Covering Up!

Mask 1Andrea here, musing about something that’s on all of our minds . . . well, actually, on all our faces! I don’t know about you, but I’m not someone who ever found a great allure in the idea of wearing masks. Unlike many of my friends, Halloween was . . meh—not a big deal. The idea of anonymity—which conjures a certain sense of dangerous freedom to misbehave and get away with it—wasn’t something that tickled my fancy.

And yet, when you look at the history of masks and masked celebrations, it’s clear that face coverings appeal to the naughty side of human nature. (There is a certain irony in today’s masks, which are quite the opposite in intent—we Plague-doctorwear them not only to be personally safe, but also to be good citizens and help protect others.) Most every culture has a tradition of masks being used for ceremonial and religious practices—and also just for mischievous fun!

Masks used to ward off illness have of course existed throughout history—the most famous examples are the plague marks of medieval Europe. (That long beak was to hold a small sachet of burning herbs, whose smoke was thought to help protect one from whatever evil was causing sickness) But for the most part, masks have been used for more frivolous things.

Masquerade-ball-burning-menMasquerade balls became popular during the during the 15th century, and were held to celebrate various occasions of court life throughout Europe. A famous example was the Burning Man Ball held by Charles VI of France, where he and five courtiers dressed as wild savages and danced among the guests. The costumes were made of flax and pitch—and when one of the dancers came too close to a burning torch, he caught fire!

Masks-2Things turned a little tamer (though not much) as the fad for masked revelries moved to Italy during the Renaissance. Venice became known for its Carnival Balls, as well as for the amorous adventures created by the freedom of anonymity. Carnival (derived from the Latin carne vale, meaning “farewell to meat”) was a last partying before the austerity of the Christian Lenten season, and gluttony, decadence and lust fueled the frenzy.
Carnival 1
Masked celebrations remained popular throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, though there were times when that alluring aura of risky behavior turned mortally dangerous. In1792, Gustav II of Sweden was assassinated at a masked ball by an unhappy nobleman, who opposed the King’s seeking to quash parliamentary reforms. (Two composers of the time turned the event into an opera entitled (appropriately!) Gustav III

Default A number of Regency novels feature masked balls and entertainments, and we have John James Heidigger, a Swiss count, to thank for introducing the such pageantry to Britain. Heidigger came to London in the early 1700s, and after gaining favor with George I because of his operas, he then introduced the fashion Venetian costume and masks to London Society. The first semi-public masquerade ball was held in the Haymarket Opera House. Another interesting detail is one of the standard costumes came to be a ruffled outfit called a “van Dyke” after the famous painter Anthony van Dyke, who painted many of his court portraits with the aristocracy wearing such finery.

Masked ball 2Masks added a frisson of excitement to any entertainment. It was fun to try to guess the identities of the partygoers, and of course, gave everyone license to fool around . . .

Masked balls are still around—a famous modern example was Truman Capote’s “Black and White” masquerade, thrown in honor of Katherine Graham.

Our current masks are more utilitarian. Like them or not, I have a feeling we’ll be wearing them for some time to come. I’ve a couple of versions, depending on the situation—a standard pleated paper mask, and a high tech neoprene one with a washable filter for more “close-quarter” forays. I’ve also ordered a fabric gaiter in a very pretty design for casual walks.

How about you? Are you one of those people who loves wearing decorative, or “fun” masks? How are you faring with your “plague” masks of today? Have you accumulated a collection?

115 thoughts on “Covering Up!”

  1. I don’t like wearing masks. Even as a child on Halloween – I found them uncomfortable and usually ripped them off before the evening was over.
    I don’t like it when the masked ball shows up in an HR I’m reading. They are pretty predictable. Even more predictable than when the heroine goes down to the library in the middle of the night to “find a book”. (smile)
    I have been house bound and haven’t had to wear a mask yet during this pandemic. My sister wears them when she goes to the store and she finds them very uncomfortable.
    I feel so bad for the health care workers (and others) who have to wear them all day. God bless them!

    Reply
  2. I don’t like wearing masks. Even as a child on Halloween – I found them uncomfortable and usually ripped them off before the evening was over.
    I don’t like it when the masked ball shows up in an HR I’m reading. They are pretty predictable. Even more predictable than when the heroine goes down to the library in the middle of the night to “find a book”. (smile)
    I have been house bound and haven’t had to wear a mask yet during this pandemic. My sister wears them when she goes to the store and she finds them very uncomfortable.
    I feel so bad for the health care workers (and others) who have to wear them all day. God bless them!

    Reply
  3. I don’t like wearing masks. Even as a child on Halloween – I found them uncomfortable and usually ripped them off before the evening was over.
    I don’t like it when the masked ball shows up in an HR I’m reading. They are pretty predictable. Even more predictable than when the heroine goes down to the library in the middle of the night to “find a book”. (smile)
    I have been house bound and haven’t had to wear a mask yet during this pandemic. My sister wears them when she goes to the store and she finds them very uncomfortable.
    I feel so bad for the health care workers (and others) who have to wear them all day. God bless them!

    Reply
  4. I don’t like wearing masks. Even as a child on Halloween – I found them uncomfortable and usually ripped them off before the evening was over.
    I don’t like it when the masked ball shows up in an HR I’m reading. They are pretty predictable. Even more predictable than when the heroine goes down to the library in the middle of the night to “find a book”. (smile)
    I have been house bound and haven’t had to wear a mask yet during this pandemic. My sister wears them when she goes to the store and she finds them very uncomfortable.
    I feel so bad for the health care workers (and others) who have to wear them all day. God bless them!

    Reply
  5. I don’t like wearing masks. Even as a child on Halloween – I found them uncomfortable and usually ripped them off before the evening was over.
    I don’t like it when the masked ball shows up in an HR I’m reading. They are pretty predictable. Even more predictable than when the heroine goes down to the library in the middle of the night to “find a book”. (smile)
    I have been house bound and haven’t had to wear a mask yet during this pandemic. My sister wears them when she goes to the store and she finds them very uncomfortable.
    I feel so bad for the health care workers (and others) who have to wear them all day. God bless them!

    Reply
  6. A fascinating history, Andrea! I’ve never been into wearing masks, but these days, like all good citizens, I have a couple to use when going out. I haven’t used masked balls much in my stories, but my Christmas novella in last year’s SEDUCTION ON A SNOWY NIGHT had one. Hmm, I think I view them as occasionally useful plot devices.

    Reply
  7. A fascinating history, Andrea! I’ve never been into wearing masks, but these days, like all good citizens, I have a couple to use when going out. I haven’t used masked balls much in my stories, but my Christmas novella in last year’s SEDUCTION ON A SNOWY NIGHT had one. Hmm, I think I view them as occasionally useful plot devices.

    Reply
  8. A fascinating history, Andrea! I’ve never been into wearing masks, but these days, like all good citizens, I have a couple to use when going out. I haven’t used masked balls much in my stories, but my Christmas novella in last year’s SEDUCTION ON A SNOWY NIGHT had one. Hmm, I think I view them as occasionally useful plot devices.

    Reply
  9. A fascinating history, Andrea! I’ve never been into wearing masks, but these days, like all good citizens, I have a couple to use when going out. I haven’t used masked balls much in my stories, but my Christmas novella in last year’s SEDUCTION ON A SNOWY NIGHT had one. Hmm, I think I view them as occasionally useful plot devices.

    Reply
  10. A fascinating history, Andrea! I’ve never been into wearing masks, but these days, like all good citizens, I have a couple to use when going out. I haven’t used masked balls much in my stories, but my Christmas novella in last year’s SEDUCTION ON A SNOWY NIGHT had one. Hmm, I think I view them as occasionally useful plot devices.

    Reply
  11. Thanks for a fascinating post, Andrea. I haven’t known the history of the word ‘carnival,’ so I leaned something today.
    I have two masks made by a friend. I prefer the one with elastic ear loops as it is easy to put on and take off; I rarely wear the one with tie strings. I wear a mask while on walks and in stores.

    Reply
  12. Thanks for a fascinating post, Andrea. I haven’t known the history of the word ‘carnival,’ so I leaned something today.
    I have two masks made by a friend. I prefer the one with elastic ear loops as it is easy to put on and take off; I rarely wear the one with tie strings. I wear a mask while on walks and in stores.

    Reply
  13. Thanks for a fascinating post, Andrea. I haven’t known the history of the word ‘carnival,’ so I leaned something today.
    I have two masks made by a friend. I prefer the one with elastic ear loops as it is easy to put on and take off; I rarely wear the one with tie strings. I wear a mask while on walks and in stores.

    Reply
  14. Thanks for a fascinating post, Andrea. I haven’t known the history of the word ‘carnival,’ so I leaned something today.
    I have two masks made by a friend. I prefer the one with elastic ear loops as it is easy to put on and take off; I rarely wear the one with tie strings. I wear a mask while on walks and in stores.

    Reply
  15. Thanks for a fascinating post, Andrea. I haven’t known the history of the word ‘carnival,’ so I leaned something today.
    I have two masks made by a friend. I prefer the one with elastic ear loops as it is easy to put on and take off; I rarely wear the one with tie strings. I wear a mask while on walks and in stores.

    Reply
  16. I haven’t been out of the house, but a face mask is ready if I do go.
    I don’t think I ever went masked when trick or treating. Or really at any other time, but I did experiment with the “cover the eyes type” and didn’t like them, and also with ones simillar to the present needs to help me avoid allergens when vacuuming and similar household tasks. I soon decided that it was easier to live with the allergies than with the masks.
    I rebel (quietly) but I’ve never been attracted to mischief for the sake of mischief.

    Reply
  17. I haven’t been out of the house, but a face mask is ready if I do go.
    I don’t think I ever went masked when trick or treating. Or really at any other time, but I did experiment with the “cover the eyes type” and didn’t like them, and also with ones simillar to the present needs to help me avoid allergens when vacuuming and similar household tasks. I soon decided that it was easier to live with the allergies than with the masks.
    I rebel (quietly) but I’ve never been attracted to mischief for the sake of mischief.

    Reply
  18. I haven’t been out of the house, but a face mask is ready if I do go.
    I don’t think I ever went masked when trick or treating. Or really at any other time, but I did experiment with the “cover the eyes type” and didn’t like them, and also with ones simillar to the present needs to help me avoid allergens when vacuuming and similar household tasks. I soon decided that it was easier to live with the allergies than with the masks.
    I rebel (quietly) but I’ve never been attracted to mischief for the sake of mischief.

    Reply
  19. I haven’t been out of the house, but a face mask is ready if I do go.
    I don’t think I ever went masked when trick or treating. Or really at any other time, but I did experiment with the “cover the eyes type” and didn’t like them, and also with ones simillar to the present needs to help me avoid allergens when vacuuming and similar household tasks. I soon decided that it was easier to live with the allergies than with the masks.
    I rebel (quietly) but I’ve never been attracted to mischief for the sake of mischief.

    Reply
  20. I haven’t been out of the house, but a face mask is ready if I do go.
    I don’t think I ever went masked when trick or treating. Or really at any other time, but I did experiment with the “cover the eyes type” and didn’t like them, and also with ones simillar to the present needs to help me avoid allergens when vacuuming and similar household tasks. I soon decided that it was easier to live with the allergies than with the masks.
    I rebel (quietly) but I’ve never been attracted to mischief for the sake of mischief.

    Reply
  21. I may have to look into a gaiter, if I need to wear a mask for a more extended period of time. My current cotton pleated ones, purchased from friends who sew, seem much too hard to breathe through for more than a fairly short grocery/errand excursion.
    As to masquerades, I was a very sad child when I had to start wearing glasses – and so could no longer wear the plastic Smurfette, etc. masks at Halloween.

    Reply
  22. I may have to look into a gaiter, if I need to wear a mask for a more extended period of time. My current cotton pleated ones, purchased from friends who sew, seem much too hard to breathe through for more than a fairly short grocery/errand excursion.
    As to masquerades, I was a very sad child when I had to start wearing glasses – and so could no longer wear the plastic Smurfette, etc. masks at Halloween.

    Reply
  23. I may have to look into a gaiter, if I need to wear a mask for a more extended period of time. My current cotton pleated ones, purchased from friends who sew, seem much too hard to breathe through for more than a fairly short grocery/errand excursion.
    As to masquerades, I was a very sad child when I had to start wearing glasses – and so could no longer wear the plastic Smurfette, etc. masks at Halloween.

    Reply
  24. I may have to look into a gaiter, if I need to wear a mask for a more extended period of time. My current cotton pleated ones, purchased from friends who sew, seem much too hard to breathe through for more than a fairly short grocery/errand excursion.
    As to masquerades, I was a very sad child when I had to start wearing glasses – and so could no longer wear the plastic Smurfette, etc. masks at Halloween.

    Reply
  25. I may have to look into a gaiter, if I need to wear a mask for a more extended period of time. My current cotton pleated ones, purchased from friends who sew, seem much too hard to breathe through for more than a fairly short grocery/errand excursion.
    As to masquerades, I was a very sad child when I had to start wearing glasses – and so could no longer wear the plastic Smurfette, etc. masks at Halloween.

    Reply
  26. Healthcare and frontline responders are true heroes. We should all be so thankful to them for being willing to don those mask for hours and put themselves in harm’s way.
    I’ve read a number of masked ball scenes that I find fun and and inventive. Like any trope they can be be done well . . . and not so well.

    Reply
  27. Healthcare and frontline responders are true heroes. We should all be so thankful to them for being willing to don those mask for hours and put themselves in harm’s way.
    I’ve read a number of masked ball scenes that I find fun and and inventive. Like any trope they can be be done well . . . and not so well.

    Reply
  28. Healthcare and frontline responders are true heroes. We should all be so thankful to them for being willing to don those mask for hours and put themselves in harm’s way.
    I’ve read a number of masked ball scenes that I find fun and and inventive. Like any trope they can be be done well . . . and not so well.

    Reply
  29. Healthcare and frontline responders are true heroes. We should all be so thankful to them for being willing to don those mask for hours and put themselves in harm’s way.
    I’ve read a number of masked ball scenes that I find fun and and inventive. Like any trope they can be be done well . . . and not so well.

    Reply
  30. Healthcare and frontline responders are true heroes. We should all be so thankful to them for being willing to don those mask for hours and put themselves in harm’s way.
    I’ve read a number of masked ball scenes that I find fun and and inventive. Like any trope they can be be done well . . . and not so well.

    Reply
  31. Oh, sympathies on the childhood disappointment with glasses and masks. I hadn’t thought of that, but clearly it can be a problem!
    I’m looking forward to getting my pandemic gaiter in the mail. I wear a synchilla one in winter when I walk on cold days, and find them comfortable to breath through when they are covering my nose and mouth. So hopefully the material used for this new one will be, too.

    Reply
  32. Oh, sympathies on the childhood disappointment with glasses and masks. I hadn’t thought of that, but clearly it can be a problem!
    I’m looking forward to getting my pandemic gaiter in the mail. I wear a synchilla one in winter when I walk on cold days, and find them comfortable to breath through when they are covering my nose and mouth. So hopefully the material used for this new one will be, too.

    Reply
  33. Oh, sympathies on the childhood disappointment with glasses and masks. I hadn’t thought of that, but clearly it can be a problem!
    I’m looking forward to getting my pandemic gaiter in the mail. I wear a synchilla one in winter when I walk on cold days, and find them comfortable to breath through when they are covering my nose and mouth. So hopefully the material used for this new one will be, too.

    Reply
  34. Oh, sympathies on the childhood disappointment with glasses and masks. I hadn’t thought of that, but clearly it can be a problem!
    I’m looking forward to getting my pandemic gaiter in the mail. I wear a synchilla one in winter when I walk on cold days, and find them comfortable to breath through when they are covering my nose and mouth. So hopefully the material used for this new one will be, too.

    Reply
  35. Oh, sympathies on the childhood disappointment with glasses and masks. I hadn’t thought of that, but clearly it can be a problem!
    I’m looking forward to getting my pandemic gaiter in the mail. I wear a synchilla one in winter when I walk on cold days, and find them comfortable to breath through when they are covering my nose and mouth. So hopefully the material used for this new one will be, too.

    Reply
  36. I don’t wear a mask around the house or out walking around, but I carry one in my jeans pocket just in case it comes up. I found a 1950s horror movie print one which is my favorite. I am noting lots of people around wearing decorative cloth ones. I wonder how effective they are in preventing the spread of disease, but it’s sort of a gesture I can make to the community and it’s not a big deal to do it. It is true they can be too warm and steamy, but I don’t have to leave them on very long – just while I’m in the store, not while driving or walking around as long as I maintain proper distance.
    My gynecologist’s office is advising all patients to wear a mask when they visit. For some reason I found that hilarious given the nature of the exam.
    As for wearing masks as costumes, I always hated them. They never fit right and they were hard to see out of. No fun, not even for Halloween.

    Reply
  37. I don’t wear a mask around the house or out walking around, but I carry one in my jeans pocket just in case it comes up. I found a 1950s horror movie print one which is my favorite. I am noting lots of people around wearing decorative cloth ones. I wonder how effective they are in preventing the spread of disease, but it’s sort of a gesture I can make to the community and it’s not a big deal to do it. It is true they can be too warm and steamy, but I don’t have to leave them on very long – just while I’m in the store, not while driving or walking around as long as I maintain proper distance.
    My gynecologist’s office is advising all patients to wear a mask when they visit. For some reason I found that hilarious given the nature of the exam.
    As for wearing masks as costumes, I always hated them. They never fit right and they were hard to see out of. No fun, not even for Halloween.

    Reply
  38. I don’t wear a mask around the house or out walking around, but I carry one in my jeans pocket just in case it comes up. I found a 1950s horror movie print one which is my favorite. I am noting lots of people around wearing decorative cloth ones. I wonder how effective they are in preventing the spread of disease, but it’s sort of a gesture I can make to the community and it’s not a big deal to do it. It is true they can be too warm and steamy, but I don’t have to leave them on very long – just while I’m in the store, not while driving or walking around as long as I maintain proper distance.
    My gynecologist’s office is advising all patients to wear a mask when they visit. For some reason I found that hilarious given the nature of the exam.
    As for wearing masks as costumes, I always hated them. They never fit right and they were hard to see out of. No fun, not even for Halloween.

    Reply
  39. I don’t wear a mask around the house or out walking around, but I carry one in my jeans pocket just in case it comes up. I found a 1950s horror movie print one which is my favorite. I am noting lots of people around wearing decorative cloth ones. I wonder how effective they are in preventing the spread of disease, but it’s sort of a gesture I can make to the community and it’s not a big deal to do it. It is true they can be too warm and steamy, but I don’t have to leave them on very long – just while I’m in the store, not while driving or walking around as long as I maintain proper distance.
    My gynecologist’s office is advising all patients to wear a mask when they visit. For some reason I found that hilarious given the nature of the exam.
    As for wearing masks as costumes, I always hated them. They never fit right and they were hard to see out of. No fun, not even for Halloween.

    Reply
  40. I don’t wear a mask around the house or out walking around, but I carry one in my jeans pocket just in case it comes up. I found a 1950s horror movie print one which is my favorite. I am noting lots of people around wearing decorative cloth ones. I wonder how effective they are in preventing the spread of disease, but it’s sort of a gesture I can make to the community and it’s not a big deal to do it. It is true they can be too warm and steamy, but I don’t have to leave them on very long – just while I’m in the store, not while driving or walking around as long as I maintain proper distance.
    My gynecologist’s office is advising all patients to wear a mask when they visit. For some reason I found that hilarious given the nature of the exam.
    As for wearing masks as costumes, I always hated them. They never fit right and they were hard to see out of. No fun, not even for Halloween.

    Reply
  41. I have not seen anyone wearing some of those lovely masks as pictured in your post….and thanks for the pictures and the post…really terrific.
    I have seen pictures of a woman wearing a kitchen sponge as a mask,a woman wearing a sanitary napkin as a mask, and a man wearing a pointed party hat as a mask (similar to some of the pointy masks in the pictures)and similar imaginative ideas of what constitutes a face covering.
    We are in interesting times and after looking at these pictures, I am rather disappointed there are not more people out there wearing masks like the heads of monsters.

    Reply
  42. I have not seen anyone wearing some of those lovely masks as pictured in your post….and thanks for the pictures and the post…really terrific.
    I have seen pictures of a woman wearing a kitchen sponge as a mask,a woman wearing a sanitary napkin as a mask, and a man wearing a pointed party hat as a mask (similar to some of the pointy masks in the pictures)and similar imaginative ideas of what constitutes a face covering.
    We are in interesting times and after looking at these pictures, I am rather disappointed there are not more people out there wearing masks like the heads of monsters.

    Reply
  43. I have not seen anyone wearing some of those lovely masks as pictured in your post….and thanks for the pictures and the post…really terrific.
    I have seen pictures of a woman wearing a kitchen sponge as a mask,a woman wearing a sanitary napkin as a mask, and a man wearing a pointed party hat as a mask (similar to some of the pointy masks in the pictures)and similar imaginative ideas of what constitutes a face covering.
    We are in interesting times and after looking at these pictures, I am rather disappointed there are not more people out there wearing masks like the heads of monsters.

    Reply
  44. I have not seen anyone wearing some of those lovely masks as pictured in your post….and thanks for the pictures and the post…really terrific.
    I have seen pictures of a woman wearing a kitchen sponge as a mask,a woman wearing a sanitary napkin as a mask, and a man wearing a pointed party hat as a mask (similar to some of the pointy masks in the pictures)and similar imaginative ideas of what constitutes a face covering.
    We are in interesting times and after looking at these pictures, I am rather disappointed there are not more people out there wearing masks like the heads of monsters.

    Reply
  45. I have not seen anyone wearing some of those lovely masks as pictured in your post….and thanks for the pictures and the post…really terrific.
    I have seen pictures of a woman wearing a kitchen sponge as a mask,a woman wearing a sanitary napkin as a mask, and a man wearing a pointed party hat as a mask (similar to some of the pointy masks in the pictures)and similar imaginative ideas of what constitutes a face covering.
    We are in interesting times and after looking at these pictures, I am rather disappointed there are not more people out there wearing masks like the heads of monsters.

    Reply
  46. LOL on your medical observation! It’s really good that we can still see the humor in things despite the seriousness of the situation.
    I.too, don’t particularly like wearing a mask for shopping, etc, but am happy to do my part. At least one can see with these masks. I agree with you on costume masks, which I always found hard to see out of —and disliked that!

    Reply
  47. LOL on your medical observation! It’s really good that we can still see the humor in things despite the seriousness of the situation.
    I.too, don’t particularly like wearing a mask for shopping, etc, but am happy to do my part. At least one can see with these masks. I agree with you on costume masks, which I always found hard to see out of —and disliked that!

    Reply
  48. LOL on your medical observation! It’s really good that we can still see the humor in things despite the seriousness of the situation.
    I.too, don’t particularly like wearing a mask for shopping, etc, but am happy to do my part. At least one can see with these masks. I agree with you on costume masks, which I always found hard to see out of —and disliked that!

    Reply
  49. LOL on your medical observation! It’s really good that we can still see the humor in things despite the seriousness of the situation.
    I.too, don’t particularly like wearing a mask for shopping, etc, but am happy to do my part. At least one can see with these masks. I agree with you on costume masks, which I always found hard to see out of —and disliked that!

    Reply
  50. LOL on your medical observation! It’s really good that we can still see the humor in things despite the seriousness of the situation.
    I.too, don’t particularly like wearing a mask for shopping, etc, but am happy to do my part. At least one can see with these masks. I agree with you on costume masks, which I always found hard to see out of —and disliked that!

    Reply
  51. I am immune compromised and generally have several medical appointments every month, so I have a selection of masks to choose from. I have no problem wearing them other than my glasses steaming up for the first ten to fifteen minutes after I put one on. Compared to the major inconveniences caused by my health, wearing a mask is relatively minor. My son also does not go out without a mask for my sake. When I was young, it was unheard of to use make-up for a Halloween disguise, and I hated the rigid ill-fitting plastic masks! I used washable makeup on both my sons when they were small so that they could see where they were going.

    Reply
  52. I am immune compromised and generally have several medical appointments every month, so I have a selection of masks to choose from. I have no problem wearing them other than my glasses steaming up for the first ten to fifteen minutes after I put one on. Compared to the major inconveniences caused by my health, wearing a mask is relatively minor. My son also does not go out without a mask for my sake. When I was young, it was unheard of to use make-up for a Halloween disguise, and I hated the rigid ill-fitting plastic masks! I used washable makeup on both my sons when they were small so that they could see where they were going.

    Reply
  53. I am immune compromised and generally have several medical appointments every month, so I have a selection of masks to choose from. I have no problem wearing them other than my glasses steaming up for the first ten to fifteen minutes after I put one on. Compared to the major inconveniences caused by my health, wearing a mask is relatively minor. My son also does not go out without a mask for my sake. When I was young, it was unheard of to use make-up for a Halloween disguise, and I hated the rigid ill-fitting plastic masks! I used washable makeup on both my sons when they were small so that they could see where they were going.

    Reply
  54. I am immune compromised and generally have several medical appointments every month, so I have a selection of masks to choose from. I have no problem wearing them other than my glasses steaming up for the first ten to fifteen minutes after I put one on. Compared to the major inconveniences caused by my health, wearing a mask is relatively minor. My son also does not go out without a mask for my sake. When I was young, it was unheard of to use make-up for a Halloween disguise, and I hated the rigid ill-fitting plastic masks! I used washable makeup on both my sons when they were small so that they could see where they were going.

    Reply
  55. I am immune compromised and generally have several medical appointments every month, so I have a selection of masks to choose from. I have no problem wearing them other than my glasses steaming up for the first ten to fifteen minutes after I put one on. Compared to the major inconveniences caused by my health, wearing a mask is relatively minor. My son also does not go out without a mask for my sake. When I was young, it was unheard of to use make-up for a Halloween disguise, and I hated the rigid ill-fitting plastic masks! I used washable makeup on both my sons when they were small so that they could see where they were going.

    Reply
  56. I never wore a mask to a costume party, but now I wear them whenever I’m going to be in the vicinity of other people. However that happens only a few times a month nowadays.
    I never knew that the meaning of carnival was farewell to meat, what an interesting historical tidbit!

    Reply
  57. I never wore a mask to a costume party, but now I wear them whenever I’m going to be in the vicinity of other people. However that happens only a few times a month nowadays.
    I never knew that the meaning of carnival was farewell to meat, what an interesting historical tidbit!

    Reply
  58. I never wore a mask to a costume party, but now I wear them whenever I’m going to be in the vicinity of other people. However that happens only a few times a month nowadays.
    I never knew that the meaning of carnival was farewell to meat, what an interesting historical tidbit!

    Reply
  59. I never wore a mask to a costume party, but now I wear them whenever I’m going to be in the vicinity of other people. However that happens only a few times a month nowadays.
    I never knew that the meaning of carnival was farewell to meat, what an interesting historical tidbit!

    Reply
  60. I never wore a mask to a costume party, but now I wear them whenever I’m going to be in the vicinity of other people. However that happens only a few times a month nowadays.
    I never knew that the meaning of carnival was farewell to meat, what an interesting historical tidbit!

    Reply
  61. The history of masked balls is fascinating. I recently read a 19th century novel by Mrs Augustus Craven in which the heroine goes to the masked Carnival at Naples – almost as famous as the event at Venice – and is dismayed to see her husband, masked of course, flirting and making an assignation with a mysterious woman. She recognizes himi but he does not even notice her, being too wrapped up in his new love.
    Then there is Verdi’s opera Un Ballo in Maschera. Very gripping!
    I don’t find today’s surgical masks quite as seductive as those sizzlers, but we’ll have to put up with them.

    Reply
  62. The history of masked balls is fascinating. I recently read a 19th century novel by Mrs Augustus Craven in which the heroine goes to the masked Carnival at Naples – almost as famous as the event at Venice – and is dismayed to see her husband, masked of course, flirting and making an assignation with a mysterious woman. She recognizes himi but he does not even notice her, being too wrapped up in his new love.
    Then there is Verdi’s opera Un Ballo in Maschera. Very gripping!
    I don’t find today’s surgical masks quite as seductive as those sizzlers, but we’ll have to put up with them.

    Reply
  63. The history of masked balls is fascinating. I recently read a 19th century novel by Mrs Augustus Craven in which the heroine goes to the masked Carnival at Naples – almost as famous as the event at Venice – and is dismayed to see her husband, masked of course, flirting and making an assignation with a mysterious woman. She recognizes himi but he does not even notice her, being too wrapped up in his new love.
    Then there is Verdi’s opera Un Ballo in Maschera. Very gripping!
    I don’t find today’s surgical masks quite as seductive as those sizzlers, but we’ll have to put up with them.

    Reply
  64. The history of masked balls is fascinating. I recently read a 19th century novel by Mrs Augustus Craven in which the heroine goes to the masked Carnival at Naples – almost as famous as the event at Venice – and is dismayed to see her husband, masked of course, flirting and making an assignation with a mysterious woman. She recognizes himi but he does not even notice her, being too wrapped up in his new love.
    Then there is Verdi’s opera Un Ballo in Maschera. Very gripping!
    I don’t find today’s surgical masks quite as seductive as those sizzlers, but we’ll have to put up with them.

    Reply
  65. The history of masked balls is fascinating. I recently read a 19th century novel by Mrs Augustus Craven in which the heroine goes to the masked Carnival at Naples – almost as famous as the event at Venice – and is dismayed to see her husband, masked of course, flirting and making an assignation with a mysterious woman. She recognizes himi but he does not even notice her, being too wrapped up in his new love.
    Then there is Verdi’s opera Un Ballo in Maschera. Very gripping!
    I don’t find today’s surgical masks quite as seductive as those sizzlers, but we’ll have to put up with them.

    Reply
  66. I always get a kick out of seeing the plague doctor’s mask. I am a certified aromatherapist and do many presentations on the use of essential oils. I use that picture when I talk about the history of aromatherapy and prior to the tale of the four thieves. the handed down story is that there was a band of robbers who would rob houses and people affected with the plague who were not always alive. They had noted that perfumers rarely got the plague so they came up with a blend of aromatic plants to protect them. The authorities noted this so when the thieves were finally captured they were offered lenience for the recipe. They gave up the recipe but were hanged anyway.

    Reply
  67. I always get a kick out of seeing the plague doctor’s mask. I am a certified aromatherapist and do many presentations on the use of essential oils. I use that picture when I talk about the history of aromatherapy and prior to the tale of the four thieves. the handed down story is that there was a band of robbers who would rob houses and people affected with the plague who were not always alive. They had noted that perfumers rarely got the plague so they came up with a blend of aromatic plants to protect them. The authorities noted this so when the thieves were finally captured they were offered lenience for the recipe. They gave up the recipe but were hanged anyway.

    Reply
  68. I always get a kick out of seeing the plague doctor’s mask. I am a certified aromatherapist and do many presentations on the use of essential oils. I use that picture when I talk about the history of aromatherapy and prior to the tale of the four thieves. the handed down story is that there was a band of robbers who would rob houses and people affected with the plague who were not always alive. They had noted that perfumers rarely got the plague so they came up with a blend of aromatic plants to protect them. The authorities noted this so when the thieves were finally captured they were offered lenience for the recipe. They gave up the recipe but were hanged anyway.

    Reply
  69. I always get a kick out of seeing the plague doctor’s mask. I am a certified aromatherapist and do many presentations on the use of essential oils. I use that picture when I talk about the history of aromatherapy and prior to the tale of the four thieves. the handed down story is that there was a band of robbers who would rob houses and people affected with the plague who were not always alive. They had noted that perfumers rarely got the plague so they came up with a blend of aromatic plants to protect them. The authorities noted this so when the thieves were finally captured they were offered lenience for the recipe. They gave up the recipe but were hanged anyway.

    Reply
  70. I always get a kick out of seeing the plague doctor’s mask. I am a certified aromatherapist and do many presentations on the use of essential oils. I use that picture when I talk about the history of aromatherapy and prior to the tale of the four thieves. the handed down story is that there was a band of robbers who would rob houses and people affected with the plague who were not always alive. They had noted that perfumers rarely got the plague so they came up with a blend of aromatic plants to protect them. The authorities noted this so when the thieves were finally captured they were offered lenience for the recipe. They gave up the recipe but were hanged anyway.

    Reply
  71. After being in nursing for over 40 years I hate wearing masks! But I will if I go anywhere. I have 1 paper one. My daughter has returned to work at Sports Clips cutting hair and has to wear a mask now.

    Reply
  72. After being in nursing for over 40 years I hate wearing masks! But I will if I go anywhere. I have 1 paper one. My daughter has returned to work at Sports Clips cutting hair and has to wear a mask now.

    Reply
  73. After being in nursing for over 40 years I hate wearing masks! But I will if I go anywhere. I have 1 paper one. My daughter has returned to work at Sports Clips cutting hair and has to wear a mask now.

    Reply
  74. After being in nursing for over 40 years I hate wearing masks! But I will if I go anywhere. I have 1 paper one. My daughter has returned to work at Sports Clips cutting hair and has to wear a mask now.

    Reply
  75. After being in nursing for over 40 years I hate wearing masks! But I will if I go anywhere. I have 1 paper one. My daughter has returned to work at Sports Clips cutting hair and has to wear a mask now.

    Reply

Leave a Comment