Confession of an Evil Twin

Since this is a blog where history reigns, I’ll offer a hearty “huzzah” for our launch (instead of the Rocky-influenced “Yo!” favored down here in Philadelphia.) I hope you come back often.

Like every true Gemini, I’m not just one writer, but two. Since 1992, I’ve written historical romances under the name Miranda Jarrett, while this summer I’ll be publishing my first book of historical fiction as Susan Holloway Scott.

Having a psuedonym/alter-ego/evil twin can be strange. When my son was in elementary school, he was fascinated by the idea that his mother had more than one name. (Actually three names, since for him the other two came in a distant second and third behind Mom.) It made me different from the other mothers. It made me exotic, or at least what passes for exotic to six-year-old boys.

But such adulation has its peril. One afternoon we were standing in the line of a crowded grocery store, inching along behind the loaded cart. My son was getting antsy. He was, at least, until I pulled my checkbook and pen out of my purse. That made him brighten up right away.

“Hey, Mom!” he called in that piercing little-boy voice. “What name are you going to sign today?”

Meeting readers, other writers, grocery store managers — yes, it’s all part of the glamourous life of a writer….

Cheers,
Susan/Miranda

27 thoughts on “Confession of an Evil Twin”

  1. Yo, Miranda! Glad to hear that your six year old didn’t land you in jail. But at least you were only doing multiple identities, not plotting a murder. Mystery writers are the the ones who really get in trouble when plotting in public.
    mjp

    Reply
  2. Yo, Miranda! Glad to hear that your six year old didn’t land you in jail. But at least you were only doing multiple identities, not plotting a murder. Mystery writers are the the ones who really get in trouble when plotting in public.
    mjp

    Reply
  3. Yo, Miranda! Glad to hear that your six year old didn’t land you in jail. But at least you were only doing multiple identities, not plotting a murder. Mystery writers are the the ones who really get in trouble when plotting in public.
    mjp

    Reply
  4. Oh, Miranda, don’t you just love loud children? Funny story. The thing about a situation like that is when you try to explain to the clerk what your child *really* meant, the more you explain, the worse it sounds! LOL!
    Sherrie

    Reply
  5. Oh, Miranda, don’t you just love loud children? Funny story. The thing about a situation like that is when you try to explain to the clerk what your child *really* meant, the more you explain, the worse it sounds! LOL!
    Sherrie

    Reply
  6. Oh, Miranda, don’t you just love loud children? Funny story. The thing about a situation like that is when you try to explain to the clerk what your child *really* meant, the more you explain, the worse it sounds! LOL!
    Sherrie

    Reply
  7. I’m just starting to get used to this whole dual-identity thing . . . since my name sucks (IMO) for historical romance and I’ve decided to go with a pen name (thank heavens for parents who at least give normal middle names, LOL!).
    On the other hand, I’ve had an “evil twin” for years and years. I called her Melissa, and whenever I got out of hand at a party it was Melissa–not me!–who was the one dancing on bars, kissing boys in public, etc. She worked out great . . . “No, I wasn’t at Patty’s party last week. My sister Melissa was, though. She gets really crazy when she drinks.” Amazingly I never got called out on this. *GRIN*
    Great new blog BTW. I can’t help but love a blog that combines so many of my favorite authors.

    Reply
  8. I’m just starting to get used to this whole dual-identity thing . . . since my name sucks (IMO) for historical romance and I’ve decided to go with a pen name (thank heavens for parents who at least give normal middle names, LOL!).
    On the other hand, I’ve had an “evil twin” for years and years. I called her Melissa, and whenever I got out of hand at a party it was Melissa–not me!–who was the one dancing on bars, kissing boys in public, etc. She worked out great . . . “No, I wasn’t at Patty’s party last week. My sister Melissa was, though. She gets really crazy when she drinks.” Amazingly I never got called out on this. *GRIN*
    Great new blog BTW. I can’t help but love a blog that combines so many of my favorite authors.

    Reply
  9. I’m just starting to get used to this whole dual-identity thing . . . since my name sucks (IMO) for historical romance and I’ve decided to go with a pen name (thank heavens for parents who at least give normal middle names, LOL!).
    On the other hand, I’ve had an “evil twin” for years and years. I called her Melissa, and whenever I got out of hand at a party it was Melissa–not me!–who was the one dancing on bars, kissing boys in public, etc. She worked out great . . . “No, I wasn’t at Patty’s party last week. My sister Melissa was, though. She gets really crazy when she drinks.” Amazingly I never got called out on this. *GRIN*
    Great new blog BTW. I can’t help but love a blog that combines so many of my favorite authors.

    Reply
  10. Miranda, I loved your story and it reminded me of an incident in my own family. My husband is an attorney (not a doctor) but his signature is totally unreadable since he has to sign so many things. Several years ago he and my daughter, then aged about 7, were at the grocery store (sound familiar?) when he signed a check and she very seriously looked at it and said, “Daddy, that’s not your name.” We all laugh about it now but it did take some explaining.

    Reply
  11. Miranda, I loved your story and it reminded me of an incident in my own family. My husband is an attorney (not a doctor) but his signature is totally unreadable since he has to sign so many things. Several years ago he and my daughter, then aged about 7, were at the grocery store (sound familiar?) when he signed a check and she very seriously looked at it and said, “Daddy, that’s not your name.” We all laugh about it now but it did take some explaining.

    Reply
  12. Miranda, I loved your story and it reminded me of an incident in my own family. My husband is an attorney (not a doctor) but his signature is totally unreadable since he has to sign so many things. Several years ago he and my daughter, then aged about 7, were at the grocery store (sound familiar?) when he signed a check and she very seriously looked at it and said, “Daddy, that’s not your name.” We all laugh about it now but it did take some explaining.

    Reply
  13. I’ve read a couple of yours, Susan/Miranda, and really liked them. I have a few more in my TBR pile that I’m anxious to read.
    And at least you aren’t Carmen/Miranda.

    Reply
  14. I’ve read a couple of yours, Susan/Miranda, and really liked them. I have a few more in my TBR pile that I’m anxious to read.
    And at least you aren’t Carmen/Miranda.

    Reply
  15. I’ve read a couple of yours, Susan/Miranda, and really liked them. I have a few more in my TBR pile that I’m anxious to read.
    And at least you aren’t Carmen/Miranda.

    Reply
  16. Love the stories about Evil Twins and Inappropriate Children! Both have the unfortunate tendency to shoot their mouths off at the wrong times.
    And I laughed at loud at becoming Carmen Miranda! Maybe if I need yet another pen-name…

    Reply
  17. Love the stories about Evil Twins and Inappropriate Children! Both have the unfortunate tendency to shoot their mouths off at the wrong times.
    And I laughed at loud at becoming Carmen Miranda! Maybe if I need yet another pen-name…

    Reply
  18. Love the stories about Evil Twins and Inappropriate Children! Both have the unfortunate tendency to shoot their mouths off at the wrong times.
    And I laughed at loud at becoming Carmen Miranda! Maybe if I need yet another pen-name…

    Reply
  19. Hello! I’m the fearsome Mole from the Running with Quills and He Wrote, She Wrote blogs (not to mention my own blog, FluffyCatBabylon), and the world’s biggest Edith Layton fan.
    Your story, Susan/Miranda, reminded me of an anecdote in one of Madeleine L’Engle’s Crosswicks Journal books. She found out from her banker that it didn’t matter what name was signed to a check as long as the computer-coded numbers at the bottom were correct, so she started signing her checks “Jane Austen,” “Charlotte Bronte,” and the like.
    They all cleared. So, no worries.

    Reply
  20. Hello! I’m the fearsome Mole from the Running with Quills and He Wrote, She Wrote blogs (not to mention my own blog, FluffyCatBabylon), and the world’s biggest Edith Layton fan.
    Your story, Susan/Miranda, reminded me of an anecdote in one of Madeleine L’Engle’s Crosswicks Journal books. She found out from her banker that it didn’t matter what name was signed to a check as long as the computer-coded numbers at the bottom were correct, so she started signing her checks “Jane Austen,” “Charlotte Bronte,” and the like.
    They all cleared. So, no worries.

    Reply
  21. Hello! I’m the fearsome Mole from the Running with Quills and He Wrote, She Wrote blogs (not to mention my own blog, FluffyCatBabylon), and the world’s biggest Edith Layton fan.
    Your story, Susan/Miranda, reminded me of an anecdote in one of Madeleine L’Engle’s Crosswicks Journal books. She found out from her banker that it didn’t matter what name was signed to a check as long as the computer-coded numbers at the bottom were correct, so she started signing her checks “Jane Austen,” “Charlotte Bronte,” and the like.
    They all cleared. So, no worries.

    Reply
  22. Talpianna–
    Welcome to the Wenches, fearsome Mole!
    You’re absolutely right about the checks, even if Jane Austen signs them. Last year my daughter recieved a birthday check from a family member that hadn’t been signed. She didn’t notice the missing signature, nor did our bank, or the originating bank either. Only the sender finally noticed when it came back with his statement, and, chagrined, he showed it to us. So at least where money’s concerned, it’s only the number that counts.
    Hmmmmm….I wonder how creative we could be with this? 🙂
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  23. Talpianna–
    Welcome to the Wenches, fearsome Mole!
    You’re absolutely right about the checks, even if Jane Austen signs them. Last year my daughter recieved a birthday check from a family member that hadn’t been signed. She didn’t notice the missing signature, nor did our bank, or the originating bank either. Only the sender finally noticed when it came back with his statement, and, chagrined, he showed it to us. So at least where money’s concerned, it’s only the number that counts.
    Hmmmmm….I wonder how creative we could be with this? 🙂
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  24. Talpianna–
    Welcome to the Wenches, fearsome Mole!
    You’re absolutely right about the checks, even if Jane Austen signs them. Last year my daughter recieved a birthday check from a family member that hadn’t been signed. She didn’t notice the missing signature, nor did our bank, or the originating bank either. Only the sender finally noticed when it came back with his statement, and, chagrined, he showed it to us. So at least where money’s concerned, it’s only the number that counts.
    Hmmmmm….I wonder how creative we could be with this? 🙂
    Susan/Miranda

    Reply
  25. When I stumbled across the name of your site, I thought I might find wenches who would be interested in making up words and submitting them to http://tinyurl.com/y8oux9 . If you don’t feel like doing it is beneath you, please drop in for a visit. (A friend and I just purchased the site and we’re looking for higher caliber submittals.)
    Alternatively … drawings at http://tinyurl.com/36akf2 represent characters in my granddaughter’s stories. Here’s a link to something she wrote when she was 13, http://tinyurl.com/2vn64m . It’s well worth reading.
    The theme for the contest she had entered was “growing up.” Her cat, Siamon, had died shortly before she wrote her story. Since she won a cash prize, the copyright is probably owned by someone else.
    She’s almost 18 now, so I don’t know where she’s hanging out these days or what’s she’s writing.
    Thanks,
    “HD”

    Reply
  26. When I stumbled across the name of your site, I thought I might find wenches who would be interested in making up words and submitting them to http://tinyurl.com/y8oux9 . If you don’t feel like doing it is beneath you, please drop in for a visit. (A friend and I just purchased the site and we’re looking for higher caliber submittals.)
    Alternatively … drawings at http://tinyurl.com/36akf2 represent characters in my granddaughter’s stories. Here’s a link to something she wrote when she was 13, http://tinyurl.com/2vn64m . It’s well worth reading.
    The theme for the contest she had entered was “growing up.” Her cat, Siamon, had died shortly before she wrote her story. Since she won a cash prize, the copyright is probably owned by someone else.
    She’s almost 18 now, so I don’t know where she’s hanging out these days or what’s she’s writing.
    Thanks,
    “HD”

    Reply
  27. When I stumbled across the name of your site, I thought I might find wenches who would be interested in making up words and submitting them to http://tinyurl.com/y8oux9 . If you don’t feel like doing it is beneath you, please drop in for a visit. (A friend and I just purchased the site and we’re looking for higher caliber submittals.)
    Alternatively … drawings at http://tinyurl.com/36akf2 represent characters in my granddaughter’s stories. Here’s a link to something she wrote when she was 13, http://tinyurl.com/2vn64m . It’s well worth reading.
    The theme for the contest she had entered was “growing up.” Her cat, Siamon, had died shortly before she wrote her story. Since she won a cash prize, the copyright is probably owned by someone else.
    She’s almost 18 now, so I don’t know where she’s hanging out these days or what’s she’s writing.
    Thanks,
    “HD”

    Reply

Leave a Comment