Confessions of an Award Ceremony Organiser!

WinnerNicola here, and today I am talking about award ceremonies, those amazing, glittering, special occasions that always run like clockwork, right? Hmm…

I love a good award ceremony. The glamour, the excitement in the air, the love in the room… And hopefully The empty room no mistakes when it comes to announcing the winners! A couple of weeks ago I was in a taxi heading across London to the Romantic Novelists’ Association 2017 award ceremony in the beautiful location of the Gladstone Library in Whitehall Place. When I arrived and threw open the doors to make my entrance… The room was empty because it was three o’clock in the afternoon and the awards didn’t start until six and between now and then an awful lot of things had to happen. In fact it was a transformation worth of Cinderella!

Of course, all the planning starts a long time in advance. The room was booked last year, the refreshments ordered, the seating plan organised, the trophies engraved and the photographer engaged. So really it was a question of bringing it all together: Decorating the room, greeting the guests and ironing out any little issues along the way. And there, of course, is the fly in the ointment, because something unexpected is always going to happen whenever you organise a big event.


Lodge ParkI was pre-warned because a few years ago we organised a small-ish wedding anniversary party in a local stately home, Lodge Park, in the picture. It was an absolutely wonderful venue but not unreasonably the age of the place brought its own issues. No high heels on the 17th century wood floor. Ditto red wine in case we spilled it on the fixtures and furnishings. Not more than 10 people on the balcony at any one time. No drinks on the roof… (I’m not sure what sort of a party they thought it was but perhaps previous experience with the British aristocracy had made them wary.) it all went beautifully on the day and everyone loved the venue and the event but it had been so stressful organising it that it came close to being a divorce rather than an anniversary party.

Meanwhile, back at the Gladstone Library, the number of guests was much larger but at least there was a team of us to deal with the problems. First we discovered that the stage was a bit on the small side. We worked out that with the celebrity guest presenter – Prue Leith, author and TV personality – plus Jane Wenham Jones, our wonderful compere, plus the winners, there would be a danger of someone falling off the side, especially in those glamorous high heels! A bigger stage was definitely needed. That was sorted.

We’d had a big response and were at our limit of guests, which was great. There was also a lot of press interest, which was equally RONA 1
fantastic but meant that the table plans needed to be a bit flexible. If someone turned up at the last minute we slotted them in as best we could. I gave up my seat – and then realised I hadn’t anywhere else to go. No canapés for me! Aargh. HOw would I survive the long evening without food? And whilst on the subject of canapés, some people will scoop up the whole plate full before other people have had their chance even to have one!

Some of the VIP guests went AWOL and I had to round them up like a sheepdog. Some random strangers wandered into the guest reception and eagerly helped themselves to champagne. The direction signs were exactly the wrong size to fit on the doors and kept falling off. Some of the winners’ envelopes were stuck down so firmly that I thought we were going to need a letter opener to break into them. No one wants to have to wait while the poor celebrity presenter struggles with a stubborn envelope! And by the end my lovely shoes, which had felt so comfortable a few hours before, were so painful I never wanted to see them again.

RONA 2BUT everyone was having a good time. It wasn’t so much about the eating and drinking, but seeing old friends and making new ones, chatting to other people in the industry and of course, celebrating with the finalists and winners. (There are more details of the RNA awards and bigger photos here!)  So in the end I’m sure all the stress and hard work is worthwhile. I’ve booked next year’s event already… But before we start organising, the whole team deserves a bit of a rest!

Have you ever been involved in organising a really big event? What was it like? Any tips or experiences to share? And if you’ve been to an award ceremony or party, what were the things you enjoyed the most or least about it?

80 thoughts on “Confessions of an Award Ceremony Organiser!”

  1. You go to some countries and they either make you wear disgusting (reused), sweaty coverings over your shoes when you walk through the buildings, or they make you go barefoot. The “no high heels” things is better than that. 🙂
    I could live with the “no red wine” rule – I’m a white wine person!
    The Australian Army “volunteered” my father (without his knowledge) to organise the fortieth anniversary military parade and wedding-style hotel reception for the Battle of Binh Ba (Vietnam War) in Canberra.
    That meant closing one of the main roads in the capital city for the army/navy/air force to march, inviting the Governor General and the federal politicians etc.
    But it also meant organising hotels for hundreds of people, and doing things like choosing menus, and colours for table runners and chair coverings.
    It was so funny watching him act like a young bride planning her dream wedding!
    I helped him with that event, but I’ve never personally been tasked with a job like that.

    Reply
  2. You go to some countries and they either make you wear disgusting (reused), sweaty coverings over your shoes when you walk through the buildings, or they make you go barefoot. The “no high heels” things is better than that. 🙂
    I could live with the “no red wine” rule – I’m a white wine person!
    The Australian Army “volunteered” my father (without his knowledge) to organise the fortieth anniversary military parade and wedding-style hotel reception for the Battle of Binh Ba (Vietnam War) in Canberra.
    That meant closing one of the main roads in the capital city for the army/navy/air force to march, inviting the Governor General and the federal politicians etc.
    But it also meant organising hotels for hundreds of people, and doing things like choosing menus, and colours for table runners and chair coverings.
    It was so funny watching him act like a young bride planning her dream wedding!
    I helped him with that event, but I’ve never personally been tasked with a job like that.

    Reply
  3. You go to some countries and they either make you wear disgusting (reused), sweaty coverings over your shoes when you walk through the buildings, or they make you go barefoot. The “no high heels” things is better than that. 🙂
    I could live with the “no red wine” rule – I’m a white wine person!
    The Australian Army “volunteered” my father (without his knowledge) to organise the fortieth anniversary military parade and wedding-style hotel reception for the Battle of Binh Ba (Vietnam War) in Canberra.
    That meant closing one of the main roads in the capital city for the army/navy/air force to march, inviting the Governor General and the federal politicians etc.
    But it also meant organising hotels for hundreds of people, and doing things like choosing menus, and colours for table runners and chair coverings.
    It was so funny watching him act like a young bride planning her dream wedding!
    I helped him with that event, but I’ve never personally been tasked with a job like that.

    Reply
  4. You go to some countries and they either make you wear disgusting (reused), sweaty coverings over your shoes when you walk through the buildings, or they make you go barefoot. The “no high heels” things is better than that. 🙂
    I could live with the “no red wine” rule – I’m a white wine person!
    The Australian Army “volunteered” my father (without his knowledge) to organise the fortieth anniversary military parade and wedding-style hotel reception for the Battle of Binh Ba (Vietnam War) in Canberra.
    That meant closing one of the main roads in the capital city for the army/navy/air force to march, inviting the Governor General and the federal politicians etc.
    But it also meant organising hotels for hundreds of people, and doing things like choosing menus, and colours for table runners and chair coverings.
    It was so funny watching him act like a young bride planning her dream wedding!
    I helped him with that event, but I’ve never personally been tasked with a job like that.

    Reply
  5. You go to some countries and they either make you wear disgusting (reused), sweaty coverings over your shoes when you walk through the buildings, or they make you go barefoot. The “no high heels” things is better than that. 🙂
    I could live with the “no red wine” rule – I’m a white wine person!
    The Australian Army “volunteered” my father (without his knowledge) to organise the fortieth anniversary military parade and wedding-style hotel reception for the Battle of Binh Ba (Vietnam War) in Canberra.
    That meant closing one of the main roads in the capital city for the army/navy/air force to march, inviting the Governor General and the federal politicians etc.
    But it also meant organising hotels for hundreds of people, and doing things like choosing menus, and colours for table runners and chair coverings.
    It was so funny watching him act like a young bride planning her dream wedding!
    I helped him with that event, but I’ve never personally been tasked with a job like that.

    Reply
  6. I used to plan events years and years ago, but not anymore. I work for a University and we have our annual student award banquet (which, coincidentally, was last night). I don’t have to help plan it, but my admin asst does and I get to help when things don’t go as planned. It’s amazing the minutiae that have to be considered. We have had our event several places, last years venue was a favorite and we wanted to use it again but the Dean requested the Natural History museum which has a list of restrictions a mile long. You can’t bring in cardboard for example (attracts bugs to the exhibits apparently). It was a nightmare and a lot of people were standing. None of us (the staff) had chairs, but it happened and we lived to tell the tale. LOL I had to giggle at the “no drinks on the roof” instruction. Oh so glad you mentioned it, we’ll definitely keep that in mind. I actually miss the planning days back when I was an admin. There’s a certain satisfaction when it’s happening that, even with bumps in the road, we did good! 😉

    Reply
  7. I used to plan events years and years ago, but not anymore. I work for a University and we have our annual student award banquet (which, coincidentally, was last night). I don’t have to help plan it, but my admin asst does and I get to help when things don’t go as planned. It’s amazing the minutiae that have to be considered. We have had our event several places, last years venue was a favorite and we wanted to use it again but the Dean requested the Natural History museum which has a list of restrictions a mile long. You can’t bring in cardboard for example (attracts bugs to the exhibits apparently). It was a nightmare and a lot of people were standing. None of us (the staff) had chairs, but it happened and we lived to tell the tale. LOL I had to giggle at the “no drinks on the roof” instruction. Oh so glad you mentioned it, we’ll definitely keep that in mind. I actually miss the planning days back when I was an admin. There’s a certain satisfaction when it’s happening that, even with bumps in the road, we did good! 😉

    Reply
  8. I used to plan events years and years ago, but not anymore. I work for a University and we have our annual student award banquet (which, coincidentally, was last night). I don’t have to help plan it, but my admin asst does and I get to help when things don’t go as planned. It’s amazing the minutiae that have to be considered. We have had our event several places, last years venue was a favorite and we wanted to use it again but the Dean requested the Natural History museum which has a list of restrictions a mile long. You can’t bring in cardboard for example (attracts bugs to the exhibits apparently). It was a nightmare and a lot of people were standing. None of us (the staff) had chairs, but it happened and we lived to tell the tale. LOL I had to giggle at the “no drinks on the roof” instruction. Oh so glad you mentioned it, we’ll definitely keep that in mind. I actually miss the planning days back when I was an admin. There’s a certain satisfaction when it’s happening that, even with bumps in the road, we did good! 😉

    Reply
  9. I used to plan events years and years ago, but not anymore. I work for a University and we have our annual student award banquet (which, coincidentally, was last night). I don’t have to help plan it, but my admin asst does and I get to help when things don’t go as planned. It’s amazing the minutiae that have to be considered. We have had our event several places, last years venue was a favorite and we wanted to use it again but the Dean requested the Natural History museum which has a list of restrictions a mile long. You can’t bring in cardboard for example (attracts bugs to the exhibits apparently). It was a nightmare and a lot of people were standing. None of us (the staff) had chairs, but it happened and we lived to tell the tale. LOL I had to giggle at the “no drinks on the roof” instruction. Oh so glad you mentioned it, we’ll definitely keep that in mind. I actually miss the planning days back when I was an admin. There’s a certain satisfaction when it’s happening that, even with bumps in the road, we did good! 😉

    Reply
  10. I used to plan events years and years ago, but not anymore. I work for a University and we have our annual student award banquet (which, coincidentally, was last night). I don’t have to help plan it, but my admin asst does and I get to help when things don’t go as planned. It’s amazing the minutiae that have to be considered. We have had our event several places, last years venue was a favorite and we wanted to use it again but the Dean requested the Natural History museum which has a list of restrictions a mile long. You can’t bring in cardboard for example (attracts bugs to the exhibits apparently). It was a nightmare and a lot of people were standing. None of us (the staff) had chairs, but it happened and we lived to tell the tale. LOL I had to giggle at the “no drinks on the roof” instruction. Oh so glad you mentioned it, we’ll definitely keep that in mind. I actually miss the planning days back when I was an admin. There’s a certain satisfaction when it’s happening that, even with bumps in the road, we did good! 😉

    Reply
  11. That’s very true, Sonya. This week I’ve been visiting a number of historic houses and there are little blue plastic bags to wear on your feet!
    Wow, that is quite a job your father was tasked with. definitely it would need to be handled with military precision with so many people involved and different logistics to juggle! There is a lot of satisfaction in handling a challenge like that.

    Reply
  12. That’s very true, Sonya. This week I’ve been visiting a number of historic houses and there are little blue plastic bags to wear on your feet!
    Wow, that is quite a job your father was tasked with. definitely it would need to be handled with military precision with so many people involved and different logistics to juggle! There is a lot of satisfaction in handling a challenge like that.

    Reply
  13. That’s very true, Sonya. This week I’ve been visiting a number of historic houses and there are little blue plastic bags to wear on your feet!
    Wow, that is quite a job your father was tasked with. definitely it would need to be handled with military precision with so many people involved and different logistics to juggle! There is a lot of satisfaction in handling a challenge like that.

    Reply
  14. That’s very true, Sonya. This week I’ve been visiting a number of historic houses and there are little blue plastic bags to wear on your feet!
    Wow, that is quite a job your father was tasked with. definitely it would need to be handled with military precision with so many people involved and different logistics to juggle! There is a lot of satisfaction in handling a challenge like that.

    Reply
  15. That’s very true, Sonya. This week I’ve been visiting a number of historic houses and there are little blue plastic bags to wear on your feet!
    Wow, that is quite a job your father was tasked with. definitely it would need to be handled with military precision with so many people involved and different logistics to juggle! There is a lot of satisfaction in handling a challenge like that.

    Reply
  16. Well, who knew that cardboard attracts bugs! That is a new one to me. In a previous life I was a University administrator too and organised open days and award ceremonies. I totally agree with you about that feeling of a job well done!

    Reply
  17. Well, who knew that cardboard attracts bugs! That is a new one to me. In a previous life I was a University administrator too and organised open days and award ceremonies. I totally agree with you about that feeling of a job well done!

    Reply
  18. Well, who knew that cardboard attracts bugs! That is a new one to me. In a previous life I was a University administrator too and organised open days and award ceremonies. I totally agree with you about that feeling of a job well done!

    Reply
  19. Well, who knew that cardboard attracts bugs! That is a new one to me. In a previous life I was a University administrator too and organised open days and award ceremonies. I totally agree with you about that feeling of a job well done!

    Reply
  20. Well, who knew that cardboard attracts bugs! That is a new one to me. In a previous life I was a University administrator too and organised open days and award ceremonies. I totally agree with you about that feeling of a job well done!

    Reply
  21. Back in my work life, when I was a secretary, I used to work the Employee Service Awards Banquet. It was lots of fun – handing out corsages and gifts, seeing the folks got to the right table, etc. Then I was put in charge of the whole affair for several years. It was challenging but rewarding.
    We had two of them a year. Trouble was in the Fall I also had responsibility for our United Way drive. Keep in mind too, this was before everyone had personal computers on their desks. A lot was done manually. Long hours and lots of overtime. But I was young and had lots of energy. I also kept in mind all the “things” that overtime money would buy me (smile).

    Reply
  22. Back in my work life, when I was a secretary, I used to work the Employee Service Awards Banquet. It was lots of fun – handing out corsages and gifts, seeing the folks got to the right table, etc. Then I was put in charge of the whole affair for several years. It was challenging but rewarding.
    We had two of them a year. Trouble was in the Fall I also had responsibility for our United Way drive. Keep in mind too, this was before everyone had personal computers on their desks. A lot was done manually. Long hours and lots of overtime. But I was young and had lots of energy. I also kept in mind all the “things” that overtime money would buy me (smile).

    Reply
  23. Back in my work life, when I was a secretary, I used to work the Employee Service Awards Banquet. It was lots of fun – handing out corsages and gifts, seeing the folks got to the right table, etc. Then I was put in charge of the whole affair for several years. It was challenging but rewarding.
    We had two of them a year. Trouble was in the Fall I also had responsibility for our United Way drive. Keep in mind too, this was before everyone had personal computers on their desks. A lot was done manually. Long hours and lots of overtime. But I was young and had lots of energy. I also kept in mind all the “things” that overtime money would buy me (smile).

    Reply
  24. Back in my work life, when I was a secretary, I used to work the Employee Service Awards Banquet. It was lots of fun – handing out corsages and gifts, seeing the folks got to the right table, etc. Then I was put in charge of the whole affair for several years. It was challenging but rewarding.
    We had two of them a year. Trouble was in the Fall I also had responsibility for our United Way drive. Keep in mind too, this was before everyone had personal computers on their desks. A lot was done manually. Long hours and lots of overtime. But I was young and had lots of energy. I also kept in mind all the “things” that overtime money would buy me (smile).

    Reply
  25. Back in my work life, when I was a secretary, I used to work the Employee Service Awards Banquet. It was lots of fun – handing out corsages and gifts, seeing the folks got to the right table, etc. Then I was put in charge of the whole affair for several years. It was challenging but rewarding.
    We had two of them a year. Trouble was in the Fall I also had responsibility for our United Way drive. Keep in mind too, this was before everyone had personal computers on their desks. A lot was done manually. Long hours and lots of overtime. But I was young and had lots of energy. I also kept in mind all the “things” that overtime money would buy me (smile).

    Reply
  26. What a wonderful post, Nicola! Better you than me. *G* I’m sure you stood there in your excruciating shoes with a calm, “Rule, Britainnia!” smile on your face.
    I do hope you got some food!

    Reply
  27. What a wonderful post, Nicola! Better you than me. *G* I’m sure you stood there in your excruciating shoes with a calm, “Rule, Britainnia!” smile on your face.
    I do hope you got some food!

    Reply
  28. What a wonderful post, Nicola! Better you than me. *G* I’m sure you stood there in your excruciating shoes with a calm, “Rule, Britainnia!” smile on your face.
    I do hope you got some food!

    Reply
  29. What a wonderful post, Nicola! Better you than me. *G* I’m sure you stood there in your excruciating shoes with a calm, “Rule, Britainnia!” smile on your face.
    I do hope you got some food!

    Reply
  30. What a wonderful post, Nicola! Better you than me. *G* I’m sure you stood there in your excruciating shoes with a calm, “Rule, Britainnia!” smile on your face.
    I do hope you got some food!

    Reply
  31. I haven’t organized the type of event you were describing. But I HAVE served on the committee that ran (and its descendants still run) one of the fan-run Science-Fiction conventions that abound in the United States. I started out small, when we first joined the committee, but had gotten quite large, before we were physically removed from the area where the convention existed.
    I remember relatively cozy planning groups, followed by hectic weekends at the actual convention, plus managing to attend my favorite events.
    As I have said, we seem to have done allright; After 40 years, Archon is now one of the biggest regional conventions in the midwest.

    Reply
  32. I haven’t organized the type of event you were describing. But I HAVE served on the committee that ran (and its descendants still run) one of the fan-run Science-Fiction conventions that abound in the United States. I started out small, when we first joined the committee, but had gotten quite large, before we were physically removed from the area where the convention existed.
    I remember relatively cozy planning groups, followed by hectic weekends at the actual convention, plus managing to attend my favorite events.
    As I have said, we seem to have done allright; After 40 years, Archon is now one of the biggest regional conventions in the midwest.

    Reply
  33. I haven’t organized the type of event you were describing. But I HAVE served on the committee that ran (and its descendants still run) one of the fan-run Science-Fiction conventions that abound in the United States. I started out small, when we first joined the committee, but had gotten quite large, before we were physically removed from the area where the convention existed.
    I remember relatively cozy planning groups, followed by hectic weekends at the actual convention, plus managing to attend my favorite events.
    As I have said, we seem to have done allright; After 40 years, Archon is now one of the biggest regional conventions in the midwest.

    Reply
  34. I haven’t organized the type of event you were describing. But I HAVE served on the committee that ran (and its descendants still run) one of the fan-run Science-Fiction conventions that abound in the United States. I started out small, when we first joined the committee, but had gotten quite large, before we were physically removed from the area where the convention existed.
    I remember relatively cozy planning groups, followed by hectic weekends at the actual convention, plus managing to attend my favorite events.
    As I have said, we seem to have done allright; After 40 years, Archon is now one of the biggest regional conventions in the midwest.

    Reply
  35. I haven’t organized the type of event you were describing. But I HAVE served on the committee that ran (and its descendants still run) one of the fan-run Science-Fiction conventions that abound in the United States. I started out small, when we first joined the committee, but had gotten quite large, before we were physically removed from the area where the convention existed.
    I remember relatively cozy planning groups, followed by hectic weekends at the actual convention, plus managing to attend my favorite events.
    As I have said, we seem to have done allright; After 40 years, Archon is now one of the biggest regional conventions in the midwest.

    Reply
  36. I haven’t organised anything as highbrow as this but many years ago when I was working in a shop we gave a fashion show. There were lots of organisers but we were each responsible for our own departments and our own models. At the time I worked in the men’s department!! I was glad at the end of the evening that I had three brothers so I was well able to handle the guys modelling. It was hard work and we were going nonstop all night but we had great fun too. Once all the work was done I thoroughly enjoyed it.

    Reply
  37. I haven’t organised anything as highbrow as this but many years ago when I was working in a shop we gave a fashion show. There were lots of organisers but we were each responsible for our own departments and our own models. At the time I worked in the men’s department!! I was glad at the end of the evening that I had three brothers so I was well able to handle the guys modelling. It was hard work and we were going nonstop all night but we had great fun too. Once all the work was done I thoroughly enjoyed it.

    Reply
  38. I haven’t organised anything as highbrow as this but many years ago when I was working in a shop we gave a fashion show. There were lots of organisers but we were each responsible for our own departments and our own models. At the time I worked in the men’s department!! I was glad at the end of the evening that I had three brothers so I was well able to handle the guys modelling. It was hard work and we were going nonstop all night but we had great fun too. Once all the work was done I thoroughly enjoyed it.

    Reply
  39. I haven’t organised anything as highbrow as this but many years ago when I was working in a shop we gave a fashion show. There were lots of organisers but we were each responsible for our own departments and our own models. At the time I worked in the men’s department!! I was glad at the end of the evening that I had three brothers so I was well able to handle the guys modelling. It was hard work and we were going nonstop all night but we had great fun too. Once all the work was done I thoroughly enjoyed it.

    Reply
  40. I haven’t organised anything as highbrow as this but many years ago when I was working in a shop we gave a fashion show. There were lots of organisers but we were each responsible for our own departments and our own models. At the time I worked in the men’s department!! I was glad at the end of the evening that I had three brothers so I was well able to handle the guys modelling. It was hard work and we were going nonstop all night but we had great fun too. Once all the work was done I thoroughly enjoyed it.

    Reply
  41. I think it might be not that the cardboard attracts bugs, but that roaches and such can hide in the cardboard without being noticed and then infest the area. When we were on a bare-boat trip in the Caribbean they wouldn’t let us bring our boxed groceries on board for that reason.

    Reply
  42. I think it might be not that the cardboard attracts bugs, but that roaches and such can hide in the cardboard without being noticed and then infest the area. When we were on a bare-boat trip in the Caribbean they wouldn’t let us bring our boxed groceries on board for that reason.

    Reply
  43. I think it might be not that the cardboard attracts bugs, but that roaches and such can hide in the cardboard without being noticed and then infest the area. When we were on a bare-boat trip in the Caribbean they wouldn’t let us bring our boxed groceries on board for that reason.

    Reply
  44. I think it might be not that the cardboard attracts bugs, but that roaches and such can hide in the cardboard without being noticed and then infest the area. When we were on a bare-boat trip in the Caribbean they wouldn’t let us bring our boxed groceries on board for that reason.

    Reply
  45. I think it might be not that the cardboard attracts bugs, but that roaches and such can hide in the cardboard without being noticed and then infest the area. When we were on a bare-boat trip in the Caribbean they wouldn’t let us bring our boxed groceries on board for that reason.

    Reply
  46. In the past, yes, I have been responsible for things like that. Most of the time all went well. Of course there was the dog show and I forgot the hurdles and other equipment for the obedience show.
    But, most of the time, the wonderful thing about any event is the company you keep. People, hopefully enjoying themselves, are what make an event memorable.

    Reply
  47. In the past, yes, I have been responsible for things like that. Most of the time all went well. Of course there was the dog show and I forgot the hurdles and other equipment for the obedience show.
    But, most of the time, the wonderful thing about any event is the company you keep. People, hopefully enjoying themselves, are what make an event memorable.

    Reply
  48. In the past, yes, I have been responsible for things like that. Most of the time all went well. Of course there was the dog show and I forgot the hurdles and other equipment for the obedience show.
    But, most of the time, the wonderful thing about any event is the company you keep. People, hopefully enjoying themselves, are what make an event memorable.

    Reply
  49. In the past, yes, I have been responsible for things like that. Most of the time all went well. Of course there was the dog show and I forgot the hurdles and other equipment for the obedience show.
    But, most of the time, the wonderful thing about any event is the company you keep. People, hopefully enjoying themselves, are what make an event memorable.

    Reply
  50. In the past, yes, I have been responsible for things like that. Most of the time all went well. Of course there was the dog show and I forgot the hurdles and other equipment for the obedience show.
    But, most of the time, the wonderful thing about any event is the company you keep. People, hopefully enjoying themselves, are what make an event memorable.

    Reply
  51. This was a fun post to read, Nicola. I am in awe of someone who can do this. I’m so self conscious and shy I tremble at the idea.
    My only teeny glimpse into this sort of thing was when my son, 20+ years ago, was in a youth symphony. From attending rehearsals and concerts and everything else between We truly realized that all these things didn’t happen like magic. There was a lot of work going on behind the scenes.
    When we took some Halloween decorated cookies to a rehearsal (and this took guts on my part, believe me) a board member asked us if we would be interested in serving on the board. We said yes. What an education. And I imagine many of you know all about chaperoning a group of teenagers on a trip somewhere. :/ We enjoyed it, felt we contributed, helped with some computer work. And those cookies were a huge hit…much to our son’s chagrin. 😀

    Reply
  52. This was a fun post to read, Nicola. I am in awe of someone who can do this. I’m so self conscious and shy I tremble at the idea.
    My only teeny glimpse into this sort of thing was when my son, 20+ years ago, was in a youth symphony. From attending rehearsals and concerts and everything else between We truly realized that all these things didn’t happen like magic. There was a lot of work going on behind the scenes.
    When we took some Halloween decorated cookies to a rehearsal (and this took guts on my part, believe me) a board member asked us if we would be interested in serving on the board. We said yes. What an education. And I imagine many of you know all about chaperoning a group of teenagers on a trip somewhere. :/ We enjoyed it, felt we contributed, helped with some computer work. And those cookies were a huge hit…much to our son’s chagrin. 😀

    Reply
  53. This was a fun post to read, Nicola. I am in awe of someone who can do this. I’m so self conscious and shy I tremble at the idea.
    My only teeny glimpse into this sort of thing was when my son, 20+ years ago, was in a youth symphony. From attending rehearsals and concerts and everything else between We truly realized that all these things didn’t happen like magic. There was a lot of work going on behind the scenes.
    When we took some Halloween decorated cookies to a rehearsal (and this took guts on my part, believe me) a board member asked us if we would be interested in serving on the board. We said yes. What an education. And I imagine many of you know all about chaperoning a group of teenagers on a trip somewhere. :/ We enjoyed it, felt we contributed, helped with some computer work. And those cookies were a huge hit…much to our son’s chagrin. 😀

    Reply
  54. This was a fun post to read, Nicola. I am in awe of someone who can do this. I’m so self conscious and shy I tremble at the idea.
    My only teeny glimpse into this sort of thing was when my son, 20+ years ago, was in a youth symphony. From attending rehearsals and concerts and everything else between We truly realized that all these things didn’t happen like magic. There was a lot of work going on behind the scenes.
    When we took some Halloween decorated cookies to a rehearsal (and this took guts on my part, believe me) a board member asked us if we would be interested in serving on the board. We said yes. What an education. And I imagine many of you know all about chaperoning a group of teenagers on a trip somewhere. :/ We enjoyed it, felt we contributed, helped with some computer work. And those cookies were a huge hit…much to our son’s chagrin. 😀

    Reply
  55. This was a fun post to read, Nicola. I am in awe of someone who can do this. I’m so self conscious and shy I tremble at the idea.
    My only teeny glimpse into this sort of thing was when my son, 20+ years ago, was in a youth symphony. From attending rehearsals and concerts and everything else between We truly realized that all these things didn’t happen like magic. There was a lot of work going on behind the scenes.
    When we took some Halloween decorated cookies to a rehearsal (and this took guts on my part, believe me) a board member asked us if we would be interested in serving on the board. We said yes. What an education. And I imagine many of you know all about chaperoning a group of teenagers on a trip somewhere. :/ We enjoyed it, felt we contributed, helped with some computer work. And those cookies were a huge hit…much to our son’s chagrin. 😀

    Reply
  56. Thanks for sharing your experiences, Michelle. Goshm that must have been fascinating being involved behind the scenes at the youth orchestra. I have very fond memories of my mother taking me with her when she chaperoned school trips! And yes, it feels good to be part of a team and to make a contribution.

    Reply
  57. Thanks for sharing your experiences, Michelle. Goshm that must have been fascinating being involved behind the scenes at the youth orchestra. I have very fond memories of my mother taking me with her when she chaperoned school trips! And yes, it feels good to be part of a team and to make a contribution.

    Reply
  58. Thanks for sharing your experiences, Michelle. Goshm that must have been fascinating being involved behind the scenes at the youth orchestra. I have very fond memories of my mother taking me with her when she chaperoned school trips! And yes, it feels good to be part of a team and to make a contribution.

    Reply
  59. Thanks for sharing your experiences, Michelle. Goshm that must have been fascinating being involved behind the scenes at the youth orchestra. I have very fond memories of my mother taking me with her when she chaperoned school trips! And yes, it feels good to be part of a team and to make a contribution.

    Reply
  60. Thanks for sharing your experiences, Michelle. Goshm that must have been fascinating being involved behind the scenes at the youth orchestra. I have very fond memories of my mother taking me with her when she chaperoned school trips! And yes, it feels good to be part of a team and to make a contribution.

    Reply

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