Coffee Table Books

Christina here. During the Christmas holidays I’ve had a chance to relax a bit and do things I don’t normally have time for. One of them is to leaf through some of the many coffee table books I own – and I have to admit there are rather a lot of them!

I’m not sure why I have so many. They’re not exactly necessary and yet seem to accrue of their own accord. Many of them are from exhibitions I’ve attended, especially those of my favourite artists, while others are on subjects close to my heart. I’m never quite sure why I buy them as I don’t usually read them – I’ll only flick through the pages to look at the photos. Admittedly, most of them do have gorgeous pictures!

DuchessToday I thought I’d tell you about a few of the ones I love best, the ones I keep returning to and never tire of looking at, and why. Then I’d love for you to tell me about yours! (Even if that means my collection grows larger as you tempt me …)

My absolute favourite is The Duchess of Devonshire’s Ball by Sophia Murphy. On 2nd July 1897 the then Duchess of Devonshire held a fancy dress ball in her London mansion in Piccadilly, Devonshire House. It was a glittering occasion and a very special ball, but what made it unique is that the duchess had all her guests photographed as they arrived and then had the pictures put into a privately printed album for herself. The costumes are out of this world, and some of them must have cost an absolute fortune. Some of the guests look ridiculous, others uncomfortable, and one can only wonder how they managed to dance all night in their finery. For me, the guest that stood out the most was the Duchess of Portland who was so beautiful, she would have looked regal in a sack. I can readily imagine her as the heroine of a romantic novel as she must have had suitors in droves!

DollshouseQueen Mary’s Doll’s House by Mary Stewart-Wilson – Those of you who have visited Windsor Castle will have come across this treasure and it’s definitely the most incredible doll’s house I’ve ever seen! Created for Queen Mary, the wife of King George V, in 1923-24, it was an astonishing collaboration by hundreds of craftsmen. The queen loved miniature objects and her family asked Sir Edward Lutyens, a famous architect, to design the doll’s house for her and he did so enthusiastically. As the author says “No detail was to be considered too trivial or unimportant; from the attic to the cellar, the house was to be a national treasure …” And I think we can safely say he succeeded. There is even a library with properly bound and miniature books – fascinating! If you can’t go and see it in person, this book is the next best thing.

FabergeFabergé Imperial Jeweller – Geza von Habsburg and Marina Lopato – This is the companion book to an exhibition I saw at the Victoria & Albert Museum and I think I can safely say it was the most amazing one I have ever been to. Showcasing not only the famous eggs, but all the other fabulous items this jewellery firm created for their wealthy patrons, it was simply stunning. I never tire of looking at these photos and my absolute favourite item of the collection was an egg made up of a mosaic of gold, platinum and all manner of gemstones. Breath-taking!

TiarasAnother stunning jewellery exhibition at the V & A featured tiaras, and the book Tiaras – A History of Splendour by Geoffrey C. Munn showcases all the glittering examples that were featured and the women who wore them. I’m a sucker for “bling” and especially antique jewellery, so seeing these was an absolute delight and looking through the photos in this book reminds of that.

Cheapside

Continuing the jewellery theme, I have to also mention The Cheapside Hoard – London’s Lost Jewels by Hazel Forsyth. Yet another exhibition I attended, about a fascinating hoard of jewellery that was found in Cheapside which is apparently “the most important source of our knowledge of Elizabethan and Jacobean jewellery” and the greatest hoard of its kind. The items I saw were definitely unique and very beautiful, so it’s lovely to have a reminder of that.

DogThe English Dog at Home by Felicity Wigan – I think you’ve all gathered by now that I adore dogs and this is a fun book about some famous owners and their pets. From the Queen’s corgis to a bull terrier named Lambchop (which always makes me laugh), to the Irish wolfhound who is the Regimental Mascot of the Irish Guards, there are some lovely stories in this book.

VanI have coffee table books about lots of different artists, but Anthony van Dyck by Christopher Brown and Hans Vlieghe is the one I return to again and again. It was the book produced for a large Van Dyck exhibition held in London some years ago now. He is my all-time favourite artist and I absolutely adore all his paintings, so I can sit and look at these for hours. This is a very comprehensive book with gorgeous illustrations of all his most famous paintings and I feel very lucky to have seen them in real life.

JapJapanese Accents in Western Interiors by Peggy Landers Roo/Jean Mahoney, and A Japanese Touch for your Home by Koji Yagi are two books I love to leaf through whenever I’m in a decorating mood. I have lots of objects I picked up when I lived in the Far East, and books like these have some great suggestions for how to incorporate them in a room’s décor. Just a few exotic touches can really transform a room!

KimKimono – Kyoto to Catwalk (edited by Anna Jackson) – this was the book accompanying the fabulous kimono exhibition I saw at the V & A museum a while back (see blog post here). There were so many gorgeous kimonos that at the time it was almost overwhelming and impossible to take it all in during a single visit. Having this book to refresh my memory and study the beautiful designs in more detail is perfect.

I could go on but I won't.

Now please do tell me what’s on your coffee tables and which books you return to over and over again!

95 thoughts on “Coffee Table Books”

  1. Several lighthouse books, a Christmas book and a book of Red and Rover. I have an affinity for lighthouses. The Christmas book is about celebrations around the world. Red and Rover is a comic. It is sweet and funny and Red is a little boy who has a dog named Rover. Rover and Red communicate, they go on space flights in a box but most of all, they love one another.
    I hope that everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  2. Several lighthouse books, a Christmas book and a book of Red and Rover. I have an affinity for lighthouses. The Christmas book is about celebrations around the world. Red and Rover is a comic. It is sweet and funny and Red is a little boy who has a dog named Rover. Rover and Red communicate, they go on space flights in a box but most of all, they love one another.
    I hope that everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  3. Several lighthouse books, a Christmas book and a book of Red and Rover. I have an affinity for lighthouses. The Christmas book is about celebrations around the world. Red and Rover is a comic. It is sweet and funny and Red is a little boy who has a dog named Rover. Rover and Red communicate, they go on space flights in a box but most of all, they love one another.
    I hope that everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  4. Several lighthouse books, a Christmas book and a book of Red and Rover. I have an affinity for lighthouses. The Christmas book is about celebrations around the world. Red and Rover is a comic. It is sweet and funny and Red is a little boy who has a dog named Rover. Rover and Red communicate, they go on space flights in a box but most of all, they love one another.
    I hope that everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  5. Several lighthouse books, a Christmas book and a book of Red and Rover. I have an affinity for lighthouses. The Christmas book is about celebrations around the world. Red and Rover is a comic. It is sweet and funny and Red is a little boy who has a dog named Rover. Rover and Red communicate, they go on space flights in a box but most of all, they love one another.
    I hope that everyone is well and safe and happy.

    Reply
  6. That’s a very eclectic mix, Annette, love it! Lighthouses are fascinating, aren’t they, but I’ve never thought of buying a book about them. Must go and have a look, thank you!

    Reply
  7. That’s a very eclectic mix, Annette, love it! Lighthouses are fascinating, aren’t they, but I’ve never thought of buying a book about them. Must go and have a look, thank you!

    Reply
  8. That’s a very eclectic mix, Annette, love it! Lighthouses are fascinating, aren’t they, but I’ve never thought of buying a book about them. Must go and have a look, thank you!

    Reply
  9. That’s a very eclectic mix, Annette, love it! Lighthouses are fascinating, aren’t they, but I’ve never thought of buying a book about them. Must go and have a look, thank you!

    Reply
  10. That’s a very eclectic mix, Annette, love it! Lighthouses are fascinating, aren’t they, but I’ve never thought of buying a book about them. Must go and have a look, thank you!

    Reply
  11. What a lovely post, Christina!
    I do have a book on the coffee table; it’s Book Marks — An Artist’s Card Catalog: Notes from the Library of My Mind by Barbara Page. It’s a combination of a memoir and a woman’s collection of decorated library card catalog cards for all the books she has read.
    https://www.amazon.com/Book-Marks-Artists-Catalog-Library/dp/1735600105/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?crid=3RCFECD03508O&keywords=book+marks+barbara+page&qid=1641837586&sprefix=+book+marks+barbara+%2Caps%2C329&sr=8-3

    Reply
  12. What a lovely post, Christina!
    I do have a book on the coffee table; it’s Book Marks — An Artist’s Card Catalog: Notes from the Library of My Mind by Barbara Page. It’s a combination of a memoir and a woman’s collection of decorated library card catalog cards for all the books she has read.
    https://www.amazon.com/Book-Marks-Artists-Catalog-Library/dp/1735600105/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?crid=3RCFECD03508O&keywords=book+marks+barbara+page&qid=1641837586&sprefix=+book+marks+barbara+%2Caps%2C329&sr=8-3

    Reply
  13. What a lovely post, Christina!
    I do have a book on the coffee table; it’s Book Marks — An Artist’s Card Catalog: Notes from the Library of My Mind by Barbara Page. It’s a combination of a memoir and a woman’s collection of decorated library card catalog cards for all the books she has read.
    https://www.amazon.com/Book-Marks-Artists-Catalog-Library/dp/1735600105/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?crid=3RCFECD03508O&keywords=book+marks+barbara+page&qid=1641837586&sprefix=+book+marks+barbara+%2Caps%2C329&sr=8-3

    Reply
  14. What a lovely post, Christina!
    I do have a book on the coffee table; it’s Book Marks — An Artist’s Card Catalog: Notes from the Library of My Mind by Barbara Page. It’s a combination of a memoir and a woman’s collection of decorated library card catalog cards for all the books she has read.
    https://www.amazon.com/Book-Marks-Artists-Catalog-Library/dp/1735600105/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?crid=3RCFECD03508O&keywords=book+marks+barbara+page&qid=1641837586&sprefix=+book+marks+barbara+%2Caps%2C329&sr=8-3

    Reply
  15. What a lovely post, Christina!
    I do have a book on the coffee table; it’s Book Marks — An Artist’s Card Catalog: Notes from the Library of My Mind by Barbara Page. It’s a combination of a memoir and a woman’s collection of decorated library card catalog cards for all the books she has read.
    https://www.amazon.com/Book-Marks-Artists-Catalog-Library/dp/1735600105/ref=mp_s_a_1_3?crid=3RCFECD03508O&keywords=book+marks+barbara+page&qid=1641837586&sprefix=+book+marks+barbara+%2Caps%2C329&sr=8-3

    Reply
  16. Lovely post! I actually have quite a stack of books on the coffee table. My husband is a woodturner/woodworker so a favorite is George Nakashima’s Soul of a Tree. Weaving Tapestry in Rural Ireland by Meghan Nuttal Sayres, an exploration of the craft through the centuries has been interesting read. Andrew Wyeth Christina’s World and the Olsen House, Farnsworth Art Museum is an exploration of the Olsons impact on Wyeth’s work with many reproductions of the art, which is gorgeous. And my bling obsession is assuaged with Angela Kelly’s The Other Side of the Coin and Leslie Fields The Queen’s Jewels. But our favorite is a large book done by our daughter-in-law of pictures taken on a trip with all of our children and grandchildren. Always passed around when they are visiting.

    Reply
  17. Lovely post! I actually have quite a stack of books on the coffee table. My husband is a woodturner/woodworker so a favorite is George Nakashima’s Soul of a Tree. Weaving Tapestry in Rural Ireland by Meghan Nuttal Sayres, an exploration of the craft through the centuries has been interesting read. Andrew Wyeth Christina’s World and the Olsen House, Farnsworth Art Museum is an exploration of the Olsons impact on Wyeth’s work with many reproductions of the art, which is gorgeous. And my bling obsession is assuaged with Angela Kelly’s The Other Side of the Coin and Leslie Fields The Queen’s Jewels. But our favorite is a large book done by our daughter-in-law of pictures taken on a trip with all of our children and grandchildren. Always passed around when they are visiting.

    Reply
  18. Lovely post! I actually have quite a stack of books on the coffee table. My husband is a woodturner/woodworker so a favorite is George Nakashima’s Soul of a Tree. Weaving Tapestry in Rural Ireland by Meghan Nuttal Sayres, an exploration of the craft through the centuries has been interesting read. Andrew Wyeth Christina’s World and the Olsen House, Farnsworth Art Museum is an exploration of the Olsons impact on Wyeth’s work with many reproductions of the art, which is gorgeous. And my bling obsession is assuaged with Angela Kelly’s The Other Side of the Coin and Leslie Fields The Queen’s Jewels. But our favorite is a large book done by our daughter-in-law of pictures taken on a trip with all of our children and grandchildren. Always passed around when they are visiting.

    Reply
  19. Lovely post! I actually have quite a stack of books on the coffee table. My husband is a woodturner/woodworker so a favorite is George Nakashima’s Soul of a Tree. Weaving Tapestry in Rural Ireland by Meghan Nuttal Sayres, an exploration of the craft through the centuries has been interesting read. Andrew Wyeth Christina’s World and the Olsen House, Farnsworth Art Museum is an exploration of the Olsons impact on Wyeth’s work with many reproductions of the art, which is gorgeous. And my bling obsession is assuaged with Angela Kelly’s The Other Side of the Coin and Leslie Fields The Queen’s Jewels. But our favorite is a large book done by our daughter-in-law of pictures taken on a trip with all of our children and grandchildren. Always passed around when they are visiting.

    Reply
  20. Lovely post! I actually have quite a stack of books on the coffee table. My husband is a woodturner/woodworker so a favorite is George Nakashima’s Soul of a Tree. Weaving Tapestry in Rural Ireland by Meghan Nuttal Sayres, an exploration of the craft through the centuries has been interesting read. Andrew Wyeth Christina’s World and the Olsen House, Farnsworth Art Museum is an exploration of the Olsons impact on Wyeth’s work with many reproductions of the art, which is gorgeous. And my bling obsession is assuaged with Angela Kelly’s The Other Side of the Coin and Leslie Fields The Queen’s Jewels. But our favorite is a large book done by our daughter-in-law of pictures taken on a trip with all of our children and grandchildren. Always passed around when they are visiting.

    Reply
  21. Oh, that sounds really interesting Kareni! I will look those up. There are so many things one can collect, isn’t there! I’m already a squirrel so don’t need an excuse to collect any more things.

    Reply
  22. Oh, that sounds really interesting Kareni! I will look those up. There are so many things one can collect, isn’t there! I’m already a squirrel so don’t need an excuse to collect any more things.

    Reply
  23. Oh, that sounds really interesting Kareni! I will look those up. There are so many things one can collect, isn’t there! I’m already a squirrel so don’t need an excuse to collect any more things.

    Reply
  24. Oh, that sounds really interesting Kareni! I will look those up. There are so many things one can collect, isn’t there! I’m already a squirrel so don’t need an excuse to collect any more things.

    Reply
  25. Oh, that sounds really interesting Kareni! I will look those up. There are so many things one can collect, isn’t there! I’m already a squirrel so don’t need an excuse to collect any more things.

    Reply
  26. What a wonderful idea, Denise! Everyone loves to look at family photos. And I like the sound of all your other coffee table books as well – thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  27. What a wonderful idea, Denise! Everyone loves to look at family photos. And I like the sound of all your other coffee table books as well – thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  28. What a wonderful idea, Denise! Everyone loves to look at family photos. And I like the sound of all your other coffee table books as well – thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  29. What a wonderful idea, Denise! Everyone loves to look at family photos. And I like the sound of all your other coffee table books as well – thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  30. What a wonderful idea, Denise! Everyone loves to look at family photos. And I like the sound of all your other coffee table books as well – thank you for sharing!

    Reply
  31. Lovely post, Christina. I am especially envious of the Duchess of Devonshire’s Ball. And the Kimono book, too. I have a number of books that I bought after attending some fabulous exhibition.
    My coffee table, however is bare. I don’t keep books there, just on a bookshelf with large enough shelves. Some of my faves are my Andy Goldsworthy books — he’s a UK artist who makes “sculptures” (for want of a better word) out of things found in nature — no glue, no massive reshaping — and he leaves them in situ, where some endure and some fade back into the landscape. So, in effect, the books full of photographs are his art. I find them endlessly beautiful and I’ve yet to show them to anyone who hasn’t ended up raptly turning pages. https://www.livingyourwildcreativity.com/art-gallery-1-mitchell-1

    Reply
  32. Lovely post, Christina. I am especially envious of the Duchess of Devonshire’s Ball. And the Kimono book, too. I have a number of books that I bought after attending some fabulous exhibition.
    My coffee table, however is bare. I don’t keep books there, just on a bookshelf with large enough shelves. Some of my faves are my Andy Goldsworthy books — he’s a UK artist who makes “sculptures” (for want of a better word) out of things found in nature — no glue, no massive reshaping — and he leaves them in situ, where some endure and some fade back into the landscape. So, in effect, the books full of photographs are his art. I find them endlessly beautiful and I’ve yet to show them to anyone who hasn’t ended up raptly turning pages. https://www.livingyourwildcreativity.com/art-gallery-1-mitchell-1

    Reply
  33. Lovely post, Christina. I am especially envious of the Duchess of Devonshire’s Ball. And the Kimono book, too. I have a number of books that I bought after attending some fabulous exhibition.
    My coffee table, however is bare. I don’t keep books there, just on a bookshelf with large enough shelves. Some of my faves are my Andy Goldsworthy books — he’s a UK artist who makes “sculptures” (for want of a better word) out of things found in nature — no glue, no massive reshaping — and he leaves them in situ, where some endure and some fade back into the landscape. So, in effect, the books full of photographs are his art. I find them endlessly beautiful and I’ve yet to show them to anyone who hasn’t ended up raptly turning pages. https://www.livingyourwildcreativity.com/art-gallery-1-mitchell-1

    Reply
  34. Lovely post, Christina. I am especially envious of the Duchess of Devonshire’s Ball. And the Kimono book, too. I have a number of books that I bought after attending some fabulous exhibition.
    My coffee table, however is bare. I don’t keep books there, just on a bookshelf with large enough shelves. Some of my faves are my Andy Goldsworthy books — he’s a UK artist who makes “sculptures” (for want of a better word) out of things found in nature — no glue, no massive reshaping — and he leaves them in situ, where some endure and some fade back into the landscape. So, in effect, the books full of photographs are his art. I find them endlessly beautiful and I’ve yet to show them to anyone who hasn’t ended up raptly turning pages. https://www.livingyourwildcreativity.com/art-gallery-1-mitchell-1

    Reply
  35. Lovely post, Christina. I am especially envious of the Duchess of Devonshire’s Ball. And the Kimono book, too. I have a number of books that I bought after attending some fabulous exhibition.
    My coffee table, however is bare. I don’t keep books there, just on a bookshelf with large enough shelves. Some of my faves are my Andy Goldsworthy books — he’s a UK artist who makes “sculptures” (for want of a better word) out of things found in nature — no glue, no massive reshaping — and he leaves them in situ, where some endure and some fade back into the landscape. So, in effect, the books full of photographs are his art. I find them endlessly beautiful and I’ve yet to show them to anyone who hasn’t ended up raptly turning pages. https://www.livingyourwildcreativity.com/art-gallery-1-mitchell-1

    Reply
  36. I love the sound of some of these, Denise. I have a good friend who is also a woodturner and I’m sure he would love George Nakashima’s Soul of a Tree. I particularly love pieces where you still see some of the old tree in a piece of furniture, not just the grain. One day I will get a table like that, where the top is a slab of beautiful old wood.
    I also have a book of photos taken during my year of backpacking, not just the usual album, but one in which I tried to be a bit artistic — inspired by some of the museums and art galleries I visited, so it’s not just a photo album, but a memoir.

    Reply
  37. I love the sound of some of these, Denise. I have a good friend who is also a woodturner and I’m sure he would love George Nakashima’s Soul of a Tree. I particularly love pieces where you still see some of the old tree in a piece of furniture, not just the grain. One day I will get a table like that, where the top is a slab of beautiful old wood.
    I also have a book of photos taken during my year of backpacking, not just the usual album, but one in which I tried to be a bit artistic — inspired by some of the museums and art galleries I visited, so it’s not just a photo album, but a memoir.

    Reply
  38. I love the sound of some of these, Denise. I have a good friend who is also a woodturner and I’m sure he would love George Nakashima’s Soul of a Tree. I particularly love pieces where you still see some of the old tree in a piece of furniture, not just the grain. One day I will get a table like that, where the top is a slab of beautiful old wood.
    I also have a book of photos taken during my year of backpacking, not just the usual album, but one in which I tried to be a bit artistic — inspired by some of the museums and art galleries I visited, so it’s not just a photo album, but a memoir.

    Reply
  39. I love the sound of some of these, Denise. I have a good friend who is also a woodturner and I’m sure he would love George Nakashima’s Soul of a Tree. I particularly love pieces where you still see some of the old tree in a piece of furniture, not just the grain. One day I will get a table like that, where the top is a slab of beautiful old wood.
    I also have a book of photos taken during my year of backpacking, not just the usual album, but one in which I tried to be a bit artistic — inspired by some of the museums and art galleries I visited, so it’s not just a photo album, but a memoir.

    Reply
  40. I love the sound of some of these, Denise. I have a good friend who is also a woodturner and I’m sure he would love George Nakashima’s Soul of a Tree. I particularly love pieces where you still see some of the old tree in a piece of furniture, not just the grain. One day I will get a table like that, where the top is a slab of beautiful old wood.
    I also have a book of photos taken during my year of backpacking, not just the usual album, but one in which I tried to be a bit artistic — inspired by some of the museums and art galleries I visited, so it’s not just a photo album, but a memoir.

    Reply
  41. In the same way that you can tell which bookcase belongs to each of us, you can tell whose books are on which end of our coffee table. I, too, have the Duchess of Devonshire‘s Ball and Tiara. Plus, my end includes several books about English country houses, as well as a two volume set on Venetian decorative design. On my husband’s end of the table, it’s all about airplanes. I must admit there are some glorious photographs in his books as well as mine. This was a great post, Christina, and now I think I must go pull some coffee table books out of the bookcases and do some rotation on the table!

    Reply
  42. In the same way that you can tell which bookcase belongs to each of us, you can tell whose books are on which end of our coffee table. I, too, have the Duchess of Devonshire‘s Ball and Tiara. Plus, my end includes several books about English country houses, as well as a two volume set on Venetian decorative design. On my husband’s end of the table, it’s all about airplanes. I must admit there are some glorious photographs in his books as well as mine. This was a great post, Christina, and now I think I must go pull some coffee table books out of the bookcases and do some rotation on the table!

    Reply
  43. In the same way that you can tell which bookcase belongs to each of us, you can tell whose books are on which end of our coffee table. I, too, have the Duchess of Devonshire‘s Ball and Tiara. Plus, my end includes several books about English country houses, as well as a two volume set on Venetian decorative design. On my husband’s end of the table, it’s all about airplanes. I must admit there are some glorious photographs in his books as well as mine. This was a great post, Christina, and now I think I must go pull some coffee table books out of the bookcases and do some rotation on the table!

    Reply
  44. In the same way that you can tell which bookcase belongs to each of us, you can tell whose books are on which end of our coffee table. I, too, have the Duchess of Devonshire‘s Ball and Tiara. Plus, my end includes several books about English country houses, as well as a two volume set on Venetian decorative design. On my husband’s end of the table, it’s all about airplanes. I must admit there are some glorious photographs in his books as well as mine. This was a great post, Christina, and now I think I must go pull some coffee table books out of the bookcases and do some rotation on the table!

    Reply
  45. In the same way that you can tell which bookcase belongs to each of us, you can tell whose books are on which end of our coffee table. I, too, have the Duchess of Devonshire‘s Ball and Tiara. Plus, my end includes several books about English country houses, as well as a two volume set on Venetian decorative design. On my husband’s end of the table, it’s all about airplanes. I must admit there are some glorious photographs in his books as well as mine. This was a great post, Christina, and now I think I must go pull some coffee table books out of the bookcases and do some rotation on the table!

    Reply
  46. That sounds fantastic Anne! Nature can provide such beautiful things. I will have to look out for that. Love the sound of your backpacking photos too!

    Reply
  47. That sounds fantastic Anne! Nature can provide such beautiful things. I will have to look out for that. Love the sound of your backpacking photos too!

    Reply
  48. That sounds fantastic Anne! Nature can provide such beautiful things. I will have to look out for that. Love the sound of your backpacking photos too!

    Reply
  49. That sounds fantastic Anne! Nature can provide such beautiful things. I will have to look out for that. Love the sound of your backpacking photos too!

    Reply
  50. That sounds fantastic Anne! Nature can provide such beautiful things. I will have to look out for that. Love the sound of your backpacking photos too!

    Reply
  51. Thank you Constance! I have lots of books about English country houses and castles too – forgot to mention those.

    Reply
  52. Thank you Constance! I have lots of books about English country houses and castles too – forgot to mention those.

    Reply
  53. Thank you Constance! I have lots of books about English country houses and castles too – forgot to mention those.

    Reply
  54. Thank you Constance! I have lots of books about English country houses and castles too – forgot to mention those.

    Reply
  55. Thank you Constance! I have lots of books about English country houses and castles too – forgot to mention those.

    Reply
  56. Christina, I discovered Andy Goldsworthy many years ago when I was in a bookshop and one of his books caught my eye. I started to turn the pages, then, since it was the kind of very civilized bookshop that had a few big comfortable red leather armchairs, I sat down to read it. There were two more Andy Goldsworthy books, so I looked through them. Several hours passed, and I eventually dragged myself away — then an hour later, I turned back and bought one of them to take home and drool over.
    To get an idea of what he does, do a google image search of his name and you’ll see what I mean. It’s magic.

    Reply
  57. Christina, I discovered Andy Goldsworthy many years ago when I was in a bookshop and one of his books caught my eye. I started to turn the pages, then, since it was the kind of very civilized bookshop that had a few big comfortable red leather armchairs, I sat down to read it. There were two more Andy Goldsworthy books, so I looked through them. Several hours passed, and I eventually dragged myself away — then an hour later, I turned back and bought one of them to take home and drool over.
    To get an idea of what he does, do a google image search of his name and you’ll see what I mean. It’s magic.

    Reply
  58. Christina, I discovered Andy Goldsworthy many years ago when I was in a bookshop and one of his books caught my eye. I started to turn the pages, then, since it was the kind of very civilized bookshop that had a few big comfortable red leather armchairs, I sat down to read it. There were two more Andy Goldsworthy books, so I looked through them. Several hours passed, and I eventually dragged myself away — then an hour later, I turned back and bought one of them to take home and drool over.
    To get an idea of what he does, do a google image search of his name and you’ll see what I mean. It’s magic.

    Reply
  59. Christina, I discovered Andy Goldsworthy many years ago when I was in a bookshop and one of his books caught my eye. I started to turn the pages, then, since it was the kind of very civilized bookshop that had a few big comfortable red leather armchairs, I sat down to read it. There were two more Andy Goldsworthy books, so I looked through them. Several hours passed, and I eventually dragged myself away — then an hour later, I turned back and bought one of them to take home and drool over.
    To get an idea of what he does, do a google image search of his name and you’ll see what I mean. It’s magic.

    Reply
  60. Christina, I discovered Andy Goldsworthy many years ago when I was in a bookshop and one of his books caught my eye. I started to turn the pages, then, since it was the kind of very civilized bookshop that had a few big comfortable red leather armchairs, I sat down to read it. There were two more Andy Goldsworthy books, so I looked through them. Several hours passed, and I eventually dragged myself away — then an hour later, I turned back and bought one of them to take home and drool over.
    To get an idea of what he does, do a google image search of his name and you’ll see what I mean. It’s magic.

    Reply
  61. My coffee table isn’t; it’s an old repurposed toy chest from Sears. It’s so sturdy they don’t sell them anymore, but there are no three year olds here to be endangered by its heavy wooden lid.
    On it rest some books too big or too wide or difficult to shelve – Oscar Night by Vanity Fair; two Star Trek the original series picture books; LA Then and Now; Jane Austen’s Town and Country Style; The Best of Project Blue Book; Roswell The Chronological Pictorial; a Peter May thriller; The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal, which I am partway through; a tiny Christmas tree I haven’t put away yet; and a stack of Griffith Observer magazines that I swear I am going to read the articles in Real Soon Now.
    Most of my regency picture and reference books are in the bookshelves where I can see what I’ve got. I love picture books.

    Reply
  62. My coffee table isn’t; it’s an old repurposed toy chest from Sears. It’s so sturdy they don’t sell them anymore, but there are no three year olds here to be endangered by its heavy wooden lid.
    On it rest some books too big or too wide or difficult to shelve – Oscar Night by Vanity Fair; two Star Trek the original series picture books; LA Then and Now; Jane Austen’s Town and Country Style; The Best of Project Blue Book; Roswell The Chronological Pictorial; a Peter May thriller; The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal, which I am partway through; a tiny Christmas tree I haven’t put away yet; and a stack of Griffith Observer magazines that I swear I am going to read the articles in Real Soon Now.
    Most of my regency picture and reference books are in the bookshelves where I can see what I’ve got. I love picture books.

    Reply
  63. My coffee table isn’t; it’s an old repurposed toy chest from Sears. It’s so sturdy they don’t sell them anymore, but there are no three year olds here to be endangered by its heavy wooden lid.
    On it rest some books too big or too wide or difficult to shelve – Oscar Night by Vanity Fair; two Star Trek the original series picture books; LA Then and Now; Jane Austen’s Town and Country Style; The Best of Project Blue Book; Roswell The Chronological Pictorial; a Peter May thriller; The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal, which I am partway through; a tiny Christmas tree I haven’t put away yet; and a stack of Griffith Observer magazines that I swear I am going to read the articles in Real Soon Now.
    Most of my regency picture and reference books are in the bookshelves where I can see what I’ve got. I love picture books.

    Reply
  64. My coffee table isn’t; it’s an old repurposed toy chest from Sears. It’s so sturdy they don’t sell them anymore, but there are no three year olds here to be endangered by its heavy wooden lid.
    On it rest some books too big or too wide or difficult to shelve – Oscar Night by Vanity Fair; two Star Trek the original series picture books; LA Then and Now; Jane Austen’s Town and Country Style; The Best of Project Blue Book; Roswell The Chronological Pictorial; a Peter May thriller; The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal, which I am partway through; a tiny Christmas tree I haven’t put away yet; and a stack of Griffith Observer magazines that I swear I am going to read the articles in Real Soon Now.
    Most of my regency picture and reference books are in the bookshelves where I can see what I’ve got. I love picture books.

    Reply
  65. My coffee table isn’t; it’s an old repurposed toy chest from Sears. It’s so sturdy they don’t sell them anymore, but there are no three year olds here to be endangered by its heavy wooden lid.
    On it rest some books too big or too wide or difficult to shelve – Oscar Night by Vanity Fair; two Star Trek the original series picture books; LA Then and Now; Jane Austen’s Town and Country Style; The Best of Project Blue Book; Roswell The Chronological Pictorial; a Peter May thriller; The Calculating Stars by Mary Robinette Kowal, which I am partway through; a tiny Christmas tree I haven’t put away yet; and a stack of Griffith Observer magazines that I swear I am going to read the articles in Real Soon Now.
    Most of my regency picture and reference books are in the bookshelves where I can see what I’ve got. I love picture books.

    Reply
  66. Oh wow! Have looked at some of his art now and it’s fantastic! I can see why you were captivated and also why some of them don’t last. Will put his books on my next birthday wish list!

    Reply
  67. Oh wow! Have looked at some of his art now and it’s fantastic! I can see why you were captivated and also why some of them don’t last. Will put his books on my next birthday wish list!

    Reply
  68. Oh wow! Have looked at some of his art now and it’s fantastic! I can see why you were captivated and also why some of them don’t last. Will put his books on my next birthday wish list!

    Reply
  69. Oh wow! Have looked at some of his art now and it’s fantastic! I can see why you were captivated and also why some of them don’t last. Will put his books on my next birthday wish list!

    Reply
  70. Oh wow! Have looked at some of his art now and it’s fantastic! I can see why you were captivated and also why some of them don’t last. Will put his books on my next birthday wish list!

    Reply
  71. That sounds like a wonderful collection, Janice, and one well worth dipping into whenever you have a moment! I love the use of storage chests of various kinds as coffee tables as well, lovely! Coffee table books do tend to be very heavy, don’t they – that’s the only downside.

    Reply
  72. That sounds like a wonderful collection, Janice, and one well worth dipping into whenever you have a moment! I love the use of storage chests of various kinds as coffee tables as well, lovely! Coffee table books do tend to be very heavy, don’t they – that’s the only downside.

    Reply
  73. That sounds like a wonderful collection, Janice, and one well worth dipping into whenever you have a moment! I love the use of storage chests of various kinds as coffee tables as well, lovely! Coffee table books do tend to be very heavy, don’t they – that’s the only downside.

    Reply
  74. That sounds like a wonderful collection, Janice, and one well worth dipping into whenever you have a moment! I love the use of storage chests of various kinds as coffee tables as well, lovely! Coffee table books do tend to be very heavy, don’t they – that’s the only downside.

    Reply
  75. That sounds like a wonderful collection, Janice, and one well worth dipping into whenever you have a moment! I love the use of storage chests of various kinds as coffee tables as well, lovely! Coffee table books do tend to be very heavy, don’t they – that’s the only downside.

    Reply
  76. I only ever have what I happen to be reading on my coffee table. However, I love your book about the Queen’s Doll’s House!! I always wanted a doll’s house as a child but hadn’t a hope of ever getting one. I’m definitely going to look into this one.
    A lovely post Christina.

    Reply
  77. I only ever have what I happen to be reading on my coffee table. However, I love your book about the Queen’s Doll’s House!! I always wanted a doll’s house as a child but hadn’t a hope of ever getting one. I’m definitely going to look into this one.
    A lovely post Christina.

    Reply
  78. I only ever have what I happen to be reading on my coffee table. However, I love your book about the Queen’s Doll’s House!! I always wanted a doll’s house as a child but hadn’t a hope of ever getting one. I’m definitely going to look into this one.
    A lovely post Christina.

    Reply
  79. I only ever have what I happen to be reading on my coffee table. However, I love your book about the Queen’s Doll’s House!! I always wanted a doll’s house as a child but hadn’t a hope of ever getting one. I’m definitely going to look into this one.
    A lovely post Christina.

    Reply
  80. I only ever have what I happen to be reading on my coffee table. However, I love your book about the Queen’s Doll’s House!! I always wanted a doll’s house as a child but hadn’t a hope of ever getting one. I’m definitely going to look into this one.
    A lovely post Christina.

    Reply
  81. Your books look wonderful! Mine are quite different. Many are sports or music related. I recently purchased The Beatles Get Back which accompanies Peter Jackson’s documentary. I have some that relate to shows like Downton Abbey & Horatio Hornblower (love looking at that one as the men were so good looking). Of course, I also have a lot of fairy books. I’m sure my children will get rid of them when I’m gone. LOL.

    Reply
  82. Your books look wonderful! Mine are quite different. Many are sports or music related. I recently purchased The Beatles Get Back which accompanies Peter Jackson’s documentary. I have some that relate to shows like Downton Abbey & Horatio Hornblower (love looking at that one as the men were so good looking). Of course, I also have a lot of fairy books. I’m sure my children will get rid of them when I’m gone. LOL.

    Reply
  83. Your books look wonderful! Mine are quite different. Many are sports or music related. I recently purchased The Beatles Get Back which accompanies Peter Jackson’s documentary. I have some that relate to shows like Downton Abbey & Horatio Hornblower (love looking at that one as the men were so good looking). Of course, I also have a lot of fairy books. I’m sure my children will get rid of them when I’m gone. LOL.

    Reply
  84. Your books look wonderful! Mine are quite different. Many are sports or music related. I recently purchased The Beatles Get Back which accompanies Peter Jackson’s documentary. I have some that relate to shows like Downton Abbey & Horatio Hornblower (love looking at that one as the men were so good looking). Of course, I also have a lot of fairy books. I’m sure my children will get rid of them when I’m gone. LOL.

    Reply
  85. Your books look wonderful! Mine are quite different. Many are sports or music related. I recently purchased The Beatles Get Back which accompanies Peter Jackson’s documentary. I have some that relate to shows like Downton Abbey & Horatio Hornblower (love looking at that one as the men were so good looking). Of course, I also have a lot of fairy books. I’m sure my children will get rid of them when I’m gone. LOL.

    Reply
  86. Doll’s houses are fascinating, aren’t they Teresa! I’m lucky enough to have one I inherited from my mother, but it’s of fairly crude construction and nothing like as fancy as Queen Mary’s. I love collecting little things to go in it though!

    Reply
  87. Doll’s houses are fascinating, aren’t they Teresa! I’m lucky enough to have one I inherited from my mother, but it’s of fairly crude construction and nothing like as fancy as Queen Mary’s. I love collecting little things to go in it though!

    Reply
  88. Doll’s houses are fascinating, aren’t they Teresa! I’m lucky enough to have one I inherited from my mother, but it’s of fairly crude construction and nothing like as fancy as Queen Mary’s. I love collecting little things to go in it though!

    Reply
  89. Doll’s houses are fascinating, aren’t they Teresa! I’m lucky enough to have one I inherited from my mother, but it’s of fairly crude construction and nothing like as fancy as Queen Mary’s. I love collecting little things to go in it though!

    Reply
  90. Doll’s houses are fascinating, aren’t they Teresa! I’m lucky enough to have one I inherited from my mother, but it’s of fairly crude construction and nothing like as fancy as Queen Mary’s. I love collecting little things to go in it though!

    Reply
  91. That sounds great, Jeanne! And we all have different tastes so our books should reflect our interests. I have a couple of fairy books too and love looking at drawings of fairies to see how the artist imagines them.

    Reply
  92. That sounds great, Jeanne! And we all have different tastes so our books should reflect our interests. I have a couple of fairy books too and love looking at drawings of fairies to see how the artist imagines them.

    Reply
  93. That sounds great, Jeanne! And we all have different tastes so our books should reflect our interests. I have a couple of fairy books too and love looking at drawings of fairies to see how the artist imagines them.

    Reply
  94. That sounds great, Jeanne! And we all have different tastes so our books should reflect our interests. I have a couple of fairy books too and love looking at drawings of fairies to see how the artist imagines them.

    Reply
  95. That sounds great, Jeanne! And we all have different tastes so our books should reflect our interests. I have a couple of fairy books too and love looking at drawings of fairies to see how the artist imagines them.

    Reply

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