All Dressed Up

Gown in progress
Confession time: I’ve always wanted a Regency gown.

Even while falling for Colin Firth’s Darcy, I couldn’t help coveting all of Elizabeth’s outfits. The fabrics! The spencers! I swooned over those just as much as I swooned over wet-shirted Darcy. But given that my books aren’t set in the Regency, I never could find a good excuse why I should have my own gown.

Until last fall, while registering for this year’s Historical Novel Society North American conference, I noticed this announcement in the schedule:

"After the Saturday banquet, the party continues with a Regency Masquerade Ball…"


And a Regency Masquerade Ball seemed the perfect excuse to acquire a gown.

FeatherI was sorting through my options when, in January—right around my birthday, as it happens—I went onto the Ruby Lane site to look for examples of early 18th century pocket watches, as one does. For a writer like me, Ruby Lane is a wonderful resource because it gathers together physical historical objects in a neatly searchable site, so even though I may not be able to put down the $18,600 needed to buy a 17th century silver skull pomander pendant, if I want to know what one looks like, I can access the photos to my heart’s content.

FabricAnyhow, on this particular day in January, by some chance or other, I came across a listing for “6.5 yards of Georgian unused silk moire fabric” with a photo so pretty it stopped me in my tracks.

Duck egg blue is just one of those colours that has this effect on me.

“This,” said the listing, “was clearly bought and never made up. Perfect condition. Enough to make a perfect re-enactment dress.”

ButtonsThe shop selling the fabric was near Swindon, in Wiltshire, England, very close to where I’d set my novel Mariana, so I chose to take this as a Sign.

Reader, I purchased it. (For less than I spend on groceries each week).

And over the next month I had a terrific time sourcing out ribbons and buttons and feathers and other antique bits and pieces on Etsy, and finding a pattern (Laughing Moon Mercantile's Pattern #126). 

StaysI also ordered a shift and short stays from the woman who’d made my much loved 18th century gown, at Fashions Revisited (Many thanks to my friend Elizabeth Boyle for taking this blackmail-grade photo of me in my undies…)

Then I took the whole kit and caboodle downtown here, to the people who had years ago reworked my mother’s wedding dress so I could wear it for my own wedding. And Emily, my seamstress fairy godmother, made me my gown.

Emily and my gownIt turns out that she, too, had fallen in love with Elizabeth Bennet's wardrobe, and had always wanted to make a Regency gown. She made me two, in fact, because before she felt confident enough to cut into the Georgian silk she first made a full practice gown out of linen (I got to keep that one, too).

Here she is working on the real thing (if you look closely you can see the photos from the Bath Museum that we used as a guide in designing the fancier parts of my gown).

49fdcade3d66e12fc21eef65c6ea5240We also referred to fashion plates of the time, which were not only useful but also absolutely charming.

Gown backBecause the unknown woman who originally bought “my” duck egg blue silk back in the early 1800s was probably much less round than I am, we ended up having a very small section at the back that needed to be filled in with new silk instead, and thanks to the fashion plates Emily had the idea to make me a bit of a train so the new-blue-almost-but-not-quite-matching silk wouldn’t stand out so sharply from the old, but would instead look as if it was meant to be a little different.

The end result was more than I had hoped for.

Susanna and AnnaHere I am at the ball, in the company of the lovely Anna Michels, who edits for my American publisher Sourcebooks. (I made the turban hat myself, to hide my very un-Regency hair). No Mr. Darcy in sight, but he wasn’t missed. I had my very own Regency gown, and I found that sufficiently swoon-worthy.

Does anyone else have a thing for old clothing? Any favourite time periods or styles?

215 thoughts on “All Dressed Up”

  1. A lovely story, Susanna! You look extremely charming, and I enjoyed the story of your Regency gown very much indeed. It had much of the flavor of one of your novels… Marianna, or maybe even more, The Rose Garden. (IMHO, of course!) Just don’t timeslip away from us before we get to see your next novel 🙂

    Reply
  2. A lovely story, Susanna! You look extremely charming, and I enjoyed the story of your Regency gown very much indeed. It had much of the flavor of one of your novels… Marianna, or maybe even more, The Rose Garden. (IMHO, of course!) Just don’t timeslip away from us before we get to see your next novel 🙂

    Reply
  3. A lovely story, Susanna! You look extremely charming, and I enjoyed the story of your Regency gown very much indeed. It had much of the flavor of one of your novels… Marianna, or maybe even more, The Rose Garden. (IMHO, of course!) Just don’t timeslip away from us before we get to see your next novel 🙂

    Reply
  4. A lovely story, Susanna! You look extremely charming, and I enjoyed the story of your Regency gown very much indeed. It had much of the flavor of one of your novels… Marianna, or maybe even more, The Rose Garden. (IMHO, of course!) Just don’t timeslip away from us before we get to see your next novel 🙂

    Reply
  5. A lovely story, Susanna! You look extremely charming, and I enjoyed the story of your Regency gown very much indeed. It had much of the flavor of one of your novels… Marianna, or maybe even more, The Rose Garden. (IMHO, of course!) Just don’t timeslip away from us before we get to see your next novel 🙂

    Reply
  6. You look lovely in your gown. Back in the day (60s or 70s) I inherited a couple of dresses from a great aunt that dated back to the 1920s. Alas, I was never slim enough to fit into them. They are still hanging in my closet.
    My favorite style era is the 1890s. They don’t look that comfortable but they are lovely to look at.

    Reply
  7. You look lovely in your gown. Back in the day (60s or 70s) I inherited a couple of dresses from a great aunt that dated back to the 1920s. Alas, I was never slim enough to fit into them. They are still hanging in my closet.
    My favorite style era is the 1890s. They don’t look that comfortable but they are lovely to look at.

    Reply
  8. You look lovely in your gown. Back in the day (60s or 70s) I inherited a couple of dresses from a great aunt that dated back to the 1920s. Alas, I was never slim enough to fit into them. They are still hanging in my closet.
    My favorite style era is the 1890s. They don’t look that comfortable but they are lovely to look at.

    Reply
  9. You look lovely in your gown. Back in the day (60s or 70s) I inherited a couple of dresses from a great aunt that dated back to the 1920s. Alas, I was never slim enough to fit into them. They are still hanging in my closet.
    My favorite style era is the 1890s. They don’t look that comfortable but they are lovely to look at.

    Reply
  10. You look lovely in your gown. Back in the day (60s or 70s) I inherited a couple of dresses from a great aunt that dated back to the 1920s. Alas, I was never slim enough to fit into them. They are still hanging in my closet.
    My favorite style era is the 1890s. They don’t look that comfortable but they are lovely to look at.

    Reply
  11. Gorgeous dress and what a find that material was. I don’t know that I would dare set scissors to such . I tell people my gowns were made by a poor soldier’s widow .

    Reply
  12. Gorgeous dress and what a find that material was. I don’t know that I would dare set scissors to such . I tell people my gowns were made by a poor soldier’s widow .

    Reply
  13. Gorgeous dress and what a find that material was. I don’t know that I would dare set scissors to such . I tell people my gowns were made by a poor soldier’s widow .

    Reply
  14. Gorgeous dress and what a find that material was. I don’t know that I would dare set scissors to such . I tell people my gowns were made by a poor soldier’s widow .

    Reply
  15. Gorgeous dress and what a find that material was. I don’t know that I would dare set scissors to such . I tell people my gowns were made by a poor soldier’s widow .

    Reply
  16. Grateful to Anne Gracie for posting on her page, gorgeous colours, great research and the journey you took, Susanna Kearsley is memorable!

    Reply
  17. Grateful to Anne Gracie for posting on her page, gorgeous colours, great research and the journey you took, Susanna Kearsley is memorable!

    Reply
  18. Grateful to Anne Gracie for posting on her page, gorgeous colours, great research and the journey you took, Susanna Kearsley is memorable!

    Reply
  19. Grateful to Anne Gracie for posting on her page, gorgeous colours, great research and the journey you took, Susanna Kearsley is memorable!

    Reply
  20. Grateful to Anne Gracie for posting on her page, gorgeous colours, great research and the journey you took, Susanna Kearsley is memorable!

    Reply
  21. What a lovely dress and an even lovelier experience. Thank you for sharing. And the color is perfect, no wonder you fell in love with the fabric. Thanks for sharing.

    Reply
  22. What a lovely dress and an even lovelier experience. Thank you for sharing. And the color is perfect, no wonder you fell in love with the fabric. Thanks for sharing.

    Reply
  23. What a lovely dress and an even lovelier experience. Thank you for sharing. And the color is perfect, no wonder you fell in love with the fabric. Thanks for sharing.

    Reply
  24. What a lovely dress and an even lovelier experience. Thank you for sharing. And the color is perfect, no wonder you fell in love with the fabric. Thanks for sharing.

    Reply
  25. What a lovely dress and an even lovelier experience. Thank you for sharing. And the color is perfect, no wonder you fell in love with the fabric. Thanks for sharing.

    Reply
  26. I love the Regency fashions. I was lucky enough to attend a Regency Ball in Bath last year with my two daughters. My eldest one who lives in London, hired the costumes for us for the weekend. I loved it. Felt like Anne Eliott when I was trotting around the dance floor:)
    Thanks for the post which brought back some lovely memories. Absolutely LOVE your dress by the way. Would like to own one of my own.

    Reply
  27. I love the Regency fashions. I was lucky enough to attend a Regency Ball in Bath last year with my two daughters. My eldest one who lives in London, hired the costumes for us for the weekend. I loved it. Felt like Anne Eliott when I was trotting around the dance floor:)
    Thanks for the post which brought back some lovely memories. Absolutely LOVE your dress by the way. Would like to own one of my own.

    Reply
  28. I love the Regency fashions. I was lucky enough to attend a Regency Ball in Bath last year with my two daughters. My eldest one who lives in London, hired the costumes for us for the weekend. I loved it. Felt like Anne Eliott when I was trotting around the dance floor:)
    Thanks for the post which brought back some lovely memories. Absolutely LOVE your dress by the way. Would like to own one of my own.

    Reply
  29. I love the Regency fashions. I was lucky enough to attend a Regency Ball in Bath last year with my two daughters. My eldest one who lives in London, hired the costumes for us for the weekend. I loved it. Felt like Anne Eliott when I was trotting around the dance floor:)
    Thanks for the post which brought back some lovely memories. Absolutely LOVE your dress by the way. Would like to own one of my own.

    Reply
  30. I love the Regency fashions. I was lucky enough to attend a Regency Ball in Bath last year with my two daughters. My eldest one who lives in London, hired the costumes for us for the weekend. I loved it. Felt like Anne Eliott when I was trotting around the dance floor:)
    Thanks for the post which brought back some lovely memories. Absolutely LOVE your dress by the way. Would like to own one of my own.

    Reply
  31. My thing for old fashioned clothing began very early. I’m told that at three I insisted that the dress my mom made me for my Auntie’s wedding be very old fashioned. From the pictures it was a regency style pink gingham dress. From then on my list ve affair with “old fashioned” dresses only grew. It led me to study history (the people were so well dressed!), to read the classics, and eventually to reading historical romance. My favourites were the Victorians….huge hoop skirts make me swoon. It seems that with every important gown I’ve owned (prom dress and wedding gown) have had the full skirts that would make Scarlett o’Hara proud! One day I’d love to have a true Victorian costume (and somewhere to wear it!).

    Reply
  32. My thing for old fashioned clothing began very early. I’m told that at three I insisted that the dress my mom made me for my Auntie’s wedding be very old fashioned. From the pictures it was a regency style pink gingham dress. From then on my list ve affair with “old fashioned” dresses only grew. It led me to study history (the people were so well dressed!), to read the classics, and eventually to reading historical romance. My favourites were the Victorians….huge hoop skirts make me swoon. It seems that with every important gown I’ve owned (prom dress and wedding gown) have had the full skirts that would make Scarlett o’Hara proud! One day I’d love to have a true Victorian costume (and somewhere to wear it!).

    Reply
  33. My thing for old fashioned clothing began very early. I’m told that at three I insisted that the dress my mom made me for my Auntie’s wedding be very old fashioned. From the pictures it was a regency style pink gingham dress. From then on my list ve affair with “old fashioned” dresses only grew. It led me to study history (the people were so well dressed!), to read the classics, and eventually to reading historical romance. My favourites were the Victorians….huge hoop skirts make me swoon. It seems that with every important gown I’ve owned (prom dress and wedding gown) have had the full skirts that would make Scarlett o’Hara proud! One day I’d love to have a true Victorian costume (and somewhere to wear it!).

    Reply
  34. My thing for old fashioned clothing began very early. I’m told that at three I insisted that the dress my mom made me for my Auntie’s wedding be very old fashioned. From the pictures it was a regency style pink gingham dress. From then on my list ve affair with “old fashioned” dresses only grew. It led me to study history (the people were so well dressed!), to read the classics, and eventually to reading historical romance. My favourites were the Victorians….huge hoop skirts make me swoon. It seems that with every important gown I’ve owned (prom dress and wedding gown) have had the full skirts that would make Scarlett o’Hara proud! One day I’d love to have a true Victorian costume (and somewhere to wear it!).

    Reply
  35. My thing for old fashioned clothing began very early. I’m told that at three I insisted that the dress my mom made me for my Auntie’s wedding be very old fashioned. From the pictures it was a regency style pink gingham dress. From then on my list ve affair with “old fashioned” dresses only grew. It led me to study history (the people were so well dressed!), to read the classics, and eventually to reading historical romance. My favourites were the Victorians….huge hoop skirts make me swoon. It seems that with every important gown I’ve owned (prom dress and wedding gown) have had the full skirts that would make Scarlett o’Hara proud! One day I’d love to have a true Victorian costume (and somewhere to wear it!).

    Reply
  36. What lovely gown, Susanna, and thanks for the fabulous post. I used to love dressing up for Klondike Days (summer fair now called K-Days) which re-enacted the gold-rush era, not regency. Alas, no more Klondike Kate’s or Dapper Dans are seen on the fair grounds anymore, but you can still pan for real gold nuggets. 🤑

    Reply
  37. What lovely gown, Susanna, and thanks for the fabulous post. I used to love dressing up for Klondike Days (summer fair now called K-Days) which re-enacted the gold-rush era, not regency. Alas, no more Klondike Kate’s or Dapper Dans are seen on the fair grounds anymore, but you can still pan for real gold nuggets. 🤑

    Reply
  38. What lovely gown, Susanna, and thanks for the fabulous post. I used to love dressing up for Klondike Days (summer fair now called K-Days) which re-enacted the gold-rush era, not regency. Alas, no more Klondike Kate’s or Dapper Dans are seen on the fair grounds anymore, but you can still pan for real gold nuggets. 🤑

    Reply
  39. What lovely gown, Susanna, and thanks for the fabulous post. I used to love dressing up for Klondike Days (summer fair now called K-Days) which re-enacted the gold-rush era, not regency. Alas, no more Klondike Kate’s or Dapper Dans are seen on the fair grounds anymore, but you can still pan for real gold nuggets. 🤑

    Reply
  40. What lovely gown, Susanna, and thanks for the fabulous post. I used to love dressing up for Klondike Days (summer fair now called K-Days) which re-enacted the gold-rush era, not regency. Alas, no more Klondike Kate’s or Dapper Dans are seen on the fair grounds anymore, but you can still pan for real gold nuggets. 🤑

    Reply
  41. I’m a Janeite from way back so I have always LOVED the Regency dresses and would love to have one but have no practical purpose for it. Yours is gorgeous!! Turned out so well! I also love the clothes from the 40’s and 50’s. Slacks, cardigans, pearls and hats are as close as I get though. LOL I think it is just the coolest thing that you got to use actually period silk. Just amazing.

    Reply
  42. I’m a Janeite from way back so I have always LOVED the Regency dresses and would love to have one but have no practical purpose for it. Yours is gorgeous!! Turned out so well! I also love the clothes from the 40’s and 50’s. Slacks, cardigans, pearls and hats are as close as I get though. LOL I think it is just the coolest thing that you got to use actually period silk. Just amazing.

    Reply
  43. I’m a Janeite from way back so I have always LOVED the Regency dresses and would love to have one but have no practical purpose for it. Yours is gorgeous!! Turned out so well! I also love the clothes from the 40’s and 50’s. Slacks, cardigans, pearls and hats are as close as I get though. LOL I think it is just the coolest thing that you got to use actually period silk. Just amazing.

    Reply
  44. I’m a Janeite from way back so I have always LOVED the Regency dresses and would love to have one but have no practical purpose for it. Yours is gorgeous!! Turned out so well! I also love the clothes from the 40’s and 50’s. Slacks, cardigans, pearls and hats are as close as I get though. LOL I think it is just the coolest thing that you got to use actually period silk. Just amazing.

    Reply
  45. I’m a Janeite from way back so I have always LOVED the Regency dresses and would love to have one but have no practical purpose for it. Yours is gorgeous!! Turned out so well! I also love the clothes from the 40’s and 50’s. Slacks, cardigans, pearls and hats are as close as I get though. LOL I think it is just the coolest thing that you got to use actually period silk. Just amazing.

    Reply
  46. I love looking at clothing from many periods. StephanieL said she likes the clothes from the
    40s and 50s. For me those are nostalgic — not historic. They represent high school,
    college, and early marriage.
    And I still wear jeans, pants, and sweaters (but not sweater sets) for my everyday wear.
    This was a lovely post, and like the others, I envy you the lovely gown and silk material.

    Reply
  47. I love looking at clothing from many periods. StephanieL said she likes the clothes from the
    40s and 50s. For me those are nostalgic — not historic. They represent high school,
    college, and early marriage.
    And I still wear jeans, pants, and sweaters (but not sweater sets) for my everyday wear.
    This was a lovely post, and like the others, I envy you the lovely gown and silk material.

    Reply
  48. I love looking at clothing from many periods. StephanieL said she likes the clothes from the
    40s and 50s. For me those are nostalgic — not historic. They represent high school,
    college, and early marriage.
    And I still wear jeans, pants, and sweaters (but not sweater sets) for my everyday wear.
    This was a lovely post, and like the others, I envy you the lovely gown and silk material.

    Reply
  49. I love looking at clothing from many periods. StephanieL said she likes the clothes from the
    40s and 50s. For me those are nostalgic — not historic. They represent high school,
    college, and early marriage.
    And I still wear jeans, pants, and sweaters (but not sweater sets) for my everyday wear.
    This was a lovely post, and like the others, I envy you the lovely gown and silk material.

    Reply
  50. I love looking at clothing from many periods. StephanieL said she likes the clothes from the
    40s and 50s. For me those are nostalgic — not historic. They represent high school,
    college, and early marriage.
    And I still wear jeans, pants, and sweaters (but not sweater sets) for my everyday wear.
    This was a lovely post, and like the others, I envy you the lovely gown and silk material.

    Reply
  51. You look just wonderful in the dress! How did you make the turban? It’s amazing the fabric was sturdy enough to be cut and sewn. Your seamstress is astounding.
    I like the 1920s’ fashions. It was such a light and easy flow on the body. No corset in sight. Only chemise, half slip, underwear, garters and stockings. I like the lower heels worn at this time, too.
    The dancing was a lot of fun and could only be done easily with the fashions available. I’m sure the fashions allowed the dancing to flourish.

    Reply
  52. You look just wonderful in the dress! How did you make the turban? It’s amazing the fabric was sturdy enough to be cut and sewn. Your seamstress is astounding.
    I like the 1920s’ fashions. It was such a light and easy flow on the body. No corset in sight. Only chemise, half slip, underwear, garters and stockings. I like the lower heels worn at this time, too.
    The dancing was a lot of fun and could only be done easily with the fashions available. I’m sure the fashions allowed the dancing to flourish.

    Reply
  53. You look just wonderful in the dress! How did you make the turban? It’s amazing the fabric was sturdy enough to be cut and sewn. Your seamstress is astounding.
    I like the 1920s’ fashions. It was such a light and easy flow on the body. No corset in sight. Only chemise, half slip, underwear, garters and stockings. I like the lower heels worn at this time, too.
    The dancing was a lot of fun and could only be done easily with the fashions available. I’m sure the fashions allowed the dancing to flourish.

    Reply
  54. You look just wonderful in the dress! How did you make the turban? It’s amazing the fabric was sturdy enough to be cut and sewn. Your seamstress is astounding.
    I like the 1920s’ fashions. It was such a light and easy flow on the body. No corset in sight. Only chemise, half slip, underwear, garters and stockings. I like the lower heels worn at this time, too.
    The dancing was a lot of fun and could only be done easily with the fashions available. I’m sure the fashions allowed the dancing to flourish.

    Reply
  55. You look just wonderful in the dress! How did you make the turban? It’s amazing the fabric was sturdy enough to be cut and sewn. Your seamstress is astounding.
    I like the 1920s’ fashions. It was such a light and easy flow on the body. No corset in sight. Only chemise, half slip, underwear, garters and stockings. I like the lower heels worn at this time, too.
    The dancing was a lot of fun and could only be done easily with the fashions available. I’m sure the fashions allowed the dancing to flourish.

    Reply
  56. What a gorgeous gown! I love duck egg blue, and that silk has a beautiful glow to it. You looked stunning! I imagine you pulling it out of the wardrobe and wearing it while you write just because you can, and I’m just a tiny bit jealous.

    Reply
  57. What a gorgeous gown! I love duck egg blue, and that silk has a beautiful glow to it. You looked stunning! I imagine you pulling it out of the wardrobe and wearing it while you write just because you can, and I’m just a tiny bit jealous.

    Reply
  58. What a gorgeous gown! I love duck egg blue, and that silk has a beautiful glow to it. You looked stunning! I imagine you pulling it out of the wardrobe and wearing it while you write just because you can, and I’m just a tiny bit jealous.

    Reply
  59. What a gorgeous gown! I love duck egg blue, and that silk has a beautiful glow to it. You looked stunning! I imagine you pulling it out of the wardrobe and wearing it while you write just because you can, and I’m just a tiny bit jealous.

    Reply
  60. What a gorgeous gown! I love duck egg blue, and that silk has a beautiful glow to it. You looked stunning! I imagine you pulling it out of the wardrobe and wearing it while you write just because you can, and I’m just a tiny bit jealous.

    Reply
  61. This made me smile. I’m 43 so high school and college were the 80’s and 90’s (like ewww) LOL those are not even nostalgic for me. I dressed then much like I do now. Slacks, skirts, cardigans, pearls, hats, etc. I was considered very “old fashioned” and that was okay with me. Much better than popped collars, hot pink lipstick, off shoulder sweatshirts, parachute pants and leg warmers. 😉

    Reply
  62. This made me smile. I’m 43 so high school and college were the 80’s and 90’s (like ewww) LOL those are not even nostalgic for me. I dressed then much like I do now. Slacks, skirts, cardigans, pearls, hats, etc. I was considered very “old fashioned” and that was okay with me. Much better than popped collars, hot pink lipstick, off shoulder sweatshirts, parachute pants and leg warmers. 😉

    Reply
  63. This made me smile. I’m 43 so high school and college were the 80’s and 90’s (like ewww) LOL those are not even nostalgic for me. I dressed then much like I do now. Slacks, skirts, cardigans, pearls, hats, etc. I was considered very “old fashioned” and that was okay with me. Much better than popped collars, hot pink lipstick, off shoulder sweatshirts, parachute pants and leg warmers. 😉

    Reply
  64. This made me smile. I’m 43 so high school and college were the 80’s and 90’s (like ewww) LOL those are not even nostalgic for me. I dressed then much like I do now. Slacks, skirts, cardigans, pearls, hats, etc. I was considered very “old fashioned” and that was okay with me. Much better than popped collars, hot pink lipstick, off shoulder sweatshirts, parachute pants and leg warmers. 😉

    Reply
  65. This made me smile. I’m 43 so high school and college were the 80’s and 90’s (like ewww) LOL those are not even nostalgic for me. I dressed then much like I do now. Slacks, skirts, cardigans, pearls, hats, etc. I was considered very “old fashioned” and that was okay with me. Much better than popped collars, hot pink lipstick, off shoulder sweatshirts, parachute pants and leg warmers. 😉

    Reply
  66. Mary, I share your problem with 1920s dresses. My grandmother gave me a beautiful black beaded one that I think I fit into for about one year before I started getting too round to fit into it. It’s still in my hope chest.

    Reply
  67. Mary, I share your problem with 1920s dresses. My grandmother gave me a beautiful black beaded one that I think I fit into for about one year before I started getting too round to fit into it. It’s still in my hope chest.

    Reply
  68. Mary, I share your problem with 1920s dresses. My grandmother gave me a beautiful black beaded one that I think I fit into for about one year before I started getting too round to fit into it. It’s still in my hope chest.

    Reply
  69. Mary, I share your problem with 1920s dresses. My grandmother gave me a beautiful black beaded one that I think I fit into for about one year before I started getting too round to fit into it. It’s still in my hope chest.

    Reply
  70. Mary, I share your problem with 1920s dresses. My grandmother gave me a beautiful black beaded one that I think I fit into for about one year before I started getting too round to fit into it. It’s still in my hope chest.

    Reply
  71. Nancy, I just told myself the fabric had been sitting in the back of someone’s cupboard forlornly waiting for a chance to go to a ball 🙂 But yes, I’m glad it was Emily and not me who had to actually wield the scissors.

    Reply
  72. Nancy, I just told myself the fabric had been sitting in the back of someone’s cupboard forlornly waiting for a chance to go to a ball 🙂 But yes, I’m glad it was Emily and not me who had to actually wield the scissors.

    Reply
  73. Nancy, I just told myself the fabric had been sitting in the back of someone’s cupboard forlornly waiting for a chance to go to a ball 🙂 But yes, I’m glad it was Emily and not me who had to actually wield the scissors.

    Reply
  74. Nancy, I just told myself the fabric had been sitting in the back of someone’s cupboard forlornly waiting for a chance to go to a ball 🙂 But yes, I’m glad it was Emily and not me who had to actually wield the scissors.

    Reply
  75. Nancy, I just told myself the fabric had been sitting in the back of someone’s cupboard forlornly waiting for a chance to go to a ball 🙂 But yes, I’m glad it was Emily and not me who had to actually wield the scissors.

    Reply
  76. How lovely that you got to go to Bath for your Regency Ball! What a memory to have. And Teresa, if you sew (or know someone who does), that pattern we used is apparently a very good one and easy to work with.

    Reply
  77. How lovely that you got to go to Bath for your Regency Ball! What a memory to have. And Teresa, if you sew (or know someone who does), that pattern we used is apparently a very good one and easy to work with.

    Reply
  78. How lovely that you got to go to Bath for your Regency Ball! What a memory to have. And Teresa, if you sew (or know someone who does), that pattern we used is apparently a very good one and easy to work with.

    Reply
  79. How lovely that you got to go to Bath for your Regency Ball! What a memory to have. And Teresa, if you sew (or know someone who does), that pattern we used is apparently a very good one and easy to work with.

    Reply
  80. How lovely that you got to go to Bath for your Regency Ball! What a memory to have. And Teresa, if you sew (or know someone who does), that pattern we used is apparently a very good one and easy to work with.

    Reply
  81. Jana, how wonderful that your love of “old fashioned” fashion led you to a love of history and our romances! Thank you for sharing that with us. And I definitely think you ought to have a Victorian costume (and wear it anywhere you like!)

    Reply
  82. Jana, how wonderful that your love of “old fashioned” fashion led you to a love of history and our romances! Thank you for sharing that with us. And I definitely think you ought to have a Victorian costume (and wear it anywhere you like!)

    Reply
  83. Jana, how wonderful that your love of “old fashioned” fashion led you to a love of history and our romances! Thank you for sharing that with us. And I definitely think you ought to have a Victorian costume (and wear it anywhere you like!)

    Reply
  84. Jana, how wonderful that your love of “old fashioned” fashion led you to a love of history and our romances! Thank you for sharing that with us. And I definitely think you ought to have a Victorian costume (and wear it anywhere you like!)

    Reply
  85. Jana, how wonderful that your love of “old fashioned” fashion led you to a love of history and our romances! Thank you for sharing that with us. And I definitely think you ought to have a Victorian costume (and wear it anywhere you like!)

    Reply
  86. Stephanie, once I hit 50 I decided not everything needed a practical purpose 🙂 I say you should go ahead and get yourself a gown!
    And I love clothes from the 50s, too, although again I’m not really the right shape to wear them. But I do love rhinestones and crinolines.

    Reply
  87. Stephanie, once I hit 50 I decided not everything needed a practical purpose 🙂 I say you should go ahead and get yourself a gown!
    And I love clothes from the 50s, too, although again I’m not really the right shape to wear them. But I do love rhinestones and crinolines.

    Reply
  88. Stephanie, once I hit 50 I decided not everything needed a practical purpose 🙂 I say you should go ahead and get yourself a gown!
    And I love clothes from the 50s, too, although again I’m not really the right shape to wear them. But I do love rhinestones and crinolines.

    Reply
  89. Stephanie, once I hit 50 I decided not everything needed a practical purpose 🙂 I say you should go ahead and get yourself a gown!
    And I love clothes from the 50s, too, although again I’m not really the right shape to wear them. But I do love rhinestones and crinolines.

    Reply
  90. Stephanie, once I hit 50 I decided not everything needed a practical purpose 🙂 I say you should go ahead and get yourself a gown!
    And I love clothes from the 50s, too, although again I’m not really the right shape to wear them. But I do love rhinestones and crinolines.

    Reply
  91. Sue, I know what you mean. I always enjoy watching fashions cycle around again, and everyone thinking they’re wearing something “new” when I have one just like it still tucked in the back of my closet from way back 🙂

    Reply
  92. Sue, I know what you mean. I always enjoy watching fashions cycle around again, and everyone thinking they’re wearing something “new” when I have one just like it still tucked in the back of my closet from way back 🙂

    Reply
  93. Sue, I know what you mean. I always enjoy watching fashions cycle around again, and everyone thinking they’re wearing something “new” when I have one just like it still tucked in the back of my closet from way back 🙂

    Reply
  94. Sue, I know what you mean. I always enjoy watching fashions cycle around again, and everyone thinking they’re wearing something “new” when I have one just like it still tucked in the back of my closet from way back 🙂

    Reply
  95. Sue, I know what you mean. I always enjoy watching fashions cycle around again, and everyone thinking they’re wearing something “new” when I have one just like it still tucked in the back of my closet from way back 🙂

    Reply
  96. Patricia, I made the turban by cutting down a silk jockey cap and wrapping it with — believe it or not — a small silk pillowcase that just happened to be close to the same colour as my gown, found by chance on sale at a fabric store. There are a lot of portraits of women wearing turbans in the period, so I studied those and copied them to make mine. The feather is Edwardian, I think, and I stitched pearls all around to hide my less-than-perfect sewing 🙂

    Reply
  97. Patricia, I made the turban by cutting down a silk jockey cap and wrapping it with — believe it or not — a small silk pillowcase that just happened to be close to the same colour as my gown, found by chance on sale at a fabric store. There are a lot of portraits of women wearing turbans in the period, so I studied those and copied them to make mine. The feather is Edwardian, I think, and I stitched pearls all around to hide my less-than-perfect sewing 🙂

    Reply
  98. Patricia, I made the turban by cutting down a silk jockey cap and wrapping it with — believe it or not — a small silk pillowcase that just happened to be close to the same colour as my gown, found by chance on sale at a fabric store. There are a lot of portraits of women wearing turbans in the period, so I studied those and copied them to make mine. The feather is Edwardian, I think, and I stitched pearls all around to hide my less-than-perfect sewing 🙂

    Reply
  99. Patricia, I made the turban by cutting down a silk jockey cap and wrapping it with — believe it or not — a small silk pillowcase that just happened to be close to the same colour as my gown, found by chance on sale at a fabric store. There are a lot of portraits of women wearing turbans in the period, so I studied those and copied them to make mine. The feather is Edwardian, I think, and I stitched pearls all around to hide my less-than-perfect sewing 🙂

    Reply
  100. Patricia, I made the turban by cutting down a silk jockey cap and wrapping it with — believe it or not — a small silk pillowcase that just happened to be close to the same colour as my gown, found by chance on sale at a fabric store. There are a lot of portraits of women wearing turbans in the period, so I studied those and copied them to make mine. The feather is Edwardian, I think, and I stitched pearls all around to hide my less-than-perfect sewing 🙂

    Reply
  101. What a gorgeous gown, Susanna. Simply gorgeous. And I loved the story as well.
    I have a Regency gown that Amanda McCabe’s mother sewed for me. It’s in a lovely floral pink and blue pattern on cream with cream lace and ribbons and cloth-covered buttons. I had a matching bonnet made from (I forget who now). I’ve worn it at the Beau Monde soiree at RWA a couple of times.

    Reply
  102. What a gorgeous gown, Susanna. Simply gorgeous. And I loved the story as well.
    I have a Regency gown that Amanda McCabe’s mother sewed for me. It’s in a lovely floral pink and blue pattern on cream with cream lace and ribbons and cloth-covered buttons. I had a matching bonnet made from (I forget who now). I’ve worn it at the Beau Monde soiree at RWA a couple of times.

    Reply
  103. What a gorgeous gown, Susanna. Simply gorgeous. And I loved the story as well.
    I have a Regency gown that Amanda McCabe’s mother sewed for me. It’s in a lovely floral pink and blue pattern on cream with cream lace and ribbons and cloth-covered buttons. I had a matching bonnet made from (I forget who now). I’ve worn it at the Beau Monde soiree at RWA a couple of times.

    Reply
  104. What a gorgeous gown, Susanna. Simply gorgeous. And I loved the story as well.
    I have a Regency gown that Amanda McCabe’s mother sewed for me. It’s in a lovely floral pink and blue pattern on cream with cream lace and ribbons and cloth-covered buttons. I had a matching bonnet made from (I forget who now). I’ve worn it at the Beau Monde soiree at RWA a couple of times.

    Reply
  105. What a gorgeous gown, Susanna. Simply gorgeous. And I loved the story as well.
    I have a Regency gown that Amanda McCabe’s mother sewed for me. It’s in a lovely floral pink and blue pattern on cream with cream lace and ribbons and cloth-covered buttons. I had a matching bonnet made from (I forget who now). I’ve worn it at the Beau Monde soiree at RWA a couple of times.

    Reply
  106. Ditto, Ditto, Ditto. Love the dress and the story. So glad you splurged on the fabric so you felt even more part of the Regency.
    Isn’t it amazing how sometimes everything works out so perfectly…found an event, found silk, knew someone who could create…and you did a fabulous job on the turban as well.
    Thanks for sharing with us.

    Reply
  107. Ditto, Ditto, Ditto. Love the dress and the story. So glad you splurged on the fabric so you felt even more part of the Regency.
    Isn’t it amazing how sometimes everything works out so perfectly…found an event, found silk, knew someone who could create…and you did a fabulous job on the turban as well.
    Thanks for sharing with us.

    Reply
  108. Ditto, Ditto, Ditto. Love the dress and the story. So glad you splurged on the fabric so you felt even more part of the Regency.
    Isn’t it amazing how sometimes everything works out so perfectly…found an event, found silk, knew someone who could create…and you did a fabulous job on the turban as well.
    Thanks for sharing with us.

    Reply
  109. Ditto, Ditto, Ditto. Love the dress and the story. So glad you splurged on the fabric so you felt even more part of the Regency.
    Isn’t it amazing how sometimes everything works out so perfectly…found an event, found silk, knew someone who could create…and you did a fabulous job on the turban as well.
    Thanks for sharing with us.

    Reply
  110. Ditto, Ditto, Ditto. Love the dress and the story. So glad you splurged on the fabric so you felt even more part of the Regency.
    Isn’t it amazing how sometimes everything works out so perfectly…found an event, found silk, knew someone who could create…and you did a fabulous job on the turban as well.
    Thanks for sharing with us.

    Reply
  111. It’s lovely. Very creative work on the turban too! I’ve bought a few vintage clothing items, probably from the 1940’s, back in the day, but I’ve never gone further back than that.

    Reply
  112. It’s lovely. Very creative work on the turban too! I’ve bought a few vintage clothing items, probably from the 1940’s, back in the day, but I’ve never gone further back than that.

    Reply
  113. It’s lovely. Very creative work on the turban too! I’ve bought a few vintage clothing items, probably from the 1940’s, back in the day, but I’ve never gone further back than that.

    Reply
  114. It’s lovely. Very creative work on the turban too! I’ve bought a few vintage clothing items, probably from the 1940’s, back in the day, but I’ve never gone further back than that.

    Reply
  115. It’s lovely. Very creative work on the turban too! I’ve bought a few vintage clothing items, probably from the 1940’s, back in the day, but I’ve never gone further back than that.

    Reply

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