Christmas is Coming!

From Susan/Miranda:

Cw_candlelit_houseBecause my parents live in Williamsburg, VA, I have the great good fortune each year to be able to spend Christmas there.  Colonial Williamsburg is the biggest, bestest restoration/recreation of 18th century colonial America in the country, and Christmas is their biggest, bestest season for visitors.  The houses and buildings are all beautifully decorated, candles are in every window, restaurants and taverns have the proverbial groaning board, there are re-enacted balls and fireworks and fiddlers and a fife and drum corps thundering out 18th century tunes –– it’s all quite wonderful.

It’s also a wonderful trial for CW’s historians.  Yes, the beautiful decorations draw in the tourists, butXmaswreathlarge_1 they’re not, well, accurate.  Not at all.  For 17th and 18th century Englishmen (which is what the Virginians still were), Christmas was a religious holiday, and little more.  Even over in London, the Court in 1774 is celebrating with George III and Queen Charlotte taking the sacrament in the Chapel-Royal from the Lord Bishop of London, and that’s about it.

The scholarly historians know this, of course, and dutifully write about the more accurate, somber Christmases past, but it’s the Grand Illumination that pays the bills.  And, to be honest, fireworks over the Governor’s Palace and wreathes decorated with pineapples and cinnamon sticks are what I like, too, so each year I cheerfully pack away my Hat of Outraged Historical Indignation for the holidays, and just have fun.

Capitol_fireworks_smFor more about Christmas in Colonial Willliamsburg, please visit their website: www.colonialwilliamsburg.com

I’ll also offer to you all the same good wishes from the Virginia Amanack for the Year of our Lord God 1771, which manage to remain entirely appropriate for 2006 as well:

We wish you health, and good fires; victuals, drink, and good stomachs; innocent diversions, and good company; honest trading, and good successes; loving courtship, and good wives & husbands; and lastly, a merry CHRISTMAS and a happy NEW YEAR.

60 thoughts on “Christmas is Coming!”

  1. I wish the same for you and yours.
    Colonial Willimaburg is a wonderful place to visit and educational for the kids. My brothers especially liked being in the stocks and having their pictures made.

    Reply
  2. I wish the same for you and yours.
    Colonial Willimaburg is a wonderful place to visit and educational for the kids. My brothers especially liked being in the stocks and having their pictures made.

    Reply
  3. I wish the same for you and yours.
    Colonial Willimaburg is a wonderful place to visit and educational for the kids. My brothers especially liked being in the stocks and having their pictures made.

    Reply
  4. I wish the same for you and yours.
    Colonial Willimaburg is a wonderful place to visit and educational for the kids. My brothers especially liked being in the stocks and having their pictures made.

    Reply
  5. I was in love with Williamsburg before I ever saw it, Susan, because I grew up reading and rereading Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg series. I have never been to Williamsburg during Christmastime, but I hope to visit some season.
    I wish for you and all the Wenches a warm and happy holiday season.

    Reply
  6. I was in love with Williamsburg before I ever saw it, Susan, because I grew up reading and rereading Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg series. I have never been to Williamsburg during Christmastime, but I hope to visit some season.
    I wish for you and all the Wenches a warm and happy holiday season.

    Reply
  7. I was in love with Williamsburg before I ever saw it, Susan, because I grew up reading and rereading Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg series. I have never been to Williamsburg during Christmastime, but I hope to visit some season.
    I wish for you and all the Wenches a warm and happy holiday season.

    Reply
  8. I was in love with Williamsburg before I ever saw it, Susan, because I grew up reading and rereading Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg series. I have never been to Williamsburg during Christmastime, but I hope to visit some season.
    I wish for you and all the Wenches a warm and happy holiday season.

    Reply
  9. Kathy, I think EVERY brother (and son, and husband, and all other classifications of males of any age) likes to have their picture taken standing in the stocks. There’s always a line waiting, too.
    Ahh, there’s always a certain magic to humiliating public punishment, isn’t there *g*

    Reply
  10. Kathy, I think EVERY brother (and son, and husband, and all other classifications of males of any age) likes to have their picture taken standing in the stocks. There’s always a line waiting, too.
    Ahh, there’s always a certain magic to humiliating public punishment, isn’t there *g*

    Reply
  11. Kathy, I think EVERY brother (and son, and husband, and all other classifications of males of any age) likes to have their picture taken standing in the stocks. There’s always a line waiting, too.
    Ahh, there’s always a certain magic to humiliating public punishment, isn’t there *g*

    Reply
  12. Kathy, I think EVERY brother (and son, and husband, and all other classifications of males of any age) likes to have their picture taken standing in the stocks. There’s always a line waiting, too.
    Ahh, there’s always a certain magic to humiliating public punishment, isn’t there *g*

    Reply
  13. We made a side trip to Colonial Williamsburg on the way back from vacationing in Washington, DC one summer when I was a kid, and I was fascinated with the place. (My parents were all about the Educational Vacation, and they imprinted me well–I’ll take touring museums, walking battlefields, and gazing upon natural marvels like Yosemite and Yellowstone over any number of tropical cruises.)
    “Hat of Outraged Historical Indignation”
    I love this phrase and plan to adopt it for my own use. It’s practically sewn to my scalp when it comes to books, but I think I could remove it to enjoy Christmas at CW, too!

    Reply
  14. We made a side trip to Colonial Williamsburg on the way back from vacationing in Washington, DC one summer when I was a kid, and I was fascinated with the place. (My parents were all about the Educational Vacation, and they imprinted me well–I’ll take touring museums, walking battlefields, and gazing upon natural marvels like Yosemite and Yellowstone over any number of tropical cruises.)
    “Hat of Outraged Historical Indignation”
    I love this phrase and plan to adopt it for my own use. It’s practically sewn to my scalp when it comes to books, but I think I could remove it to enjoy Christmas at CW, too!

    Reply
  15. We made a side trip to Colonial Williamsburg on the way back from vacationing in Washington, DC one summer when I was a kid, and I was fascinated with the place. (My parents were all about the Educational Vacation, and they imprinted me well–I’ll take touring museums, walking battlefields, and gazing upon natural marvels like Yosemite and Yellowstone over any number of tropical cruises.)
    “Hat of Outraged Historical Indignation”
    I love this phrase and plan to adopt it for my own use. It’s practically sewn to my scalp when it comes to books, but I think I could remove it to enjoy Christmas at CW, too!

    Reply
  16. We made a side trip to Colonial Williamsburg on the way back from vacationing in Washington, DC one summer when I was a kid, and I was fascinated with the place. (My parents were all about the Educational Vacation, and they imprinted me well–I’ll take touring museums, walking battlefields, and gazing upon natural marvels like Yosemite and Yellowstone over any number of tropical cruises.)
    “Hat of Outraged Historical Indignation”
    I love this phrase and plan to adopt it for my own use. It’s practically sewn to my scalp when it comes to books, but I think I could remove it to enjoy Christmas at CW, too!

    Reply
  17. I’ve only visited Colonial Williamsburg once, Susan, but I loved it, too. Fabulous books for sale, too.
    Yes, Regency Fiction Christmas stories have created a Christmas not quite as Jane Austen would have known it. That’s why a set the first one I wrote in a family that liked to recreate a medieval twelve days.
    Even the first Christmas card, which dates from the Victorian period, emphasises wholesome family gatherings, religious observance, and about all charity.
    But I do think that we’ve retained some of that beneath the buy, buy, buy. Christmas is family time for most. It’s still the time when many people who aren’t regular churhgoers attend a service. And everyone becomes more generous to the less fortunate.
    Magical,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  18. I’ve only visited Colonial Williamsburg once, Susan, but I loved it, too. Fabulous books for sale, too.
    Yes, Regency Fiction Christmas stories have created a Christmas not quite as Jane Austen would have known it. That’s why a set the first one I wrote in a family that liked to recreate a medieval twelve days.
    Even the first Christmas card, which dates from the Victorian period, emphasises wholesome family gatherings, religious observance, and about all charity.
    But I do think that we’ve retained some of that beneath the buy, buy, buy. Christmas is family time for most. It’s still the time when many people who aren’t regular churhgoers attend a service. And everyone becomes more generous to the less fortunate.
    Magical,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  19. I’ve only visited Colonial Williamsburg once, Susan, but I loved it, too. Fabulous books for sale, too.
    Yes, Regency Fiction Christmas stories have created a Christmas not quite as Jane Austen would have known it. That’s why a set the first one I wrote in a family that liked to recreate a medieval twelve days.
    Even the first Christmas card, which dates from the Victorian period, emphasises wholesome family gatherings, religious observance, and about all charity.
    But I do think that we’ve retained some of that beneath the buy, buy, buy. Christmas is family time for most. It’s still the time when many people who aren’t regular churhgoers attend a service. And everyone becomes more generous to the less fortunate.
    Magical,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  20. I’ve only visited Colonial Williamsburg once, Susan, but I loved it, too. Fabulous books for sale, too.
    Yes, Regency Fiction Christmas stories have created a Christmas not quite as Jane Austen would have known it. That’s why a set the first one I wrote in a family that liked to recreate a medieval twelve days.
    Even the first Christmas card, which dates from the Victorian period, emphasises wholesome family gatherings, religious observance, and about all charity.
    But I do think that we’ve retained some of that beneath the buy, buy, buy. Christmas is family time for most. It’s still the time when many people who aren’t regular churhgoers attend a service. And everyone becomes more generous to the less fortunate.
    Magical,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  21. I have never been to Colonial Williamsburg during the holidays, which is really quite strange since I’ve been there many times and only live 45 minutes away. I have always loved going up there though, it’s like stepping into another world.

    Reply
  22. I have never been to Colonial Williamsburg during the holidays, which is really quite strange since I’ve been there many times and only live 45 minutes away. I have always loved going up there though, it’s like stepping into another world.

    Reply
  23. I have never been to Colonial Williamsburg during the holidays, which is really quite strange since I’ve been there many times and only live 45 minutes away. I have always loved going up there though, it’s like stepping into another world.

    Reply
  24. I have never been to Colonial Williamsburg during the holidays, which is really quite strange since I’ve been there many times and only live 45 minutes away. I have always loved going up there though, it’s like stepping into another world.

    Reply
  25. No matter how Christmas is celebrated I guess some things are always the same. . . food’s probably a biggie. . . LOL 🙂
    Never been to Williamsburg, but long time ago went to various places in NJ that George Washington was at and the Revolutionary war. Oh, and Bucks County PA as well. Been a while though. 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  26. No matter how Christmas is celebrated I guess some things are always the same. . . food’s probably a biggie. . . LOL 🙂
    Never been to Williamsburg, but long time ago went to various places in NJ that George Washington was at and the Revolutionary war. Oh, and Bucks County PA as well. Been a while though. 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  27. No matter how Christmas is celebrated I guess some things are always the same. . . food’s probably a biggie. . . LOL 🙂
    Never been to Williamsburg, but long time ago went to various places in NJ that George Washington was at and the Revolutionary war. Oh, and Bucks County PA as well. Been a while though. 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  28. No matter how Christmas is celebrated I guess some things are always the same. . . food’s probably a biggie. . . LOL 🙂
    Never been to Williamsburg, but long time ago went to various places in NJ that George Washington was at and the Revolutionary war. Oh, and Bucks County PA as well. Been a while though. 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  29. LOL about the “Hat of Outraged Historical Indignation!” Like you, Susan, I can be huffy about bad history, but I’ll forgive a good show a lot of inaccuracies.
    Once I visited CW in January. I think the major festivities were over, but the decorations were stil up, and lovely it was. Inaccurate, but lovely!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  30. LOL about the “Hat of Outraged Historical Indignation!” Like you, Susan, I can be huffy about bad history, but I’ll forgive a good show a lot of inaccuracies.
    Once I visited CW in January. I think the major festivities were over, but the decorations were stil up, and lovely it was. Inaccurate, but lovely!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  31. LOL about the “Hat of Outraged Historical Indignation!” Like you, Susan, I can be huffy about bad history, but I’ll forgive a good show a lot of inaccuracies.
    Once I visited CW in January. I think the major festivities were over, but the decorations were stil up, and lovely it was. Inaccurate, but lovely!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  32. LOL about the “Hat of Outraged Historical Indignation!” Like you, Susan, I can be huffy about bad history, but I’ll forgive a good show a lot of inaccuracies.
    Once I visited CW in January. I think the major festivities were over, but the decorations were stil up, and lovely it was. Inaccurate, but lovely!
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  33. My husband got his master’s at William and Mary and my oldest daughter was born in Williamsburg, so the town has a special place in my heart. CW is well worth a visit…and besides the neat historical stuff, the outlet stores are fab! (Sorry for the commercial plug, but right now I’ve got shopping on the brain. Where is Santa when you need him?) Happy Holidays to all the wonderful Wenches and Wenchlings…Wenchettes?

    Reply
  34. My husband got his master’s at William and Mary and my oldest daughter was born in Williamsburg, so the town has a special place in my heart. CW is well worth a visit…and besides the neat historical stuff, the outlet stores are fab! (Sorry for the commercial plug, but right now I’ve got shopping on the brain. Where is Santa when you need him?) Happy Holidays to all the wonderful Wenches and Wenchlings…Wenchettes?

    Reply
  35. My husband got his master’s at William and Mary and my oldest daughter was born in Williamsburg, so the town has a special place in my heart. CW is well worth a visit…and besides the neat historical stuff, the outlet stores are fab! (Sorry for the commercial plug, but right now I’ve got shopping on the brain. Where is Santa when you need him?) Happy Holidays to all the wonderful Wenches and Wenchlings…Wenchettes?

    Reply
  36. My husband got his master’s at William and Mary and my oldest daughter was born in Williamsburg, so the town has a special place in my heart. CW is well worth a visit…and besides the neat historical stuff, the outlet stores are fab! (Sorry for the commercial plug, but right now I’ve got shopping on the brain. Where is Santa when you need him?) Happy Holidays to all the wonderful Wenches and Wenchlings…Wenchettes?

    Reply
  37. So many people do have good memories of Williamsburg, whether from a family vacation, a school trip, someone at William & Mary, or just on their own. It has much to reccommend it, for every age and interest group. When my kids were younger, it was off to do chores or the musket drill. Now for me, it’s the bookstore and the library.
    After being so immersed in 17th century English history lately, I look at the place names in a different light. Obviously, the college is named after William of Orange and Mary Stuart, who also left a sizable sum to the school in her will, but I find myself wondering which Duke of Gloucester is the street named for? Charles II’s youngest brother? Queen Anne’s haples son, who died so young? Or some other prince later in the 18th century? Ahh, the curse of the History Nerds!!
    And yes, the OUTLETS. Maggie, there’s no shame in that — each time I go down there, it seems like there are more. Yayyyy! Woman does not live by research alone….

    Reply
  38. So many people do have good memories of Williamsburg, whether from a family vacation, a school trip, someone at William & Mary, or just on their own. It has much to reccommend it, for every age and interest group. When my kids were younger, it was off to do chores or the musket drill. Now for me, it’s the bookstore and the library.
    After being so immersed in 17th century English history lately, I look at the place names in a different light. Obviously, the college is named after William of Orange and Mary Stuart, who also left a sizable sum to the school in her will, but I find myself wondering which Duke of Gloucester is the street named for? Charles II’s youngest brother? Queen Anne’s haples son, who died so young? Or some other prince later in the 18th century? Ahh, the curse of the History Nerds!!
    And yes, the OUTLETS. Maggie, there’s no shame in that — each time I go down there, it seems like there are more. Yayyyy! Woman does not live by research alone….

    Reply
  39. So many people do have good memories of Williamsburg, whether from a family vacation, a school trip, someone at William & Mary, or just on their own. It has much to reccommend it, for every age and interest group. When my kids were younger, it was off to do chores or the musket drill. Now for me, it’s the bookstore and the library.
    After being so immersed in 17th century English history lately, I look at the place names in a different light. Obviously, the college is named after William of Orange and Mary Stuart, who also left a sizable sum to the school in her will, but I find myself wondering which Duke of Gloucester is the street named for? Charles II’s youngest brother? Queen Anne’s haples son, who died so young? Or some other prince later in the 18th century? Ahh, the curse of the History Nerds!!
    And yes, the OUTLETS. Maggie, there’s no shame in that — each time I go down there, it seems like there are more. Yayyyy! Woman does not live by research alone….

    Reply
  40. So many people do have good memories of Williamsburg, whether from a family vacation, a school trip, someone at William & Mary, or just on their own. It has much to reccommend it, for every age and interest group. When my kids were younger, it was off to do chores or the musket drill. Now for me, it’s the bookstore and the library.
    After being so immersed in 17th century English history lately, I look at the place names in a different light. Obviously, the college is named after William of Orange and Mary Stuart, who also left a sizable sum to the school in her will, but I find myself wondering which Duke of Gloucester is the street named for? Charles II’s youngest brother? Queen Anne’s haples son, who died so young? Or some other prince later in the 18th century? Ahh, the curse of the History Nerds!!
    And yes, the OUTLETS. Maggie, there’s no shame in that — each time I go down there, it seems like there are more. Yayyyy! Woman does not live by research alone….

    Reply
  41. Hmmmm…perhaps we should design the “Hat of Outraged Historical Indignation”? I’d think it would be sturdy and sensible, made for hard wear, yet with a flamboyant plume as well, or perhaps a bit of gold lace along the brim…..

    Reply
  42. Hmmmm…perhaps we should design the “Hat of Outraged Historical Indignation”? I’d think it would be sturdy and sensible, made for hard wear, yet with a flamboyant plume as well, or perhaps a bit of gold lace along the brim…..

    Reply
  43. Hmmmm…perhaps we should design the “Hat of Outraged Historical Indignation”? I’d think it would be sturdy and sensible, made for hard wear, yet with a flamboyant plume as well, or perhaps a bit of gold lace along the brim…..

    Reply
  44. Hmmmm…perhaps we should design the “Hat of Outraged Historical Indignation”? I’d think it would be sturdy and sensible, made for hard wear, yet with a flamboyant plume as well, or perhaps a bit of gold lace along the brim…..

    Reply
  45. Williamsburg is beautiful at Christmas! My husband and I honeymooned there 20 years ago. (we were married on Dec 12) What I remember the most is the smells… sweet cinnamon, fresh gingerbread and warm wood fires. It was magical.
    Merry Christmas Susan/Sarah!
    Nina, who would like to see S/S in that hat.

    Reply
  46. Williamsburg is beautiful at Christmas! My husband and I honeymooned there 20 years ago. (we were married on Dec 12) What I remember the most is the smells… sweet cinnamon, fresh gingerbread and warm wood fires. It was magical.
    Merry Christmas Susan/Sarah!
    Nina, who would like to see S/S in that hat.

    Reply
  47. Williamsburg is beautiful at Christmas! My husband and I honeymooned there 20 years ago. (we were married on Dec 12) What I remember the most is the smells… sweet cinnamon, fresh gingerbread and warm wood fires. It was magical.
    Merry Christmas Susan/Sarah!
    Nina, who would like to see S/S in that hat.

    Reply
  48. Williamsburg is beautiful at Christmas! My husband and I honeymooned there 20 years ago. (we were married on Dec 12) What I remember the most is the smells… sweet cinnamon, fresh gingerbread and warm wood fires. It was magical.
    Merry Christmas Susan/Sarah!
    Nina, who would like to see S/S in that hat.

    Reply
  49. I went to William & Mary for my undergrad, where I got a bachelor’s in history. It happens to have a very good history program, but that’s not why I originally decided to go. I decided to go when I was 14 and went to visit and decided this must be what heaven is like, where history is all around and you can just walk down the street and breathe it in. The school also happened to be a perfect fit for me and my personality and what I was looking for, but what got me looking was the falling in love with a place.
    Susan Scott — Duke of Gloucester Street was named for Queen Anne’s hapless son, since the town was laid out in the early 1700s when he was still the heir. The street is more commonly known as DoG Street to the students and locals. Much easier to say!!!
    And I love the hat as well!!! One of the best descriptions I’ve heard. My family will recognize it :).

    Reply
  50. I went to William & Mary for my undergrad, where I got a bachelor’s in history. It happens to have a very good history program, but that’s not why I originally decided to go. I decided to go when I was 14 and went to visit and decided this must be what heaven is like, where history is all around and you can just walk down the street and breathe it in. The school also happened to be a perfect fit for me and my personality and what I was looking for, but what got me looking was the falling in love with a place.
    Susan Scott — Duke of Gloucester Street was named for Queen Anne’s hapless son, since the town was laid out in the early 1700s when he was still the heir. The street is more commonly known as DoG Street to the students and locals. Much easier to say!!!
    And I love the hat as well!!! One of the best descriptions I’ve heard. My family will recognize it :).

    Reply
  51. I went to William & Mary for my undergrad, where I got a bachelor’s in history. It happens to have a very good history program, but that’s not why I originally decided to go. I decided to go when I was 14 and went to visit and decided this must be what heaven is like, where history is all around and you can just walk down the street and breathe it in. The school also happened to be a perfect fit for me and my personality and what I was looking for, but what got me looking was the falling in love with a place.
    Susan Scott — Duke of Gloucester Street was named for Queen Anne’s hapless son, since the town was laid out in the early 1700s when he was still the heir. The street is more commonly known as DoG Street to the students and locals. Much easier to say!!!
    And I love the hat as well!!! One of the best descriptions I’ve heard. My family will recognize it :).

    Reply
  52. I went to William & Mary for my undergrad, where I got a bachelor’s in history. It happens to have a very good history program, but that’s not why I originally decided to go. I decided to go when I was 14 and went to visit and decided this must be what heaven is like, where history is all around and you can just walk down the street and breathe it in. The school also happened to be a perfect fit for me and my personality and what I was looking for, but what got me looking was the falling in love with a place.
    Susan Scott — Duke of Gloucester Street was named for Queen Anne’s hapless son, since the town was laid out in the early 1700s when he was still the heir. The street is more commonly known as DoG Street to the students and locals. Much easier to say!!!
    And I love the hat as well!!! One of the best descriptions I’ve heard. My family will recognize it :).

    Reply
  53. You are all great authors; my favorite is Jo. But your comment on Colonial Williamsburg brought to mind a book I read recently by Janet Evanovich whose book, “Thanksgiving” is set in Williamsburg. The heroine is a weekend volunteer at the village. I went there once, long ago, but that story and your comments make me want to repeat that trip. I can’t imagine a better place in the USA to spend Christmas.

    Reply
  54. You are all great authors; my favorite is Jo. But your comment on Colonial Williamsburg brought to mind a book I read recently by Janet Evanovich whose book, “Thanksgiving” is set in Williamsburg. The heroine is a weekend volunteer at the village. I went there once, long ago, but that story and your comments make me want to repeat that trip. I can’t imagine a better place in the USA to spend Christmas.

    Reply
  55. You are all great authors; my favorite is Jo. But your comment on Colonial Williamsburg brought to mind a book I read recently by Janet Evanovich whose book, “Thanksgiving” is set in Williamsburg. The heroine is a weekend volunteer at the village. I went there once, long ago, but that story and your comments make me want to repeat that trip. I can’t imagine a better place in the USA to spend Christmas.

    Reply
  56. You are all great authors; my favorite is Jo. But your comment on Colonial Williamsburg brought to mind a book I read recently by Janet Evanovich whose book, “Thanksgiving” is set in Williamsburg. The heroine is a weekend volunteer at the village. I went there once, long ago, but that story and your comments make me want to repeat that trip. I can’t imagine a better place in the USA to spend Christmas.

    Reply
  57. I want to add that the staff of CW are a great source of information, too. Their training is extensive, and most of them work for the love of history (I doubt they get paid anywhere near commensurate to their knowledge.) Even if it’s a busy day, I’ve found that they’ll take time to answer even the most esoteric of questions (what, me?) or offer insight to nit-picky questions.
    Yeah, my family teases me mercilessly when I go to talks with titles like “An Interpretation of the Poultry” — but that interpreter spoke not only about domestic hens a-laying, but also about fighting cocks. She had a large obstrepurous rooster with her, in his historically accurate wicker carrying-basket, and showed us reproduction 18th century cock-spurs. She continued to talk with me long after the rest of the audience left, and learned more from her than I could in a week of internet searches.
    And yes, soon after, there was a cockfighting scene in one of my books. *g*

    Reply
  58. I want to add that the staff of CW are a great source of information, too. Their training is extensive, and most of them work for the love of history (I doubt they get paid anywhere near commensurate to their knowledge.) Even if it’s a busy day, I’ve found that they’ll take time to answer even the most esoteric of questions (what, me?) or offer insight to nit-picky questions.
    Yeah, my family teases me mercilessly when I go to talks with titles like “An Interpretation of the Poultry” — but that interpreter spoke not only about domestic hens a-laying, but also about fighting cocks. She had a large obstrepurous rooster with her, in his historically accurate wicker carrying-basket, and showed us reproduction 18th century cock-spurs. She continued to talk with me long after the rest of the audience left, and learned more from her than I could in a week of internet searches.
    And yes, soon after, there was a cockfighting scene in one of my books. *g*

    Reply
  59. I want to add that the staff of CW are a great source of information, too. Their training is extensive, and most of them work for the love of history (I doubt they get paid anywhere near commensurate to their knowledge.) Even if it’s a busy day, I’ve found that they’ll take time to answer even the most esoteric of questions (what, me?) or offer insight to nit-picky questions.
    Yeah, my family teases me mercilessly when I go to talks with titles like “An Interpretation of the Poultry” — but that interpreter spoke not only about domestic hens a-laying, but also about fighting cocks. She had a large obstrepurous rooster with her, in his historically accurate wicker carrying-basket, and showed us reproduction 18th century cock-spurs. She continued to talk with me long after the rest of the audience left, and learned more from her than I could in a week of internet searches.
    And yes, soon after, there was a cockfighting scene in one of my books. *g*

    Reply
  60. I want to add that the staff of CW are a great source of information, too. Their training is extensive, and most of them work for the love of history (I doubt they get paid anywhere near commensurate to their knowledge.) Even if it’s a busy day, I’ve found that they’ll take time to answer even the most esoteric of questions (what, me?) or offer insight to nit-picky questions.
    Yeah, my family teases me mercilessly when I go to talks with titles like “An Interpretation of the Poultry” — but that interpreter spoke not only about domestic hens a-laying, but also about fighting cocks. She had a large obstrepurous rooster with her, in his historically accurate wicker carrying-basket, and showed us reproduction 18th century cock-spurs. She continued to talk with me long after the rest of the audience left, and learned more from her than I could in a week of internet searches.
    And yes, soon after, there was a cockfighting scene in one of my books. *g*

    Reply

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