turn up. <G>

The first in the series, Murder on a Girls' Night Out,is kicked off when Mary Alice buys the Boot'n Skoot bar because she loves line dancing. Things Happen. <G>

There are lots of friends and relatives–daughters, nieces. In the last book, Murder Boogies with Elvis, a man with good genes shows up on Patricia Anne's doorstep and announces, "I'm here to impregnate your niece! Happily, willingly, ecstatically!" or words George.MurderBoogiesElvisto that effect. <G>

But the heart of the series is the teasing bond between the sisters. Patricia Anne can be quietly subversive and Mary Alice is frequently bossy, but they are best friends and there is no question of how much they love each other. (Why, yes, I have a sister who is older, taller, and possibly a bit bossy. Why do you ask??? <g>)

One of the fun elements is that Patricia Anne and her husband live in a neighborhood where they can see the bare backside of the giant iron statue of Vulcan which is on the top of Red BirminghamVulcanStatureMountain. As a city with a history of iron and steel working, Vulcan, god of the forge, was chosen a suitable emblem of the city. From the front, he's working on his forge and wearing an apron for protection. His other side moons a good bit of Birmingham. <g>

You may already be familiar with these writers and their series, but if not and you're looking for clever, light-hearted cozy mysteries, given them a try!

If you read cozies, who are your favorite authors? I'd love to find new favorites!

Mary Jo

 

200 thoughts on “Cozy Criminal Ladies”

  1. I just finished the first Mrs Pollifax while we were traveling last week! It was quite entertaining and built up slowly to the crisis where courage more than experience saved the crew. I just like all the men staring at her as if she’s crazed, and then she goes on and saves the day.
    I enjoy a good cozy, although I wouldn’t call this a cozy mystery when it comes to plot. It’s technically a spy story with a cozy protagonist. 😉

    Reply
  2. I just finished the first Mrs Pollifax while we were traveling last week! It was quite entertaining and built up slowly to the crisis where courage more than experience saved the crew. I just like all the men staring at her as if she’s crazed, and then she goes on and saves the day.
    I enjoy a good cozy, although I wouldn’t call this a cozy mystery when it comes to plot. It’s technically a spy story with a cozy protagonist. 😉

    Reply
  3. I just finished the first Mrs Pollifax while we were traveling last week! It was quite entertaining and built up slowly to the crisis where courage more than experience saved the crew. I just like all the men staring at her as if she’s crazed, and then she goes on and saves the day.
    I enjoy a good cozy, although I wouldn’t call this a cozy mystery when it comes to plot. It’s technically a spy story with a cozy protagonist. 😉

    Reply
  4. I just finished the first Mrs Pollifax while we were traveling last week! It was quite entertaining and built up slowly to the crisis where courage more than experience saved the crew. I just like all the men staring at her as if she’s crazed, and then she goes on and saves the day.
    I enjoy a good cozy, although I wouldn’t call this a cozy mystery when it comes to plot. It’s technically a spy story with a cozy protagonist. 😉

    Reply
  5. I just finished the first Mrs Pollifax while we were traveling last week! It was quite entertaining and built up slowly to the crisis where courage more than experience saved the crew. I just like all the men staring at her as if she’s crazed, and then she goes on and saves the day.
    I enjoy a good cozy, although I wouldn’t call this a cozy mystery when it comes to plot. It’s technically a spy story with a cozy protagonist. 😉

    Reply
  6. The topic reminded me of a book I read some years ago, It’s Different Abroad by Herny Calvin. It’s about a teacher in her 30s, single, who drives to France to meet up with some relatives (I think) in her beloved little red car. It gets mixed up with a car being used by smugglers, and she meets up with a charming garage owner. It’s really delightful, but then hen I went to check on the author and title, I came across this cover that some idiot had slapped on it (and I hope you can see it):
    https://www.amazon.com/different-abroad-Henry-Calvin-1983-05-03/dp/B01F9R5U3A/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1529504924&sr=1-4&keywords=it%27s+different+abroad

    Reply
  7. The topic reminded me of a book I read some years ago, It’s Different Abroad by Herny Calvin. It’s about a teacher in her 30s, single, who drives to France to meet up with some relatives (I think) in her beloved little red car. It gets mixed up with a car being used by smugglers, and she meets up with a charming garage owner. It’s really delightful, but then hen I went to check on the author and title, I came across this cover that some idiot had slapped on it (and I hope you can see it):
    https://www.amazon.com/different-abroad-Henry-Calvin-1983-05-03/dp/B01F9R5U3A/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1529504924&sr=1-4&keywords=it%27s+different+abroad

    Reply
  8. The topic reminded me of a book I read some years ago, It’s Different Abroad by Herny Calvin. It’s about a teacher in her 30s, single, who drives to France to meet up with some relatives (I think) in her beloved little red car. It gets mixed up with a car being used by smugglers, and she meets up with a charming garage owner. It’s really delightful, but then hen I went to check on the author and title, I came across this cover that some idiot had slapped on it (and I hope you can see it):
    https://www.amazon.com/different-abroad-Henry-Calvin-1983-05-03/dp/B01F9R5U3A/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1529504924&sr=1-4&keywords=it%27s+different+abroad

    Reply
  9. The topic reminded me of a book I read some years ago, It’s Different Abroad by Herny Calvin. It’s about a teacher in her 30s, single, who drives to France to meet up with some relatives (I think) in her beloved little red car. It gets mixed up with a car being used by smugglers, and she meets up with a charming garage owner. It’s really delightful, but then hen I went to check on the author and title, I came across this cover that some idiot had slapped on it (and I hope you can see it):
    https://www.amazon.com/different-abroad-Henry-Calvin-1983-05-03/dp/B01F9R5U3A/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1529504924&sr=1-4&keywords=it%27s+different+abroad

    Reply
  10. The topic reminded me of a book I read some years ago, It’s Different Abroad by Herny Calvin. It’s about a teacher in her 30s, single, who drives to France to meet up with some relatives (I think) in her beloved little red car. It gets mixed up with a car being used by smugglers, and she meets up with a charming garage owner. It’s really delightful, but then hen I went to check on the author and title, I came across this cover that some idiot had slapped on it (and I hope you can see it):
    https://www.amazon.com/different-abroad-Henry-Calvin-1983-05-03/dp/B01F9R5U3A/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1529504924&sr=1-4&keywords=it%27s+different+abroad

    Reply
  11. I am a romance lover at heart, so my favorite cozies always have some kind of romantic interest or subplot.
    I enjoy Ngaio Marsh’s mysteries, featuring Inspector Alleyn and his artist wife.
    I think Dorothy Sayers’ books qualify as cozy mysteries, and of course I’ve read and loved all of them.
    And then there is Patricia Wentworth. Miss Silver is her elderly lady detective(the equivalent of Christie’s Miss Marple), but there is always a young couple in the plot, sometimes even 2 couples, who provide the romantic interest. Decades ago, I used to haunt used books stores and church sales and yard sales looking for her old paperbacks. Nowadays it’s so easy because everything is available as an e-book on Amazon! My favorite Wentworth book is called “Nothing Venture”, and it doesn’t even include Miss Silver, it’s a great romantic suspense story, where the heroine gets to rescue the hero.

    Reply
  12. I am a romance lover at heart, so my favorite cozies always have some kind of romantic interest or subplot.
    I enjoy Ngaio Marsh’s mysteries, featuring Inspector Alleyn and his artist wife.
    I think Dorothy Sayers’ books qualify as cozy mysteries, and of course I’ve read and loved all of them.
    And then there is Patricia Wentworth. Miss Silver is her elderly lady detective(the equivalent of Christie’s Miss Marple), but there is always a young couple in the plot, sometimes even 2 couples, who provide the romantic interest. Decades ago, I used to haunt used books stores and church sales and yard sales looking for her old paperbacks. Nowadays it’s so easy because everything is available as an e-book on Amazon! My favorite Wentworth book is called “Nothing Venture”, and it doesn’t even include Miss Silver, it’s a great romantic suspense story, where the heroine gets to rescue the hero.

    Reply
  13. I am a romance lover at heart, so my favorite cozies always have some kind of romantic interest or subplot.
    I enjoy Ngaio Marsh’s mysteries, featuring Inspector Alleyn and his artist wife.
    I think Dorothy Sayers’ books qualify as cozy mysteries, and of course I’ve read and loved all of them.
    And then there is Patricia Wentworth. Miss Silver is her elderly lady detective(the equivalent of Christie’s Miss Marple), but there is always a young couple in the plot, sometimes even 2 couples, who provide the romantic interest. Decades ago, I used to haunt used books stores and church sales and yard sales looking for her old paperbacks. Nowadays it’s so easy because everything is available as an e-book on Amazon! My favorite Wentworth book is called “Nothing Venture”, and it doesn’t even include Miss Silver, it’s a great romantic suspense story, where the heroine gets to rescue the hero.

    Reply
  14. I am a romance lover at heart, so my favorite cozies always have some kind of romantic interest or subplot.
    I enjoy Ngaio Marsh’s mysteries, featuring Inspector Alleyn and his artist wife.
    I think Dorothy Sayers’ books qualify as cozy mysteries, and of course I’ve read and loved all of them.
    And then there is Patricia Wentworth. Miss Silver is her elderly lady detective(the equivalent of Christie’s Miss Marple), but there is always a young couple in the plot, sometimes even 2 couples, who provide the romantic interest. Decades ago, I used to haunt used books stores and church sales and yard sales looking for her old paperbacks. Nowadays it’s so easy because everything is available as an e-book on Amazon! My favorite Wentworth book is called “Nothing Venture”, and it doesn’t even include Miss Silver, it’s a great romantic suspense story, where the heroine gets to rescue the hero.

    Reply
  15. I am a romance lover at heart, so my favorite cozies always have some kind of romantic interest or subplot.
    I enjoy Ngaio Marsh’s mysteries, featuring Inspector Alleyn and his artist wife.
    I think Dorothy Sayers’ books qualify as cozy mysteries, and of course I’ve read and loved all of them.
    And then there is Patricia Wentworth. Miss Silver is her elderly lady detective(the equivalent of Christie’s Miss Marple), but there is always a young couple in the plot, sometimes even 2 couples, who provide the romantic interest. Decades ago, I used to haunt used books stores and church sales and yard sales looking for her old paperbacks. Nowadays it’s so easy because everything is available as an e-book on Amazon! My favorite Wentworth book is called “Nothing Venture”, and it doesn’t even include Miss Silver, it’s a great romantic suspense story, where the heroine gets to rescue the hero.

    Reply
  16. I have to be in the right mood for cozy mysteries, but I do enjoy them. I’ve wanted to read the Daisy Dalrymple series for a while now, but all those books seem so daunting. 🙂
    Lately I’ve enjoyed Juliet Blackwell’s Haunted Home Renovation series. I’ve only read the first 3 but it has some great characters and I love reading about renovating historic homes in the San Francisco area. Plus, the haunted parts are pretty tame, which is good because I don’t like to be scared.

    Reply
  17. I have to be in the right mood for cozy mysteries, but I do enjoy them. I’ve wanted to read the Daisy Dalrymple series for a while now, but all those books seem so daunting. 🙂
    Lately I’ve enjoyed Juliet Blackwell’s Haunted Home Renovation series. I’ve only read the first 3 but it has some great characters and I love reading about renovating historic homes in the San Francisco area. Plus, the haunted parts are pretty tame, which is good because I don’t like to be scared.

    Reply
  18. I have to be in the right mood for cozy mysteries, but I do enjoy them. I’ve wanted to read the Daisy Dalrymple series for a while now, but all those books seem so daunting. 🙂
    Lately I’ve enjoyed Juliet Blackwell’s Haunted Home Renovation series. I’ve only read the first 3 but it has some great characters and I love reading about renovating historic homes in the San Francisco area. Plus, the haunted parts are pretty tame, which is good because I don’t like to be scared.

    Reply
  19. I have to be in the right mood for cozy mysteries, but I do enjoy them. I’ve wanted to read the Daisy Dalrymple series for a while now, but all those books seem so daunting. 🙂
    Lately I’ve enjoyed Juliet Blackwell’s Haunted Home Renovation series. I’ve only read the first 3 but it has some great characters and I love reading about renovating historic homes in the San Francisco area. Plus, the haunted parts are pretty tame, which is good because I don’t like to be scared.

    Reply
  20. I have to be in the right mood for cozy mysteries, but I do enjoy them. I’ve wanted to read the Daisy Dalrymple series for a while now, but all those books seem so daunting. 🙂
    Lately I’ve enjoyed Juliet Blackwell’s Haunted Home Renovation series. I’ve only read the first 3 but it has some great characters and I love reading about renovating historic homes in the San Francisco area. Plus, the haunted parts are pretty tame, which is good because I don’t like to be scared.

    Reply
  21. I just finished the most recent Daisy Dalrymple which comes out in July. I had forgotten how much fun those books provide. I need to go back and read some of the most recent ones because I missed them.
    My very favorite is Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody. I would love to grow up and be Amelia. Her adventures are wonderful and the love between Amelia and Emerson, her husband, is absolutely lovely. When their son falls in love, it too becomes a terrific romance.

    Reply
  22. I just finished the most recent Daisy Dalrymple which comes out in July. I had forgotten how much fun those books provide. I need to go back and read some of the most recent ones because I missed them.
    My very favorite is Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody. I would love to grow up and be Amelia. Her adventures are wonderful and the love between Amelia and Emerson, her husband, is absolutely lovely. When their son falls in love, it too becomes a terrific romance.

    Reply
  23. I just finished the most recent Daisy Dalrymple which comes out in July. I had forgotten how much fun those books provide. I need to go back and read some of the most recent ones because I missed them.
    My very favorite is Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody. I would love to grow up and be Amelia. Her adventures are wonderful and the love between Amelia and Emerson, her husband, is absolutely lovely. When their son falls in love, it too becomes a terrific romance.

    Reply
  24. I just finished the most recent Daisy Dalrymple which comes out in July. I had forgotten how much fun those books provide. I need to go back and read some of the most recent ones because I missed them.
    My very favorite is Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody. I would love to grow up and be Amelia. Her adventures are wonderful and the love between Amelia and Emerson, her husband, is absolutely lovely. When their son falls in love, it too becomes a terrific romance.

    Reply
  25. I just finished the most recent Daisy Dalrymple which comes out in July. I had forgotten how much fun those books provide. I need to go back and read some of the most recent ones because I missed them.
    My very favorite is Elizabeth Peters’ Amelia Peabody. I would love to grow up and be Amelia. Her adventures are wonderful and the love between Amelia and Emerson, her husband, is absolutely lovely. When their son falls in love, it too becomes a terrific romance.

    Reply
  26. I apologize – the Daisy Dalrymple book is The Corpse at the Crystal Palace. It is a very well written story by Ms Dunn.

    Reply
  27. I apologize – the Daisy Dalrymple book is The Corpse at the Crystal Palace. It is a very well written story by Ms Dunn.

    Reply
  28. I apologize – the Daisy Dalrymple book is The Corpse at the Crystal Palace. It is a very well written story by Ms Dunn.

    Reply
  29. I apologize – the Daisy Dalrymple book is The Corpse at the Crystal Palace. It is a very well written story by Ms Dunn.

    Reply
  30. I apologize – the Daisy Dalrymple book is The Corpse at the Crystal Palace. It is a very well written story by Ms Dunn.

    Reply
  31. Gilman’s early Pollifax books were great fun. Also enjoyed Dalrymph series.
    The multi-faceted Camille Minichino has written the periodic table mysteries; under the name Margaret Grace, a series on miniatures; under Ada Madison, a series featuring a professor; and under Jean Flowers, a postmistress.

    Reply
  32. Gilman’s early Pollifax books were great fun. Also enjoyed Dalrymph series.
    The multi-faceted Camille Minichino has written the periodic table mysteries; under the name Margaret Grace, a series on miniatures; under Ada Madison, a series featuring a professor; and under Jean Flowers, a postmistress.

    Reply
  33. Gilman’s early Pollifax books were great fun. Also enjoyed Dalrymph series.
    The multi-faceted Camille Minichino has written the periodic table mysteries; under the name Margaret Grace, a series on miniatures; under Ada Madison, a series featuring a professor; and under Jean Flowers, a postmistress.

    Reply
  34. Gilman’s early Pollifax books were great fun. Also enjoyed Dalrymph series.
    The multi-faceted Camille Minichino has written the periodic table mysteries; under the name Margaret Grace, a series on miniatures; under Ada Madison, a series featuring a professor; and under Jean Flowers, a postmistress.

    Reply
  35. Gilman’s early Pollifax books were great fun. Also enjoyed Dalrymph series.
    The multi-faceted Camille Minichino has written the periodic table mysteries; under the name Margaret Grace, a series on miniatures; under Ada Madison, a series featuring a professor; and under Jean Flowers, a postmistress.

    Reply
  36. Minnie Crockwell writes Cozy Mysteries. I haven’t read any but I have read her time travel novels which she writes under the name, Bess McBride. These are great stories so if her mysteries are half as good you will enjoy them MaryJo.
    I’ve often considered reading the Carola Dunn mystery series. Think I’ll pick up the first one and have a go having read this post.

    Reply
  37. Minnie Crockwell writes Cozy Mysteries. I haven’t read any but I have read her time travel novels which she writes under the name, Bess McBride. These are great stories so if her mysteries are half as good you will enjoy them MaryJo.
    I’ve often considered reading the Carola Dunn mystery series. Think I’ll pick up the first one and have a go having read this post.

    Reply
  38. Minnie Crockwell writes Cozy Mysteries. I haven’t read any but I have read her time travel novels which she writes under the name, Bess McBride. These are great stories so if her mysteries are half as good you will enjoy them MaryJo.
    I’ve often considered reading the Carola Dunn mystery series. Think I’ll pick up the first one and have a go having read this post.

    Reply
  39. Minnie Crockwell writes Cozy Mysteries. I haven’t read any but I have read her time travel novels which she writes under the name, Bess McBride. These are great stories so if her mysteries are half as good you will enjoy them MaryJo.
    I’ve often considered reading the Carola Dunn mystery series. Think I’ll pick up the first one and have a go having read this post.

    Reply
  40. Minnie Crockwell writes Cozy Mysteries. I haven’t read any but I have read her time travel novels which she writes under the name, Bess McBride. These are great stories so if her mysteries are half as good you will enjoy them MaryJo.
    I’ve often considered reading the Carola Dunn mystery series. Think I’ll pick up the first one and have a go having read this post.

    Reply
  41. I will add two additional writers to the above. Catherine Aird and the Mr. Campion stories by Margery Allingham.
    There are other cozy mystery writers in my library, but these are the two that sprang to mind while I was reading the blog and all the above posts.

    Reply
  42. I will add two additional writers to the above. Catherine Aird and the Mr. Campion stories by Margery Allingham.
    There are other cozy mystery writers in my library, but these are the two that sprang to mind while I was reading the blog and all the above posts.

    Reply
  43. I will add two additional writers to the above. Catherine Aird and the Mr. Campion stories by Margery Allingham.
    There are other cozy mystery writers in my library, but these are the two that sprang to mind while I was reading the blog and all the above posts.

    Reply
  44. I will add two additional writers to the above. Catherine Aird and the Mr. Campion stories by Margery Allingham.
    There are other cozy mystery writers in my library, but these are the two that sprang to mind while I was reading the blog and all the above posts.

    Reply
  45. I will add two additional writers to the above. Catherine Aird and the Mr. Campion stories by Margery Allingham.
    There are other cozy mystery writers in my library, but these are the two that sprang to mind while I was reading the blog and all the above posts.

    Reply
  46. Diane Sallans, I enjoyed them also, up to the book about the heir to the duke, which is built on the massively stupid error that the duke could leave his title and fortune to anyone he wanted, and maybe he’d leave it to his valet. This is SO WRONG, and every character in the book would have known that. I haven’t read any of the books since. Broken faith.

    Reply
  47. Diane Sallans, I enjoyed them also, up to the book about the heir to the duke, which is built on the massively stupid error that the duke could leave his title and fortune to anyone he wanted, and maybe he’d leave it to his valet. This is SO WRONG, and every character in the book would have known that. I haven’t read any of the books since. Broken faith.

    Reply
  48. Diane Sallans, I enjoyed them also, up to the book about the heir to the duke, which is built on the massively stupid error that the duke could leave his title and fortune to anyone he wanted, and maybe he’d leave it to his valet. This is SO WRONG, and every character in the book would have known that. I haven’t read any of the books since. Broken faith.

    Reply
  49. Diane Sallans, I enjoyed them also, up to the book about the heir to the duke, which is built on the massively stupid error that the duke could leave his title and fortune to anyone he wanted, and maybe he’d leave it to his valet. This is SO WRONG, and every character in the book would have known that. I haven’t read any of the books since. Broken faith.

    Reply
  50. Diane Sallans, I enjoyed them also, up to the book about the heir to the duke, which is built on the massively stupid error that the duke could leave his title and fortune to anyone he wanted, and maybe he’d leave it to his valet. This is SO WRONG, and every character in the book would have known that. I haven’t read any of the books since. Broken faith.

    Reply
  51. I just loved Gillian Roberts’ Amanda Pepper Series set in Philadelphia. I was so sad when she quit writing them. She ended them around Hurricane Katrina time and was able to tie things up nicely. Still I always wonder what Amanda & C.K. are up to now. According to Amazon there are 14 books in the series. Of course, I have them all in hard cover. They were keepers.

    Reply
  52. I just loved Gillian Roberts’ Amanda Pepper Series set in Philadelphia. I was so sad when she quit writing them. She ended them around Hurricane Katrina time and was able to tie things up nicely. Still I always wonder what Amanda & C.K. are up to now. According to Amazon there are 14 books in the series. Of course, I have them all in hard cover. They were keepers.

    Reply
  53. I just loved Gillian Roberts’ Amanda Pepper Series set in Philadelphia. I was so sad when she quit writing them. She ended them around Hurricane Katrina time and was able to tie things up nicely. Still I always wonder what Amanda & C.K. are up to now. According to Amazon there are 14 books in the series. Of course, I have them all in hard cover. They were keepers.

    Reply
  54. I just loved Gillian Roberts’ Amanda Pepper Series set in Philadelphia. I was so sad when she quit writing them. She ended them around Hurricane Katrina time and was able to tie things up nicely. Still I always wonder what Amanda & C.K. are up to now. According to Amazon there are 14 books in the series. Of course, I have them all in hard cover. They were keepers.

    Reply
  55. I just loved Gillian Roberts’ Amanda Pepper Series set in Philadelphia. I was so sad when she quit writing them. She ended them around Hurricane Katrina time and was able to tie things up nicely. Still I always wonder what Amanda & C.K. are up to now. According to Amazon there are 14 books in the series. Of course, I have them all in hard cover. They were keepers.

    Reply
  56. Thanks, Jodi! I’m familiar with the Beatons–she wrote a bunch of traditional Regencies under a different name which I don’t remember, but always with a light touch. Who needs gore when we have the daily news???

    Reply
  57. Thanks, Jodi! I’m familiar with the Beatons–she wrote a bunch of traditional Regencies under a different name which I don’t remember, but always with a light touch. Who needs gore when we have the daily news???

    Reply
  58. Thanks, Jodi! I’m familiar with the Beatons–she wrote a bunch of traditional Regencies under a different name which I don’t remember, but always with a light touch. Who needs gore when we have the daily news???

    Reply
  59. Thanks, Jodi! I’m familiar with the Beatons–she wrote a bunch of traditional Regencies under a different name which I don’t remember, but always with a light touch. Who needs gore when we have the daily news???

    Reply
  60. Thanks, Jodi! I’m familiar with the Beatons–she wrote a bunch of traditional Regencies under a different name which I don’t remember, but always with a light touch. Who needs gore when we have the daily news???

    Reply
  61. Thanks for this, Karin — I read all these authors ages ago when I was a kid. Might be time for a reread. I love it when favorite old books are brought back to life as e-books.

    Reply
  62. Thanks for this, Karin — I read all these authors ages ago when I was a kid. Might be time for a reread. I love it when favorite old books are brought back to life as e-books.

    Reply
  63. Thanks for this, Karin — I read all these authors ages ago when I was a kid. Might be time for a reread. I love it when favorite old books are brought back to life as e-books.

    Reply
  64. Thanks for this, Karin — I read all these authors ages ago when I was a kid. Might be time for a reread. I love it when favorite old books are brought back to life as e-books.

    Reply
  65. Thanks for this, Karin — I read all these authors ages ago when I was a kid. Might be time for a reread. I love it when favorite old books are brought back to life as e-books.

    Reply
  66. Joanna, I made the mistake of seeing the Hamish Macbeth TV series first, and that’s the world I wanted in the books, and of course it’s quite, quite different. I still have those books, and one day will read them. But the TV series won my heart first.

    Reply
  67. Joanna, I made the mistake of seeing the Hamish Macbeth TV series first, and that’s the world I wanted in the books, and of course it’s quite, quite different. I still have those books, and one day will read them. But the TV series won my heart first.

    Reply
  68. Joanna, I made the mistake of seeing the Hamish Macbeth TV series first, and that’s the world I wanted in the books, and of course it’s quite, quite different. I still have those books, and one day will read them. But the TV series won my heart first.

    Reply
  69. Joanna, I made the mistake of seeing the Hamish Macbeth TV series first, and that’s the world I wanted in the books, and of course it’s quite, quite different. I still have those books, and one day will read them. But the TV series won my heart first.

    Reply
  70. Joanna, I made the mistake of seeing the Hamish Macbeth TV series first, and that’s the world I wanted in the books, and of course it’s quite, quite different. I still have those books, and one day will read them. But the TV series won my heart first.

    Reply
  71. Have you read the Joe Sandilands series by Barbara Cleverly? Not exactly cozy, but excellent mysteries, set beginning in the 20s in India and over the course of the series they move back to England.
    I think I learned of the Anne Cleeland books from a “What We’re Reading” Word Wenches post. The first is Murder in Thrall. I really enjoy them. Once again, not exactly cozy, because the hero is a Sherlock Holmes type who is a vigilante and also becomes obsessed with the heroine. The heroine takes him in hand and is a bit clairvoyant as well as seeing ghosts. If that sounds too creepy, then consider it a warning.
    The Captain Lacey Regency Mysteries by Ashley Gardner are favorites, as are the Sebastian St. Cyr mysteries by C.S. Harris.
    I read all the Ngaio Marsh mysteries ages ago, and Georgette Heyer’s mysteries after I ran out of the Regencies. I re-read them periodically. I also like to go back and read Josephine Tey’s mysteries again.
    Hope that gives you some new, or old, ideas.

    Reply
  72. Have you read the Joe Sandilands series by Barbara Cleverly? Not exactly cozy, but excellent mysteries, set beginning in the 20s in India and over the course of the series they move back to England.
    I think I learned of the Anne Cleeland books from a “What We’re Reading” Word Wenches post. The first is Murder in Thrall. I really enjoy them. Once again, not exactly cozy, because the hero is a Sherlock Holmes type who is a vigilante and also becomes obsessed with the heroine. The heroine takes him in hand and is a bit clairvoyant as well as seeing ghosts. If that sounds too creepy, then consider it a warning.
    The Captain Lacey Regency Mysteries by Ashley Gardner are favorites, as are the Sebastian St. Cyr mysteries by C.S. Harris.
    I read all the Ngaio Marsh mysteries ages ago, and Georgette Heyer’s mysteries after I ran out of the Regencies. I re-read them periodically. I also like to go back and read Josephine Tey’s mysteries again.
    Hope that gives you some new, or old, ideas.

    Reply
  73. Have you read the Joe Sandilands series by Barbara Cleverly? Not exactly cozy, but excellent mysteries, set beginning in the 20s in India and over the course of the series they move back to England.
    I think I learned of the Anne Cleeland books from a “What We’re Reading” Word Wenches post. The first is Murder in Thrall. I really enjoy them. Once again, not exactly cozy, because the hero is a Sherlock Holmes type who is a vigilante and also becomes obsessed with the heroine. The heroine takes him in hand and is a bit clairvoyant as well as seeing ghosts. If that sounds too creepy, then consider it a warning.
    The Captain Lacey Regency Mysteries by Ashley Gardner are favorites, as are the Sebastian St. Cyr mysteries by C.S. Harris.
    I read all the Ngaio Marsh mysteries ages ago, and Georgette Heyer’s mysteries after I ran out of the Regencies. I re-read them periodically. I also like to go back and read Josephine Tey’s mysteries again.
    Hope that gives you some new, or old, ideas.

    Reply
  74. Have you read the Joe Sandilands series by Barbara Cleverly? Not exactly cozy, but excellent mysteries, set beginning in the 20s in India and over the course of the series they move back to England.
    I think I learned of the Anne Cleeland books from a “What We’re Reading” Word Wenches post. The first is Murder in Thrall. I really enjoy them. Once again, not exactly cozy, because the hero is a Sherlock Holmes type who is a vigilante and also becomes obsessed with the heroine. The heroine takes him in hand and is a bit clairvoyant as well as seeing ghosts. If that sounds too creepy, then consider it a warning.
    The Captain Lacey Regency Mysteries by Ashley Gardner are favorites, as are the Sebastian St. Cyr mysteries by C.S. Harris.
    I read all the Ngaio Marsh mysteries ages ago, and Georgette Heyer’s mysteries after I ran out of the Regencies. I re-read them periodically. I also like to go back and read Josephine Tey’s mysteries again.
    Hope that gives you some new, or old, ideas.

    Reply
  75. Have you read the Joe Sandilands series by Barbara Cleverly? Not exactly cozy, but excellent mysteries, set beginning in the 20s in India and over the course of the series they move back to England.
    I think I learned of the Anne Cleeland books from a “What We’re Reading” Word Wenches post. The first is Murder in Thrall. I really enjoy them. Once again, not exactly cozy, because the hero is a Sherlock Holmes type who is a vigilante and also becomes obsessed with the heroine. The heroine takes him in hand and is a bit clairvoyant as well as seeing ghosts. If that sounds too creepy, then consider it a warning.
    The Captain Lacey Regency Mysteries by Ashley Gardner are favorites, as are the Sebastian St. Cyr mysteries by C.S. Harris.
    I read all the Ngaio Marsh mysteries ages ago, and Georgette Heyer’s mysteries after I ran out of the Regencies. I re-read them periodically. I also like to go back and read Josephine Tey’s mysteries again.
    Hope that gives you some new, or old, ideas.

    Reply
  76. Phryne Fisher writes mysteries, which I think would qualify. I especially liked the Corinna Chapman ones, all that talk about baked goods makes for hungry reading, though. I must admit the Miss Fisher ones were less to my taste somehow.
    I also like Rita Mae Brown’s Mrs Murphy books, at least the early ones are great. If you can accept the major role the animals play.

    Reply
  77. Phryne Fisher writes mysteries, which I think would qualify. I especially liked the Corinna Chapman ones, all that talk about baked goods makes for hungry reading, though. I must admit the Miss Fisher ones were less to my taste somehow.
    I also like Rita Mae Brown’s Mrs Murphy books, at least the early ones are great. If you can accept the major role the animals play.

    Reply
  78. Phryne Fisher writes mysteries, which I think would qualify. I especially liked the Corinna Chapman ones, all that talk about baked goods makes for hungry reading, though. I must admit the Miss Fisher ones were less to my taste somehow.
    I also like Rita Mae Brown’s Mrs Murphy books, at least the early ones are great. If you can accept the major role the animals play.

    Reply
  79. Phryne Fisher writes mysteries, which I think would qualify. I especially liked the Corinna Chapman ones, all that talk about baked goods makes for hungry reading, though. I must admit the Miss Fisher ones were less to my taste somehow.
    I also like Rita Mae Brown’s Mrs Murphy books, at least the early ones are great. If you can accept the major role the animals play.

    Reply
  80. Phryne Fisher writes mysteries, which I think would qualify. I especially liked the Corinna Chapman ones, all that talk about baked goods makes for hungry reading, though. I must admit the Miss Fisher ones were less to my taste somehow.
    I also like Rita Mae Brown’s Mrs Murphy books, at least the early ones are great. If you can accept the major role the animals play.

    Reply
  81. Cynthia, I’ve read both Barbara Cleverly and Captain Lacey, and both are excellent writers, but cozy they’re not. I have to be in the right mood for the more intense mysteries. I’m another Josephine Tey fan: THE DAUGHTER OF TIME, yes!

    Reply
  82. Cynthia, I’ve read both Barbara Cleverly and Captain Lacey, and both are excellent writers, but cozy they’re not. I have to be in the right mood for the more intense mysteries. I’m another Josephine Tey fan: THE DAUGHTER OF TIME, yes!

    Reply
  83. Cynthia, I’ve read both Barbara Cleverly and Captain Lacey, and both are excellent writers, but cozy they’re not. I have to be in the right mood for the more intense mysteries. I’m another Josephine Tey fan: THE DAUGHTER OF TIME, yes!

    Reply
  84. Cynthia, I’ve read both Barbara Cleverly and Captain Lacey, and both are excellent writers, but cozy they’re not. I have to be in the right mood for the more intense mysteries. I’m another Josephine Tey fan: THE DAUGHTER OF TIME, yes!

    Reply
  85. Cynthia, I’ve read both Barbara Cleverly and Captain Lacey, and both are excellent writers, but cozy they’re not. I have to be in the right mood for the more intense mysteries. I’m another Josephine Tey fan: THE DAUGHTER OF TIME, yes!

    Reply
  86. Katja, Kerry Greenwood is author of the Phryne Fisher and Corinna Chapman books, and Anne Gracie has interviewed her on Word Wenches. I ADORE the Corinna Chapman books and hope she writes more. She and her friends and cats and lover are so wonderful. I’m fine with animals being part of the story, so maybe I should try Mrs. Murphy. *G* (I have three cats lounging about my office even as I type.)

    Reply
  87. Katja, Kerry Greenwood is author of the Phryne Fisher and Corinna Chapman books, and Anne Gracie has interviewed her on Word Wenches. I ADORE the Corinna Chapman books and hope she writes more. She and her friends and cats and lover are so wonderful. I’m fine with animals being part of the story, so maybe I should try Mrs. Murphy. *G* (I have three cats lounging about my office even as I type.)

    Reply
  88. Katja, Kerry Greenwood is author of the Phryne Fisher and Corinna Chapman books, and Anne Gracie has interviewed her on Word Wenches. I ADORE the Corinna Chapman books and hope she writes more. She and her friends and cats and lover are so wonderful. I’m fine with animals being part of the story, so maybe I should try Mrs. Murphy. *G* (I have three cats lounging about my office even as I type.)

    Reply
  89. Katja, Kerry Greenwood is author of the Phryne Fisher and Corinna Chapman books, and Anne Gracie has interviewed her on Word Wenches. I ADORE the Corinna Chapman books and hope she writes more. She and her friends and cats and lover are so wonderful. I’m fine with animals being part of the story, so maybe I should try Mrs. Murphy. *G* (I have three cats lounging about my office even as I type.)

    Reply
  90. Katja, Kerry Greenwood is author of the Phryne Fisher and Corinna Chapman books, and Anne Gracie has interviewed her on Word Wenches. I ADORE the Corinna Chapman books and hope she writes more. She and her friends and cats and lover are so wonderful. I’m fine with animals being part of the story, so maybe I should try Mrs. Murphy. *G* (I have three cats lounging about my office even as I type.)

    Reply
  91. My sister is really into cozies and a series she is working on collecting is Jacqueline Winspear. Maisie Dobbs is the name of the main character. She is English and the first book is set in 1929 and is titled Maisie Dobbs.
    Love love love the Southern Sisters and Mrs. Pollifax books. Especially loved listening to them on audio book. Barbara Rosenblat reads the Mrs. Pollifax ones.
    Ruth Ann Phimister reads the Southern Sisters. Love love love the southern accent. Southern but not too too… It sounds correct (me being from Georgia and once having lived in Alabama for 2 years).
    I don’t know if you would consider Tony Hillerman’s Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee mysteries as cozies but the body count is low and there isn’t gratuitous violence and yuck. It is a window into a different culture.

    Reply
  92. My sister is really into cozies and a series she is working on collecting is Jacqueline Winspear. Maisie Dobbs is the name of the main character. She is English and the first book is set in 1929 and is titled Maisie Dobbs.
    Love love love the Southern Sisters and Mrs. Pollifax books. Especially loved listening to them on audio book. Barbara Rosenblat reads the Mrs. Pollifax ones.
    Ruth Ann Phimister reads the Southern Sisters. Love love love the southern accent. Southern but not too too… It sounds correct (me being from Georgia and once having lived in Alabama for 2 years).
    I don’t know if you would consider Tony Hillerman’s Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee mysteries as cozies but the body count is low and there isn’t gratuitous violence and yuck. It is a window into a different culture.

    Reply
  93. My sister is really into cozies and a series she is working on collecting is Jacqueline Winspear. Maisie Dobbs is the name of the main character. She is English and the first book is set in 1929 and is titled Maisie Dobbs.
    Love love love the Southern Sisters and Mrs. Pollifax books. Especially loved listening to them on audio book. Barbara Rosenblat reads the Mrs. Pollifax ones.
    Ruth Ann Phimister reads the Southern Sisters. Love love love the southern accent. Southern but not too too… It sounds correct (me being from Georgia and once having lived in Alabama for 2 years).
    I don’t know if you would consider Tony Hillerman’s Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee mysteries as cozies but the body count is low and there isn’t gratuitous violence and yuck. It is a window into a different culture.

    Reply
  94. My sister is really into cozies and a series she is working on collecting is Jacqueline Winspear. Maisie Dobbs is the name of the main character. She is English and the first book is set in 1929 and is titled Maisie Dobbs.
    Love love love the Southern Sisters and Mrs. Pollifax books. Especially loved listening to them on audio book. Barbara Rosenblat reads the Mrs. Pollifax ones.
    Ruth Ann Phimister reads the Southern Sisters. Love love love the southern accent. Southern but not too too… It sounds correct (me being from Georgia and once having lived in Alabama for 2 years).
    I don’t know if you would consider Tony Hillerman’s Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee mysteries as cozies but the body count is low and there isn’t gratuitous violence and yuck. It is a window into a different culture.

    Reply
  95. My sister is really into cozies and a series she is working on collecting is Jacqueline Winspear. Maisie Dobbs is the name of the main character. She is English and the first book is set in 1929 and is titled Maisie Dobbs.
    Love love love the Southern Sisters and Mrs. Pollifax books. Especially loved listening to them on audio book. Barbara Rosenblat reads the Mrs. Pollifax ones.
    Ruth Ann Phimister reads the Southern Sisters. Love love love the southern accent. Southern but not too too… It sounds correct (me being from Georgia and once having lived in Alabama for 2 years).
    I don’t know if you would consider Tony Hillerman’s Joe Leaphorn and Jim Chee mysteries as cozies but the body count is low and there isn’t gratuitous violence and yuck. It is a window into a different culture.

    Reply
  96. I’ve read many of the books mentioned. Two older series set in the US that I enjoyed are the Susan Henshaw mysteries by Valerie Wolzien (wealthy surburban Connecticut wife and mother with a former female police detective for a best friend), and the Faith Fairchild books by Katherine Hall Page (minister’s wife.) Also, the Peter Shandy mysteries by Charlotte MacLeod (professor at an agricultural college and, eventually, his librarian wife). I’m also trying to think of a series I read in which the detective was a errand runner for a lawyer in New York City, I think. I believe they were written by a man and had one-word titles. But for the life of me, I can’t remember any other details. Oh, and the Deborah Knott by Margaret Marion, especially the early books.

    Reply
  97. I’ve read many of the books mentioned. Two older series set in the US that I enjoyed are the Susan Henshaw mysteries by Valerie Wolzien (wealthy surburban Connecticut wife and mother with a former female police detective for a best friend), and the Faith Fairchild books by Katherine Hall Page (minister’s wife.) Also, the Peter Shandy mysteries by Charlotte MacLeod (professor at an agricultural college and, eventually, his librarian wife). I’m also trying to think of a series I read in which the detective was a errand runner for a lawyer in New York City, I think. I believe they were written by a man and had one-word titles. But for the life of me, I can’t remember any other details. Oh, and the Deborah Knott by Margaret Marion, especially the early books.

    Reply
  98. I’ve read many of the books mentioned. Two older series set in the US that I enjoyed are the Susan Henshaw mysteries by Valerie Wolzien (wealthy surburban Connecticut wife and mother with a former female police detective for a best friend), and the Faith Fairchild books by Katherine Hall Page (minister’s wife.) Also, the Peter Shandy mysteries by Charlotte MacLeod (professor at an agricultural college and, eventually, his librarian wife). I’m also trying to think of a series I read in which the detective was a errand runner for a lawyer in New York City, I think. I believe they were written by a man and had one-word titles. But for the life of me, I can’t remember any other details. Oh, and the Deborah Knott by Margaret Marion, especially the early books.

    Reply
  99. I’ve read many of the books mentioned. Two older series set in the US that I enjoyed are the Susan Henshaw mysteries by Valerie Wolzien (wealthy surburban Connecticut wife and mother with a former female police detective for a best friend), and the Faith Fairchild books by Katherine Hall Page (minister’s wife.) Also, the Peter Shandy mysteries by Charlotte MacLeod (professor at an agricultural college and, eventually, his librarian wife). I’m also trying to think of a series I read in which the detective was a errand runner for a lawyer in New York City, I think. I believe they were written by a man and had one-word titles. But for the life of me, I can’t remember any other details. Oh, and the Deborah Knott by Margaret Marion, especially the early books.

    Reply
  100. I’ve read many of the books mentioned. Two older series set in the US that I enjoyed are the Susan Henshaw mysteries by Valerie Wolzien (wealthy surburban Connecticut wife and mother with a former female police detective for a best friend), and the Faith Fairchild books by Katherine Hall Page (minister’s wife.) Also, the Peter Shandy mysteries by Charlotte MacLeod (professor at an agricultural college and, eventually, his librarian wife). I’m also trying to think of a series I read in which the detective was a errand runner for a lawyer in New York City, I think. I believe they were written by a man and had one-word titles. But for the life of me, I can’t remember any other details. Oh, and the Deborah Knott by Margaret Marion, especially the early books.

    Reply
  101. I’m another fan of Anne Cleeland’s Acton and Doyle mysteries but agree with you, Cynthia, that they are not exactly cozy. I also like the Captain Lacey mysteries.
    I used to read the Mrs. Pollifax series back in the seventies. I guess I have some catching up to do!

    Reply
  102. I’m another fan of Anne Cleeland’s Acton and Doyle mysteries but agree with you, Cynthia, that they are not exactly cozy. I also like the Captain Lacey mysteries.
    I used to read the Mrs. Pollifax series back in the seventies. I guess I have some catching up to do!

    Reply
  103. I’m another fan of Anne Cleeland’s Acton and Doyle mysteries but agree with you, Cynthia, that they are not exactly cozy. I also like the Captain Lacey mysteries.
    I used to read the Mrs. Pollifax series back in the seventies. I guess I have some catching up to do!

    Reply
  104. I’m another fan of Anne Cleeland’s Acton and Doyle mysteries but agree with you, Cynthia, that they are not exactly cozy. I also like the Captain Lacey mysteries.
    I used to read the Mrs. Pollifax series back in the seventies. I guess I have some catching up to do!

    Reply
  105. I’m another fan of Anne Cleeland’s Acton and Doyle mysteries but agree with you, Cynthia, that they are not exactly cozy. I also like the Captain Lacey mysteries.
    I used to read the Mrs. Pollifax series back in the seventies. I guess I have some catching up to do!

    Reply
  106. I don’t think the Bess Crawford series by Charles Todd (a mother and son writing team) has been mentioned yet. Bess was a WW1 nurse and each novel so far has something to do with some aspect of that war.
    I also like Jacqueline Winspear, who was mentioned above. Maisie Dobbs is a fascinating character, and I like that she is aging with the books and with her experiences, not fixed and unchangeable like so many series leads.

    Reply
  107. I don’t think the Bess Crawford series by Charles Todd (a mother and son writing team) has been mentioned yet. Bess was a WW1 nurse and each novel so far has something to do with some aspect of that war.
    I also like Jacqueline Winspear, who was mentioned above. Maisie Dobbs is a fascinating character, and I like that she is aging with the books and with her experiences, not fixed and unchangeable like so many series leads.

    Reply
  108. I don’t think the Bess Crawford series by Charles Todd (a mother and son writing team) has been mentioned yet. Bess was a WW1 nurse and each novel so far has something to do with some aspect of that war.
    I also like Jacqueline Winspear, who was mentioned above. Maisie Dobbs is a fascinating character, and I like that she is aging with the books and with her experiences, not fixed and unchangeable like so many series leads.

    Reply
  109. I don’t think the Bess Crawford series by Charles Todd (a mother and son writing team) has been mentioned yet. Bess was a WW1 nurse and each novel so far has something to do with some aspect of that war.
    I also like Jacqueline Winspear, who was mentioned above. Maisie Dobbs is a fascinating character, and I like that she is aging with the books and with her experiences, not fixed and unchangeable like so many series leads.

    Reply
  110. I don’t think the Bess Crawford series by Charles Todd (a mother and son writing team) has been mentioned yet. Bess was a WW1 nurse and each novel so far has something to do with some aspect of that war.
    I also like Jacqueline Winspear, who was mentioned above. Maisie Dobbs is a fascinating character, and I like that she is aging with the books and with her experiences, not fixed and unchangeable like so many series leads.

    Reply
  111. Just a thought: You wrote you don’t like a high body count but in Your latest, Once a Rebel, the body count was quite high! A little too high for my taste, but I liked the book otherwise 😀

    Reply
  112. Just a thought: You wrote you don’t like a high body count but in Your latest, Once a Rebel, the body count was quite high! A little too high for my taste, but I liked the book otherwise 😀

    Reply
  113. Just a thought: You wrote you don’t like a high body count but in Your latest, Once a Rebel, the body count was quite high! A little too high for my taste, but I liked the book otherwise 😀

    Reply
  114. Just a thought: You wrote you don’t like a high body count but in Your latest, Once a Rebel, the body count was quite high! A little too high for my taste, but I liked the book otherwise 😀

    Reply
  115. Just a thought: You wrote you don’t like a high body count but in Your latest, Once a Rebel, the body count was quite high! A little too high for my taste, but I liked the book otherwise 😀

    Reply

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