Conflict 101

W-DeskLady1 Pat here:

I know most readers are unaware of, and probably don't care about, the underlying structure and craft of a novel. You just want a good rip-roaring yarn that drags you into the pages and doesn’t let you go. Good writers make this story telling seem effortless, but in reality, it isn’t. Some of us are good at dreaming up characters. Some of us know how to put together tension and action and drive the story through plot. The most fortunate of us can do both, but even then, word crafting to achieve what’s in our head Writing2 becomes an obstacle.

My biggest obstacle is conflict. I’m the eldest daughter of a dysfunctional family and if you read the personality profile, you’ll see my goal in life is to please others and avoid conflict. Which means I don’t want my characters to get hurt. I want them to be happy achievers who have a jolly life dancing merrily around the ballroom and having wonderful conversations with exciting people.

Innocent Obviously, this does not lead to a good rip-roaring yarn. So my internal conflict is giving my characters conflicts. Since character development is the fun part of writing for me, I don’t have a problem knowing my current heroine has been babied all her life and has learned to manipulate her difficult family to get what she wants. Her internal conflict will have to involve discovering she’s dug herself in dangerously deep with her bad habits, then developing the maturity to find a better way of dealing with her problems.  It’s also fun to see that she’s an uneducated but happy people person while the hero is a sardonic intellectual.  She’s all about nurturing animals and he’s more likely to hunt them. And so forth. Those are simple conflicts.

For me, the hard part is developing a nailbiting, tension-racking goal-oriented conflict. In the book coming out next summer—THE WICKED WYCKERLY— the characters, their goals, and their conflicts magically fell into place with scarcely a second thought. He’s inherited a bankrupt estate, has never had a family, knows nothing of children, and needs to marry an heiress.  She knows nothing except family, has no money, and is desperate to raise the half-siblings their guardian has taken away. Characters and goals all neatly opposed and impossible to resolve except through the magic of love. (No cool cover image yet, sorry!)

The manuscript in progress refuses to be so uncomplicated. My characters are quite willing to bite each other’s noses off or fall into bed, whichever comes first, but once they do that, there’s no story. All they need to do is fight off a few bad guys and voila, they’re free to be happy. Everyone makes Arguing marriage of convenience stories seem so easy, but while I fight with this manuscript, all I’m seeing is drawbacks. And my brainstorming partners refuse to let me bomb or set fire to anyone again. <G>

So, how are you at resolving conflicts, personal or work-related? Anyone remember a book with the kind of conflict that kept you turning the pages? How about some good marriage of convenience story recommendations? I’m desperate for direction. Or distraction. Or I may bite someone’s nose off.

115 thoughts on “Conflict 101”

  1. The method to achieve the hero and heroine’s common goal could be a continuing source of conflict. He may want to break heads. She wants to be diplomatic. Or vice versa. Even when they achieve their goal, these differences remain.

    Reply
  2. The method to achieve the hero and heroine’s common goal could be a continuing source of conflict. He may want to break heads. She wants to be diplomatic. Or vice versa. Even when they achieve their goal, these differences remain.

    Reply
  3. The method to achieve the hero and heroine’s common goal could be a continuing source of conflict. He may want to break heads. She wants to be diplomatic. Or vice versa. Even when they achieve their goal, these differences remain.

    Reply
  4. The method to achieve the hero and heroine’s common goal could be a continuing source of conflict. He may want to break heads. She wants to be diplomatic. Or vice versa. Even when they achieve their goal, these differences remain.

    Reply
  5. The method to achieve the hero and heroine’s common goal could be a continuing source of conflict. He may want to break heads. She wants to be diplomatic. Or vice versa. Even when they achieve their goal, these differences remain.

    Reply
  6. Nailed it in one, Linda! She’s domesticated, he’s not. “G” I suspect they may gravitate a little more to the middle as time goes on, so she can learn to step on toes and he can learn to bow politely, but it should be an interesting struggle!

    Reply
  7. Nailed it in one, Linda! She’s domesticated, he’s not. “G” I suspect they may gravitate a little more to the middle as time goes on, so she can learn to step on toes and he can learn to bow politely, but it should be an interesting struggle!

    Reply
  8. Nailed it in one, Linda! She’s domesticated, he’s not. “G” I suspect they may gravitate a little more to the middle as time goes on, so she can learn to step on toes and he can learn to bow politely, but it should be an interesting struggle!

    Reply
  9. Nailed it in one, Linda! She’s domesticated, he’s not. “G” I suspect they may gravitate a little more to the middle as time goes on, so she can learn to step on toes and he can learn to bow politely, but it should be an interesting struggle!

    Reply
  10. Nailed it in one, Linda! She’s domesticated, he’s not. “G” I suspect they may gravitate a little more to the middle as time goes on, so she can learn to step on toes and he can learn to bow politely, but it should be an interesting struggle!

    Reply
  11. I avoid conflict in real life and apparently in fiction. I had an editor tell me there was insufficient conflict in a book I pitched—this, after I had the hero’s ex-wife kidnap him and try to have her way with him, after holding the heroine hostage at gunpoint. Oh well, to each his own, LOL. I guess she wanted internal rather than external conflict.
    Pat, I’m sure you’ll do beautifully and I can’t wait to read it! I adore marriage of convenience stories, and always think of the Heyer one where the lord marries a plain rich cit’s daughter and falls in love with her. Off to Google…

    Reply
  12. I avoid conflict in real life and apparently in fiction. I had an editor tell me there was insufficient conflict in a book I pitched—this, after I had the hero’s ex-wife kidnap him and try to have her way with him, after holding the heroine hostage at gunpoint. Oh well, to each his own, LOL. I guess she wanted internal rather than external conflict.
    Pat, I’m sure you’ll do beautifully and I can’t wait to read it! I adore marriage of convenience stories, and always think of the Heyer one where the lord marries a plain rich cit’s daughter and falls in love with her. Off to Google…

    Reply
  13. I avoid conflict in real life and apparently in fiction. I had an editor tell me there was insufficient conflict in a book I pitched—this, after I had the hero’s ex-wife kidnap him and try to have her way with him, after holding the heroine hostage at gunpoint. Oh well, to each his own, LOL. I guess she wanted internal rather than external conflict.
    Pat, I’m sure you’ll do beautifully and I can’t wait to read it! I adore marriage of convenience stories, and always think of the Heyer one where the lord marries a plain rich cit’s daughter and falls in love with her. Off to Google…

    Reply
  14. I avoid conflict in real life and apparently in fiction. I had an editor tell me there was insufficient conflict in a book I pitched—this, after I had the hero’s ex-wife kidnap him and try to have her way with him, after holding the heroine hostage at gunpoint. Oh well, to each his own, LOL. I guess she wanted internal rather than external conflict.
    Pat, I’m sure you’ll do beautifully and I can’t wait to read it! I adore marriage of convenience stories, and always think of the Heyer one where the lord marries a plain rich cit’s daughter and falls in love with her. Off to Google…

    Reply
  15. I avoid conflict in real life and apparently in fiction. I had an editor tell me there was insufficient conflict in a book I pitched—this, after I had the hero’s ex-wife kidnap him and try to have her way with him, after holding the heroine hostage at gunpoint. Oh well, to each his own, LOL. I guess she wanted internal rather than external conflict.
    Pat, I’m sure you’ll do beautifully and I can’t wait to read it! I adore marriage of convenience stories, and always think of the Heyer one where the lord marries a plain rich cit’s daughter and falls in love with her. Off to Google…

    Reply
  16. wow, cool, thank you, Maggie! A whole site! Now that’s scary. “G”
    Yup, I suspect your editor was talking internal conflict. Now, if the hero’s goal was to become a monk and the heroine’s (as well as the ex-wife’s!) goal was to have a child, THEN you’d have conflict. “G”

    Reply
  17. wow, cool, thank you, Maggie! A whole site! Now that’s scary. “G”
    Yup, I suspect your editor was talking internal conflict. Now, if the hero’s goal was to become a monk and the heroine’s (as well as the ex-wife’s!) goal was to have a child, THEN you’d have conflict. “G”

    Reply
  18. wow, cool, thank you, Maggie! A whole site! Now that’s scary. “G”
    Yup, I suspect your editor was talking internal conflict. Now, if the hero’s goal was to become a monk and the heroine’s (as well as the ex-wife’s!) goal was to have a child, THEN you’d have conflict. “G”

    Reply
  19. wow, cool, thank you, Maggie! A whole site! Now that’s scary. “G”
    Yup, I suspect your editor was talking internal conflict. Now, if the hero’s goal was to become a monk and the heroine’s (as well as the ex-wife’s!) goal was to have a child, THEN you’d have conflict. “G”

    Reply
  20. wow, cool, thank you, Maggie! A whole site! Now that’s scary. “G”
    Yup, I suspect your editor was talking internal conflict. Now, if the hero’s goal was to become a monk and the heroine’s (as well as the ex-wife’s!) goal was to have a child, THEN you’d have conflict. “G”

    Reply
  21. I’m a lover of harmony too, Pat, and will go to great lengths to avoid conflict in RL–a predictable trait of an INFP type. But I never thought about this characteristic contributing to my writing struggles with conflict.
    I do love marriage-of-convenience tales. My book catalog shows well over a hundred keepers with this theme. Among these keepers are many Wench titles. There’s Jo’s AN ARRANGED MARRIAGE, AN UNWILLING BRIDE, DARK CHAMPION, CHRISTMAS ANGEL, FORBIDDEN, FORBIDDEN MAGIC, and THE ROGUE’s RETURN; Loretta’s DON”T TEMPT ME; Anne’s TALLIE’S KNIGHT, THE PERFFECT STRANGER, and THE STOLEN PRINCESS; Edith’s TO WED A STRANGER and A BRIDE FOR HIS CONVENIENCE; your LOVE FOREVER AFTER, IMPOSSIBLE DREAMS, and THE TROUBLE WITH MAGIC; Mary Jo’s THE WOULD-BE WIDOW, THE BARGAIN, VEILS of SILK, THE BARTERED BRIDE, and A KISS OF FATE. I’m sure I’m missing some. And I’m not even listing favorites by Mary Balogh, Carla Kelly, Eloisa James . . . 🙂

    Reply
  22. I’m a lover of harmony too, Pat, and will go to great lengths to avoid conflict in RL–a predictable trait of an INFP type. But I never thought about this characteristic contributing to my writing struggles with conflict.
    I do love marriage-of-convenience tales. My book catalog shows well over a hundred keepers with this theme. Among these keepers are many Wench titles. There’s Jo’s AN ARRANGED MARRIAGE, AN UNWILLING BRIDE, DARK CHAMPION, CHRISTMAS ANGEL, FORBIDDEN, FORBIDDEN MAGIC, and THE ROGUE’s RETURN; Loretta’s DON”T TEMPT ME; Anne’s TALLIE’S KNIGHT, THE PERFFECT STRANGER, and THE STOLEN PRINCESS; Edith’s TO WED A STRANGER and A BRIDE FOR HIS CONVENIENCE; your LOVE FOREVER AFTER, IMPOSSIBLE DREAMS, and THE TROUBLE WITH MAGIC; Mary Jo’s THE WOULD-BE WIDOW, THE BARGAIN, VEILS of SILK, THE BARTERED BRIDE, and A KISS OF FATE. I’m sure I’m missing some. And I’m not even listing favorites by Mary Balogh, Carla Kelly, Eloisa James . . . 🙂

    Reply
  23. I’m a lover of harmony too, Pat, and will go to great lengths to avoid conflict in RL–a predictable trait of an INFP type. But I never thought about this characteristic contributing to my writing struggles with conflict.
    I do love marriage-of-convenience tales. My book catalog shows well over a hundred keepers with this theme. Among these keepers are many Wench titles. There’s Jo’s AN ARRANGED MARRIAGE, AN UNWILLING BRIDE, DARK CHAMPION, CHRISTMAS ANGEL, FORBIDDEN, FORBIDDEN MAGIC, and THE ROGUE’s RETURN; Loretta’s DON”T TEMPT ME; Anne’s TALLIE’S KNIGHT, THE PERFFECT STRANGER, and THE STOLEN PRINCESS; Edith’s TO WED A STRANGER and A BRIDE FOR HIS CONVENIENCE; your LOVE FOREVER AFTER, IMPOSSIBLE DREAMS, and THE TROUBLE WITH MAGIC; Mary Jo’s THE WOULD-BE WIDOW, THE BARGAIN, VEILS of SILK, THE BARTERED BRIDE, and A KISS OF FATE. I’m sure I’m missing some. And I’m not even listing favorites by Mary Balogh, Carla Kelly, Eloisa James . . . 🙂

    Reply
  24. I’m a lover of harmony too, Pat, and will go to great lengths to avoid conflict in RL–a predictable trait of an INFP type. But I never thought about this characteristic contributing to my writing struggles with conflict.
    I do love marriage-of-convenience tales. My book catalog shows well over a hundred keepers with this theme. Among these keepers are many Wench titles. There’s Jo’s AN ARRANGED MARRIAGE, AN UNWILLING BRIDE, DARK CHAMPION, CHRISTMAS ANGEL, FORBIDDEN, FORBIDDEN MAGIC, and THE ROGUE’s RETURN; Loretta’s DON”T TEMPT ME; Anne’s TALLIE’S KNIGHT, THE PERFFECT STRANGER, and THE STOLEN PRINCESS; Edith’s TO WED A STRANGER and A BRIDE FOR HIS CONVENIENCE; your LOVE FOREVER AFTER, IMPOSSIBLE DREAMS, and THE TROUBLE WITH MAGIC; Mary Jo’s THE WOULD-BE WIDOW, THE BARGAIN, VEILS of SILK, THE BARTERED BRIDE, and A KISS OF FATE. I’m sure I’m missing some. And I’m not even listing favorites by Mary Balogh, Carla Kelly, Eloisa James . . . 🙂

    Reply
  25. I’m a lover of harmony too, Pat, and will go to great lengths to avoid conflict in RL–a predictable trait of an INFP type. But I never thought about this characteristic contributing to my writing struggles with conflict.
    I do love marriage-of-convenience tales. My book catalog shows well over a hundred keepers with this theme. Among these keepers are many Wench titles. There’s Jo’s AN ARRANGED MARRIAGE, AN UNWILLING BRIDE, DARK CHAMPION, CHRISTMAS ANGEL, FORBIDDEN, FORBIDDEN MAGIC, and THE ROGUE’s RETURN; Loretta’s DON”T TEMPT ME; Anne’s TALLIE’S KNIGHT, THE PERFFECT STRANGER, and THE STOLEN PRINCESS; Edith’s TO WED A STRANGER and A BRIDE FOR HIS CONVENIENCE; your LOVE FOREVER AFTER, IMPOSSIBLE DREAMS, and THE TROUBLE WITH MAGIC; Mary Jo’s THE WOULD-BE WIDOW, THE BARGAIN, VEILS of SILK, THE BARTERED BRIDE, and A KISS OF FATE. I’m sure I’m missing some. And I’m not even listing favorites by Mary Balogh, Carla Kelly, Eloisa James . . . 🙂

    Reply
  26. Janga, I suspect your desire to promote harmony resists setting up situations that cause conflict. Maybe we need to start a new genre that’s oriented to peace and love!
    Oh, all the lovely books I can re-read in the interest of research! I may not come out again until spring…

    Reply
  27. Janga, I suspect your desire to promote harmony resists setting up situations that cause conflict. Maybe we need to start a new genre that’s oriented to peace and love!
    Oh, all the lovely books I can re-read in the interest of research! I may not come out again until spring…

    Reply
  28. Janga, I suspect your desire to promote harmony resists setting up situations that cause conflict. Maybe we need to start a new genre that’s oriented to peace and love!
    Oh, all the lovely books I can re-read in the interest of research! I may not come out again until spring…

    Reply
  29. Janga, I suspect your desire to promote harmony resists setting up situations that cause conflict. Maybe we need to start a new genre that’s oriented to peace and love!
    Oh, all the lovely books I can re-read in the interest of research! I may not come out again until spring…

    Reply
  30. Janga, I suspect your desire to promote harmony resists setting up situations that cause conflict. Maybe we need to start a new genre that’s oriented to peace and love!
    Oh, all the lovely books I can re-read in the interest of research! I may not come out again until spring…

    Reply
  31. There are so many good marriage of convenience stories out there. janga certainly mentioned a lot.
    How about an uncle trying to commit an heiress to Bedlam in order to gain her fortune. He has raised her keeping her out of society and spreading rumors about her behavior and mental state. The hero cares nothing about the sanity of the young woman, he just has a score to settle with her uncle. He marries her to keep her out of Bedlam thereby keeping her uncle from getting the fortune.
    It has probably already been done, but I’d like to read one with that plot.

    Reply
  32. There are so many good marriage of convenience stories out there. janga certainly mentioned a lot.
    How about an uncle trying to commit an heiress to Bedlam in order to gain her fortune. He has raised her keeping her out of society and spreading rumors about her behavior and mental state. The hero cares nothing about the sanity of the young woman, he just has a score to settle with her uncle. He marries her to keep her out of Bedlam thereby keeping her uncle from getting the fortune.
    It has probably already been done, but I’d like to read one with that plot.

    Reply
  33. There are so many good marriage of convenience stories out there. janga certainly mentioned a lot.
    How about an uncle trying to commit an heiress to Bedlam in order to gain her fortune. He has raised her keeping her out of society and spreading rumors about her behavior and mental state. The hero cares nothing about the sanity of the young woman, he just has a score to settle with her uncle. He marries her to keep her out of Bedlam thereby keeping her uncle from getting the fortune.
    It has probably already been done, but I’d like to read one with that plot.

    Reply
  34. There are so many good marriage of convenience stories out there. janga certainly mentioned a lot.
    How about an uncle trying to commit an heiress to Bedlam in order to gain her fortune. He has raised her keeping her out of society and spreading rumors about her behavior and mental state. The hero cares nothing about the sanity of the young woman, he just has a score to settle with her uncle. He marries her to keep her out of Bedlam thereby keeping her uncle from getting the fortune.
    It has probably already been done, but I’d like to read one with that plot.

    Reply
  35. There are so many good marriage of convenience stories out there. janga certainly mentioned a lot.
    How about an uncle trying to commit an heiress to Bedlam in order to gain her fortune. He has raised her keeping her out of society and spreading rumors about her behavior and mental state. The hero cares nothing about the sanity of the young woman, he just has a score to settle with her uncle. He marries her to keep her out of Bedlam thereby keeping her uncle from getting the fortune.
    It has probably already been done, but I’d like to read one with that plot.

    Reply
  36. I love the Bedlam idea! I don’t think I’ve done a Gothic mad heroine in a long time. Must smack my hand and stick with revisions before the little hamster in my head takes off with this…

    Reply
  37. I love the Bedlam idea! I don’t think I’ve done a Gothic mad heroine in a long time. Must smack my hand and stick with revisions before the little hamster in my head takes off with this…

    Reply
  38. I love the Bedlam idea! I don’t think I’ve done a Gothic mad heroine in a long time. Must smack my hand and stick with revisions before the little hamster in my head takes off with this…

    Reply
  39. I love the Bedlam idea! I don’t think I’ve done a Gothic mad heroine in a long time. Must smack my hand and stick with revisions before the little hamster in my head takes off with this…

    Reply
  40. I love the Bedlam idea! I don’t think I’ve done a Gothic mad heroine in a long time. Must smack my hand and stick with revisions before the little hamster in my head takes off with this…

    Reply
  41. could you have the male having a secret “ability” connected with him having no family experience, like maybe his family was distroyed by persons who are frightned by their ablilties?

    Reply
  42. could you have the male having a secret “ability” connected with him having no family experience, like maybe his family was distroyed by persons who are frightned by their ablilties?

    Reply
  43. could you have the male having a secret “ability” connected with him having no family experience, like maybe his family was distroyed by persons who are frightned by their ablilties?

    Reply
  44. could you have the male having a secret “ability” connected with him having no family experience, like maybe his family was distroyed by persons who are frightned by their ablilties?

    Reply
  45. could you have the male having a secret “ability” connected with him having no family experience, like maybe his family was distroyed by persons who are frightned by their ablilties?

    Reply
  46. Intriguing possibility, Dorotha! That would give him great internal conflict. And maybe the heroine could really need his secret abilities, so they wouldn’t be secret anymore!

    Reply
  47. Intriguing possibility, Dorotha! That would give him great internal conflict. And maybe the heroine could really need his secret abilities, so they wouldn’t be secret anymore!

    Reply
  48. Intriguing possibility, Dorotha! That would give him great internal conflict. And maybe the heroine could really need his secret abilities, so they wouldn’t be secret anymore!

    Reply
  49. Intriguing possibility, Dorotha! That would give him great internal conflict. And maybe the heroine could really need his secret abilities, so they wouldn’t be secret anymore!

    Reply
  50. Intriguing possibility, Dorotha! That would give him great internal conflict. And maybe the heroine could really need his secret abilities, so they wouldn’t be secret anymore!

    Reply
  51. Hi Pat, I laughed when I read about your conflict problems — that’s the exact excuse I use whenever I explain why I never became the writer that I planned to be. I can’t bear to put my characters through real hardships, leaving very little left to talk about.
    My take on the marriage of convenience thing would be something like this: two people who marry for other reasons than by choice might very well not be ready to open their lives and hearts to anyone, much less a stranger. You know how when a person feels “ready”, they usually find someone fairly quickly who also feels “ready” to take the step of committing to a relationship. Well if they are both ordinary (not gorgeous or perfect) but each has one or two irritating faults, then it would be quite interesting to see how life brings them individually (and perhaps not at the same time) to the point of readiness. Suddenly seeing something potentially exciting about someone you thought was ordinary is a big shot of adrenaline! Oops, you guessed it, I’m a sucker for those “just good friends” stories where they suddenly fall in love.

    Reply
  52. Hi Pat, I laughed when I read about your conflict problems — that’s the exact excuse I use whenever I explain why I never became the writer that I planned to be. I can’t bear to put my characters through real hardships, leaving very little left to talk about.
    My take on the marriage of convenience thing would be something like this: two people who marry for other reasons than by choice might very well not be ready to open their lives and hearts to anyone, much less a stranger. You know how when a person feels “ready”, they usually find someone fairly quickly who also feels “ready” to take the step of committing to a relationship. Well if they are both ordinary (not gorgeous or perfect) but each has one or two irritating faults, then it would be quite interesting to see how life brings them individually (and perhaps not at the same time) to the point of readiness. Suddenly seeing something potentially exciting about someone you thought was ordinary is a big shot of adrenaline! Oops, you guessed it, I’m a sucker for those “just good friends” stories where they suddenly fall in love.

    Reply
  53. Hi Pat, I laughed when I read about your conflict problems — that’s the exact excuse I use whenever I explain why I never became the writer that I planned to be. I can’t bear to put my characters through real hardships, leaving very little left to talk about.
    My take on the marriage of convenience thing would be something like this: two people who marry for other reasons than by choice might very well not be ready to open their lives and hearts to anyone, much less a stranger. You know how when a person feels “ready”, they usually find someone fairly quickly who also feels “ready” to take the step of committing to a relationship. Well if they are both ordinary (not gorgeous or perfect) but each has one or two irritating faults, then it would be quite interesting to see how life brings them individually (and perhaps not at the same time) to the point of readiness. Suddenly seeing something potentially exciting about someone you thought was ordinary is a big shot of adrenaline! Oops, you guessed it, I’m a sucker for those “just good friends” stories where they suddenly fall in love.

    Reply
  54. Hi Pat, I laughed when I read about your conflict problems — that’s the exact excuse I use whenever I explain why I never became the writer that I planned to be. I can’t bear to put my characters through real hardships, leaving very little left to talk about.
    My take on the marriage of convenience thing would be something like this: two people who marry for other reasons than by choice might very well not be ready to open their lives and hearts to anyone, much less a stranger. You know how when a person feels “ready”, they usually find someone fairly quickly who also feels “ready” to take the step of committing to a relationship. Well if they are both ordinary (not gorgeous or perfect) but each has one or two irritating faults, then it would be quite interesting to see how life brings them individually (and perhaps not at the same time) to the point of readiness. Suddenly seeing something potentially exciting about someone you thought was ordinary is a big shot of adrenaline! Oops, you guessed it, I’m a sucker for those “just good friends” stories where they suddenly fall in love.

    Reply
  55. Hi Pat, I laughed when I read about your conflict problems — that’s the exact excuse I use whenever I explain why I never became the writer that I planned to be. I can’t bear to put my characters through real hardships, leaving very little left to talk about.
    My take on the marriage of convenience thing would be something like this: two people who marry for other reasons than by choice might very well not be ready to open their lives and hearts to anyone, much less a stranger. You know how when a person feels “ready”, they usually find someone fairly quickly who also feels “ready” to take the step of committing to a relationship. Well if they are both ordinary (not gorgeous or perfect) but each has one or two irritating faults, then it would be quite interesting to see how life brings them individually (and perhaps not at the same time) to the point of readiness. Suddenly seeing something potentially exciting about someone you thought was ordinary is a big shot of adrenaline! Oops, you guessed it, I’m a sucker for those “just good friends” stories where they suddenly fall in love.

    Reply
  56. There ought to be more room in the market for those “just good friends” stories! I love your take on MOC. Very nice insight, thank you. I think you’re on to something there, if I can keep lust from getting in the way. “G”

    Reply
  57. There ought to be more room in the market for those “just good friends” stories! I love your take on MOC. Very nice insight, thank you. I think you’re on to something there, if I can keep lust from getting in the way. “G”

    Reply
  58. There ought to be more room in the market for those “just good friends” stories! I love your take on MOC. Very nice insight, thank you. I think you’re on to something there, if I can keep lust from getting in the way. “G”

    Reply
  59. There ought to be more room in the market for those “just good friends” stories! I love your take on MOC. Very nice insight, thank you. I think you’re on to something there, if I can keep lust from getting in the way. “G”

    Reply
  60. There ought to be more room in the market for those “just good friends” stories! I love your take on MOC. Very nice insight, thank you. I think you’re on to something there, if I can keep lust from getting in the way. “G”

    Reply
  61. Pat, as the youngest (by 7 years) in a large family of Very Bossy People I learned that conflict would never end happily for me and that avoidance was much more effective.
    So the noisy, arguing kind of conflict isn’t one I use often in my books. Conflict of goals, conflict of needs, the difference between what they think they want and what, deep down they want/need/are scared to want is much more useful to me, and that fits well with convenient marriage stories, of which I’m very fond.

    Reply
  62. Pat, as the youngest (by 7 years) in a large family of Very Bossy People I learned that conflict would never end happily for me and that avoidance was much more effective.
    So the noisy, arguing kind of conflict isn’t one I use often in my books. Conflict of goals, conflict of needs, the difference between what they think they want and what, deep down they want/need/are scared to want is much more useful to me, and that fits well with convenient marriage stories, of which I’m very fond.

    Reply
  63. Pat, as the youngest (by 7 years) in a large family of Very Bossy People I learned that conflict would never end happily for me and that avoidance was much more effective.
    So the noisy, arguing kind of conflict isn’t one I use often in my books. Conflict of goals, conflict of needs, the difference between what they think they want and what, deep down they want/need/are scared to want is much more useful to me, and that fits well with convenient marriage stories, of which I’m very fond.

    Reply
  64. Pat, as the youngest (by 7 years) in a large family of Very Bossy People I learned that conflict would never end happily for me and that avoidance was much more effective.
    So the noisy, arguing kind of conflict isn’t one I use often in my books. Conflict of goals, conflict of needs, the difference between what they think they want and what, deep down they want/need/are scared to want is much more useful to me, and that fits well with convenient marriage stories, of which I’m very fond.

    Reply
  65. Pat, as the youngest (by 7 years) in a large family of Very Bossy People I learned that conflict would never end happily for me and that avoidance was much more effective.
    So the noisy, arguing kind of conflict isn’t one I use often in my books. Conflict of goals, conflict of needs, the difference between what they think they want and what, deep down they want/need/are scared to want is much more useful to me, and that fits well with convenient marriage stories, of which I’m very fond.

    Reply
  66. Pat, maybe you signed in through type-pad as well. I think that’s the key. Though before, when i was still wrestling to get an avatar up, yours was there all the time, showing me it could be done.

    Reply
  67. Pat, maybe you signed in through type-pad as well. I think that’s the key. Though before, when i was still wrestling to get an avatar up, yours was there all the time, showing me it could be done.

    Reply
  68. Pat, maybe you signed in through type-pad as well. I think that’s the key. Though before, when i was still wrestling to get an avatar up, yours was there all the time, showing me it could be done.

    Reply
  69. Pat, maybe you signed in through type-pad as well. I think that’s the key. Though before, when i was still wrestling to get an avatar up, yours was there all the time, showing me it could be done.

    Reply
  70. Pat, maybe you signed in through type-pad as well. I think that’s the key. Though before, when i was still wrestling to get an avatar up, yours was there all the time, showing me it could be done.

    Reply
  71. Pat, I’ve never posted and have just started reading the wordwenches website. I love it. I am a unpublished romance writer. Have one written, thinking of starting another. Hearing you write about your struggles inspires me. Thanks for the honesty.

    Reply
  72. Pat, I’ve never posted and have just started reading the wordwenches website. I love it. I am a unpublished romance writer. Have one written, thinking of starting another. Hearing you write about your struggles inspires me. Thanks for the honesty.

    Reply
  73. Pat, I’ve never posted and have just started reading the wordwenches website. I love it. I am a unpublished romance writer. Have one written, thinking of starting another. Hearing you write about your struggles inspires me. Thanks for the honesty.

    Reply
  74. Pat, I’ve never posted and have just started reading the wordwenches website. I love it. I am a unpublished romance writer. Have one written, thinking of starting another. Hearing you write about your struggles inspires me. Thanks for the honesty.

    Reply
  75. Pat, I’ve never posted and have just started reading the wordwenches website. I love it. I am a unpublished romance writer. Have one written, thinking of starting another. Hearing you write about your struggles inspires me. Thanks for the honesty.

    Reply
  76. I adore the MOC plot device. I have a few half-written novels in my hard drive I could loan you. *g*
    What if the heroine posed as an heiress in the hopes of finding a rich mate who is also a bit of a pushover and will allow her siblings to come along to his palatial pad. She lands hero, under false pretenses, but neither realizes until the fateful vows are said and then they have to find a wicked uncle’s buried treasure…or something like that. 🙂
    I’m sure you’ll come up with something brilliant and we’ll all love it! 🙂
    Thanks for showing us the inner workings of an author and her craft. 🙂

    Reply
  77. I adore the MOC plot device. I have a few half-written novels in my hard drive I could loan you. *g*
    What if the heroine posed as an heiress in the hopes of finding a rich mate who is also a bit of a pushover and will allow her siblings to come along to his palatial pad. She lands hero, under false pretenses, but neither realizes until the fateful vows are said and then they have to find a wicked uncle’s buried treasure…or something like that. 🙂
    I’m sure you’ll come up with something brilliant and we’ll all love it! 🙂
    Thanks for showing us the inner workings of an author and her craft. 🙂

    Reply
  78. I adore the MOC plot device. I have a few half-written novels in my hard drive I could loan you. *g*
    What if the heroine posed as an heiress in the hopes of finding a rich mate who is also a bit of a pushover and will allow her siblings to come along to his palatial pad. She lands hero, under false pretenses, but neither realizes until the fateful vows are said and then they have to find a wicked uncle’s buried treasure…or something like that. 🙂
    I’m sure you’ll come up with something brilliant and we’ll all love it! 🙂
    Thanks for showing us the inner workings of an author and her craft. 🙂

    Reply
  79. I adore the MOC plot device. I have a few half-written novels in my hard drive I could loan you. *g*
    What if the heroine posed as an heiress in the hopes of finding a rich mate who is also a bit of a pushover and will allow her siblings to come along to his palatial pad. She lands hero, under false pretenses, but neither realizes until the fateful vows are said and then they have to find a wicked uncle’s buried treasure…or something like that. 🙂
    I’m sure you’ll come up with something brilliant and we’ll all love it! 🙂
    Thanks for showing us the inner workings of an author and her craft. 🙂

    Reply
  80. I adore the MOC plot device. I have a few half-written novels in my hard drive I could loan you. *g*
    What if the heroine posed as an heiress in the hopes of finding a rich mate who is also a bit of a pushover and will allow her siblings to come along to his palatial pad. She lands hero, under false pretenses, but neither realizes until the fateful vows are said and then they have to find a wicked uncle’s buried treasure…or something like that. 🙂
    I’m sure you’ll come up with something brilliant and we’ll all love it! 🙂
    Thanks for showing us the inner workings of an author and her craft. 🙂

    Reply
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