Christmas in October

16221933.thbSusan here. 
So it's barely
October, with the pumpkins newly orange and still growing on their vines, and the leaves
more green than golden – summer warmth lingers in the air and Halloween is weeks
away – and yet we’re talkin’ Christmas.

At least we are today, here at Word Wenches. We’ve
got two newly released Christmas anthologies by some or all of the Wenches, and we’re pleased
as holiday punch with sherbet rings to share them with you now!

MaryJoPutney_ChristmasRosesNovella_200Christmas
Roses: Love Blooms in Winter
– an anthology of novellas by Mary Jo Putney, Patricia Rice and
Susan King, released in ebook by Millington House Publishing, with a gorgeous cover by Kim Killion.

Years
ago, when I was a new author in perfect awe of Mary Jo Putney and Patricia Rice –
who were especially nice to a nervous newbie – we were all writing historical
romance for Penguin’s Topaz imprint, and we often crossed paths. Thanks to writers
groups, luncheons, workshops and late nights in conference hotels, we became
friends, lunch buddies, brainstorming buddies – and Wenches. Meanwhile, we were
writing lots of novels and novellas.

Not long ago, we agreed it would be fun to e-publish some of our backlist novellas together. Mary
Jo and I had breakfast with a local friend, Jim Lefter, who’s also an e-publisher, and we decided
to give him a novella
7359591each, one from Pat as well: an anthology of friends.

Our
stories were all holiday themed and each one had roses somewhere in the story – so this was one of the easiest titles we've ever had to think up … Christmas
Roses.
We gave Kim a bit of cover art direction: uh, Christmas and, er, roses. She knew what we needed and came up with a gorgeous cover. 

Our three historical
romance novellas are collected
together here for the first time in this exclusive eBook. “The Snow Rose,” “The
Black Beast of Belleterre,” and “The Kissing Bough” weave tales of the joys of
unexpected love at a special time of year. Discovery in the midst of a clash of
clans; the hidden desires of an unexpected suitor; and a love once lost and
found combine for a journey through history – by turns adventurous, romantic, poignant and fun. We’ve included new introductions
— and scrumptious recipes. In fact, we want to share our intros with you today as a sneak peek.  . . .

PAT RICE, "The Kissing Bough"

Xmasornament"The Kissing Bough" first appeared in A Regency Christmas in 1989.
At the time, I was mostly writing American westerns with my characters making
an occasional sailing stop in London. Due to my fascination with English
literature and my need to know more about the historical events in the books I
was reading, I’d been studying English history for years. The thought of having
one of my  stories appear in an anthology with Mary Balogh and the
late, great Edith Layton inspired my imagination.

 I happily dug into obscure pamphlets on English Christmas
traditions to research my story, but to my dismay, Christmas as we know it now
was more Victorian than Regency. My soldier heroes wouldn’t be coming home to huge
fir trees adorned with hand-made ornaments. But kissing boughs are steeped deep
in medieval English tradition, when a small tree top was hung at the entrance
as a symbol of the holy trinity. The practice became more elaborate over
time—and thus Diana could decorate the drawing room with greenery to her
heart’s content. And even with his one good arm, Jonathan could match her love
and determination by hauling in the Yule log.

I hope my first Regency story inspires a lovely
green Christmas of your own!

Lambs Wool Punch

This traditional Christmas punch has been served since the Middle
Ages. The name probably refers to the fluffy white flesh revealed by the broken
skin of the roasted apples which float on top of the bowl of ale.

4 eating apples
4 pints of ale or cider
6 cloves and 1 tablespoon of grated nutmeg. Half a teaspoon of
ground ginger. Pinch of allspice. I cinnamon stick, 1 – 2 tablespoons dark soft
brown sugar
Heat oven to 400. Place the apples in a baking dish with a little
ale, cider or water and cook for 30 minutes until the apple flesh is
"woolly" in texture.
Meanwhile, heat the ale or cider, spices and sugar to taste in a
large pan over a low heat until very hot, but do not allow to boil. Strain into
a large serving bowl. Scoop out the apple pulp with a spoon, discarding the
core and the pips and pile on the hot ale. Serve hot with a scoop of apple
flesh.

MARY JO PUTNEY, "The Black Beast of Belleterre"

19045703.thb
“The Black Beast of
Belleterre” was my miracle novella.  In an excess of enthusiasm for
writing Christmas stories, which I love, I committed to doing them for two
different holiday anthologies the same year.

As always, things take
longer than they take, and all of sudden I was up against a drop dead delivery
date: my editor needed the story delivered in less that two
weeks.  In nine days I was booked for a conference in Savannah, and I
hadn’t started the story.

So I did the only thing
I could: sat down at my computer and started to work.  Then came the
miracle.  Each day for the next eight days, I wrote ten
pages.  At the end, I had eighty pages and the story was
done.  I have never written with that kind of speed
and regular pacing!

And the miracle didn’t
end there.  “The Black Beast of Belleterre” is one of my very favorite
novellas.  Well, it’s a beauty and the beast story, and that’s a
surefire winner. Plus, it was a Victorian setting, which gave me fun
elements to play with that wouldn’t fit into my usual Regency story.

But most of all, Ariel
and Falconer were a gift.  I loved writing about them, and when I
reread this story for inclusion in this anthology, I loved them
still.  I hope you do also.


34746556.thbPotato Kale Soup

This is my own version
of a traditional Portuguese peasant soup.  It’s robust and full of
flavor. This makes a very large
batch—at least 16 servings, and requires a very large pot.  You may
prefer to halve ingredients. It helps to have a food processor for
chopping the onions and garlic, and slicing the potatoes.  Saves a
lot of time.

1 pound hot Italian
sausage, either bulk or squeezed from casings, browned, and
drained. (Chorizo sausage can be used if you prefer—it’s more
authentic, but I like the bite of the Italian sausage. If you like
sausage, you can use more.)

2 large onions, chopped
12 cloves of garlic,
peeled and mashed
2 T. olive oil
3 to 4 quarts chicken
stock
4 pounds of potatoes,
sliced. (If you use young, thin-skinned potatoes like Yukon Gold, they don’t need to be
peeled. If old and tough, peel them.)
1 to 1 1/2 pounds of
kale, approximately, washed, cleaned, and shredded. (Collard or
mustard greens can be used, I’m told.) Or—use a one lb. package
of loose leaf frozen kale, or two 10 oz packages of frozen chopped
kale. Thaw, drain, and mix in. Almost as good, and a lot
less work.)
Salt and pepper to
taste  (For this quantity, I use about a tablespoon of salt and a
half teaspoon of freshly ground pepper).

Sautee
onions and garlic in olive oil until translucent, 5 to 10 minutes. Place
all ingredients except the kale in a large soup pot, bring to a boil, then
simmer until potatoes are tender and have started to break down.  If
you’re using fresh kale, you can use the simmering time to wash the kale, strip
out the tough stems, and send it through the slicer on the food
processor. When
potatoes are tender and crumbling a bit, stir the chopped kale in and simmer
for about 5 minutes more.  Adjust seasoning and
serve.  Tastes good with corn bread, which is the traditional
Portuguese way.  Freezes well. 

SUSAN KING, "The Snow Rose"

34836091.thbWriting
this little story is one of my happiest creative experiences, and I’m delighted
to be able to share it with readers again. “The Snow Rose” was my first
novella, a spinoff of my second novel, The
Raven’s Wish
, and it first appeared in A Stockingful of Joy. The related stories are both set within the ongoing feud between the
Frasers and the MacDonalds in 16th century Scotland. I love clan
legends, and I’m part Fraser, so now and again I write something about the
historical Frasers to stir some fictional mischief for them.

“The
Snow Rose” is the story of Kenneth Fraser, one of the many cousins of Elspeth
Fraser in The Raven’s Wish (among
eighty Fraser cousins all born within the same year, Elspeth is the only
girl—it’s based on a legend of Clan Fraser). I loved Kenneth, with his dry wit,
his long, braided dark hair and his sexy Highlander demeanor, and I wanted him to
have a truly special romance of his own. His soulmate turned out to be Catriona MacDonald,
who desperately needs help one snowy New Year’s Eve—or Hogmanay, as this is
Scotland.

Kenneth
is the “first foot” arriving at Catriona’s snowbound cottage one New Year’s
Eve—that is, first to set foot on the threshold after midnight. A dark-haired
handsome man is a good omen, and these two bring luck to each other in the
midst of a clan feud—but their New Year’s beginning is a bit calamitous. A
collapsed roof, a cow and a horse inside the cottage, a cat named Dog, a lost
and valuable brooch, and, of course, the MacBaddies after our hero and heroine,
who are getting to know each other even while the snow falls through a hole in
the roof and a cow tumbles head over heels for the hero.

Here’s
a lovely wee recipe for a whiskey brose that’s straight from the story, and
just right for your own Hogmanay or New Year’s Eve. Best wishes of the New Year
to you!

Oatmeal
Brose (aka Atholl Brose):

Measure
out about ½ cup of oatmeal and twice that in boiling water; soak the oats in
the water until you can extract the liquid, or the brose (oat broth). In the
hot brose, dissolve 1 tablespoon honey (preferably heather honey!), and add 4
tablespoons heavy cream and 6 tablespoons or so of your favorite Scottish
whiskey. Blend together, chill, pour into glasses, sprinkle with some cinnamon
and nutmeg, and enjoy!

MISCHIEF
AND MISTLETOE

Jo Beverley, Mary Jo Putney, Patricia Rice, Joanna Bourne, Anne Gracie, Nicola Cornick, Cara Elliott and Susan King 

“Confections
that charm and delight, like the holidays themselves!” –
RT Book Reviews

1377598_687092237985325_2085948170_n
You
may remember that last year the Wenches got together to write new stories for a
Christmas romance anthology published in trade paperback by Kensington Books –
the first author blog to publish a collection together! This year, Kensington
is bringing the anthology back, complete with a wonderful new cover, in mass
market paperback. If you didn’t catch M&M by WW the first time, or if you’d
like to give some copies as gifts this year, check out the new paperback (available
in e-book too). Kensington just created a beautiful postcard for Mischief and Mistletoe – here it is! 

So there you go, a bit of Christmas in October. What do you think of our new covers?  

Do Christmas and holiday stories always seem to find their way to your TBR pile?
Do you have a shelf dedicated to them, as I do?  (Christmas children's books too – we've got boxes of them at our house!)
And just how early do the holidays start for you – before or after Halloween?     

We've got a giveaway for you – a chance to win an ebook copy of Christmas Roses! – if you'll take a moment to leave a comment below. 

Susan

70 thoughts on “Christmas in October”

  1. Susan–
    Since we both live in Maryland, you know that we’re getting unseasonably warm weather, in the mid to upper 80s, so looking at the CHRISTMAS ROSES cover of red roses in snow is particularly appealing! I do love Christmas stories, which means I love the fact that e-publishing makes it possible for these great classic stories to become readily available again.
    Plus, I don’t know why it didn’t occur to me before, but our Christmas Roses stories are three wide spread settings:16th Century Scotland, Regency England, and late Victorian England, were I was able to do all the holiday hoopla that we love. *G*

    Reply
  2. Susan–
    Since we both live in Maryland, you know that we’re getting unseasonably warm weather, in the mid to upper 80s, so looking at the CHRISTMAS ROSES cover of red roses in snow is particularly appealing! I do love Christmas stories, which means I love the fact that e-publishing makes it possible for these great classic stories to become readily available again.
    Plus, I don’t know why it didn’t occur to me before, but our Christmas Roses stories are three wide spread settings:16th Century Scotland, Regency England, and late Victorian England, were I was able to do all the holiday hoopla that we love. *G*

    Reply
  3. Susan–
    Since we both live in Maryland, you know that we’re getting unseasonably warm weather, in the mid to upper 80s, so looking at the CHRISTMAS ROSES cover of red roses in snow is particularly appealing! I do love Christmas stories, which means I love the fact that e-publishing makes it possible for these great classic stories to become readily available again.
    Plus, I don’t know why it didn’t occur to me before, but our Christmas Roses stories are three wide spread settings:16th Century Scotland, Regency England, and late Victorian England, were I was able to do all the holiday hoopla that we love. *G*

    Reply
  4. Susan–
    Since we both live in Maryland, you know that we’re getting unseasonably warm weather, in the mid to upper 80s, so looking at the CHRISTMAS ROSES cover of red roses in snow is particularly appealing! I do love Christmas stories, which means I love the fact that e-publishing makes it possible for these great classic stories to become readily available again.
    Plus, I don’t know why it didn’t occur to me before, but our Christmas Roses stories are three wide spread settings:16th Century Scotland, Regency England, and late Victorian England, were I was able to do all the holiday hoopla that we love. *G*

    Reply
  5. Susan–
    Since we both live in Maryland, you know that we’re getting unseasonably warm weather, in the mid to upper 80s, so looking at the CHRISTMAS ROSES cover of red roses in snow is particularly appealing! I do love Christmas stories, which means I love the fact that e-publishing makes it possible for these great classic stories to become readily available again.
    Plus, I don’t know why it didn’t occur to me before, but our Christmas Roses stories are three wide spread settings:16th Century Scotland, Regency England, and late Victorian England, were I was able to do all the holiday hoopla that we love. *G*

    Reply
  6. I love the covers, especially Christmas Roses. I’m not generally a fan of anthologies as I believe that there is not such thing as too long of a book, but I do love Christmas anthologies. I buy a couple every year, and I won’t allow myself to read them until December. So even if I don’t win a copy, you can be sure that Christmas Roses will be added to my collection (I added M & M last year).
    Despite the 80 degree temps here, Christmas will be here before you know it!

    Reply
  7. I love the covers, especially Christmas Roses. I’m not generally a fan of anthologies as I believe that there is not such thing as too long of a book, but I do love Christmas anthologies. I buy a couple every year, and I won’t allow myself to read them until December. So even if I don’t win a copy, you can be sure that Christmas Roses will be added to my collection (I added M & M last year).
    Despite the 80 degree temps here, Christmas will be here before you know it!

    Reply
  8. I love the covers, especially Christmas Roses. I’m not generally a fan of anthologies as I believe that there is not such thing as too long of a book, but I do love Christmas anthologies. I buy a couple every year, and I won’t allow myself to read them until December. So even if I don’t win a copy, you can be sure that Christmas Roses will be added to my collection (I added M & M last year).
    Despite the 80 degree temps here, Christmas will be here before you know it!

    Reply
  9. I love the covers, especially Christmas Roses. I’m not generally a fan of anthologies as I believe that there is not such thing as too long of a book, but I do love Christmas anthologies. I buy a couple every year, and I won’t allow myself to read them until December. So even if I don’t win a copy, you can be sure that Christmas Roses will be added to my collection (I added M & M last year).
    Despite the 80 degree temps here, Christmas will be here before you know it!

    Reply
  10. I love the covers, especially Christmas Roses. I’m not generally a fan of anthologies as I believe that there is not such thing as too long of a book, but I do love Christmas anthologies. I buy a couple every year, and I won’t allow myself to read them until December. So even if I don’t win a copy, you can be sure that Christmas Roses will be added to my collection (I added M & M last year).
    Despite the 80 degree temps here, Christmas will be here before you know it!

    Reply
  11. I love the cover. I’m like Donna, long stories are better but I enjoy Christmas stories and cat stories, so there’s some anthologies on my TBR list.
    M&M is how I heard about this blog. I don’t know which is/was better, the blog or M&M. The wenches in each are delightful.
    As for winter roses, I made a wreath a couple of years back the Friday after Thanksgiving with silk red roses, green holly, and fake babies breath for white. Two months before it goes up on the door, and I fervently hope for a few more days of sunshine this October. The still green weeping willows and the river sparkle in those bright rays.

    Reply
  12. I love the cover. I’m like Donna, long stories are better but I enjoy Christmas stories and cat stories, so there’s some anthologies on my TBR list.
    M&M is how I heard about this blog. I don’t know which is/was better, the blog or M&M. The wenches in each are delightful.
    As for winter roses, I made a wreath a couple of years back the Friday after Thanksgiving with silk red roses, green holly, and fake babies breath for white. Two months before it goes up on the door, and I fervently hope for a few more days of sunshine this October. The still green weeping willows and the river sparkle in those bright rays.

    Reply
  13. I love the cover. I’m like Donna, long stories are better but I enjoy Christmas stories and cat stories, so there’s some anthologies on my TBR list.
    M&M is how I heard about this blog. I don’t know which is/was better, the blog or M&M. The wenches in each are delightful.
    As for winter roses, I made a wreath a couple of years back the Friday after Thanksgiving with silk red roses, green holly, and fake babies breath for white. Two months before it goes up on the door, and I fervently hope for a few more days of sunshine this October. The still green weeping willows and the river sparkle in those bright rays.

    Reply
  14. I love the cover. I’m like Donna, long stories are better but I enjoy Christmas stories and cat stories, so there’s some anthologies on my TBR list.
    M&M is how I heard about this blog. I don’t know which is/was better, the blog or M&M. The wenches in each are delightful.
    As for winter roses, I made a wreath a couple of years back the Friday after Thanksgiving with silk red roses, green holly, and fake babies breath for white. Two months before it goes up on the door, and I fervently hope for a few more days of sunshine this October. The still green weeping willows and the river sparkle in those bright rays.

    Reply
  15. I love the cover. I’m like Donna, long stories are better but I enjoy Christmas stories and cat stories, so there’s some anthologies on my TBR list.
    M&M is how I heard about this blog. I don’t know which is/was better, the blog or M&M. The wenches in each are delightful.
    As for winter roses, I made a wreath a couple of years back the Friday after Thanksgiving with silk red roses, green holly, and fake babies breath for white. Two months before it goes up on the door, and I fervently hope for a few more days of sunshine this October. The still green weeping willows and the river sparkle in those bright rays.

    Reply
  16. I love reading Christmas and holiday stories, I think they’re always fun. I prefer that the holidays start after Thanksgiving. I like Halloween to have it’s day in the spotlight, and Thanksgiving should be about family and good food. Then there’s time for all the holiday madness.

    Reply
  17. I love reading Christmas and holiday stories, I think they’re always fun. I prefer that the holidays start after Thanksgiving. I like Halloween to have it’s day in the spotlight, and Thanksgiving should be about family and good food. Then there’s time for all the holiday madness.

    Reply
  18. I love reading Christmas and holiday stories, I think they’re always fun. I prefer that the holidays start after Thanksgiving. I like Halloween to have it’s day in the spotlight, and Thanksgiving should be about family and good food. Then there’s time for all the holiday madness.

    Reply
  19. I love reading Christmas and holiday stories, I think they’re always fun. I prefer that the holidays start after Thanksgiving. I like Halloween to have it’s day in the spotlight, and Thanksgiving should be about family and good food. Then there’s time for all the holiday madness.

    Reply
  20. I love reading Christmas and holiday stories, I think they’re always fun. I prefer that the holidays start after Thanksgiving. I like Halloween to have it’s day in the spotlight, and Thanksgiving should be about family and good food. Then there’s time for all the holiday madness.

    Reply
  21. Wow, what beautiful festive covers (and I am not a person who usually pays a lot of attention to covers). They look lovely and thanks a lot, now I want some punch with sherbet rings, lol. Congrats on the reissue and thanks for the recipes. And no, I don’t usually have a shelf dedicated to Christmas stories but then again the shelves are buried anyway, lol.

    Reply
  22. Wow, what beautiful festive covers (and I am not a person who usually pays a lot of attention to covers). They look lovely and thanks a lot, now I want some punch with sherbet rings, lol. Congrats on the reissue and thanks for the recipes. And no, I don’t usually have a shelf dedicated to Christmas stories but then again the shelves are buried anyway, lol.

    Reply
  23. Wow, what beautiful festive covers (and I am not a person who usually pays a lot of attention to covers). They look lovely and thanks a lot, now I want some punch with sherbet rings, lol. Congrats on the reissue and thanks for the recipes. And no, I don’t usually have a shelf dedicated to Christmas stories but then again the shelves are buried anyway, lol.

    Reply
  24. Wow, what beautiful festive covers (and I am not a person who usually pays a lot of attention to covers). They look lovely and thanks a lot, now I want some punch with sherbet rings, lol. Congrats on the reissue and thanks for the recipes. And no, I don’t usually have a shelf dedicated to Christmas stories but then again the shelves are buried anyway, lol.

    Reply
  25. Wow, what beautiful festive covers (and I am not a person who usually pays a lot of attention to covers). They look lovely and thanks a lot, now I want some punch with sherbet rings, lol. Congrats on the reissue and thanks for the recipes. And no, I don’t usually have a shelf dedicated to Christmas stories but then again the shelves are buried anyway, lol.

    Reply
  26. I will read Christmas stories any time of the year. The only time it is disconcerting is when I read them at the beach in July — my mind is telling me be cold, but it is hot. However, I refuse to get into Christmas season until I see Santa at the end of the Macy’s Day parade. The Christmas spirit is part of me everyday. Wishing everyone a joyful and generous day.

    Reply
  27. I will read Christmas stories any time of the year. The only time it is disconcerting is when I read them at the beach in July — my mind is telling me be cold, but it is hot. However, I refuse to get into Christmas season until I see Santa at the end of the Macy’s Day parade. The Christmas spirit is part of me everyday. Wishing everyone a joyful and generous day.

    Reply
  28. I will read Christmas stories any time of the year. The only time it is disconcerting is when I read them at the beach in July — my mind is telling me be cold, but it is hot. However, I refuse to get into Christmas season until I see Santa at the end of the Macy’s Day parade. The Christmas spirit is part of me everyday. Wishing everyone a joyful and generous day.

    Reply
  29. I will read Christmas stories any time of the year. The only time it is disconcerting is when I read them at the beach in July — my mind is telling me be cold, but it is hot. However, I refuse to get into Christmas season until I see Santa at the end of the Macy’s Day parade. The Christmas spirit is part of me everyday. Wishing everyone a joyful and generous day.

    Reply
  30. I will read Christmas stories any time of the year. The only time it is disconcerting is when I read them at the beach in July — my mind is telling me be cold, but it is hot. However, I refuse to get into Christmas season until I see Santa at the end of the Macy’s Day parade. The Christmas spirit is part of me everyday. Wishing everyone a joyful and generous day.

    Reply
  31. I have a part of a bookcase devoted to Christmas stories. I love the anthologies because I get to sample many authors. Right now I am living with temperatures in the 90’s, not much of a holiday feeling there, so the Christmas stories help adjust my attitude. And I have been known to read them during the year when I need a lift.

    Reply
  32. I have a part of a bookcase devoted to Christmas stories. I love the anthologies because I get to sample many authors. Right now I am living with temperatures in the 90’s, not much of a holiday feeling there, so the Christmas stories help adjust my attitude. And I have been known to read them during the year when I need a lift.

    Reply
  33. I have a part of a bookcase devoted to Christmas stories. I love the anthologies because I get to sample many authors. Right now I am living with temperatures in the 90’s, not much of a holiday feeling there, so the Christmas stories help adjust my attitude. And I have been known to read them during the year when I need a lift.

    Reply
  34. I have a part of a bookcase devoted to Christmas stories. I love the anthologies because I get to sample many authors. Right now I am living with temperatures in the 90’s, not much of a holiday feeling there, so the Christmas stories help adjust my attitude. And I have been known to read them during the year when I need a lift.

    Reply
  35. I have a part of a bookcase devoted to Christmas stories. I love the anthologies because I get to sample many authors. Right now I am living with temperatures in the 90’s, not much of a holiday feeling there, so the Christmas stories help adjust my attitude. And I have been known to read them during the year when I need a lift.

    Reply
  36. Beautiful covers! I love Christmas stories, love, love, love them. I enjoy Christmas stories anytime of the year. No time is the wrong time for a Christmas story 🙂

    Reply
  37. Beautiful covers! I love Christmas stories, love, love, love them. I enjoy Christmas stories anytime of the year. No time is the wrong time for a Christmas story 🙂

    Reply
  38. Beautiful covers! I love Christmas stories, love, love, love them. I enjoy Christmas stories anytime of the year. No time is the wrong time for a Christmas story 🙂

    Reply
  39. Beautiful covers! I love Christmas stories, love, love, love them. I enjoy Christmas stories anytime of the year. No time is the wrong time for a Christmas story 🙂

    Reply
  40. Beautiful covers! I love Christmas stories, love, love, love them. I enjoy Christmas stories anytime of the year. No time is the wrong time for a Christmas story 🙂

    Reply
  41. I agree on Rosamund Pilcher’s WINTER SOLSTICE for holiday stories. In fact, I have two copies because I bought a second when I wanted to take it on a holiday and couldn’t find the first. *G* British author Trisha Ashley has also written some wonder fun romantic Christmas stories, especially THE TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS, which I’ve reread a couple of times.

    Reply
  42. I agree on Rosamund Pilcher’s WINTER SOLSTICE for holiday stories. In fact, I have two copies because I bought a second when I wanted to take it on a holiday and couldn’t find the first. *G* British author Trisha Ashley has also written some wonder fun romantic Christmas stories, especially THE TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS, which I’ve reread a couple of times.

    Reply
  43. I agree on Rosamund Pilcher’s WINTER SOLSTICE for holiday stories. In fact, I have two copies because I bought a second when I wanted to take it on a holiday and couldn’t find the first. *G* British author Trisha Ashley has also written some wonder fun romantic Christmas stories, especially THE TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS, which I’ve reread a couple of times.

    Reply
  44. I agree on Rosamund Pilcher’s WINTER SOLSTICE for holiday stories. In fact, I have two copies because I bought a second when I wanted to take it on a holiday and couldn’t find the first. *G* British author Trisha Ashley has also written some wonder fun romantic Christmas stories, especially THE TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS, which I’ve reread a couple of times.

    Reply
  45. I agree on Rosamund Pilcher’s WINTER SOLSTICE for holiday stories. In fact, I have two copies because I bought a second when I wanted to take it on a holiday and couldn’t find the first. *G* British author Trisha Ashley has also written some wonder fun romantic Christmas stories, especially THE TWELVE DAYS OF CHRISTMAS, which I’ve reread a couple of times.

    Reply
  46. I do love Christmas stories as well as the Christmas season! I have become a bit of a Schrooge about Christmas starting to early — not to mention those who insist on not using the term Christmas but that’s another discussion entirely. I wait until Thanksgiving to break out the Christmas reading, but if by some chance I don’t finish all my planned books by New Year’s I have no problem reading through January. 🙂

    Reply
  47. I do love Christmas stories as well as the Christmas season! I have become a bit of a Schrooge about Christmas starting to early — not to mention those who insist on not using the term Christmas but that’s another discussion entirely. I wait until Thanksgiving to break out the Christmas reading, but if by some chance I don’t finish all my planned books by New Year’s I have no problem reading through January. 🙂

    Reply
  48. I do love Christmas stories as well as the Christmas season! I have become a bit of a Schrooge about Christmas starting to early — not to mention those who insist on not using the term Christmas but that’s another discussion entirely. I wait until Thanksgiving to break out the Christmas reading, but if by some chance I don’t finish all my planned books by New Year’s I have no problem reading through January. 🙂

    Reply
  49. I do love Christmas stories as well as the Christmas season! I have become a bit of a Schrooge about Christmas starting to early — not to mention those who insist on not using the term Christmas but that’s another discussion entirely. I wait until Thanksgiving to break out the Christmas reading, but if by some chance I don’t finish all my planned books by New Year’s I have no problem reading through January. 🙂

    Reply
  50. I do love Christmas stories as well as the Christmas season! I have become a bit of a Schrooge about Christmas starting to early — not to mention those who insist on not using the term Christmas but that’s another discussion entirely. I wait until Thanksgiving to break out the Christmas reading, but if by some chance I don’t finish all my planned books by New Year’s I have no problem reading through January. 🙂

    Reply

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