Cold weather

JocoldHi, Jo here, and as it's December now I thought I'd blog about cold weather in fiction.There's a picture of me looking surprisingly cheerful when I'm ready to venture out into freezing temperatures.

As an aside, the Met Office here now breaks the seasons by months, not by the sun, so winter begins on the first of December. I'm not keen on this. I like tradition and also accuracy. The sun's solstices are a fact of nature; the division of the year into 12 month is merely a human device that we could change tomorrow if we wanted to. I'm sure some people are itching to get rid of February at least.

I also don't like winter starting weeks before it should, but I console myself with the knowledge that spring will come early next year. N1360 bl06

Do you like winter? By that I mean the cold, frosty, possibly snowy, short-day time of year? I don't. I used to see some of the romance of frost feathers on the windows and a landscape dusted with white. That was before we emigrated to Halifax, Nova Scotia, where the snow started falling as winter began, in late December, and pretty well stayed until way past the beginning of spring. But it could be fun, I admit, especially for the children.

Then we moved to Montreal and then Ottawa, where the depth of snowfall tended to be less, but that was because it was colder. Much, much colder. The average low January temp in Ottawa is given as -14 C, or 6F, but that's an average. -20 or more wasn't unusual.

The end result is that I don't like winter, and that affects my writing.

334px-Catherine_Palace_heaterIf I were sensible I'd set all my books in spring, summer, and autumn, but the sequencing tends to push me into winter now and then, plus there's the allure of Christmas stories. They're fun and I like them, because I like Christmas a lot.

Even though I know it's unlikely, my stately homes are very well heated in winter, because I don't want anyone with goose-bumps. In the upcoming The Viscount Needs a Wife, I even installed a very large Dutch stove in Beauchamp Abbey  to help things along. It isn't as elaborate as this one from St. Petersburg, but you get the idea. It's an enormous radiator.

I don't know why they weren't more popular in Britain, for they're safer than an open flam and much more efficient. A lot of the heat from a traditional fire goes up the chimney. Travelers must have experienced them on the Continent. Perhaps they really did think a bracing cold good for body, mind, and soul.

I set Winter Fire at Rothgar Abbey at Christmas, which was fine because the Marquess of Rothgar would certainly make sure all his guests were comfortable. One can hardly imagine him scuttling from warm room to warm room wearing woolen mittens! Even so, Genova's must have goosebumps, lounging around in a large space like that. WfsbThat image is from the step-back. All that snow outside, and one small fire. Brrrrrrrr!

It's layers weather, Genova, — flannel petticoats and shawls, and especially underwear — even in Rothgar Abbey!

But then the sequel, A Most Unsuitable Man, carried some of the characters off to the rather decrepit house of the Marquess of Ashart, and I was dealing with  real cold.

My muse realized that I was dodging the issue and broke our central heating system. It was winter in Victoria, British Columbia, which is a balmy paradise compared to Ontario, but of course it happened on a weekend and we couldn't get it fixed for a few days. Victoria's climate is much like Englands, and it brought back all the memories of growing up without central heating.

AmumlgHere are a few snippets, to give you a feel.

"When it came to cold, being inside Cheynings was hardly better than being outside. Four single candles stood waiting for use, but as only one was lit, they did little for the gloom and nothing for the temperature. The great marble hearth held no fire, and the black-and-white marble tiled floor only increased the chill. Here, so greenery or berries celebrated the season, and a smell of damp decay permeated the place."

"Damaris drifted up from a dream of difficult travel. She opened her eyes to musty darkness, but the dark was from closed bedcurtains. She felt as if it was morning, but even in the tent of the bed, the air was icy against her nose. Ah, Cheynings. She remembered it well.

Her skin puckered at the thought of being exposed to the icy air, but she was no delicate blossom. She'd never had a fire in her bedroom at Birch House unless she'd been ill.

She saw her brown woolen robe hung over a rack in front of the dead fireplace. An expanse of uncarpeted floor stretched between it and the bed. She braced herself, slid her feet out of bed and into her slippers, and dashed across room and into her robe.

It was new and of thick wool, but even wrapped in it, she shivered. She hurried to the washstand, but found only a thin layer of ice. When she raised the festoon curtains and pulled open the warped shutters, she faced window panes obscured by a layer of ice so thick her fingernail made no impression. It must be as cold in here as outdoors!

Ah-ha! She flung open the armoire and laughed with giddy relief at the sight of her blue cloak. In moments she was huddled in its furry warmth, hood up. She tucked her hands into the muff, rubbing them together, and feeling much better.

Cheynings would not defeat her."

So, how do you feel about winter cold, in life and in literature? N1362 bl08

Leaving aside Christmas books, do you enjoy historical romances set in winter? Do you have a favourite?

A large country house had to be cold in winter before central heating. There was a reason the wealthy who visited their estates for Christmas scarpered off to Town in early January. A terraced London house was much easier to keep warm. So, do you think authors convey that? Do you want them to? Of course, sharing a fur-lined cloak, cuddling together for warmth and, in extremis, sharing a bed for survival can all be excellent opportunities!

Any and all comments welcome, and there's a copy of Winter Fire for one randomly selected commenters. Alas, I don't have any spare copies of A Most Unsuitable Man.

Giving thanks for central heating and a gas fire if I need a little more,

Jo πŸ™‚

340 thoughts on “Cold weather”

  1. Having been miserably cold in the west of Ireland in June, and having spent many a summer evening in front of the electric fire in England, I’m always a bit surprised that characters in historical romances never seem to feel chilled. I would think that those six or seven petticoats a Victorian lady was said to wear would be a comfort rather than a burden.

    Reply
  2. Having been miserably cold in the west of Ireland in June, and having spent many a summer evening in front of the electric fire in England, I’m always a bit surprised that characters in historical romances never seem to feel chilled. I would think that those six or seven petticoats a Victorian lady was said to wear would be a comfort rather than a burden.

    Reply
  3. Having been miserably cold in the west of Ireland in June, and having spent many a summer evening in front of the electric fire in England, I’m always a bit surprised that characters in historical romances never seem to feel chilled. I would think that those six or seven petticoats a Victorian lady was said to wear would be a comfort rather than a burden.

    Reply
  4. Having been miserably cold in the west of Ireland in June, and having spent many a summer evening in front of the electric fire in England, I’m always a bit surprised that characters in historical romances never seem to feel chilled. I would think that those six or seven petticoats a Victorian lady was said to wear would be a comfort rather than a burden.

    Reply
  5. Having been miserably cold in the west of Ireland in June, and having spent many a summer evening in front of the electric fire in England, I’m always a bit surprised that characters in historical romances never seem to feel chilled. I would think that those six or seven petticoats a Victorian lady was said to wear would be a comfort rather than a burden.

    Reply
  6. Absolutely, Kathy. Though as I remember, we were dressed in so many layers we kept our distance from the fire and didn’t freeze anywhere, but that’s the advantage of living the simple life with a family all in a 12 x 12 living room!

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  7. Absolutely, Kathy. Though as I remember, we were dressed in so many layers we kept our distance from the fire and didn’t freeze anywhere, but that’s the advantage of living the simple life with a family all in a 12 x 12 living room!

    Reply
  8. Absolutely, Kathy. Though as I remember, we were dressed in so many layers we kept our distance from the fire and didn’t freeze anywhere, but that’s the advantage of living the simple life with a family all in a 12 x 12 living room!

    Reply
  9. Absolutely, Kathy. Though as I remember, we were dressed in so many layers we kept our distance from the fire and didn’t freeze anywhere, but that’s the advantage of living the simple life with a family all in a 12 x 12 living room!

    Reply
  10. Absolutely, Kathy. Though as I remember, we were dressed in so many layers we kept our distance from the fire and didn’t freeze anywhere, but that’s the advantage of living the simple life with a family all in a 12 x 12 living room!

    Reply
  11. Yes on the petticoats, Lillian. They didn’t wear them in summer. And shawls, mittens, even hats.
    They all wore nightcaps, which few of our heroes and heroines do.

    Reply
  12. Yes on the petticoats, Lillian. They didn’t wear them in summer. And shawls, mittens, even hats.
    They all wore nightcaps, which few of our heroes and heroines do.

    Reply
  13. Yes on the petticoats, Lillian. They didn’t wear them in summer. And shawls, mittens, even hats.
    They all wore nightcaps, which few of our heroes and heroines do.

    Reply
  14. Yes on the petticoats, Lillian. They didn’t wear them in summer. And shawls, mittens, even hats.
    They all wore nightcaps, which few of our heroes and heroines do.

    Reply
  15. Yes on the petticoats, Lillian. They didn’t wear them in summer. And shawls, mittens, even hats.
    They all wore nightcaps, which few of our heroes and heroines do.

    Reply
  16. I love winter stories, but I agree, I don’t think most authors convey the feeling. Maybe they haven’t really experienced it enough to, I don’t know. We had oil heat when I was young and invariably, there would be some moisture that would collect in the line from the outside tank to the inside furnace so there was many a day we woke to no heat and sometimes, it was off for several days because the line would burst and would have to be replaced. We’d have to crack the faucets to make sure the water pipes didn’t burst as well. One advantage to not having running water in regency times πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  17. I love winter stories, but I agree, I don’t think most authors convey the feeling. Maybe they haven’t really experienced it enough to, I don’t know. We had oil heat when I was young and invariably, there would be some moisture that would collect in the line from the outside tank to the inside furnace so there was many a day we woke to no heat and sometimes, it was off for several days because the line would burst and would have to be replaced. We’d have to crack the faucets to make sure the water pipes didn’t burst as well. One advantage to not having running water in regency times πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  18. I love winter stories, but I agree, I don’t think most authors convey the feeling. Maybe they haven’t really experienced it enough to, I don’t know. We had oil heat when I was young and invariably, there would be some moisture that would collect in the line from the outside tank to the inside furnace so there was many a day we woke to no heat and sometimes, it was off for several days because the line would burst and would have to be replaced. We’d have to crack the faucets to make sure the water pipes didn’t burst as well. One advantage to not having running water in regency times πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  19. I love winter stories, but I agree, I don’t think most authors convey the feeling. Maybe they haven’t really experienced it enough to, I don’t know. We had oil heat when I was young and invariably, there would be some moisture that would collect in the line from the outside tank to the inside furnace so there was many a day we woke to no heat and sometimes, it was off for several days because the line would burst and would have to be replaced. We’d have to crack the faucets to make sure the water pipes didn’t burst as well. One advantage to not having running water in regency times πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  20. I love winter stories, but I agree, I don’t think most authors convey the feeling. Maybe they haven’t really experienced it enough to, I don’t know. We had oil heat when I was young and invariably, there would be some moisture that would collect in the line from the outside tank to the inside furnace so there was many a day we woke to no heat and sometimes, it was off for several days because the line would burst and would have to be replaced. We’d have to crack the faucets to make sure the water pipes didn’t burst as well. One advantage to not having running water in regency times πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  21. Wasn’t there a closed fireplace system in place by the Regency? Probably not earlier, though.
    Though all the fashion pictures would have us believe that ladies went around wearing next to nothing all the time, I think they probably pulled out the lindsey Woolsey and other warmer fabrics in winter.
    I like both the Winter Fire and Most Unsuitable Man and never bothered about whether the people were actually cold– who noticed the weather with so much else going on? Though I don’t care what season is depicted in the books,I do want books noted as being for Christmas to be a bit more cheerful. I certainly want them to end on a happy note.

    Reply
  22. Wasn’t there a closed fireplace system in place by the Regency? Probably not earlier, though.
    Though all the fashion pictures would have us believe that ladies went around wearing next to nothing all the time, I think they probably pulled out the lindsey Woolsey and other warmer fabrics in winter.
    I like both the Winter Fire and Most Unsuitable Man and never bothered about whether the people were actually cold– who noticed the weather with so much else going on? Though I don’t care what season is depicted in the books,I do want books noted as being for Christmas to be a bit more cheerful. I certainly want them to end on a happy note.

    Reply
  23. Wasn’t there a closed fireplace system in place by the Regency? Probably not earlier, though.
    Though all the fashion pictures would have us believe that ladies went around wearing next to nothing all the time, I think they probably pulled out the lindsey Woolsey and other warmer fabrics in winter.
    I like both the Winter Fire and Most Unsuitable Man and never bothered about whether the people were actually cold– who noticed the weather with so much else going on? Though I don’t care what season is depicted in the books,I do want books noted as being for Christmas to be a bit more cheerful. I certainly want them to end on a happy note.

    Reply
  24. Wasn’t there a closed fireplace system in place by the Regency? Probably not earlier, though.
    Though all the fashion pictures would have us believe that ladies went around wearing next to nothing all the time, I think they probably pulled out the lindsey Woolsey and other warmer fabrics in winter.
    I like both the Winter Fire and Most Unsuitable Man and never bothered about whether the people were actually cold– who noticed the weather with so much else going on? Though I don’t care what season is depicted in the books,I do want books noted as being for Christmas to be a bit more cheerful. I certainly want them to end on a happy note.

    Reply
  25. Wasn’t there a closed fireplace system in place by the Regency? Probably not earlier, though.
    Though all the fashion pictures would have us believe that ladies went around wearing next to nothing all the time, I think they probably pulled out the lindsey Woolsey and other warmer fabrics in winter.
    I like both the Winter Fire and Most Unsuitable Man and never bothered about whether the people were actually cold– who noticed the weather with so much else going on? Though I don’t care what season is depicted in the books,I do want books noted as being for Christmas to be a bit more cheerful. I certainly want them to end on a happy note.

    Reply
  26. Ah, in the bleak midwinter! Having grown up in Western New York, not all of that far from Canada, in an elderly and not well heated mid-19th century farmhouse, I know cold. Like you, I rather enjoy writing winter stories when I can reasonably keep my characters cozy, but you did capture the essence with Damaris at Cheynings. *G*

    Reply
  27. Ah, in the bleak midwinter! Having grown up in Western New York, not all of that far from Canada, in an elderly and not well heated mid-19th century farmhouse, I know cold. Like you, I rather enjoy writing winter stories when I can reasonably keep my characters cozy, but you did capture the essence with Damaris at Cheynings. *G*

    Reply
  28. Ah, in the bleak midwinter! Having grown up in Western New York, not all of that far from Canada, in an elderly and not well heated mid-19th century farmhouse, I know cold. Like you, I rather enjoy writing winter stories when I can reasonably keep my characters cozy, but you did capture the essence with Damaris at Cheynings. *G*

    Reply
  29. Ah, in the bleak midwinter! Having grown up in Western New York, not all of that far from Canada, in an elderly and not well heated mid-19th century farmhouse, I know cold. Like you, I rather enjoy writing winter stories when I can reasonably keep my characters cozy, but you did capture the essence with Damaris at Cheynings. *G*

    Reply
  30. Ah, in the bleak midwinter! Having grown up in Western New York, not all of that far from Canada, in an elderly and not well heated mid-19th century farmhouse, I know cold. Like you, I rather enjoy writing winter stories when I can reasonably keep my characters cozy, but you did capture the essence with Damaris at Cheynings. *G*

    Reply
  31. A post script. Jo, here they’ve also started talking about quarterly months as beginning of the season, and they distinguish calendar seasons from astronomical seasons. Here in moderate Maryland, the calendar seasons actually correlate a bit better with the weather, but of course that’s not the same elsewhere.

    Reply
  32. A post script. Jo, here they’ve also started talking about quarterly months as beginning of the season, and they distinguish calendar seasons from astronomical seasons. Here in moderate Maryland, the calendar seasons actually correlate a bit better with the weather, but of course that’s not the same elsewhere.

    Reply
  33. A post script. Jo, here they’ve also started talking about quarterly months as beginning of the season, and they distinguish calendar seasons from astronomical seasons. Here in moderate Maryland, the calendar seasons actually correlate a bit better with the weather, but of course that’s not the same elsewhere.

    Reply
  34. A post script. Jo, here they’ve also started talking about quarterly months as beginning of the season, and they distinguish calendar seasons from astronomical seasons. Here in moderate Maryland, the calendar seasons actually correlate a bit better with the weather, but of course that’s not the same elsewhere.

    Reply
  35. A post script. Jo, here they’ve also started talking about quarterly months as beginning of the season, and they distinguish calendar seasons from astronomical seasons. Here in moderate Maryland, the calendar seasons actually correlate a bit better with the weather, but of course that’s not the same elsewhere.

    Reply
  36. Central heating is great, but I found out I prefer my own fireplace, the old traditional wood fueled one. Fingers crossed for the giveaway. Iris

    Reply
  37. Central heating is great, but I found out I prefer my own fireplace, the old traditional wood fueled one. Fingers crossed for the giveaway. Iris

    Reply
  38. Central heating is great, but I found out I prefer my own fireplace, the old traditional wood fueled one. Fingers crossed for the giveaway. Iris

    Reply
  39. Central heating is great, but I found out I prefer my own fireplace, the old traditional wood fueled one. Fingers crossed for the giveaway. Iris

    Reply
  40. Central heating is great, but I found out I prefer my own fireplace, the old traditional wood fueled one. Fingers crossed for the giveaway. Iris

    Reply
  41. I responded to this once, Theo, but I don’t know where it went. Typepad is being odd. They “upgraded.” :: sigh ::
    There were fewer pipe problems for sure, but getting the water was difficult. I don’t know about pumps in cold weather, but I’m sure there were problems.

    Reply
  42. I responded to this once, Theo, but I don’t know where it went. Typepad is being odd. They “upgraded.” :: sigh ::
    There were fewer pipe problems for sure, but getting the water was difficult. I don’t know about pumps in cold weather, but I’m sure there were problems.

    Reply
  43. I responded to this once, Theo, but I don’t know where it went. Typepad is being odd. They “upgraded.” :: sigh ::
    There were fewer pipe problems for sure, but getting the water was difficult. I don’t know about pumps in cold weather, but I’m sure there were problems.

    Reply
  44. I responded to this once, Theo, but I don’t know where it went. Typepad is being odd. They “upgraded.” :: sigh ::
    There were fewer pipe problems for sure, but getting the water was difficult. I don’t know about pumps in cold weather, but I’m sure there were problems.

    Reply
  45. I responded to this once, Theo, but I don’t know where it went. Typepad is being odd. They “upgraded.” :: sigh ::
    There were fewer pipe problems for sure, but getting the water was difficult. I don’t know about pumps in cold weather, but I’m sure there were problems.

    Reply
  46. I hate the cold and would happily never have winter again. I’ve often thought about how cold those country houses must have been, and I don’t think it is well-conveyed, generally. I suspect most authors have grown up with central heating and well-insulated homes!
    Although I love fires to look at, they’re an amazingly inefficient way of heating rooms, and only work if the room door is kept shut and the fire blazes for a few hours. I also wonder why the Dutch stoves (and other stoves) didn’t catch on in the UK. What fuel did they use? — the English seem to have remained wedded to wood, rather than coal for example, for as long as possible.
    I do like snow, though. Still long for proper deep snow, which we so rarely get in England.

    Reply
  47. I hate the cold and would happily never have winter again. I’ve often thought about how cold those country houses must have been, and I don’t think it is well-conveyed, generally. I suspect most authors have grown up with central heating and well-insulated homes!
    Although I love fires to look at, they’re an amazingly inefficient way of heating rooms, and only work if the room door is kept shut and the fire blazes for a few hours. I also wonder why the Dutch stoves (and other stoves) didn’t catch on in the UK. What fuel did they use? — the English seem to have remained wedded to wood, rather than coal for example, for as long as possible.
    I do like snow, though. Still long for proper deep snow, which we so rarely get in England.

    Reply
  48. I hate the cold and would happily never have winter again. I’ve often thought about how cold those country houses must have been, and I don’t think it is well-conveyed, generally. I suspect most authors have grown up with central heating and well-insulated homes!
    Although I love fires to look at, they’re an amazingly inefficient way of heating rooms, and only work if the room door is kept shut and the fire blazes for a few hours. I also wonder why the Dutch stoves (and other stoves) didn’t catch on in the UK. What fuel did they use? — the English seem to have remained wedded to wood, rather than coal for example, for as long as possible.
    I do like snow, though. Still long for proper deep snow, which we so rarely get in England.

    Reply
  49. I hate the cold and would happily never have winter again. I’ve often thought about how cold those country houses must have been, and I don’t think it is well-conveyed, generally. I suspect most authors have grown up with central heating and well-insulated homes!
    Although I love fires to look at, they’re an amazingly inefficient way of heating rooms, and only work if the room door is kept shut and the fire blazes for a few hours. I also wonder why the Dutch stoves (and other stoves) didn’t catch on in the UK. What fuel did they use? — the English seem to have remained wedded to wood, rather than coal for example, for as long as possible.
    I do like snow, though. Still long for proper deep snow, which we so rarely get in England.

    Reply
  50. I hate the cold and would happily never have winter again. I’ve often thought about how cold those country houses must have been, and I don’t think it is well-conveyed, generally. I suspect most authors have grown up with central heating and well-insulated homes!
    Although I love fires to look at, they’re an amazingly inefficient way of heating rooms, and only work if the room door is kept shut and the fire blazes for a few hours. I also wonder why the Dutch stoves (and other stoves) didn’t catch on in the UK. What fuel did they use? — the English seem to have remained wedded to wood, rather than coal for example, for as long as possible.
    I do like snow, though. Still long for proper deep snow, which we so rarely get in England.

    Reply
  51. I am 71 years old and as a child the house we lived in out in the country was heated by coal and wood burning stoves. The bedroom that us kids slept in didn’t even have a stove, but the only miserable memory that I have of being cold at that time, was getting out of bed in the morning and making my way to the kitchen which was always warm by the time we kids got up.
    However, I have many memories of being extremely uncomfortable in the heat of Summer. When I read stories that tell of the nurseries or servant quarters being on the top floor, I do find myself thinking how uncomfortable they must have been trying to sleep in the summer.
    I think you authors do a fine enough job of conveying the living conditions of the times. It was what it was. We have to remember that those people had never experienced central heating/air conditioning. Didn’t know what they were missing.

    Reply
  52. I am 71 years old and as a child the house we lived in out in the country was heated by coal and wood burning stoves. The bedroom that us kids slept in didn’t even have a stove, but the only miserable memory that I have of being cold at that time, was getting out of bed in the morning and making my way to the kitchen which was always warm by the time we kids got up.
    However, I have many memories of being extremely uncomfortable in the heat of Summer. When I read stories that tell of the nurseries or servant quarters being on the top floor, I do find myself thinking how uncomfortable they must have been trying to sleep in the summer.
    I think you authors do a fine enough job of conveying the living conditions of the times. It was what it was. We have to remember that those people had never experienced central heating/air conditioning. Didn’t know what they were missing.

    Reply
  53. I am 71 years old and as a child the house we lived in out in the country was heated by coal and wood burning stoves. The bedroom that us kids slept in didn’t even have a stove, but the only miserable memory that I have of being cold at that time, was getting out of bed in the morning and making my way to the kitchen which was always warm by the time we kids got up.
    However, I have many memories of being extremely uncomfortable in the heat of Summer. When I read stories that tell of the nurseries or servant quarters being on the top floor, I do find myself thinking how uncomfortable they must have been trying to sleep in the summer.
    I think you authors do a fine enough job of conveying the living conditions of the times. It was what it was. We have to remember that those people had never experienced central heating/air conditioning. Didn’t know what they were missing.

    Reply
  54. I am 71 years old and as a child the house we lived in out in the country was heated by coal and wood burning stoves. The bedroom that us kids slept in didn’t even have a stove, but the only miserable memory that I have of being cold at that time, was getting out of bed in the morning and making my way to the kitchen which was always warm by the time we kids got up.
    However, I have many memories of being extremely uncomfortable in the heat of Summer. When I read stories that tell of the nurseries or servant quarters being on the top floor, I do find myself thinking how uncomfortable they must have been trying to sleep in the summer.
    I think you authors do a fine enough job of conveying the living conditions of the times. It was what it was. We have to remember that those people had never experienced central heating/air conditioning. Didn’t know what they were missing.

    Reply
  55. I am 71 years old and as a child the house we lived in out in the country was heated by coal and wood burning stoves. The bedroom that us kids slept in didn’t even have a stove, but the only miserable memory that I have of being cold at that time, was getting out of bed in the morning and making my way to the kitchen which was always warm by the time we kids got up.
    However, I have many memories of being extremely uncomfortable in the heat of Summer. When I read stories that tell of the nurseries or servant quarters being on the top floor, I do find myself thinking how uncomfortable they must have been trying to sleep in the summer.
    I think you authors do a fine enough job of conveying the living conditions of the times. It was what it was. We have to remember that those people had never experienced central heating/air conditioning. Didn’t know what they were missing.

    Reply
  56. There were Rumford stoves, Nancy, which cut down the amount of heat wasted up the chimney. Beauchamp Abbey has those, too! I did a bit of research on home heating. There was a company advertizing steam heat, presumably a kind of central heating, but I couldn’t find anything about it actually being used.
    I think Sir John Soane had a heating system in his house, which is a fascinating place. http://www.soane.org I remember a grating in the floor of one room that had some kind of heater beneath.

    Reply
  57. There were Rumford stoves, Nancy, which cut down the amount of heat wasted up the chimney. Beauchamp Abbey has those, too! I did a bit of research on home heating. There was a company advertizing steam heat, presumably a kind of central heating, but I couldn’t find anything about it actually being used.
    I think Sir John Soane had a heating system in his house, which is a fascinating place. http://www.soane.org I remember a grating in the floor of one room that had some kind of heater beneath.

    Reply
  58. There were Rumford stoves, Nancy, which cut down the amount of heat wasted up the chimney. Beauchamp Abbey has those, too! I did a bit of research on home heating. There was a company advertizing steam heat, presumably a kind of central heating, but I couldn’t find anything about it actually being used.
    I think Sir John Soane had a heating system in his house, which is a fascinating place. http://www.soane.org I remember a grating in the floor of one room that had some kind of heater beneath.

    Reply
  59. There were Rumford stoves, Nancy, which cut down the amount of heat wasted up the chimney. Beauchamp Abbey has those, too! I did a bit of research on home heating. There was a company advertizing steam heat, presumably a kind of central heating, but I couldn’t find anything about it actually being used.
    I think Sir John Soane had a heating system in his house, which is a fascinating place. http://www.soane.org I remember a grating in the floor of one room that had some kind of heater beneath.

    Reply
  60. There were Rumford stoves, Nancy, which cut down the amount of heat wasted up the chimney. Beauchamp Abbey has those, too! I did a bit of research on home heating. There was a company advertizing steam heat, presumably a kind of central heating, but I couldn’t find anything about it actually being used.
    I think Sir John Soane had a heating system in his house, which is a fascinating place. http://www.soane.org I remember a grating in the floor of one room that had some kind of heater beneath.

    Reply
  61. True about the fun, Dean, but it seems to me that most authors go for the fun bit. Is it because they think readers want that, or because they’ve never really had to endure the harsh side of it? Rhetorical question, of course.

    Reply
  62. True about the fun, Dean, but it seems to me that most authors go for the fun bit. Is it because they think readers want that, or because they’ve never really had to endure the harsh side of it? Rhetorical question, of course.

    Reply
  63. True about the fun, Dean, but it seems to me that most authors go for the fun bit. Is it because they think readers want that, or because they’ve never really had to endure the harsh side of it? Rhetorical question, of course.

    Reply
  64. True about the fun, Dean, but it seems to me that most authors go for the fun bit. Is it because they think readers want that, or because they’ve never really had to endure the harsh side of it? Rhetorical question, of course.

    Reply
  65. True about the fun, Dean, but it seems to me that most authors go for the fun bit. Is it because they think readers want that, or because they’ve never really had to endure the harsh side of it? Rhetorical question, of course.

    Reply
  66. They correlate pretty well here, too, Mary Jo. I’m just resisting change. *G*
    I’m not sure what anyone would do with a place like Ottawa. There’d have to be irregular seasons, with winter November to March.

    Reply
  67. They correlate pretty well here, too, Mary Jo. I’m just resisting change. *G*
    I’m not sure what anyone would do with a place like Ottawa. There’d have to be irregular seasons, with winter November to March.

    Reply
  68. They correlate pretty well here, too, Mary Jo. I’m just resisting change. *G*
    I’m not sure what anyone would do with a place like Ottawa. There’d have to be irregular seasons, with winter November to March.

    Reply
  69. They correlate pretty well here, too, Mary Jo. I’m just resisting change. *G*
    I’m not sure what anyone would do with a place like Ottawa. There’d have to be irregular seasons, with winter November to March.

    Reply
  70. They correlate pretty well here, too, Mary Jo. I’m just resisting change. *G*
    I’m not sure what anyone would do with a place like Ottawa. There’d have to be irregular seasons, with winter November to March.

    Reply
  71. I do think a wood fire is splendid, Iris. I’m not so keen on coal. It’s efficient, but there’s an acrid smell to it. Central heating plus occasional wood fire is ideal for me, but here the only fireplace is gas. We’d have to build a whole new chimney for anything else.

    Reply
  72. I do think a wood fire is splendid, Iris. I’m not so keen on coal. It’s efficient, but there’s an acrid smell to it. Central heating plus occasional wood fire is ideal for me, but here the only fireplace is gas. We’d have to build a whole new chimney for anything else.

    Reply
  73. I do think a wood fire is splendid, Iris. I’m not so keen on coal. It’s efficient, but there’s an acrid smell to it. Central heating plus occasional wood fire is ideal for me, but here the only fireplace is gas. We’d have to build a whole new chimney for anything else.

    Reply
  74. I do think a wood fire is splendid, Iris. I’m not so keen on coal. It’s efficient, but there’s an acrid smell to it. Central heating plus occasional wood fire is ideal for me, but here the only fireplace is gas. We’d have to build a whole new chimney for anything else.

    Reply
  75. I do think a wood fire is splendid, Iris. I’m not so keen on coal. It’s efficient, but there’s an acrid smell to it. Central heating plus occasional wood fire is ideal for me, but here the only fireplace is gas. We’d have to build a whole new chimney for anything else.

    Reply
  76. I’m pretty sure the stoves used charcoal, HJ, which was available in Britain. As for wood v coal, by the 18th century most town houses used coal, which was cheaper and more efficient than wood.
    But in the country wood was cheap, and on an estate, free. Then there’s peat, a whole other matter.

    Reply
  77. I’m pretty sure the stoves used charcoal, HJ, which was available in Britain. As for wood v coal, by the 18th century most town houses used coal, which was cheaper and more efficient than wood.
    But in the country wood was cheap, and on an estate, free. Then there’s peat, a whole other matter.

    Reply
  78. I’m pretty sure the stoves used charcoal, HJ, which was available in Britain. As for wood v coal, by the 18th century most town houses used coal, which was cheaper and more efficient than wood.
    But in the country wood was cheap, and on an estate, free. Then there’s peat, a whole other matter.

    Reply
  79. I’m pretty sure the stoves used charcoal, HJ, which was available in Britain. As for wood v coal, by the 18th century most town houses used coal, which was cheaper and more efficient than wood.
    But in the country wood was cheap, and on an estate, free. Then there’s peat, a whole other matter.

    Reply
  80. I’m pretty sure the stoves used charcoal, HJ, which was available in Britain. As for wood v coal, by the 18th century most town houses used coal, which was cheaper and more efficient than wood.
    But in the country wood was cheap, and on an estate, free. Then there’s peat, a whole other matter.

    Reply
  81. Good point, Mary, about them not knowing what they were missing. Growing up, I took the situation for granted, including that rush from warm bedroom to warm kitchen. I remember being quite confused about what central heating was, imagining some enormous something in the middle of the house, giving out heat.
    A lot of old houses were terraces, which saved heat going out of external walls for most.
    As for heat, it rarely gets that hot in Britain. There would have been uncomfortable days, but rarely hot nights.

    Reply
  82. Good point, Mary, about them not knowing what they were missing. Growing up, I took the situation for granted, including that rush from warm bedroom to warm kitchen. I remember being quite confused about what central heating was, imagining some enormous something in the middle of the house, giving out heat.
    A lot of old houses were terraces, which saved heat going out of external walls for most.
    As for heat, it rarely gets that hot in Britain. There would have been uncomfortable days, but rarely hot nights.

    Reply
  83. Good point, Mary, about them not knowing what they were missing. Growing up, I took the situation for granted, including that rush from warm bedroom to warm kitchen. I remember being quite confused about what central heating was, imagining some enormous something in the middle of the house, giving out heat.
    A lot of old houses were terraces, which saved heat going out of external walls for most.
    As for heat, it rarely gets that hot in Britain. There would have been uncomfortable days, but rarely hot nights.

    Reply
  84. Good point, Mary, about them not knowing what they were missing. Growing up, I took the situation for granted, including that rush from warm bedroom to warm kitchen. I remember being quite confused about what central heating was, imagining some enormous something in the middle of the house, giving out heat.
    A lot of old houses were terraces, which saved heat going out of external walls for most.
    As for heat, it rarely gets that hot in Britain. There would have been uncomfortable days, but rarely hot nights.

    Reply
  85. Good point, Mary, about them not knowing what they were missing. Growing up, I took the situation for granted, including that rush from warm bedroom to warm kitchen. I remember being quite confused about what central heating was, imagining some enormous something in the middle of the house, giving out heat.
    A lot of old houses were terraces, which saved heat going out of external walls for most.
    As for heat, it rarely gets that hot in Britain. There would have been uncomfortable days, but rarely hot nights.

    Reply
  86. I don’t really think the temperature conditions in houses are portrayed accurately. Even in contemporary fiction. Well unless a point is being made because it is important to the plot.
    Growing up, I lived in a mostly uninsulated house with 2 floor furnaces (the kind with grates that burn and scar your feet.) Once Thanksgiving came we put plastic over all the windows until spring to cut down on drafts which made it more tolerable but not warm.
    You didn’t sit near windows, everyone cuddled on the couch together to share body warmth and just before going to bed you stood over the floor furnace and filled your nightgown with hot air before dashing to bed.
    No AC either..so in the summer us kids frequently slept on the cool, bare floor because it was cooler. I remember many nights waking up and then moving to the floor because I was so hot.
    Though England of course wouldn’t have that kind of stifling, muggy heat.
    Another thing to think about is that rooms couldn’t be heated very well because of such high ceilings – 10 and 12 feet tall means ALL the warmth goes up versus down where the people are.
    Though I do know that you adapt to the temperatures you are accustomed to. If you go to the Oregon Coast in summer from Georgia, it feels cold. They think there is a heat wave if it hits 80. Same for New Hampshire and Georgia.
    Give me fleece and flannel come winter. No cotton, no silk, no nylon, no rayon or other slinky cold fabrics.

    Reply
  87. I don’t really think the temperature conditions in houses are portrayed accurately. Even in contemporary fiction. Well unless a point is being made because it is important to the plot.
    Growing up, I lived in a mostly uninsulated house with 2 floor furnaces (the kind with grates that burn and scar your feet.) Once Thanksgiving came we put plastic over all the windows until spring to cut down on drafts which made it more tolerable but not warm.
    You didn’t sit near windows, everyone cuddled on the couch together to share body warmth and just before going to bed you stood over the floor furnace and filled your nightgown with hot air before dashing to bed.
    No AC either..so in the summer us kids frequently slept on the cool, bare floor because it was cooler. I remember many nights waking up and then moving to the floor because I was so hot.
    Though England of course wouldn’t have that kind of stifling, muggy heat.
    Another thing to think about is that rooms couldn’t be heated very well because of such high ceilings – 10 and 12 feet tall means ALL the warmth goes up versus down where the people are.
    Though I do know that you adapt to the temperatures you are accustomed to. If you go to the Oregon Coast in summer from Georgia, it feels cold. They think there is a heat wave if it hits 80. Same for New Hampshire and Georgia.
    Give me fleece and flannel come winter. No cotton, no silk, no nylon, no rayon or other slinky cold fabrics.

    Reply
  88. I don’t really think the temperature conditions in houses are portrayed accurately. Even in contemporary fiction. Well unless a point is being made because it is important to the plot.
    Growing up, I lived in a mostly uninsulated house with 2 floor furnaces (the kind with grates that burn and scar your feet.) Once Thanksgiving came we put plastic over all the windows until spring to cut down on drafts which made it more tolerable but not warm.
    You didn’t sit near windows, everyone cuddled on the couch together to share body warmth and just before going to bed you stood over the floor furnace and filled your nightgown with hot air before dashing to bed.
    No AC either..so in the summer us kids frequently slept on the cool, bare floor because it was cooler. I remember many nights waking up and then moving to the floor because I was so hot.
    Though England of course wouldn’t have that kind of stifling, muggy heat.
    Another thing to think about is that rooms couldn’t be heated very well because of such high ceilings – 10 and 12 feet tall means ALL the warmth goes up versus down where the people are.
    Though I do know that you adapt to the temperatures you are accustomed to. If you go to the Oregon Coast in summer from Georgia, it feels cold. They think there is a heat wave if it hits 80. Same for New Hampshire and Georgia.
    Give me fleece and flannel come winter. No cotton, no silk, no nylon, no rayon or other slinky cold fabrics.

    Reply
  89. I don’t really think the temperature conditions in houses are portrayed accurately. Even in contemporary fiction. Well unless a point is being made because it is important to the plot.
    Growing up, I lived in a mostly uninsulated house with 2 floor furnaces (the kind with grates that burn and scar your feet.) Once Thanksgiving came we put plastic over all the windows until spring to cut down on drafts which made it more tolerable but not warm.
    You didn’t sit near windows, everyone cuddled on the couch together to share body warmth and just before going to bed you stood over the floor furnace and filled your nightgown with hot air before dashing to bed.
    No AC either..so in the summer us kids frequently slept on the cool, bare floor because it was cooler. I remember many nights waking up and then moving to the floor because I was so hot.
    Though England of course wouldn’t have that kind of stifling, muggy heat.
    Another thing to think about is that rooms couldn’t be heated very well because of such high ceilings – 10 and 12 feet tall means ALL the warmth goes up versus down where the people are.
    Though I do know that you adapt to the temperatures you are accustomed to. If you go to the Oregon Coast in summer from Georgia, it feels cold. They think there is a heat wave if it hits 80. Same for New Hampshire and Georgia.
    Give me fleece and flannel come winter. No cotton, no silk, no nylon, no rayon or other slinky cold fabrics.

    Reply
  90. I don’t really think the temperature conditions in houses are portrayed accurately. Even in contemporary fiction. Well unless a point is being made because it is important to the plot.
    Growing up, I lived in a mostly uninsulated house with 2 floor furnaces (the kind with grates that burn and scar your feet.) Once Thanksgiving came we put plastic over all the windows until spring to cut down on drafts which made it more tolerable but not warm.
    You didn’t sit near windows, everyone cuddled on the couch together to share body warmth and just before going to bed you stood over the floor furnace and filled your nightgown with hot air before dashing to bed.
    No AC either..so in the summer us kids frequently slept on the cool, bare floor because it was cooler. I remember many nights waking up and then moving to the floor because I was so hot.
    Though England of course wouldn’t have that kind of stifling, muggy heat.
    Another thing to think about is that rooms couldn’t be heated very well because of such high ceilings – 10 and 12 feet tall means ALL the warmth goes up versus down where the people are.
    Though I do know that you adapt to the temperatures you are accustomed to. If you go to the Oregon Coast in summer from Georgia, it feels cold. They think there is a heat wave if it hits 80. Same for New Hampshire and Georgia.
    Give me fleece and flannel come winter. No cotton, no silk, no nylon, no rayon or other slinky cold fabrics.

    Reply
  91. I dislike being cold. So much so I moved to Pawleys Island SC and enjoy visiting my mother in Melbourne Beach, Florida. Wish you all were here. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  92. I dislike being cold. So much so I moved to Pawleys Island SC and enjoy visiting my mother in Melbourne Beach, Florida. Wish you all were here. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  93. I dislike being cold. So much so I moved to Pawleys Island SC and enjoy visiting my mother in Melbourne Beach, Florida. Wish you all were here. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  94. I dislike being cold. So much so I moved to Pawleys Island SC and enjoy visiting my mother in Melbourne Beach, Florida. Wish you all were here. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  95. I dislike being cold. So much so I moved to Pawleys Island SC and enjoy visiting my mother in Melbourne Beach, Florida. Wish you all were here. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  96. I hate being cold. And I particularly detest the shorter days. The last romance I read set in winter, I actually caught myself actively trying to forget it was winter. Of course I didn’t even notice this “over-ride” until the author mentioned snow. I had a little moment of confusion. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  97. I hate being cold. And I particularly detest the shorter days. The last romance I read set in winter, I actually caught myself actively trying to forget it was winter. Of course I didn’t even notice this “over-ride” until the author mentioned snow. I had a little moment of confusion. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  98. I hate being cold. And I particularly detest the shorter days. The last romance I read set in winter, I actually caught myself actively trying to forget it was winter. Of course I didn’t even notice this “over-ride” until the author mentioned snow. I had a little moment of confusion. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  99. I hate being cold. And I particularly detest the shorter days. The last romance I read set in winter, I actually caught myself actively trying to forget it was winter. Of course I didn’t even notice this “over-ride” until the author mentioned snow. I had a little moment of confusion. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  100. I hate being cold. And I particularly detest the shorter days. The last romance I read set in winter, I actually caught myself actively trying to forget it was winter. Of course I didn’t even notice this “over-ride” until the author mentioned snow. I had a little moment of confusion. πŸ˜‰

    Reply
  101. I have never been a fan of summer, temperatures above 75 are unbearable for me, even as a child. I loved everything about winter, the snow, the cold, the clothes, the outdoor games. But now that I am 78 I am afraid of falling so my love has turned to dread. I still get excited with the first snow flakes and I love looking at the snow and watching my dog’s joy with the cold and snow, (she also hates summer) I hate the fact that it gets dark so early, and that I am confined to the house a lot of the time, Still and all if I only had the choice of summer or winter, would choose winter.

    Reply
  102. I have never been a fan of summer, temperatures above 75 are unbearable for me, even as a child. I loved everything about winter, the snow, the cold, the clothes, the outdoor games. But now that I am 78 I am afraid of falling so my love has turned to dread. I still get excited with the first snow flakes and I love looking at the snow and watching my dog’s joy with the cold and snow, (she also hates summer) I hate the fact that it gets dark so early, and that I am confined to the house a lot of the time, Still and all if I only had the choice of summer or winter, would choose winter.

    Reply
  103. I have never been a fan of summer, temperatures above 75 are unbearable for me, even as a child. I loved everything about winter, the snow, the cold, the clothes, the outdoor games. But now that I am 78 I am afraid of falling so my love has turned to dread. I still get excited with the first snow flakes and I love looking at the snow and watching my dog’s joy with the cold and snow, (she also hates summer) I hate the fact that it gets dark so early, and that I am confined to the house a lot of the time, Still and all if I only had the choice of summer or winter, would choose winter.

    Reply
  104. I have never been a fan of summer, temperatures above 75 are unbearable for me, even as a child. I loved everything about winter, the snow, the cold, the clothes, the outdoor games. But now that I am 78 I am afraid of falling so my love has turned to dread. I still get excited with the first snow flakes and I love looking at the snow and watching my dog’s joy with the cold and snow, (she also hates summer) I hate the fact that it gets dark so early, and that I am confined to the house a lot of the time, Still and all if I only had the choice of summer or winter, would choose winter.

    Reply
  105. I have never been a fan of summer, temperatures above 75 are unbearable for me, even as a child. I loved everything about winter, the snow, the cold, the clothes, the outdoor games. But now that I am 78 I am afraid of falling so my love has turned to dread. I still get excited with the first snow flakes and I love looking at the snow and watching my dog’s joy with the cold and snow, (she also hates summer) I hate the fact that it gets dark so early, and that I am confined to the house a lot of the time, Still and all if I only had the choice of summer or winter, would choose winter.

    Reply
  106. Having just re read Winter Fire and its companion I think the touches of winter reality like keeping clothes under the bedclothes and thick frost on the inside of windows make me laugh and remember doing those things as a child. I also remember getting into a bed with sheets so cold they made me squeal …in a very cold draughty old house by the sea but those things are vivid memories and I love the touches of reality which allow a real connection with the characters so keep the reality of winter please!

    Reply
  107. Having just re read Winter Fire and its companion I think the touches of winter reality like keeping clothes under the bedclothes and thick frost on the inside of windows make me laugh and remember doing those things as a child. I also remember getting into a bed with sheets so cold they made me squeal …in a very cold draughty old house by the sea but those things are vivid memories and I love the touches of reality which allow a real connection with the characters so keep the reality of winter please!

    Reply
  108. Having just re read Winter Fire and its companion I think the touches of winter reality like keeping clothes under the bedclothes and thick frost on the inside of windows make me laugh and remember doing those things as a child. I also remember getting into a bed with sheets so cold they made me squeal …in a very cold draughty old house by the sea but those things are vivid memories and I love the touches of reality which allow a real connection with the characters so keep the reality of winter please!

    Reply
  109. Having just re read Winter Fire and its companion I think the touches of winter reality like keeping clothes under the bedclothes and thick frost on the inside of windows make me laugh and remember doing those things as a child. I also remember getting into a bed with sheets so cold they made me squeal …in a very cold draughty old house by the sea but those things are vivid memories and I love the touches of reality which allow a real connection with the characters so keep the reality of winter please!

    Reply
  110. Having just re read Winter Fire and its companion I think the touches of winter reality like keeping clothes under the bedclothes and thick frost on the inside of windows make me laugh and remember doing those things as a child. I also remember getting into a bed with sheets so cold they made me squeal …in a very cold draughty old house by the sea but those things are vivid memories and I love the touches of reality which allow a real connection with the characters so keep the reality of winter please!

    Reply
  111. I remember back in the 60’s, living in an old mansion house in the English Cotswolds. We had some very severe winters (by our standards!). Deep drifts covered the hedges, my sister measured her length in snow on the front path, but what really sticks in the memory is icicles on the insides of windows (no double glazing or central heating). I don’t recall a winter romance with icicles inside, but perhaps Mary Balogh came close with ‘Snow Angels’. LOL

    Reply
  112. I remember back in the 60’s, living in an old mansion house in the English Cotswolds. We had some very severe winters (by our standards!). Deep drifts covered the hedges, my sister measured her length in snow on the front path, but what really sticks in the memory is icicles on the insides of windows (no double glazing or central heating). I don’t recall a winter romance with icicles inside, but perhaps Mary Balogh came close with ‘Snow Angels’. LOL

    Reply
  113. I remember back in the 60’s, living in an old mansion house in the English Cotswolds. We had some very severe winters (by our standards!). Deep drifts covered the hedges, my sister measured her length in snow on the front path, but what really sticks in the memory is icicles on the insides of windows (no double glazing or central heating). I don’t recall a winter romance with icicles inside, but perhaps Mary Balogh came close with ‘Snow Angels’. LOL

    Reply
  114. I remember back in the 60’s, living in an old mansion house in the English Cotswolds. We had some very severe winters (by our standards!). Deep drifts covered the hedges, my sister measured her length in snow on the front path, but what really sticks in the memory is icicles on the insides of windows (no double glazing or central heating). I don’t recall a winter romance with icicles inside, but perhaps Mary Balogh came close with ‘Snow Angels’. LOL

    Reply
  115. I remember back in the 60’s, living in an old mansion house in the English Cotswolds. We had some very severe winters (by our standards!). Deep drifts covered the hedges, my sister measured her length in snow on the front path, but what really sticks in the memory is icicles on the insides of windows (no double glazing or central heating). I don’t recall a winter romance with icicles inside, but perhaps Mary Balogh came close with ‘Snow Angels’. LOL

    Reply
  116. Vicki, I can relate to all of that! Our first house in Canada had a gravity feed furnace and just one of those central grates. It did a pretty good job of keeping us warm, but yes, it could burn.
    Our Ottawa house had high ceilings and our feet were cold until we thought of getting a ceiling fan to push the hot air down.
    Jo

    Reply
  117. Vicki, I can relate to all of that! Our first house in Canada had a gravity feed furnace and just one of those central grates. It did a pretty good job of keeping us warm, but yes, it could burn.
    Our Ottawa house had high ceilings and our feet were cold until we thought of getting a ceiling fan to push the hot air down.
    Jo

    Reply
  118. Vicki, I can relate to all of that! Our first house in Canada had a gravity feed furnace and just one of those central grates. It did a pretty good job of keeping us warm, but yes, it could burn.
    Our Ottawa house had high ceilings and our feet were cold until we thought of getting a ceiling fan to push the hot air down.
    Jo

    Reply
  119. Vicki, I can relate to all of that! Our first house in Canada had a gravity feed furnace and just one of those central grates. It did a pretty good job of keeping us warm, but yes, it could burn.
    Our Ottawa house had high ceilings and our feet were cold until we thought of getting a ceiling fan to push the hot air down.
    Jo

    Reply
  120. Vicki, I can relate to all of that! Our first house in Canada had a gravity feed furnace and just one of those central grates. It did a pretty good job of keeping us warm, but yes, it could burn.
    Our Ottawa house had high ceilings and our feet were cold until we thought of getting a ceiling fan to push the hot air down.
    Jo

    Reply
  121. Interesting, Janice. I don’t like it very hot, and perhaps winter wouldn’t be so bad with longer days, but that’s not possible.
    It is horrid to have slippy sidewalks. Have you tried the spikes on the bottom of your shoes or boots? They work really well, and you can add a stick with a metal point on the bottom.

    Reply
  122. Interesting, Janice. I don’t like it very hot, and perhaps winter wouldn’t be so bad with longer days, but that’s not possible.
    It is horrid to have slippy sidewalks. Have you tried the spikes on the bottom of your shoes or boots? They work really well, and you can add a stick with a metal point on the bottom.

    Reply
  123. Interesting, Janice. I don’t like it very hot, and perhaps winter wouldn’t be so bad with longer days, but that’s not possible.
    It is horrid to have slippy sidewalks. Have you tried the spikes on the bottom of your shoes or boots? They work really well, and you can add a stick with a metal point on the bottom.

    Reply
  124. Interesting, Janice. I don’t like it very hot, and perhaps winter wouldn’t be so bad with longer days, but that’s not possible.
    It is horrid to have slippy sidewalks. Have you tried the spikes on the bottom of your shoes or boots? They work really well, and you can add a stick with a metal point on the bottom.

    Reply
  125. Interesting, Janice. I don’t like it very hot, and perhaps winter wouldn’t be so bad with longer days, but that’s not possible.
    It is horrid to have slippy sidewalks. Have you tried the spikes on the bottom of your shoes or boots? They work really well, and you can add a stick with a metal point on the bottom.

    Reply
  126. I don’t actually remember indoor icicles, Quantum. Frost on the inside, yes — what we called frost feathers, because they did make pretty patterns. It must have been quite humid in the house to create icicles, mustn’t it?

    Reply
  127. I don’t actually remember indoor icicles, Quantum. Frost on the inside, yes — what we called frost feathers, because they did make pretty patterns. It must have been quite humid in the house to create icicles, mustn’t it?

    Reply
  128. I don’t actually remember indoor icicles, Quantum. Frost on the inside, yes — what we called frost feathers, because they did make pretty patterns. It must have been quite humid in the house to create icicles, mustn’t it?

    Reply
  129. I don’t actually remember indoor icicles, Quantum. Frost on the inside, yes — what we called frost feathers, because they did make pretty patterns. It must have been quite humid in the house to create icicles, mustn’t it?

    Reply
  130. I don’t actually remember indoor icicles, Quantum. Frost on the inside, yes — what we called frost feathers, because they did make pretty patterns. It must have been quite humid in the house to create icicles, mustn’t it?

    Reply
  131. I don’t like winter and I personally always got too hot in summer. But when we retired, we cam back home to Missouri, home of cold winters and hot summers!
    I DO like realistic portrayals of winter (or summer) in stories. It must be realistic to the location though. Winter is Southern California or in London would not be equivalent to my Missouri Winters.
    I grew up with a coal furnace which didn’t begin to heat the house until after I was dressed. Frost feathers on the windows and sometime frost so thick they wouldn’t warm and melt away until noon. Summers wearing pongee (silk) pjs, and lying very still with all the windows open, hoping to breathe.

    Reply
  132. I don’t like winter and I personally always got too hot in summer. But when we retired, we cam back home to Missouri, home of cold winters and hot summers!
    I DO like realistic portrayals of winter (or summer) in stories. It must be realistic to the location though. Winter is Southern California or in London would not be equivalent to my Missouri Winters.
    I grew up with a coal furnace which didn’t begin to heat the house until after I was dressed. Frost feathers on the windows and sometime frost so thick they wouldn’t warm and melt away until noon. Summers wearing pongee (silk) pjs, and lying very still with all the windows open, hoping to breathe.

    Reply
  133. I don’t like winter and I personally always got too hot in summer. But when we retired, we cam back home to Missouri, home of cold winters and hot summers!
    I DO like realistic portrayals of winter (or summer) in stories. It must be realistic to the location though. Winter is Southern California or in London would not be equivalent to my Missouri Winters.
    I grew up with a coal furnace which didn’t begin to heat the house until after I was dressed. Frost feathers on the windows and sometime frost so thick they wouldn’t warm and melt away until noon. Summers wearing pongee (silk) pjs, and lying very still with all the windows open, hoping to breathe.

    Reply
  134. I don’t like winter and I personally always got too hot in summer. But when we retired, we cam back home to Missouri, home of cold winters and hot summers!
    I DO like realistic portrayals of winter (or summer) in stories. It must be realistic to the location though. Winter is Southern California or in London would not be equivalent to my Missouri Winters.
    I grew up with a coal furnace which didn’t begin to heat the house until after I was dressed. Frost feathers on the windows and sometime frost so thick they wouldn’t warm and melt away until noon. Summers wearing pongee (silk) pjs, and lying very still with all the windows open, hoping to breathe.

    Reply
  135. I don’t like winter and I personally always got too hot in summer. But when we retired, we cam back home to Missouri, home of cold winters and hot summers!
    I DO like realistic portrayals of winter (or summer) in stories. It must be realistic to the location though. Winter is Southern California or in London would not be equivalent to my Missouri Winters.
    I grew up with a coal furnace which didn’t begin to heat the house until after I was dressed. Frost feathers on the windows and sometime frost so thick they wouldn’t warm and melt away until noon. Summers wearing pongee (silk) pjs, and lying very still with all the windows open, hoping to breathe.

    Reply
  136. I too grew up with a coal furnace in a century-old home, with frost feathers on the windows and a closet that was–I swear–colder than the outdoors. I freeze every time I read ‘A Most Unsuitable Man’–One of my favorite books, along with ‘Hazard’.
    I remember a Roberta Gellis description of winter’s ills in one of her books–cold, damp, chilblains. Brrrrr.

    Reply
  137. I too grew up with a coal furnace in a century-old home, with frost feathers on the windows and a closet that was–I swear–colder than the outdoors. I freeze every time I read ‘A Most Unsuitable Man’–One of my favorite books, along with ‘Hazard’.
    I remember a Roberta Gellis description of winter’s ills in one of her books–cold, damp, chilblains. Brrrrr.

    Reply
  138. I too grew up with a coal furnace in a century-old home, with frost feathers on the windows and a closet that was–I swear–colder than the outdoors. I freeze every time I read ‘A Most Unsuitable Man’–One of my favorite books, along with ‘Hazard’.
    I remember a Roberta Gellis description of winter’s ills in one of her books–cold, damp, chilblains. Brrrrr.

    Reply
  139. I too grew up with a coal furnace in a century-old home, with frost feathers on the windows and a closet that was–I swear–colder than the outdoors. I freeze every time I read ‘A Most Unsuitable Man’–One of my favorite books, along with ‘Hazard’.
    I remember a Roberta Gellis description of winter’s ills in one of her books–cold, damp, chilblains. Brrrrr.

    Reply
  140. I too grew up with a coal furnace in a century-old home, with frost feathers on the windows and a closet that was–I swear–colder than the outdoors. I freeze every time I read ‘A Most Unsuitable Man’–One of my favorite books, along with ‘Hazard’.
    I remember a Roberta Gellis description of winter’s ills in one of her books–cold, damp, chilblains. Brrrrr.

    Reply
  141. I have a few favorite books that are set at least partially in winter; Mrs. Drew Plays Her Hand, Devil in Winter, and Duncan’s Bride by Linda Howard. Some of Ellis Peters’s best Brother Cadfael books are set during the winter.
    I don’t like the cold myself, I got shivery just reading this post. I have lived with wood and coal heat(but with central heat as a backup). Coal, at least the anthracite we get on the East Coast of the U.S., makes wonderful heat, the fire lasts forever, and it’s not smelly at all. There is a lot of dust though, so better to have it in the basement and let the heat rise up through floor grates.

    Reply
  142. I have a few favorite books that are set at least partially in winter; Mrs. Drew Plays Her Hand, Devil in Winter, and Duncan’s Bride by Linda Howard. Some of Ellis Peters’s best Brother Cadfael books are set during the winter.
    I don’t like the cold myself, I got shivery just reading this post. I have lived with wood and coal heat(but with central heat as a backup). Coal, at least the anthracite we get on the East Coast of the U.S., makes wonderful heat, the fire lasts forever, and it’s not smelly at all. There is a lot of dust though, so better to have it in the basement and let the heat rise up through floor grates.

    Reply
  143. I have a few favorite books that are set at least partially in winter; Mrs. Drew Plays Her Hand, Devil in Winter, and Duncan’s Bride by Linda Howard. Some of Ellis Peters’s best Brother Cadfael books are set during the winter.
    I don’t like the cold myself, I got shivery just reading this post. I have lived with wood and coal heat(but with central heat as a backup). Coal, at least the anthracite we get on the East Coast of the U.S., makes wonderful heat, the fire lasts forever, and it’s not smelly at all. There is a lot of dust though, so better to have it in the basement and let the heat rise up through floor grates.

    Reply
  144. I have a few favorite books that are set at least partially in winter; Mrs. Drew Plays Her Hand, Devil in Winter, and Duncan’s Bride by Linda Howard. Some of Ellis Peters’s best Brother Cadfael books are set during the winter.
    I don’t like the cold myself, I got shivery just reading this post. I have lived with wood and coal heat(but with central heat as a backup). Coal, at least the anthracite we get on the East Coast of the U.S., makes wonderful heat, the fire lasts forever, and it’s not smelly at all. There is a lot of dust though, so better to have it in the basement and let the heat rise up through floor grates.

    Reply
  145. I have a few favorite books that are set at least partially in winter; Mrs. Drew Plays Her Hand, Devil in Winter, and Duncan’s Bride by Linda Howard. Some of Ellis Peters’s best Brother Cadfael books are set during the winter.
    I don’t like the cold myself, I got shivery just reading this post. I have lived with wood and coal heat(but with central heat as a backup). Coal, at least the anthracite we get on the East Coast of the U.S., makes wonderful heat, the fire lasts forever, and it’s not smelly at all. There is a lot of dust though, so better to have it in the basement and let the heat rise up through floor grates.

    Reply
  146. I just wanted to add that when we lost our electrical power during Hurricane Sandy, it was the end of October/beginning of November, but quite chilly and damp. I’m sure it was all the historical romances I’ve read that inspired me to make my own warming pan, by heating a cast iron griddle on my gas stove, wrapping it in an old towel, and using it to warm the sheets. I also left it in the bed as a footwarmer, and it was delightful. So never say reading historicals has no practical value!

    Reply
  147. I just wanted to add that when we lost our electrical power during Hurricane Sandy, it was the end of October/beginning of November, but quite chilly and damp. I’m sure it was all the historical romances I’ve read that inspired me to make my own warming pan, by heating a cast iron griddle on my gas stove, wrapping it in an old towel, and using it to warm the sheets. I also left it in the bed as a footwarmer, and it was delightful. So never say reading historicals has no practical value!

    Reply
  148. I just wanted to add that when we lost our electrical power during Hurricane Sandy, it was the end of October/beginning of November, but quite chilly and damp. I’m sure it was all the historical romances I’ve read that inspired me to make my own warming pan, by heating a cast iron griddle on my gas stove, wrapping it in an old towel, and using it to warm the sheets. I also left it in the bed as a footwarmer, and it was delightful. So never say reading historicals has no practical value!

    Reply
  149. I just wanted to add that when we lost our electrical power during Hurricane Sandy, it was the end of October/beginning of November, but quite chilly and damp. I’m sure it was all the historical romances I’ve read that inspired me to make my own warming pan, by heating a cast iron griddle on my gas stove, wrapping it in an old towel, and using it to warm the sheets. I also left it in the bed as a footwarmer, and it was delightful. So never say reading historicals has no practical value!

    Reply
  150. I just wanted to add that when we lost our electrical power during Hurricane Sandy, it was the end of October/beginning of November, but quite chilly and damp. I’m sure it was all the historical romances I’ve read that inspired me to make my own warming pan, by heating a cast iron griddle on my gas stove, wrapping it in an old towel, and using it to warm the sheets. I also left it in the bed as a footwarmer, and it was delightful. So never say reading historicals has no practical value!

    Reply
  151. Jo,it was in an attic used as a bedroom. It had sash windows and snow could drive through the gaps building mini-drifts during the day.These tended to melt at night when the room was occupied so we youngsters could find icicles in the morning!

    Reply
  152. Jo,it was in an attic used as a bedroom. It had sash windows and snow could drive through the gaps building mini-drifts during the day.These tended to melt at night when the room was occupied so we youngsters could find icicles in the morning!

    Reply
  153. Jo,it was in an attic used as a bedroom. It had sash windows and snow could drive through the gaps building mini-drifts during the day.These tended to melt at night when the room was occupied so we youngsters could find icicles in the morning!

    Reply
  154. Jo,it was in an attic used as a bedroom. It had sash windows and snow could drive through the gaps building mini-drifts during the day.These tended to melt at night when the room was occupied so we youngsters could find icicles in the morning!

    Reply
  155. Jo,it was in an attic used as a bedroom. It had sash windows and snow could drive through the gaps building mini-drifts during the day.These tended to melt at night when the room was occupied so we youngsters could find icicles in the morning!

    Reply
  156. Some people seem to feel the cold more than others; some people are almost impervious to temperature or humidity. Maybe it all depends on the hero or heroine? πŸ™‚
    Being Australian, mainly from Perth, I romanticise the cold and despise heat, having been subjected to way too many hot, dry summers. That could change, of course, if I ever spent time in a snowy spot without central heating. Reading about the reality of the past is always my preference, but not essential. . .the story matters more.
    Georgette Heyer mentioned the cold in the opening scene of Arabella, where she described the small size of the room in the parsonage as being an advantage in winter. This was contrasted with the warmth of Beaumaris’ hunting lodge, where she sought shelter rather than freeze in her broken-down carriage. Weather was definitely integral to the plot in this story.

    Reply
  157. Some people seem to feel the cold more than others; some people are almost impervious to temperature or humidity. Maybe it all depends on the hero or heroine? πŸ™‚
    Being Australian, mainly from Perth, I romanticise the cold and despise heat, having been subjected to way too many hot, dry summers. That could change, of course, if I ever spent time in a snowy spot without central heating. Reading about the reality of the past is always my preference, but not essential. . .the story matters more.
    Georgette Heyer mentioned the cold in the opening scene of Arabella, where she described the small size of the room in the parsonage as being an advantage in winter. This was contrasted with the warmth of Beaumaris’ hunting lodge, where she sought shelter rather than freeze in her broken-down carriage. Weather was definitely integral to the plot in this story.

    Reply
  158. Some people seem to feel the cold more than others; some people are almost impervious to temperature or humidity. Maybe it all depends on the hero or heroine? πŸ™‚
    Being Australian, mainly from Perth, I romanticise the cold and despise heat, having been subjected to way too many hot, dry summers. That could change, of course, if I ever spent time in a snowy spot without central heating. Reading about the reality of the past is always my preference, but not essential. . .the story matters more.
    Georgette Heyer mentioned the cold in the opening scene of Arabella, where she described the small size of the room in the parsonage as being an advantage in winter. This was contrasted with the warmth of Beaumaris’ hunting lodge, where she sought shelter rather than freeze in her broken-down carriage. Weather was definitely integral to the plot in this story.

    Reply
  159. Some people seem to feel the cold more than others; some people are almost impervious to temperature or humidity. Maybe it all depends on the hero or heroine? πŸ™‚
    Being Australian, mainly from Perth, I romanticise the cold and despise heat, having been subjected to way too many hot, dry summers. That could change, of course, if I ever spent time in a snowy spot without central heating. Reading about the reality of the past is always my preference, but not essential. . .the story matters more.
    Georgette Heyer mentioned the cold in the opening scene of Arabella, where she described the small size of the room in the parsonage as being an advantage in winter. This was contrasted with the warmth of Beaumaris’ hunting lodge, where she sought shelter rather than freeze in her broken-down carriage. Weather was definitely integral to the plot in this story.

    Reply
  160. Some people seem to feel the cold more than others; some people are almost impervious to temperature or humidity. Maybe it all depends on the hero or heroine? πŸ™‚
    Being Australian, mainly from Perth, I romanticise the cold and despise heat, having been subjected to way too many hot, dry summers. That could change, of course, if I ever spent time in a snowy spot without central heating. Reading about the reality of the past is always my preference, but not essential. . .the story matters more.
    Georgette Heyer mentioned the cold in the opening scene of Arabella, where she described the small size of the room in the parsonage as being an advantage in winter. This was contrasted with the warmth of Beaumaris’ hunting lodge, where she sought shelter rather than freeze in her broken-down carriage. Weather was definitely integral to the plot in this story.

    Reply
  161. I’m glad you enjoy AMUM and Hazard, Jean. Chilblains, yes. I never had them. I gather they’re most likely if we come in very cold and then warm up too close to the fire.

    Reply
  162. I’m glad you enjoy AMUM and Hazard, Jean. Chilblains, yes. I never had them. I gather they’re most likely if we come in very cold and then warm up too close to the fire.

    Reply
  163. I’m glad you enjoy AMUM and Hazard, Jean. Chilblains, yes. I never had them. I gather they’re most likely if we come in very cold and then warm up too close to the fire.

    Reply
  164. I’m glad you enjoy AMUM and Hazard, Jean. Chilblains, yes. I never had them. I gather they’re most likely if we come in very cold and then warm up too close to the fire.

    Reply
  165. I’m glad you enjoy AMUM and Hazard, Jean. Chilblains, yes. I never had them. I gather they’re most likely if we come in very cold and then warm up too close to the fire.

    Reply
  166. Good point about coal dust, Karin. I had to look up anthracite. I knew of it, but I’d always assumed it was a modified coal, not that it came out of the ground that way. Fascinating.

    Reply
  167. Good point about coal dust, Karin. I had to look up anthracite. I knew of it, but I’d always assumed it was a modified coal, not that it came out of the ground that way. Fascinating.

    Reply
  168. Good point about coal dust, Karin. I had to look up anthracite. I knew of it, but I’d always assumed it was a modified coal, not that it came out of the ground that way. Fascinating.

    Reply
  169. Good point about coal dust, Karin. I had to look up anthracite. I knew of it, but I’d always assumed it was a modified coal, not that it came out of the ground that way. Fascinating.

    Reply
  170. Good point about coal dust, Karin. I had to look up anthracite. I knew of it, but I’d always assumed it was a modified coal, not that it came out of the ground that way. Fascinating.

    Reply
  171. I remember that in Arabella, Deborah.
    As best I can tell even the richest had modest-sized living-rooms to use in the winter. Not for entertaining, but for family times. Even the royal family did.

    Reply
  172. I remember that in Arabella, Deborah.
    As best I can tell even the richest had modest-sized living-rooms to use in the winter. Not for entertaining, but for family times. Even the royal family did.

    Reply
  173. I remember that in Arabella, Deborah.
    As best I can tell even the richest had modest-sized living-rooms to use in the winter. Not for entertaining, but for family times. Even the royal family did.

    Reply
  174. I remember that in Arabella, Deborah.
    As best I can tell even the richest had modest-sized living-rooms to use in the winter. Not for entertaining, but for family times. Even the royal family did.

    Reply
  175. I remember that in Arabella, Deborah.
    As best I can tell even the richest had modest-sized living-rooms to use in the winter. Not for entertaining, but for family times. Even the royal family did.

    Reply
  176. I prefer cold to excessive heat. I have lived in a small apartment where the power was off for a week and in a two story house where we were without power for five days in January with a hole in the roof. I had a child in Germany in December and brought him home to an apartment where the heat had been cut off for four days and the janitor was off someplace. I stayed at a house one January with no indoor toilets — and no central heat. If I could keep the warmth of my winter coats but reduce the bulk and weight I’d be happy.My son ( the one who came home to a cold apartment) prefers Vermont with its seven months of winter to Georgia with the eight months of heat. I mention the various times only to show that I do have a basis for comparison when I say I prefer cooler temperatures to hotter ones. This despite the fact that I go around bundled up at work complaining about the cold.

    Reply
  177. I prefer cold to excessive heat. I have lived in a small apartment where the power was off for a week and in a two story house where we were without power for five days in January with a hole in the roof. I had a child in Germany in December and brought him home to an apartment where the heat had been cut off for four days and the janitor was off someplace. I stayed at a house one January with no indoor toilets — and no central heat. If I could keep the warmth of my winter coats but reduce the bulk and weight I’d be happy.My son ( the one who came home to a cold apartment) prefers Vermont with its seven months of winter to Georgia with the eight months of heat. I mention the various times only to show that I do have a basis for comparison when I say I prefer cooler temperatures to hotter ones. This despite the fact that I go around bundled up at work complaining about the cold.

    Reply
  178. I prefer cold to excessive heat. I have lived in a small apartment where the power was off for a week and in a two story house where we were without power for five days in January with a hole in the roof. I had a child in Germany in December and brought him home to an apartment where the heat had been cut off for four days and the janitor was off someplace. I stayed at a house one January with no indoor toilets — and no central heat. If I could keep the warmth of my winter coats but reduce the bulk and weight I’d be happy.My son ( the one who came home to a cold apartment) prefers Vermont with its seven months of winter to Georgia with the eight months of heat. I mention the various times only to show that I do have a basis for comparison when I say I prefer cooler temperatures to hotter ones. This despite the fact that I go around bundled up at work complaining about the cold.

    Reply
  179. I prefer cold to excessive heat. I have lived in a small apartment where the power was off for a week and in a two story house where we were without power for five days in January with a hole in the roof. I had a child in Germany in December and brought him home to an apartment where the heat had been cut off for four days and the janitor was off someplace. I stayed at a house one January with no indoor toilets — and no central heat. If I could keep the warmth of my winter coats but reduce the bulk and weight I’d be happy.My son ( the one who came home to a cold apartment) prefers Vermont with its seven months of winter to Georgia with the eight months of heat. I mention the various times only to show that I do have a basis for comparison when I say I prefer cooler temperatures to hotter ones. This despite the fact that I go around bundled up at work complaining about the cold.

    Reply
  180. I prefer cold to excessive heat. I have lived in a small apartment where the power was off for a week and in a two story house where we were without power for five days in January with a hole in the roof. I had a child in Germany in December and brought him home to an apartment where the heat had been cut off for four days and the janitor was off someplace. I stayed at a house one January with no indoor toilets — and no central heat. If I could keep the warmth of my winter coats but reduce the bulk and weight I’d be happy.My son ( the one who came home to a cold apartment) prefers Vermont with its seven months of winter to Georgia with the eight months of heat. I mention the various times only to show that I do have a basis for comparison when I say I prefer cooler temperatures to hotter ones. This despite the fact that I go around bundled up at work complaining about the cold.

    Reply
  181. My childhood home had no heat in the upstairs- and 5 drafty 90 inch tall windows in the bedroom I shared with my sister. So in winter we moved two double beds for us 4 girls and one twin for my brother into the central room with only 2 windows, and we slept under Hudson bay wool blankets and quilts. I had a flannel nightgown that came with a nightcap, and I tried wearing it- and found it really did make a difference! I appreciate central heating now but still prefer to keep my bedroom around 65 and sleep under a wool blanket.

    Reply
  182. My childhood home had no heat in the upstairs- and 5 drafty 90 inch tall windows in the bedroom I shared with my sister. So in winter we moved two double beds for us 4 girls and one twin for my brother into the central room with only 2 windows, and we slept under Hudson bay wool blankets and quilts. I had a flannel nightgown that came with a nightcap, and I tried wearing it- and found it really did make a difference! I appreciate central heating now but still prefer to keep my bedroom around 65 and sleep under a wool blanket.

    Reply
  183. My childhood home had no heat in the upstairs- and 5 drafty 90 inch tall windows in the bedroom I shared with my sister. So in winter we moved two double beds for us 4 girls and one twin for my brother into the central room with only 2 windows, and we slept under Hudson bay wool blankets and quilts. I had a flannel nightgown that came with a nightcap, and I tried wearing it- and found it really did make a difference! I appreciate central heating now but still prefer to keep my bedroom around 65 and sleep under a wool blanket.

    Reply
  184. My childhood home had no heat in the upstairs- and 5 drafty 90 inch tall windows in the bedroom I shared with my sister. So in winter we moved two double beds for us 4 girls and one twin for my brother into the central room with only 2 windows, and we slept under Hudson bay wool blankets and quilts. I had a flannel nightgown that came with a nightcap, and I tried wearing it- and found it really did make a difference! I appreciate central heating now but still prefer to keep my bedroom around 65 and sleep under a wool blanket.

    Reply
  185. My childhood home had no heat in the upstairs- and 5 drafty 90 inch tall windows in the bedroom I shared with my sister. So in winter we moved two double beds for us 4 girls and one twin for my brother into the central room with only 2 windows, and we slept under Hudson bay wool blankets and quilts. I had a flannel nightgown that came with a nightcap, and I tried wearing it- and found it really did make a difference! I appreciate central heating now but still prefer to keep my bedroom around 65 and sleep under a wool blanket.

    Reply
  186. Reading the excerpt took me right back. I grew up in a small cottage in Southern Ireland. There was no such thing as heating just a fire in the kitchen. When you stepped out of bed on to the lino your feet stuck to it with the cold. Next was scrapping the ice off the inside of the window to get a look out at the day. But it toughened us up and kids today would not be as hardy as we were. It was a tough life but good.I like books set in any season of the year but Winter ones just seem to have that little bit extra magic.

    Reply
  187. Reading the excerpt took me right back. I grew up in a small cottage in Southern Ireland. There was no such thing as heating just a fire in the kitchen. When you stepped out of bed on to the lino your feet stuck to it with the cold. Next was scrapping the ice off the inside of the window to get a look out at the day. But it toughened us up and kids today would not be as hardy as we were. It was a tough life but good.I like books set in any season of the year but Winter ones just seem to have that little bit extra magic.

    Reply
  188. Reading the excerpt took me right back. I grew up in a small cottage in Southern Ireland. There was no such thing as heating just a fire in the kitchen. When you stepped out of bed on to the lino your feet stuck to it with the cold. Next was scrapping the ice off the inside of the window to get a look out at the day. But it toughened us up and kids today would not be as hardy as we were. It was a tough life but good.I like books set in any season of the year but Winter ones just seem to have that little bit extra magic.

    Reply
  189. Reading the excerpt took me right back. I grew up in a small cottage in Southern Ireland. There was no such thing as heating just a fire in the kitchen. When you stepped out of bed on to the lino your feet stuck to it with the cold. Next was scrapping the ice off the inside of the window to get a look out at the day. But it toughened us up and kids today would not be as hardy as we were. It was a tough life but good.I like books set in any season of the year but Winter ones just seem to have that little bit extra magic.

    Reply
  190. Reading the excerpt took me right back. I grew up in a small cottage in Southern Ireland. There was no such thing as heating just a fire in the kitchen. When you stepped out of bed on to the lino your feet stuck to it with the cold. Next was scrapping the ice off the inside of the window to get a look out at the day. But it toughened us up and kids today would not be as hardy as we were. It was a tough life but good.I like books set in any season of the year but Winter ones just seem to have that little bit extra magic.

    Reply
  191. I honestly don’t think that writers convey that cold enough. People manage to wear revealing gowns at Christmas parties and never have goosebumps. πŸ™‚ And honestly, I can see story potential in this. What if the poor heroine just goes to that smaller, more private room at a party just to warm up, and then……

    Reply
  192. I honestly don’t think that writers convey that cold enough. People manage to wear revealing gowns at Christmas parties and never have goosebumps. πŸ™‚ And honestly, I can see story potential in this. What if the poor heroine just goes to that smaller, more private room at a party just to warm up, and then……

    Reply
  193. I honestly don’t think that writers convey that cold enough. People manage to wear revealing gowns at Christmas parties and never have goosebumps. πŸ™‚ And honestly, I can see story potential in this. What if the poor heroine just goes to that smaller, more private room at a party just to warm up, and then……

    Reply
  194. I honestly don’t think that writers convey that cold enough. People manage to wear revealing gowns at Christmas parties and never have goosebumps. πŸ™‚ And honestly, I can see story potential in this. What if the poor heroine just goes to that smaller, more private room at a party just to warm up, and then……

    Reply
  195. I honestly don’t think that writers convey that cold enough. People manage to wear revealing gowns at Christmas parties and never have goosebumps. πŸ™‚ And honestly, I can see story potential in this. What if the poor heroine just goes to that smaller, more private room at a party just to warm up, and then……

    Reply
  196. I had always wondered about this because I grew up in an apartment above a uptown shop and we only had a heater in the living room. The whole apartment was freezing except for the living room. So even with roaring fires in the rooms you know that passageways and stairways would be freezing.

    Reply
  197. I had always wondered about this because I grew up in an apartment above a uptown shop and we only had a heater in the living room. The whole apartment was freezing except for the living room. So even with roaring fires in the rooms you know that passageways and stairways would be freezing.

    Reply
  198. I had always wondered about this because I grew up in an apartment above a uptown shop and we only had a heater in the living room. The whole apartment was freezing except for the living room. So even with roaring fires in the rooms you know that passageways and stairways would be freezing.

    Reply
  199. I had always wondered about this because I grew up in an apartment above a uptown shop and we only had a heater in the living room. The whole apartment was freezing except for the living room. So even with roaring fires in the rooms you know that passageways and stairways would be freezing.

    Reply
  200. I had always wondered about this because I grew up in an apartment above a uptown shop and we only had a heater in the living room. The whole apartment was freezing except for the living room. So even with roaring fires in the rooms you know that passageways and stairways would be freezing.

    Reply
  201. When I was a child, I lived near Lake Michigan and the snow and cold seemed fine. When I was a little older, our family moved to Dallas and I found the wonder of winters with weather warm enough to wear shorts. Now that is the only winter I truly want. The weather is not always that warm, but it is pretty lovely to me. I believe snow is beautiful – on Christmas cards, in beer commercials and described from a distance in books. Personally, if I would have lived in one of those large old homes with little or no heat, I would have probably died, and my body would have been found by a servant in a frozen popsicle like position.

    Reply
  202. When I was a child, I lived near Lake Michigan and the snow and cold seemed fine. When I was a little older, our family moved to Dallas and I found the wonder of winters with weather warm enough to wear shorts. Now that is the only winter I truly want. The weather is not always that warm, but it is pretty lovely to me. I believe snow is beautiful – on Christmas cards, in beer commercials and described from a distance in books. Personally, if I would have lived in one of those large old homes with little or no heat, I would have probably died, and my body would have been found by a servant in a frozen popsicle like position.

    Reply
  203. When I was a child, I lived near Lake Michigan and the snow and cold seemed fine. When I was a little older, our family moved to Dallas and I found the wonder of winters with weather warm enough to wear shorts. Now that is the only winter I truly want. The weather is not always that warm, but it is pretty lovely to me. I believe snow is beautiful – on Christmas cards, in beer commercials and described from a distance in books. Personally, if I would have lived in one of those large old homes with little or no heat, I would have probably died, and my body would have been found by a servant in a frozen popsicle like position.

    Reply
  204. When I was a child, I lived near Lake Michigan and the snow and cold seemed fine. When I was a little older, our family moved to Dallas and I found the wonder of winters with weather warm enough to wear shorts. Now that is the only winter I truly want. The weather is not always that warm, but it is pretty lovely to me. I believe snow is beautiful – on Christmas cards, in beer commercials and described from a distance in books. Personally, if I would have lived in one of those large old homes with little or no heat, I would have probably died, and my body would have been found by a servant in a frozen popsicle like position.

    Reply
  205. When I was a child, I lived near Lake Michigan and the snow and cold seemed fine. When I was a little older, our family moved to Dallas and I found the wonder of winters with weather warm enough to wear shorts. Now that is the only winter I truly want. The weather is not always that warm, but it is pretty lovely to me. I believe snow is beautiful – on Christmas cards, in beer commercials and described from a distance in books. Personally, if I would have lived in one of those large old homes with little or no heat, I would have probably died, and my body would have been found by a servant in a frozen popsicle like position.

    Reply
  206. I HATE the cold, but I don’t mind in the least being curled up with a cup of tea near the fire place and reading a lovely tale that takes place in the cold! I’m always amused when the hero stays warm regardless of the temperature (and shares his warmth unselfishly with the heroine!), as my own personal Romeo gets just as cold as I do and gripes heartily if my cold feed touch his in bed!

    Reply
  207. I HATE the cold, but I don’t mind in the least being curled up with a cup of tea near the fire place and reading a lovely tale that takes place in the cold! I’m always amused when the hero stays warm regardless of the temperature (and shares his warmth unselfishly with the heroine!), as my own personal Romeo gets just as cold as I do and gripes heartily if my cold feed touch his in bed!

    Reply
  208. I HATE the cold, but I don’t mind in the least being curled up with a cup of tea near the fire place and reading a lovely tale that takes place in the cold! I’m always amused when the hero stays warm regardless of the temperature (and shares his warmth unselfishly with the heroine!), as my own personal Romeo gets just as cold as I do and gripes heartily if my cold feed touch his in bed!

    Reply
  209. I HATE the cold, but I don’t mind in the least being curled up with a cup of tea near the fire place and reading a lovely tale that takes place in the cold! I’m always amused when the hero stays warm regardless of the temperature (and shares his warmth unselfishly with the heroine!), as my own personal Romeo gets just as cold as I do and gripes heartily if my cold feed touch his in bed!

    Reply
  210. I HATE the cold, but I don’t mind in the least being curled up with a cup of tea near the fire place and reading a lovely tale that takes place in the cold! I’m always amused when the hero stays warm regardless of the temperature (and shares his warmth unselfishly with the heroine!), as my own personal Romeo gets just as cold as I do and gripes heartily if my cold feed touch his in bed!

    Reply
  211. You are a trooper, Nancy! It’s amazing how many older apartment buildings in Europe didn’t have central heating and maybe still don’t!) A friend of mine had an apt in Berlin in the 1970’s and had to lug coal up several flights of stairs to feed the stove!

    Reply
  212. You are a trooper, Nancy! It’s amazing how many older apartment buildings in Europe didn’t have central heating and maybe still don’t!) A friend of mine had an apt in Berlin in the 1970’s and had to lug coal up several flights of stairs to feed the stove!

    Reply
  213. You are a trooper, Nancy! It’s amazing how many older apartment buildings in Europe didn’t have central heating and maybe still don’t!) A friend of mine had an apt in Berlin in the 1970’s and had to lug coal up several flights of stairs to feed the stove!

    Reply
  214. You are a trooper, Nancy! It’s amazing how many older apartment buildings in Europe didn’t have central heating and maybe still don’t!) A friend of mine had an apt in Berlin in the 1970’s and had to lug coal up several flights of stairs to feed the stove!

    Reply
  215. You are a trooper, Nancy! It’s amazing how many older apartment buildings in Europe didn’t have central heating and maybe still don’t!) A friend of mine had an apt in Berlin in the 1970’s and had to lug coal up several flights of stairs to feed the stove!

    Reply
  216. I think men are supposed to have a slightly higher body temp than women — statistically, but when men take off coats and such to give to the heroine I suppose it’s sacrificial gallantry. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  217. I think men are supposed to have a slightly higher body temp than women — statistically, but when men take off coats and such to give to the heroine I suppose it’s sacrificial gallantry. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  218. I think men are supposed to have a slightly higher body temp than women — statistically, but when men take off coats and such to give to the heroine I suppose it’s sacrificial gallantry. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  219. I think men are supposed to have a slightly higher body temp than women — statistically, but when men take off coats and such to give to the heroine I suppose it’s sacrificial gallantry. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  220. I think men are supposed to have a slightly higher body temp than women — statistically, but when men take off coats and such to give to the heroine I suppose it’s sacrificial gallantry. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  221. You try not to have to go to the toilet in the cold though, don’t you? Freezing cold on very vulnerable Arras. It feels like you may never warm up again. You dance about before and then you have to dance to warm up afterwards. Lol.

    Reply
  222. You try not to have to go to the toilet in the cold though, don’t you? Freezing cold on very vulnerable Arras. It feels like you may never warm up again. You dance about before and then you have to dance to warm up afterwards. Lol.

    Reply
  223. You try not to have to go to the toilet in the cold though, don’t you? Freezing cold on very vulnerable Arras. It feels like you may never warm up again. You dance about before and then you have to dance to warm up afterwards. Lol.

    Reply
  224. You try not to have to go to the toilet in the cold though, don’t you? Freezing cold on very vulnerable Arras. It feels like you may never warm up again. You dance about before and then you have to dance to warm up afterwards. Lol.

    Reply
  225. You try not to have to go to the toilet in the cold though, don’t you? Freezing cold on very vulnerable Arras. It feels like you may never warm up again. You dance about before and then you have to dance to warm up afterwards. Lol.

    Reply
  226. I grew up in Sydney Australia and still complained about the cold. About 10% of people, mostly women, have Reynauds Syndrome, which makes them extremely susceptible to cold and draughts. Most aren’t diagnosed and don’t know but are figures of fun – think of the aunts with their many scarves near the fire in over heated rooms. I know that will be me one day. I have to wear woolies in air conditioning and I loved living in central Australia for the temperatures. I’d leave work in the evening and it would be 36oC (but dry). I thought Forbidden Magic had the best depiction of how the realities of cold climate could make or break lives.

    Reply
  227. I grew up in Sydney Australia and still complained about the cold. About 10% of people, mostly women, have Reynauds Syndrome, which makes them extremely susceptible to cold and draughts. Most aren’t diagnosed and don’t know but are figures of fun – think of the aunts with their many scarves near the fire in over heated rooms. I know that will be me one day. I have to wear woolies in air conditioning and I loved living in central Australia for the temperatures. I’d leave work in the evening and it would be 36oC (but dry). I thought Forbidden Magic had the best depiction of how the realities of cold climate could make or break lives.

    Reply
  228. I grew up in Sydney Australia and still complained about the cold. About 10% of people, mostly women, have Reynauds Syndrome, which makes them extremely susceptible to cold and draughts. Most aren’t diagnosed and don’t know but are figures of fun – think of the aunts with their many scarves near the fire in over heated rooms. I know that will be me one day. I have to wear woolies in air conditioning and I loved living in central Australia for the temperatures. I’d leave work in the evening and it would be 36oC (but dry). I thought Forbidden Magic had the best depiction of how the realities of cold climate could make or break lives.

    Reply
  229. I grew up in Sydney Australia and still complained about the cold. About 10% of people, mostly women, have Reynauds Syndrome, which makes them extremely susceptible to cold and draughts. Most aren’t diagnosed and don’t know but are figures of fun – think of the aunts with their many scarves near the fire in over heated rooms. I know that will be me one day. I have to wear woolies in air conditioning and I loved living in central Australia for the temperatures. I’d leave work in the evening and it would be 36oC (but dry). I thought Forbidden Magic had the best depiction of how the realities of cold climate could make or break lives.

    Reply
  230. I grew up in Sydney Australia and still complained about the cold. About 10% of people, mostly women, have Reynauds Syndrome, which makes them extremely susceptible to cold and draughts. Most aren’t diagnosed and don’t know but are figures of fun – think of the aunts with their many scarves near the fire in over heated rooms. I know that will be me one day. I have to wear woolies in air conditioning and I loved living in central Australia for the temperatures. I’d leave work in the evening and it would be 36oC (but dry). I thought Forbidden Magic had the best depiction of how the realities of cold climate could make or break lives.

    Reply
  231. When I was a child, I complained bitterly that my bedroom was cold; my parents would come up, put a hand in front of the register and indicate heat was coming into the room. My mother believed in “modern” materials, so I had percale sheets and a nylon blanket in winter – and froze. Many years later, I received an abject apology from them; it seems they discovered the heating ducts into the room had never been connected! In the course of my life, I have experienced the gravity-fed heat with snowdrifts inside the windows, ice formed in glasses and so on. Nevertheless, I love winter and winter-set stories. What has not been mentioned is the mattresses; our coil spring mattresses are unlike the feather or straw mattresses of the regency. I have slept on a rope bed with a feather mattress and while I prefer a feather duvet, good wool blankets will keep you toasty with almost no warm-up time, even when the heat is off in winter for days. But yes, clothes have to be pulled into the bed to warm up before wearing. Now I find I cannot sleep in a well-heated room.

    Reply
  232. When I was a child, I complained bitterly that my bedroom was cold; my parents would come up, put a hand in front of the register and indicate heat was coming into the room. My mother believed in “modern” materials, so I had percale sheets and a nylon blanket in winter – and froze. Many years later, I received an abject apology from them; it seems they discovered the heating ducts into the room had never been connected! In the course of my life, I have experienced the gravity-fed heat with snowdrifts inside the windows, ice formed in glasses and so on. Nevertheless, I love winter and winter-set stories. What has not been mentioned is the mattresses; our coil spring mattresses are unlike the feather or straw mattresses of the regency. I have slept on a rope bed with a feather mattress and while I prefer a feather duvet, good wool blankets will keep you toasty with almost no warm-up time, even when the heat is off in winter for days. But yes, clothes have to be pulled into the bed to warm up before wearing. Now I find I cannot sleep in a well-heated room.

    Reply
  233. When I was a child, I complained bitterly that my bedroom was cold; my parents would come up, put a hand in front of the register and indicate heat was coming into the room. My mother believed in “modern” materials, so I had percale sheets and a nylon blanket in winter – and froze. Many years later, I received an abject apology from them; it seems they discovered the heating ducts into the room had never been connected! In the course of my life, I have experienced the gravity-fed heat with snowdrifts inside the windows, ice formed in glasses and so on. Nevertheless, I love winter and winter-set stories. What has not been mentioned is the mattresses; our coil spring mattresses are unlike the feather or straw mattresses of the regency. I have slept on a rope bed with a feather mattress and while I prefer a feather duvet, good wool blankets will keep you toasty with almost no warm-up time, even when the heat is off in winter for days. But yes, clothes have to be pulled into the bed to warm up before wearing. Now I find I cannot sleep in a well-heated room.

    Reply
  234. When I was a child, I complained bitterly that my bedroom was cold; my parents would come up, put a hand in front of the register and indicate heat was coming into the room. My mother believed in “modern” materials, so I had percale sheets and a nylon blanket in winter – and froze. Many years later, I received an abject apology from them; it seems they discovered the heating ducts into the room had never been connected! In the course of my life, I have experienced the gravity-fed heat with snowdrifts inside the windows, ice formed in glasses and so on. Nevertheless, I love winter and winter-set stories. What has not been mentioned is the mattresses; our coil spring mattresses are unlike the feather or straw mattresses of the regency. I have slept on a rope bed with a feather mattress and while I prefer a feather duvet, good wool blankets will keep you toasty with almost no warm-up time, even when the heat is off in winter for days. But yes, clothes have to be pulled into the bed to warm up before wearing. Now I find I cannot sleep in a well-heated room.

    Reply
  235. When I was a child, I complained bitterly that my bedroom was cold; my parents would come up, put a hand in front of the register and indicate heat was coming into the room. My mother believed in “modern” materials, so I had percale sheets and a nylon blanket in winter – and froze. Many years later, I received an abject apology from them; it seems they discovered the heating ducts into the room had never been connected! In the course of my life, I have experienced the gravity-fed heat with snowdrifts inside the windows, ice formed in glasses and so on. Nevertheless, I love winter and winter-set stories. What has not been mentioned is the mattresses; our coil spring mattresses are unlike the feather or straw mattresses of the regency. I have slept on a rope bed with a feather mattress and while I prefer a feather duvet, good wool blankets will keep you toasty with almost no warm-up time, even when the heat is off in winter for days. But yes, clothes have to be pulled into the bed to warm up before wearing. Now I find I cannot sleep in a well-heated room.

    Reply
  236. I love, love, love cold! I get tetchy when temps get above the low 70s F, and 25-60 is my sweet spot. I wouldn’t want to spend a lot of time outside when it’s much below freezing, but I’d rather go outside when it’s 25F than when it’s 95F. I love snow too πŸ™‚ :). Ice, not so much – that’s destructive. I confess, though, that I like my creature comforts. My grandparents’ house only had a couple of heating stoves, and no indoor restroom, until I was 10, so when I visited I got acquainted with the joys of a chamber pot in the cold and dark. I have no preference for romance setting, though, except I love the Christmas anthologies that are getting harder to find. I think I would like living in Canada weather, as long as my electricity and plumbing held up. πŸ˜€

    Reply
  237. I love, love, love cold! I get tetchy when temps get above the low 70s F, and 25-60 is my sweet spot. I wouldn’t want to spend a lot of time outside when it’s much below freezing, but I’d rather go outside when it’s 25F than when it’s 95F. I love snow too πŸ™‚ :). Ice, not so much – that’s destructive. I confess, though, that I like my creature comforts. My grandparents’ house only had a couple of heating stoves, and no indoor restroom, until I was 10, so when I visited I got acquainted with the joys of a chamber pot in the cold and dark. I have no preference for romance setting, though, except I love the Christmas anthologies that are getting harder to find. I think I would like living in Canada weather, as long as my electricity and plumbing held up. πŸ˜€

    Reply
  238. I love, love, love cold! I get tetchy when temps get above the low 70s F, and 25-60 is my sweet spot. I wouldn’t want to spend a lot of time outside when it’s much below freezing, but I’d rather go outside when it’s 25F than when it’s 95F. I love snow too πŸ™‚ :). Ice, not so much – that’s destructive. I confess, though, that I like my creature comforts. My grandparents’ house only had a couple of heating stoves, and no indoor restroom, until I was 10, so when I visited I got acquainted with the joys of a chamber pot in the cold and dark. I have no preference for romance setting, though, except I love the Christmas anthologies that are getting harder to find. I think I would like living in Canada weather, as long as my electricity and plumbing held up. πŸ˜€

    Reply
  239. I love, love, love cold! I get tetchy when temps get above the low 70s F, and 25-60 is my sweet spot. I wouldn’t want to spend a lot of time outside when it’s much below freezing, but I’d rather go outside when it’s 25F than when it’s 95F. I love snow too πŸ™‚ :). Ice, not so much – that’s destructive. I confess, though, that I like my creature comforts. My grandparents’ house only had a couple of heating stoves, and no indoor restroom, until I was 10, so when I visited I got acquainted with the joys of a chamber pot in the cold and dark. I have no preference for romance setting, though, except I love the Christmas anthologies that are getting harder to find. I think I would like living in Canada weather, as long as my electricity and plumbing held up. πŸ˜€

    Reply
  240. I love, love, love cold! I get tetchy when temps get above the low 70s F, and 25-60 is my sweet spot. I wouldn’t want to spend a lot of time outside when it’s much below freezing, but I’d rather go outside when it’s 25F than when it’s 95F. I love snow too πŸ™‚ :). Ice, not so much – that’s destructive. I confess, though, that I like my creature comforts. My grandparents’ house only had a couple of heating stoves, and no indoor restroom, until I was 10, so when I visited I got acquainted with the joys of a chamber pot in the cold and dark. I have no preference for romance setting, though, except I love the Christmas anthologies that are getting harder to find. I think I would like living in Canada weather, as long as my electricity and plumbing held up. πŸ˜€

    Reply
  241. I’m quite sensitive to the cold, therefore, summer is my favourite season. I’m not very fond of winter and coldness, although I can enjoy a snowed landscape -as long as I’m dressed properly. There’s something eerie in the silence of a forest with a lot of snow and the bare branches of the trees. Or when you walk on snow and hear that subtle crunch under your feet or see points sparkling in the sun, as if there were jewels underneath.
    In literature, I love it when they get the climate and the weather accurately, for instance, representing the Little Ice Age that Europe suffered from the 14th century up until the beginning of the 19th one. Or the Year Without a Summer. It looks more realistic to me when I see rain, and snow, and mud on the streets.

    Reply
  242. I’m quite sensitive to the cold, therefore, summer is my favourite season. I’m not very fond of winter and coldness, although I can enjoy a snowed landscape -as long as I’m dressed properly. There’s something eerie in the silence of a forest with a lot of snow and the bare branches of the trees. Or when you walk on snow and hear that subtle crunch under your feet or see points sparkling in the sun, as if there were jewels underneath.
    In literature, I love it when they get the climate and the weather accurately, for instance, representing the Little Ice Age that Europe suffered from the 14th century up until the beginning of the 19th one. Or the Year Without a Summer. It looks more realistic to me when I see rain, and snow, and mud on the streets.

    Reply
  243. I’m quite sensitive to the cold, therefore, summer is my favourite season. I’m not very fond of winter and coldness, although I can enjoy a snowed landscape -as long as I’m dressed properly. There’s something eerie in the silence of a forest with a lot of snow and the bare branches of the trees. Or when you walk on snow and hear that subtle crunch under your feet or see points sparkling in the sun, as if there were jewels underneath.
    In literature, I love it when they get the climate and the weather accurately, for instance, representing the Little Ice Age that Europe suffered from the 14th century up until the beginning of the 19th one. Or the Year Without a Summer. It looks more realistic to me when I see rain, and snow, and mud on the streets.

    Reply
  244. I’m quite sensitive to the cold, therefore, summer is my favourite season. I’m not very fond of winter and coldness, although I can enjoy a snowed landscape -as long as I’m dressed properly. There’s something eerie in the silence of a forest with a lot of snow and the bare branches of the trees. Or when you walk on snow and hear that subtle crunch under your feet or see points sparkling in the sun, as if there were jewels underneath.
    In literature, I love it when they get the climate and the weather accurately, for instance, representing the Little Ice Age that Europe suffered from the 14th century up until the beginning of the 19th one. Or the Year Without a Summer. It looks more realistic to me when I see rain, and snow, and mud on the streets.

    Reply
  245. I’m quite sensitive to the cold, therefore, summer is my favourite season. I’m not very fond of winter and coldness, although I can enjoy a snowed landscape -as long as I’m dressed properly. There’s something eerie in the silence of a forest with a lot of snow and the bare branches of the trees. Or when you walk on snow and hear that subtle crunch under your feet or see points sparkling in the sun, as if there were jewels underneath.
    In literature, I love it when they get the climate and the weather accurately, for instance, representing the Little Ice Age that Europe suffered from the 14th century up until the beginning of the 19th one. Or the Year Without a Summer. It looks more realistic to me when I see rain, and snow, and mud on the streets.

    Reply

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