Keeping Warm

Kingsfavorite
By Susan Holloway Scott

Don’t know how the weather is where you are, but for most of America, this January has been a doozy. Record snowfalls, ice by the bucket, sub-zero temperatures: if this isn’t the winter of our discontent, then I don’t know what is. 

When we’re not talking/whining/weeping about the cold, we’re figuring out the best ways to keep warm. For a ten-minute trip to the grocery, we’re outfitted for arctic exploration.  We shroud ourselves in layers of wool, fleece, and down, weigh the various merits of North Face vs. Under Armor, and discourse on the calculations necessary to determine the wind-chill.

All of which made me think of one of my favorite historical prints: Winter, etched by Wenceslaus Hollar in 1643 (from the collections of the British Museum.)

Hollar winter jpg

 
 

This lady represents the height of winter-wear fashion in seventeenth century London, prepared to face whatever the weather may bring in considerable style. In case Typepad won’t cooperate and enlarge the image, here’s the caption:

The cold, not cruelty, makes her wear
In Winter furs and wild beasts’ hair
For a smoother skin at night
Embraceth her with more delight.

What’s she wearing? To begin, she’s layered several mohair petticoats in different colors, looping them over her arm to protect them from the dirt of the streets. Of course that also reveals the lace border on her underskirt and the silk rosette on her high-heeled shoe, the sort of details calculated to drive the gallants wild. She’s tied a quilted silk hood over her hair and a mask to protect her complexion from the cold, and perhaps to hide her identity on her way to an assignation. Certainly some gentleman, whether husband or lover, is supporting her (and enjoying that “smoother skin at night”?), because she’s sporting a costly sable tippet over her shoulders and an enormous sable muff over her arm, all thanks to the burgeoning fur trade with New England. Muffs were also considered erotically enticing, especially when lined with cherry-colored silk.

And if all this early consumerism weren’t clear enough, the artist has shown her walking in the prosperous London neighborhood of Cornhill. The winter sky is filled with the smoke of coal fires and the tower of the first Royal Exchange (one of the earliest enclosed malls, with galleries of shops selling luxury goods)is in the background.

One last note about keeping warm in seventeenth-century London. According to diarist Samuel Pepys, a favorite drink in winter taverns was a concoction called “lamb’s wool”: buttered ale served hot, and garnished with roasted spiced apples. Yum!

So tell us: how are you keeping warm?  Sable tippets, or pets on the bed?  Layers over layers over layers? Steaming mugs of tea, coffee, chocolate, or buttered ale?

120 thoughts on “Keeping Warm”

  1. Love the mask! Nifty mix of superhero, trick-or-treat and apres-ski. Would go over big here in Chicago, and so would those sable-furs.

    Reply
  2. Love the mask! Nifty mix of superhero, trick-or-treat and apres-ski. Would go over big here in Chicago, and so would those sable-furs.

    Reply
  3. Love the mask! Nifty mix of superhero, trick-or-treat and apres-ski. Would go over big here in Chicago, and so would those sable-furs.

    Reply
  4. Love the mask! Nifty mix of superhero, trick-or-treat and apres-ski. Would go over big here in Chicago, and so would those sable-furs.

    Reply
  5. Love the mask! Nifty mix of superhero, trick-or-treat and apres-ski. Would go over big here in Chicago, and so would those sable-furs.

    Reply
  6. Our heater actually broke and we had to run out and buy a kerosene heater for the weekend until the guy could come fix it on Monday!
    And… buttered ale sounds quite interesting:)

    Reply
  7. Our heater actually broke and we had to run out and buy a kerosene heater for the weekend until the guy could come fix it on Monday!
    And… buttered ale sounds quite interesting:)

    Reply
  8. Our heater actually broke and we had to run out and buy a kerosene heater for the weekend until the guy could come fix it on Monday!
    And… buttered ale sounds quite interesting:)

    Reply
  9. Our heater actually broke and we had to run out and buy a kerosene heater for the weekend until the guy could come fix it on Monday!
    And… buttered ale sounds quite interesting:)

    Reply
  10. Our heater actually broke and we had to run out and buy a kerosene heater for the weekend until the guy could come fix it on Monday!
    And… buttered ale sounds quite interesting:)

    Reply
  11. We’ve done the broken furnace thing, too, two winters ago. Not fun. We bought an electric heater d to get buy until the repairman came. I was terrified it would burn the house down, the thing got so hot. Too hot, too cold. Can’t win!

    Reply
  12. We’ve done the broken furnace thing, too, two winters ago. Not fun. We bought an electric heater d to get buy until the repairman came. I was terrified it would burn the house down, the thing got so hot. Too hot, too cold. Can’t win!

    Reply
  13. We’ve done the broken furnace thing, too, two winters ago. Not fun. We bought an electric heater d to get buy until the repairman came. I was terrified it would burn the house down, the thing got so hot. Too hot, too cold. Can’t win!

    Reply
  14. We’ve done the broken furnace thing, too, two winters ago. Not fun. We bought an electric heater d to get buy until the repairman came. I was terrified it would burn the house down, the thing got so hot. Too hot, too cold. Can’t win!

    Reply
  15. We’ve done the broken furnace thing, too, two winters ago. Not fun. We bought an electric heater d to get buy until the repairman came. I was terrified it would burn the house down, the thing got so hot. Too hot, too cold. Can’t win!

    Reply
  16. It’s been so cold here in Maine the cars would not start/hold a charge. Had to get a new battery for my Explorer. I’m just staying in as much as possible when I’m not at work (good for the writing) and counting the days until we go to Key West in February!

    Reply
  17. It’s been so cold here in Maine the cars would not start/hold a charge. Had to get a new battery for my Explorer. I’m just staying in as much as possible when I’m not at work (good for the writing) and counting the days until we go to Key West in February!

    Reply
  18. It’s been so cold here in Maine the cars would not start/hold a charge. Had to get a new battery for my Explorer. I’m just staying in as much as possible when I’m not at work (good for the writing) and counting the days until we go to Key West in February!

    Reply
  19. It’s been so cold here in Maine the cars would not start/hold a charge. Had to get a new battery for my Explorer. I’m just staying in as much as possible when I’m not at work (good for the writing) and counting the days until we go to Key West in February!

    Reply
  20. It’s been so cold here in Maine the cars would not start/hold a charge. Had to get a new battery for my Explorer. I’m just staying in as much as possible when I’m not at work (good for the writing) and counting the days until we go to Key West in February!

    Reply
  21. I’m pretty tired of the snow piles on the sides of my driveway being taller than I am. Shoveling over the top is hard, and backing out of the driveway is an adventure(polite term for “taking my life in my hands”.

    Reply
  22. I’m pretty tired of the snow piles on the sides of my driveway being taller than I am. Shoveling over the top is hard, and backing out of the driveway is an adventure(polite term for “taking my life in my hands”.

    Reply
  23. I’m pretty tired of the snow piles on the sides of my driveway being taller than I am. Shoveling over the top is hard, and backing out of the driveway is an adventure(polite term for “taking my life in my hands”.

    Reply
  24. I’m pretty tired of the snow piles on the sides of my driveway being taller than I am. Shoveling over the top is hard, and backing out of the driveway is an adventure(polite term for “taking my life in my hands”.

    Reply
  25. I’m pretty tired of the snow piles on the sides of my driveway being taller than I am. Shoveling over the top is hard, and backing out of the driveway is an adventure(polite term for “taking my life in my hands”.

    Reply
  26. Well, today we are having a heat wave…it’s going to get up to 23 from 3 this morning. About a week before Christmas, our section of the United States was hit with an ice storm. Our household was without electricity for three days and we were one of the lucky ones. Not only wasn’t there any heat, but it was dark dark dark dark. Even with candles and lanterns. I of course wondered how in the world anyone living in the past could read, write or do needle work in the kind of light we had. When the temperature in the house reached 32, we drained the pipes, backed up the pets and stayed with my daughter. However, it was an interesting experience and it made be realize what a really hardy group of people our ancestors must have been.

    Reply
  27. Well, today we are having a heat wave…it’s going to get up to 23 from 3 this morning. About a week before Christmas, our section of the United States was hit with an ice storm. Our household was without electricity for three days and we were one of the lucky ones. Not only wasn’t there any heat, but it was dark dark dark dark. Even with candles and lanterns. I of course wondered how in the world anyone living in the past could read, write or do needle work in the kind of light we had. When the temperature in the house reached 32, we drained the pipes, backed up the pets and stayed with my daughter. However, it was an interesting experience and it made be realize what a really hardy group of people our ancestors must have been.

    Reply
  28. Well, today we are having a heat wave…it’s going to get up to 23 from 3 this morning. About a week before Christmas, our section of the United States was hit with an ice storm. Our household was without electricity for three days and we were one of the lucky ones. Not only wasn’t there any heat, but it was dark dark dark dark. Even with candles and lanterns. I of course wondered how in the world anyone living in the past could read, write or do needle work in the kind of light we had. When the temperature in the house reached 32, we drained the pipes, backed up the pets and stayed with my daughter. However, it was an interesting experience and it made be realize what a really hardy group of people our ancestors must have been.

    Reply
  29. Well, today we are having a heat wave…it’s going to get up to 23 from 3 this morning. About a week before Christmas, our section of the United States was hit with an ice storm. Our household was without electricity for three days and we were one of the lucky ones. Not only wasn’t there any heat, but it was dark dark dark dark. Even with candles and lanterns. I of course wondered how in the world anyone living in the past could read, write or do needle work in the kind of light we had. When the temperature in the house reached 32, we drained the pipes, backed up the pets and stayed with my daughter. However, it was an interesting experience and it made be realize what a really hardy group of people our ancestors must have been.

    Reply
  30. Well, today we are having a heat wave…it’s going to get up to 23 from 3 this morning. About a week before Christmas, our section of the United States was hit with an ice storm. Our household was without electricity for three days and we were one of the lucky ones. Not only wasn’t there any heat, but it was dark dark dark dark. Even with candles and lanterns. I of course wondered how in the world anyone living in the past could read, write or do needle work in the kind of light we had. When the temperature in the house reached 32, we drained the pipes, backed up the pets and stayed with my daughter. However, it was an interesting experience and it made be realize what a really hardy group of people our ancestors must have been.

    Reply
  31. Great post, fun picture. I do love these historical entries from the Wenches.
    The strange thing about all this cold weather in January is how December was very mild in the northeast. We went for a walk in shirtsleeves at my sister’s house in NJ on Christmas Day, must have been around 65. Hasn’t gone much above freezing since then. I’m ready for spring.

    Reply
  32. Great post, fun picture. I do love these historical entries from the Wenches.
    The strange thing about all this cold weather in January is how December was very mild in the northeast. We went for a walk in shirtsleeves at my sister’s house in NJ on Christmas Day, must have been around 65. Hasn’t gone much above freezing since then. I’m ready for spring.

    Reply
  33. Great post, fun picture. I do love these historical entries from the Wenches.
    The strange thing about all this cold weather in January is how December was very mild in the northeast. We went for a walk in shirtsleeves at my sister’s house in NJ on Christmas Day, must have been around 65. Hasn’t gone much above freezing since then. I’m ready for spring.

    Reply
  34. Great post, fun picture. I do love these historical entries from the Wenches.
    The strange thing about all this cold weather in January is how December was very mild in the northeast. We went for a walk in shirtsleeves at my sister’s house in NJ on Christmas Day, must have been around 65. Hasn’t gone much above freezing since then. I’m ready for spring.

    Reply
  35. Great post, fun picture. I do love these historical entries from the Wenches.
    The strange thing about all this cold weather in January is how December was very mild in the northeast. We went for a walk in shirtsleeves at my sister’s house in NJ on Christmas Day, must have been around 65. Hasn’t gone much above freezing since then. I’m ready for spring.

    Reply
  36. Maybe Barbara’s part of the Northeast was warm; mine was more like Kay’s. In fact, I’m wondering if Kay lives on my street…
    Oh, to be swathed in sable–with silk underwear. Instead, here am in in unromantic fleece, with a hot cup of tea.

    Reply
  37. Maybe Barbara’s part of the Northeast was warm; mine was more like Kay’s. In fact, I’m wondering if Kay lives on my street…
    Oh, to be swathed in sable–with silk underwear. Instead, here am in in unromantic fleece, with a hot cup of tea.

    Reply
  38. Maybe Barbara’s part of the Northeast was warm; mine was more like Kay’s. In fact, I’m wondering if Kay lives on my street…
    Oh, to be swathed in sable–with silk underwear. Instead, here am in in unromantic fleece, with a hot cup of tea.

    Reply
  39. Maybe Barbara’s part of the Northeast was warm; mine was more like Kay’s. In fact, I’m wondering if Kay lives on my street…
    Oh, to be swathed in sable–with silk underwear. Instead, here am in in unromantic fleece, with a hot cup of tea.

    Reply
  40. Maybe Barbara’s part of the Northeast was warm; mine was more like Kay’s. In fact, I’m wondering if Kay lives on my street…
    Oh, to be swathed in sable–with silk underwear. Instead, here am in in unromantic fleece, with a hot cup of tea.

    Reply
  41. I’m not envious of your cold weather…although I’ve experienced it in the distant past.
    Southern California has had a warmish winter. Temperature the last few days have pushed towards the 80s in the afternoon and drops to mid 40s in the nights.
    That cup of hot chocalate in the evenings is good.

    Reply
  42. I’m not envious of your cold weather…although I’ve experienced it in the distant past.
    Southern California has had a warmish winter. Temperature the last few days have pushed towards the 80s in the afternoon and drops to mid 40s in the nights.
    That cup of hot chocalate in the evenings is good.

    Reply
  43. I’m not envious of your cold weather…although I’ve experienced it in the distant past.
    Southern California has had a warmish winter. Temperature the last few days have pushed towards the 80s in the afternoon and drops to mid 40s in the nights.
    That cup of hot chocalate in the evenings is good.

    Reply
  44. I’m not envious of your cold weather…although I’ve experienced it in the distant past.
    Southern California has had a warmish winter. Temperature the last few days have pushed towards the 80s in the afternoon and drops to mid 40s in the nights.
    That cup of hot chocalate in the evenings is good.

    Reply
  45. I’m not envious of your cold weather…although I’ve experienced it in the distant past.
    Southern California has had a warmish winter. Temperature the last few days have pushed towards the 80s in the afternoon and drops to mid 40s in the nights.
    That cup of hot chocalate in the evenings is good.

    Reply
  46. Susan here:
    I’m glad we’re all keeping warm, one way or another!
    We, too, had to suffer through the dying furnace a year or two back. Our house is older, and the furnace was “vintage”, from 1946! We’d been nursing it along, hoping against hope to drag it through one more winter, until at last it gave up the ghost. I will say the new one is about a quarter the size in our basement, and much more energy efficient — though it will probably take another half-century before it pays for its (very costly!) self in oil savings.
    Kay, I think you and Loretta must live in the same part of New England that was bound up in ice! Here’s hoping that you’ve melted out by now (though I do know Loretta has a spiffy new snow-blower to ease her suffering….*g*)
    Barbara, despite the skeptics, I do remember Christmas as being very mild. I was in Williamsburg, VA, and many of the tourists were wearing shorts (!!) on the following Sunday, when the temps were just shy of 80. Whew!
    Louis, my father grew up in San Diego, and used to tease us about his long, arduous walks to school through the snowy drifts…and then right on off to the beach after school. Har-har! So I don’t think you’ll find too much sympathy among the other readers there in balmy SoCal.

    Reply
  47. Susan here:
    I’m glad we’re all keeping warm, one way or another!
    We, too, had to suffer through the dying furnace a year or two back. Our house is older, and the furnace was “vintage”, from 1946! We’d been nursing it along, hoping against hope to drag it through one more winter, until at last it gave up the ghost. I will say the new one is about a quarter the size in our basement, and much more energy efficient — though it will probably take another half-century before it pays for its (very costly!) self in oil savings.
    Kay, I think you and Loretta must live in the same part of New England that was bound up in ice! Here’s hoping that you’ve melted out by now (though I do know Loretta has a spiffy new snow-blower to ease her suffering….*g*)
    Barbara, despite the skeptics, I do remember Christmas as being very mild. I was in Williamsburg, VA, and many of the tourists were wearing shorts (!!) on the following Sunday, when the temps were just shy of 80. Whew!
    Louis, my father grew up in San Diego, and used to tease us about his long, arduous walks to school through the snowy drifts…and then right on off to the beach after school. Har-har! So I don’t think you’ll find too much sympathy among the other readers there in balmy SoCal.

    Reply
  48. Susan here:
    I’m glad we’re all keeping warm, one way or another!
    We, too, had to suffer through the dying furnace a year or two back. Our house is older, and the furnace was “vintage”, from 1946! We’d been nursing it along, hoping against hope to drag it through one more winter, until at last it gave up the ghost. I will say the new one is about a quarter the size in our basement, and much more energy efficient — though it will probably take another half-century before it pays for its (very costly!) self in oil savings.
    Kay, I think you and Loretta must live in the same part of New England that was bound up in ice! Here’s hoping that you’ve melted out by now (though I do know Loretta has a spiffy new snow-blower to ease her suffering….*g*)
    Barbara, despite the skeptics, I do remember Christmas as being very mild. I was in Williamsburg, VA, and many of the tourists were wearing shorts (!!) on the following Sunday, when the temps were just shy of 80. Whew!
    Louis, my father grew up in San Diego, and used to tease us about his long, arduous walks to school through the snowy drifts…and then right on off to the beach after school. Har-har! So I don’t think you’ll find too much sympathy among the other readers there in balmy SoCal.

    Reply
  49. Susan here:
    I’m glad we’re all keeping warm, one way or another!
    We, too, had to suffer through the dying furnace a year or two back. Our house is older, and the furnace was “vintage”, from 1946! We’d been nursing it along, hoping against hope to drag it through one more winter, until at last it gave up the ghost. I will say the new one is about a quarter the size in our basement, and much more energy efficient — though it will probably take another half-century before it pays for its (very costly!) self in oil savings.
    Kay, I think you and Loretta must live in the same part of New England that was bound up in ice! Here’s hoping that you’ve melted out by now (though I do know Loretta has a spiffy new snow-blower to ease her suffering….*g*)
    Barbara, despite the skeptics, I do remember Christmas as being very mild. I was in Williamsburg, VA, and many of the tourists were wearing shorts (!!) on the following Sunday, when the temps were just shy of 80. Whew!
    Louis, my father grew up in San Diego, and used to tease us about his long, arduous walks to school through the snowy drifts…and then right on off to the beach after school. Har-har! So I don’t think you’ll find too much sympathy among the other readers there in balmy SoCal.

    Reply
  50. Susan here:
    I’m glad we’re all keeping warm, one way or another!
    We, too, had to suffer through the dying furnace a year or two back. Our house is older, and the furnace was “vintage”, from 1946! We’d been nursing it along, hoping against hope to drag it through one more winter, until at last it gave up the ghost. I will say the new one is about a quarter the size in our basement, and much more energy efficient — though it will probably take another half-century before it pays for its (very costly!) self in oil savings.
    Kay, I think you and Loretta must live in the same part of New England that was bound up in ice! Here’s hoping that you’ve melted out by now (though I do know Loretta has a spiffy new snow-blower to ease her suffering….*g*)
    Barbara, despite the skeptics, I do remember Christmas as being very mild. I was in Williamsburg, VA, and many of the tourists were wearing shorts (!!) on the following Sunday, when the temps were just shy of 80. Whew!
    Louis, my father grew up in San Diego, and used to tease us about his long, arduous walks to school through the snowy drifts…and then right on off to the beach after school. Har-har! So I don’t think you’ll find too much sympathy among the other readers there in balmy SoCal.

    Reply
  51. Cats are good–they run a higher body temperature than humans–but they’re small and unreliable. Layers are good. Lots of layers. And don’t forget the nice hot soup!
    It’s been pretty darned cold in Maryland for the last couple of weeks, but not a patch on what New England other northern climes have suffered. The Mayhem Consultant looked at The Weather Channel and started muttering in amazement, “It’s -90 in Siberia!”
    Mary Jo, making sure the bird feeder is kept filled

    Reply
  52. Cats are good–they run a higher body temperature than humans–but they’re small and unreliable. Layers are good. Lots of layers. And don’t forget the nice hot soup!
    It’s been pretty darned cold in Maryland for the last couple of weeks, but not a patch on what New England other northern climes have suffered. The Mayhem Consultant looked at The Weather Channel and started muttering in amazement, “It’s -90 in Siberia!”
    Mary Jo, making sure the bird feeder is kept filled

    Reply
  53. Cats are good–they run a higher body temperature than humans–but they’re small and unreliable. Layers are good. Lots of layers. And don’t forget the nice hot soup!
    It’s been pretty darned cold in Maryland for the last couple of weeks, but not a patch on what New England other northern climes have suffered. The Mayhem Consultant looked at The Weather Channel and started muttering in amazement, “It’s -90 in Siberia!”
    Mary Jo, making sure the bird feeder is kept filled

    Reply
  54. Cats are good–they run a higher body temperature than humans–but they’re small and unreliable. Layers are good. Lots of layers. And don’t forget the nice hot soup!
    It’s been pretty darned cold in Maryland for the last couple of weeks, but not a patch on what New England other northern climes have suffered. The Mayhem Consultant looked at The Weather Channel and started muttering in amazement, “It’s -90 in Siberia!”
    Mary Jo, making sure the bird feeder is kept filled

    Reply
  55. Cats are good–they run a higher body temperature than humans–but they’re small and unreliable. Layers are good. Lots of layers. And don’t forget the nice hot soup!
    It’s been pretty darned cold in Maryland for the last couple of weeks, but not a patch on what New England other northern climes have suffered. The Mayhem Consultant looked at The Weather Channel and started muttering in amazement, “It’s -90 in Siberia!”
    Mary Jo, making sure the bird feeder is kept filled

    Reply
  56. This morning it was in the 40’s so my appointments canceled. It was ‘just too cold to work’ This is the result of being a native Floridian and therefore giving preference to other native Floridians when hiring contractors, etc. If I hadn’t ‘done time’ up north, I’d have pulled the covers over my head and said forget it as well.
    My older girl had a fundraising event this morning that included running – I told her the cold would motivate her and it did – she ran more than twice her goal distance, trying to keep warm!

    Reply
  57. This morning it was in the 40’s so my appointments canceled. It was ‘just too cold to work’ This is the result of being a native Floridian and therefore giving preference to other native Floridians when hiring contractors, etc. If I hadn’t ‘done time’ up north, I’d have pulled the covers over my head and said forget it as well.
    My older girl had a fundraising event this morning that included running – I told her the cold would motivate her and it did – she ran more than twice her goal distance, trying to keep warm!

    Reply
  58. This morning it was in the 40’s so my appointments canceled. It was ‘just too cold to work’ This is the result of being a native Floridian and therefore giving preference to other native Floridians when hiring contractors, etc. If I hadn’t ‘done time’ up north, I’d have pulled the covers over my head and said forget it as well.
    My older girl had a fundraising event this morning that included running – I told her the cold would motivate her and it did – she ran more than twice her goal distance, trying to keep warm!

    Reply
  59. This morning it was in the 40’s so my appointments canceled. It was ‘just too cold to work’ This is the result of being a native Floridian and therefore giving preference to other native Floridians when hiring contractors, etc. If I hadn’t ‘done time’ up north, I’d have pulled the covers over my head and said forget it as well.
    My older girl had a fundraising event this morning that included running – I told her the cold would motivate her and it did – she ran more than twice her goal distance, trying to keep warm!

    Reply
  60. This morning it was in the 40’s so my appointments canceled. It was ‘just too cold to work’ This is the result of being a native Floridian and therefore giving preference to other native Floridians when hiring contractors, etc. If I hadn’t ‘done time’ up north, I’d have pulled the covers over my head and said forget it as well.
    My older girl had a fundraising event this morning that included running – I told her the cold would motivate her and it did – she ran more than twice her goal distance, trying to keep warm!

    Reply
  61. It feel like Spring hit when the temperature climbed from -32*C to -9. It felt postively balmy! Growing up in England we hardly ever got below freezing and a light dusting of snow would bring traffic to a standstill. I love sending weather information to my family in England, I know they get a lot of mileage out of it with their friends; “it’s how cold?”
    We have a gas furnace and it keeps the house at a much more constant temperature than our old oil one did. I also stayed inside as much as possible and planned trips from the cruise we are taking at March break. Belize and Mexico…the best antidote to winter.

    Reply
  62. It feel like Spring hit when the temperature climbed from -32*C to -9. It felt postively balmy! Growing up in England we hardly ever got below freezing and a light dusting of snow would bring traffic to a standstill. I love sending weather information to my family in England, I know they get a lot of mileage out of it with their friends; “it’s how cold?”
    We have a gas furnace and it keeps the house at a much more constant temperature than our old oil one did. I also stayed inside as much as possible and planned trips from the cruise we are taking at March break. Belize and Mexico…the best antidote to winter.

    Reply
  63. It feel like Spring hit when the temperature climbed from -32*C to -9. It felt postively balmy! Growing up in England we hardly ever got below freezing and a light dusting of snow would bring traffic to a standstill. I love sending weather information to my family in England, I know they get a lot of mileage out of it with their friends; “it’s how cold?”
    We have a gas furnace and it keeps the house at a much more constant temperature than our old oil one did. I also stayed inside as much as possible and planned trips from the cruise we are taking at March break. Belize and Mexico…the best antidote to winter.

    Reply
  64. It feel like Spring hit when the temperature climbed from -32*C to -9. It felt postively balmy! Growing up in England we hardly ever got below freezing and a light dusting of snow would bring traffic to a standstill. I love sending weather information to my family in England, I know they get a lot of mileage out of it with their friends; “it’s how cold?”
    We have a gas furnace and it keeps the house at a much more constant temperature than our old oil one did. I also stayed inside as much as possible and planned trips from the cruise we are taking at March break. Belize and Mexico…the best antidote to winter.

    Reply
  65. It feel like Spring hit when the temperature climbed from -32*C to -9. It felt postively balmy! Growing up in England we hardly ever got below freezing and a light dusting of snow would bring traffic to a standstill. I love sending weather information to my family in England, I know they get a lot of mileage out of it with their friends; “it’s how cold?”
    We have a gas furnace and it keeps the house at a much more constant temperature than our old oil one did. I also stayed inside as much as possible and planned trips from the cruise we are taking at March break. Belize and Mexico…the best antidote to winter.

    Reply
  66. Not to make you all dizzy with envy, but here in Los Angeles in the Valley it was around 80 today, and people were back to tee shirts and flipflops (well, they never give those up, actually). It’s 10:30 PM right now, I have the windows open and have only just now gone for a hoodie because my arms are cold.
    Lest you get too envious, it’s supposed to rain and be colder later this week.

    Reply
  67. Not to make you all dizzy with envy, but here in Los Angeles in the Valley it was around 80 today, and people were back to tee shirts and flipflops (well, they never give those up, actually). It’s 10:30 PM right now, I have the windows open and have only just now gone for a hoodie because my arms are cold.
    Lest you get too envious, it’s supposed to rain and be colder later this week.

    Reply
  68. Not to make you all dizzy with envy, but here in Los Angeles in the Valley it was around 80 today, and people were back to tee shirts and flipflops (well, they never give those up, actually). It’s 10:30 PM right now, I have the windows open and have only just now gone for a hoodie because my arms are cold.
    Lest you get too envious, it’s supposed to rain and be colder later this week.

    Reply
  69. Not to make you all dizzy with envy, but here in Los Angeles in the Valley it was around 80 today, and people were back to tee shirts and flipflops (well, they never give those up, actually). It’s 10:30 PM right now, I have the windows open and have only just now gone for a hoodie because my arms are cold.
    Lest you get too envious, it’s supposed to rain and be colder later this week.

    Reply
  70. Not to make you all dizzy with envy, but here in Los Angeles in the Valley it was around 80 today, and people were back to tee shirts and flipflops (well, they never give those up, actually). It’s 10:30 PM right now, I have the windows open and have only just now gone for a hoodie because my arms are cold.
    Lest you get too envious, it’s supposed to rain and be colder later this week.

    Reply
  71. Sherrie, here.
    Susan S., like you, I replaced my furnace 4 years ago. When the repairman crawled under the house to fix it, he came back up, looking amazed. It had “exploded” under the house and wasn’t salvageable. He also told me I was very lucky, as it had been leaking carbon monoxide into the house, which explained why I was always headachy and falling asleep at my desk. I now have a carbon monoxide detector.
    I work from home, and the best location for my desk is, unfortunately, against two outside walls. This means it gets very cold in the winter, so I layer. Right now, I’m wearing a long-sleeved thermal top and a sweatshirt, with a quilted flannel shirt over all. If I fell down, I’d flop around like a turtle. I have a lap robe over my legs, a cat squashed into the chair with me, and my feet are encased in thick hunter’s socks and fleece-lined Ugg boots. I’m doing my part to save the planet (and my budget) by keeping the thermostat at 62. Layering works well for me, and I’m quite acclimated to the lower temps, but the downside is I swelter when visiting friends! *g* I am so ready for spring! I could swear I see catkins on my pussywillow tree!

    Reply
  72. Sherrie, here.
    Susan S., like you, I replaced my furnace 4 years ago. When the repairman crawled under the house to fix it, he came back up, looking amazed. It had “exploded” under the house and wasn’t salvageable. He also told me I was very lucky, as it had been leaking carbon monoxide into the house, which explained why I was always headachy and falling asleep at my desk. I now have a carbon monoxide detector.
    I work from home, and the best location for my desk is, unfortunately, against two outside walls. This means it gets very cold in the winter, so I layer. Right now, I’m wearing a long-sleeved thermal top and a sweatshirt, with a quilted flannel shirt over all. If I fell down, I’d flop around like a turtle. I have a lap robe over my legs, a cat squashed into the chair with me, and my feet are encased in thick hunter’s socks and fleece-lined Ugg boots. I’m doing my part to save the planet (and my budget) by keeping the thermostat at 62. Layering works well for me, and I’m quite acclimated to the lower temps, but the downside is I swelter when visiting friends! *g* I am so ready for spring! I could swear I see catkins on my pussywillow tree!

    Reply
  73. Sherrie, here.
    Susan S., like you, I replaced my furnace 4 years ago. When the repairman crawled under the house to fix it, he came back up, looking amazed. It had “exploded” under the house and wasn’t salvageable. He also told me I was very lucky, as it had been leaking carbon monoxide into the house, which explained why I was always headachy and falling asleep at my desk. I now have a carbon monoxide detector.
    I work from home, and the best location for my desk is, unfortunately, against two outside walls. This means it gets very cold in the winter, so I layer. Right now, I’m wearing a long-sleeved thermal top and a sweatshirt, with a quilted flannel shirt over all. If I fell down, I’d flop around like a turtle. I have a lap robe over my legs, a cat squashed into the chair with me, and my feet are encased in thick hunter’s socks and fleece-lined Ugg boots. I’m doing my part to save the planet (and my budget) by keeping the thermostat at 62. Layering works well for me, and I’m quite acclimated to the lower temps, but the downside is I swelter when visiting friends! *g* I am so ready for spring! I could swear I see catkins on my pussywillow tree!

    Reply
  74. Sherrie, here.
    Susan S., like you, I replaced my furnace 4 years ago. When the repairman crawled under the house to fix it, he came back up, looking amazed. It had “exploded” under the house and wasn’t salvageable. He also told me I was very lucky, as it had been leaking carbon monoxide into the house, which explained why I was always headachy and falling asleep at my desk. I now have a carbon monoxide detector.
    I work from home, and the best location for my desk is, unfortunately, against two outside walls. This means it gets very cold in the winter, so I layer. Right now, I’m wearing a long-sleeved thermal top and a sweatshirt, with a quilted flannel shirt over all. If I fell down, I’d flop around like a turtle. I have a lap robe over my legs, a cat squashed into the chair with me, and my feet are encased in thick hunter’s socks and fleece-lined Ugg boots. I’m doing my part to save the planet (and my budget) by keeping the thermostat at 62. Layering works well for me, and I’m quite acclimated to the lower temps, but the downside is I swelter when visiting friends! *g* I am so ready for spring! I could swear I see catkins on my pussywillow tree!

    Reply
  75. Sherrie, here.
    Susan S., like you, I replaced my furnace 4 years ago. When the repairman crawled under the house to fix it, he came back up, looking amazed. It had “exploded” under the house and wasn’t salvageable. He also told me I was very lucky, as it had been leaking carbon monoxide into the house, which explained why I was always headachy and falling asleep at my desk. I now have a carbon monoxide detector.
    I work from home, and the best location for my desk is, unfortunately, against two outside walls. This means it gets very cold in the winter, so I layer. Right now, I’m wearing a long-sleeved thermal top and a sweatshirt, with a quilted flannel shirt over all. If I fell down, I’d flop around like a turtle. I have a lap robe over my legs, a cat squashed into the chair with me, and my feet are encased in thick hunter’s socks and fleece-lined Ugg boots. I’m doing my part to save the planet (and my budget) by keeping the thermostat at 62. Layering works well for me, and I’m quite acclimated to the lower temps, but the downside is I swelter when visiting friends! *g* I am so ready for spring! I could swear I see catkins on my pussywillow tree!

    Reply
  76. Dogs can be pretty cozy, too, if they don’t hog the whole bed. My two little guys(mostly corgi, we think)are great snugglers, but when our big old lab gets in on the action, there’s not much room left in the bed for me or my DH. We’re warm, though, a real “three dog night”

    Reply
  77. Dogs can be pretty cozy, too, if they don’t hog the whole bed. My two little guys(mostly corgi, we think)are great snugglers, but when our big old lab gets in on the action, there’s not much room left in the bed for me or my DH. We’re warm, though, a real “three dog night”

    Reply
  78. Dogs can be pretty cozy, too, if they don’t hog the whole bed. My two little guys(mostly corgi, we think)are great snugglers, but when our big old lab gets in on the action, there’s not much room left in the bed for me or my DH. We’re warm, though, a real “three dog night”

    Reply
  79. Dogs can be pretty cozy, too, if they don’t hog the whole bed. My two little guys(mostly corgi, we think)are great snugglers, but when our big old lab gets in on the action, there’s not much room left in the bed for me or my DH. We’re warm, though, a real “three dog night”

    Reply
  80. Dogs can be pretty cozy, too, if they don’t hog the whole bed. My two little guys(mostly corgi, we think)are great snugglers, but when our big old lab gets in on the action, there’s not much room left in the bed for me or my DH. We’re warm, though, a real “three dog night”

    Reply
  81. Susan again:
    Yep, it’s forty today in Pennsylvania, and it definitely feels like a heat wave!
    I’m a cold-weather girl at heart. I agree with Liz M: the cold makes me think better, and I just generally have more energy in the winter. (I hate summer, but that’s a blog for another day.) I’m also of the layer-up school, and I’m s determined wearer of wool rather than the more popular fleece, probably because I’m also a knitter. So like Sherrie, I’m bundled when I work, with a couple of cats scattered about as well.
    But becuase I like that cold weather, I also keep the heating register closed when I’m writing, and often have the window open a crack, too, all winter long.
    And yes, I know, I’m demented. 🙂
    I’m reminded of the intro to the old tv show “Rhoda”: “I moved to Minneapolis where it was cold, and I figured I’d keep better.” *g*

    Reply
  82. Susan again:
    Yep, it’s forty today in Pennsylvania, and it definitely feels like a heat wave!
    I’m a cold-weather girl at heart. I agree with Liz M: the cold makes me think better, and I just generally have more energy in the winter. (I hate summer, but that’s a blog for another day.) I’m also of the layer-up school, and I’m s determined wearer of wool rather than the more popular fleece, probably because I’m also a knitter. So like Sherrie, I’m bundled when I work, with a couple of cats scattered about as well.
    But becuase I like that cold weather, I also keep the heating register closed when I’m writing, and often have the window open a crack, too, all winter long.
    And yes, I know, I’m demented. 🙂
    I’m reminded of the intro to the old tv show “Rhoda”: “I moved to Minneapolis where it was cold, and I figured I’d keep better.” *g*

    Reply
  83. Susan again:
    Yep, it’s forty today in Pennsylvania, and it definitely feels like a heat wave!
    I’m a cold-weather girl at heart. I agree with Liz M: the cold makes me think better, and I just generally have more energy in the winter. (I hate summer, but that’s a blog for another day.) I’m also of the layer-up school, and I’m s determined wearer of wool rather than the more popular fleece, probably because I’m also a knitter. So like Sherrie, I’m bundled when I work, with a couple of cats scattered about as well.
    But becuase I like that cold weather, I also keep the heating register closed when I’m writing, and often have the window open a crack, too, all winter long.
    And yes, I know, I’m demented. 🙂
    I’m reminded of the intro to the old tv show “Rhoda”: “I moved to Minneapolis where it was cold, and I figured I’d keep better.” *g*

    Reply
  84. Susan again:
    Yep, it’s forty today in Pennsylvania, and it definitely feels like a heat wave!
    I’m a cold-weather girl at heart. I agree with Liz M: the cold makes me think better, and I just generally have more energy in the winter. (I hate summer, but that’s a blog for another day.) I’m also of the layer-up school, and I’m s determined wearer of wool rather than the more popular fleece, probably because I’m also a knitter. So like Sherrie, I’m bundled when I work, with a couple of cats scattered about as well.
    But becuase I like that cold weather, I also keep the heating register closed when I’m writing, and often have the window open a crack, too, all winter long.
    And yes, I know, I’m demented. 🙂
    I’m reminded of the intro to the old tv show “Rhoda”: “I moved to Minneapolis where it was cold, and I figured I’d keep better.” *g*

    Reply
  85. Susan again:
    Yep, it’s forty today in Pennsylvania, and it definitely feels like a heat wave!
    I’m a cold-weather girl at heart. I agree with Liz M: the cold makes me think better, and I just generally have more energy in the winter. (I hate summer, but that’s a blog for another day.) I’m also of the layer-up school, and I’m s determined wearer of wool rather than the more popular fleece, probably because I’m also a knitter. So like Sherrie, I’m bundled when I work, with a couple of cats scattered about as well.
    But becuase I like that cold weather, I also keep the heating register closed when I’m writing, and often have the window open a crack, too, all winter long.
    And yes, I know, I’m demented. 🙂
    I’m reminded of the intro to the old tv show “Rhoda”: “I moved to Minneapolis where it was cold, and I figured I’d keep better.” *g*

    Reply
  86. Ooh, that Lamb’s Wool recipe sounds delicious, given what a huge fan of hot buttered rum I am.
    I find this 17th c. clothing far more comforting (that mask/hat notwithstanding) than the short-sleeved flimsy Regency gowns. What an incredibly silly idea…one that has not gone out of style yet.

    Reply
  87. Ooh, that Lamb’s Wool recipe sounds delicious, given what a huge fan of hot buttered rum I am.
    I find this 17th c. clothing far more comforting (that mask/hat notwithstanding) than the short-sleeved flimsy Regency gowns. What an incredibly silly idea…one that has not gone out of style yet.

    Reply
  88. Ooh, that Lamb’s Wool recipe sounds delicious, given what a huge fan of hot buttered rum I am.
    I find this 17th c. clothing far more comforting (that mask/hat notwithstanding) than the short-sleeved flimsy Regency gowns. What an incredibly silly idea…one that has not gone out of style yet.

    Reply
  89. Ooh, that Lamb’s Wool recipe sounds delicious, given what a huge fan of hot buttered rum I am.
    I find this 17th c. clothing far more comforting (that mask/hat notwithstanding) than the short-sleeved flimsy Regency gowns. What an incredibly silly idea…one that has not gone out of style yet.

    Reply
  90. Ooh, that Lamb’s Wool recipe sounds delicious, given what a huge fan of hot buttered rum I am.
    I find this 17th c. clothing far more comforting (that mask/hat notwithstanding) than the short-sleeved flimsy Regency gowns. What an incredibly silly idea…one that has not gone out of style yet.

    Reply
  91. Susan here again
    Keira, I’m sorry the Lamb’s Wool recipe isn’t really a recipe, only a mention with the ingredients. I find myself wondering about the proportions: was it more ale than apples, or the other way around (though that sounds like beer-smoothie territory!)
    As for the layered clothing: it’s easy for modern people to look at clothes from the past and judge them as impractical and uncomfortable, when in reality they often weren’t. This lady with her layers was smart, and natural fibers are comfier than polyester, too.
    Though I do agree that there must have been an awful lot of shivering Regency ladies. Fragile, impractical clothing for drafty rooms. No wonder those big shawls were all the rage — otherwise none of those ladies would have survived winter.

    Reply
  92. Susan here again
    Keira, I’m sorry the Lamb’s Wool recipe isn’t really a recipe, only a mention with the ingredients. I find myself wondering about the proportions: was it more ale than apples, or the other way around (though that sounds like beer-smoothie territory!)
    As for the layered clothing: it’s easy for modern people to look at clothes from the past and judge them as impractical and uncomfortable, when in reality they often weren’t. This lady with her layers was smart, and natural fibers are comfier than polyester, too.
    Though I do agree that there must have been an awful lot of shivering Regency ladies. Fragile, impractical clothing for drafty rooms. No wonder those big shawls were all the rage — otherwise none of those ladies would have survived winter.

    Reply
  93. Susan here again
    Keira, I’m sorry the Lamb’s Wool recipe isn’t really a recipe, only a mention with the ingredients. I find myself wondering about the proportions: was it more ale than apples, or the other way around (though that sounds like beer-smoothie territory!)
    As for the layered clothing: it’s easy for modern people to look at clothes from the past and judge them as impractical and uncomfortable, when in reality they often weren’t. This lady with her layers was smart, and natural fibers are comfier than polyester, too.
    Though I do agree that there must have been an awful lot of shivering Regency ladies. Fragile, impractical clothing for drafty rooms. No wonder those big shawls were all the rage — otherwise none of those ladies would have survived winter.

    Reply
  94. Susan here again
    Keira, I’m sorry the Lamb’s Wool recipe isn’t really a recipe, only a mention with the ingredients. I find myself wondering about the proportions: was it more ale than apples, or the other way around (though that sounds like beer-smoothie territory!)
    As for the layered clothing: it’s easy for modern people to look at clothes from the past and judge them as impractical and uncomfortable, when in reality they often weren’t. This lady with her layers was smart, and natural fibers are comfier than polyester, too.
    Though I do agree that there must have been an awful lot of shivering Regency ladies. Fragile, impractical clothing for drafty rooms. No wonder those big shawls were all the rage — otherwise none of those ladies would have survived winter.

    Reply
  95. Susan here again
    Keira, I’m sorry the Lamb’s Wool recipe isn’t really a recipe, only a mention with the ingredients. I find myself wondering about the proportions: was it more ale than apples, or the other way around (though that sounds like beer-smoothie territory!)
    As for the layered clothing: it’s easy for modern people to look at clothes from the past and judge them as impractical and uncomfortable, when in reality they often weren’t. This lady with her layers was smart, and natural fibers are comfier than polyester, too.
    Though I do agree that there must have been an awful lot of shivering Regency ladies. Fragile, impractical clothing for drafty rooms. No wonder those big shawls were all the rage — otherwise none of those ladies would have survived winter.

    Reply
  96. I’m here, right next door to Minneapolis, in St. Paul, and we’re enjoying? enduring? the same cold as the Northeast. Here, I’m curling up with a steamy romance novel or two and staying warm! And a pair of CuddleDuds doesn’t hurt! 🙂

    Reply
  97. I’m here, right next door to Minneapolis, in St. Paul, and we’re enjoying? enduring? the same cold as the Northeast. Here, I’m curling up with a steamy romance novel or two and staying warm! And a pair of CuddleDuds doesn’t hurt! 🙂

    Reply
  98. I’m here, right next door to Minneapolis, in St. Paul, and we’re enjoying? enduring? the same cold as the Northeast. Here, I’m curling up with a steamy romance novel or two and staying warm! And a pair of CuddleDuds doesn’t hurt! 🙂

    Reply
  99. I’m here, right next door to Minneapolis, in St. Paul, and we’re enjoying? enduring? the same cold as the Northeast. Here, I’m curling up with a steamy romance novel or two and staying warm! And a pair of CuddleDuds doesn’t hurt! 🙂

    Reply
  100. I’m here, right next door to Minneapolis, in St. Paul, and we’re enjoying? enduring? the same cold as the Northeast. Here, I’m curling up with a steamy romance novel or two and staying warm! And a pair of CuddleDuds doesn’t hurt! 🙂

    Reply
  101. Here in Sydney we are having most of our fair share of summer this last week! We have had 2 days including today of 42C, and I think every other day it has been 35C plus. So if you are really cold…jump on a plane to Sydney, or Melbourne has been hot too.

    Reply
  102. Here in Sydney we are having most of our fair share of summer this last week! We have had 2 days including today of 42C, and I think every other day it has been 35C plus. So if you are really cold…jump on a plane to Sydney, or Melbourne has been hot too.

    Reply
  103. Here in Sydney we are having most of our fair share of summer this last week! We have had 2 days including today of 42C, and I think every other day it has been 35C plus. So if you are really cold…jump on a plane to Sydney, or Melbourne has been hot too.

    Reply
  104. Here in Sydney we are having most of our fair share of summer this last week! We have had 2 days including today of 42C, and I think every other day it has been 35C plus. So if you are really cold…jump on a plane to Sydney, or Melbourne has been hot too.

    Reply
  105. Here in Sydney we are having most of our fair share of summer this last week! We have had 2 days including today of 42C, and I think every other day it has been 35C plus. So if you are really cold…jump on a plane to Sydney, or Melbourne has been hot too.

    Reply

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