Christine Wells and One Woman’s War

Anne here, and today I'm interviewing Christine Wells, whose latest book, One Woman's War: A Novel of the Real Miss Moneypenny, is coming out next week. You can preorder it here.

OneWoman'sWarChristine's books featuring strong, fascinating women have gained some wonderful reviews. “One Woman's War is a thrilling and suspenseful ride, perfect for fans of Kate Quinn, Beatriz Williams and Natasha Lester. Inspired by historic events, this story will have readers on the edge of their seats. Christine Wells’ masterful characterisation and meticulous research have made for one of the best books of the year.” (Kelly Rimmer New York Times Bestselling Author of The German Wife)
Booklist: “An exciting story, well told.

Anne: Christine, welcome back to the Word Wenches, it's lovely to see you here. (For those who haven't met Christine before, she's been interviewed by Nicola, Andrea, and now me. You can see our earlier interviews with her by clicking on those links.

Christine, after a very successful career writing Regency-era historical romance (as Christina Brooke) you've switched in recent years to writing historical novels, set around WW2. Apart from One Woman's War, there is Sisters of the Resistance: A Novel of Catherine Dior's Paris Spy Network, inspired by the real-life bravery of Catherine Dior, sister of the fashion designer and a heroine of World War II France. The Juliet Code is about a British agent and wireless operator in occupied Paris who was caught by the Germans.


SistersOfResistanceWhat is it about WW2 that appeals to you?

Christine: First of all, thank you so much for having me back on Word Wenches, Anne. I’m delighted to be here with so many long-standing friends and writers whose work I admire so much. And I know many in your community, as well, so I’m waving to everyone.

As for the war, when I was in year seven at school, about twelve years old, I did a six month project on the rise and fall of Adolf Hitler. My father, who was always a keen historian, taught me how to research, using several different sources. I found the subject horrifying and absorbing and I have been fascinated by World War II ever since.

However it wasn’t until relatively recently that I began reading in depth about the incredible things women did during the war, and in particular, while working for British intelligence.

Women who were dropped behind enemy lines in France like Nancy Wake and Noor Inayat Khan, inspired “The Juliet Code”. Women who worked in counterespionage for MI-5, and women whose title was secretary but who effectively worked as intelligence officers themselves inspired “One Woman’s War”. And of course, those brave women of the French resistance inspired “Sisters of the Resistance”, particularly Catherine Dior, whose unassuming stoicism was in stark contrast to the glittering world of fashion her brother Christian inhabited.

JulietCodeAnne: One Woman's War is billed as a story about Victoire “Paddy” Bennett, the real-life inspiration for the James Bond character, Miss Moneypenny. How did you come across her?

Christine: I’m a bit obsessed with spies and I had been reading biographies of Ian Fleming, author of the James Bond novels. Fleming himself worked for the intelligence arm of the British Royal Navy during World War II and it’s where he gleaned inspiration for the James Bond novels. Some of the less likely plots in those novels were based on real events, such as when Bond emerges from the  Mediterranean in scuba gear, strips off to reveal a dinner suit and then swans into a casino in Thunderball—that actually happened in WWII! Researching further, I stumbled across a newspaper article about the women in Fleming’s life—most of them, strong, witty and clever—the opposite of the women he often wrote about!

Quite a few different women have been touted as inspiration for Miss Moneypenny and the truth is that of course, probably more than one woman did inspire that character, but because Fleming took so much Bond-lore from his time in Naval Intelligence, where Paddy worked for him as a secretary, she seemed to best fit the bill. You can see her pictured here in later life in the pink jacket, with Lois Maxwell, who played Moneypenny in several Bond films.

Despite the Moneypenny connection, it was really Paddy herself who intrigued me. She was such a redoubtable woman, she seemed perfect for my next heroine.

Anne: Paddy is a fascinating character. Tell us about her.

Christine: Victoire “Paddy” Bennett grew up living in The Boltons in London, which is one of the most expensive addresses in the world, inhabited now by sheikhs and movie stars. Her Irish mother was one of the first women to receive a medical degree from Trinity College, Dublin. Paddy said, “Half of me is Irish and half of me is Yorkshire, so the battle is terrific!”

The story goes that Paddy’s mother, deeming the nursing home where she was to give birth to Paddy too uncomfortable, removed herself to the exclusive Claridge’s Hotel, where Paddy was born. Paddy studied architecture at the Sorbonne but returned to London when war broke out.

She trained as a nurse but was soon recruited to the Naval Intelligence Directorate, where she worked for several officers, including Ian Fleming. She was very young but proved herself such a valuable asset to the NID’s “Room 39” that the officers joked her fiancé was setting back the war effort when he married her, obliging her to resign. Later, Paddy became involved as an operative in the famous wartime deception, Operation Mincemeat—an operation coincidentally the subject of a recent movie starring Colin Firth and Matthew Macfadyen. Paddy is not mentioned in the movie, with a large part of her role in the deception folded into the character of Jean Leslie. Paddy was made a Dame of the British Empire for her wartime service.

One of the best stories about Paddy, and one that convinced me I had to write about her, happened when she was in her seventies. She repulsed a would-be mugger by kicking him where it hurt! She claimed it was her years of ballet that gave her the requisite flexibility and a sturdy pair of Marks and Spencer shoes.

Anne:  Paddy sounds like a cracker! One Woman's War is not just about one woman, though, is it? Apart from Paddy's good friend(s), I found Friedl rather interesting, too. 

Christine: Thank you! I had fun writing Friedl. She is a less transparent character than Paddy—we are never quite sure what her motives are or which way she will jump. Friedl Stöttinger was also a real woman, an Austrian national who became a double agent for the British. I was fascinated to gain access to her MI-5 file from the National Archive, but it was difficult to make out her true character from the various accounts of her because many of the men around Friedl wrote her off as a ditzy good-time girl. Others who knew her better said she was intelligent and an excellent spy. However, this duality gave me the opportunity to write a more complex character.

Anne:  Can you give us a little taste of One Woman's War, please?

Christine: Of course! In this short excerpt, Paddy meets Ian Fleming for the second time. In their first encounter, Paddy boldly stepped up to take over dealing with the passenger manifest when Fleming was in charge of evacuating the British from Bordeaux as the Germans marched on Paris.

“We all have to do our bit,” said Paddy automatically, catching sight of two tall men in full Navy uniform. Both looked intimidatingly distinguished. One, a great, burly older man—fair and handsome in his way—who must be the admiral. But it was the younger officer who caught and held Paddy’s attention. Tall and lean, dark hair, hooded blue eyes, long nose. She’d seen him before . . .

“Bordeaux!” she exclaimed, before her mother had the chance to make the introductions. “Fancy meeting you here.”

The admiral’s eyebrows shot up. He glanced from Paddy to his subordinate.

“Admiral Godfrey, I’d like you to meet my daughter, Victoire Bennett,” said Edith.

“And this is Commander Ian Fleming,” said Godfrey, glancing between Paddy and the younger officer. “But I take it you’ve met?”

“Not formally,” answered Fleming, drawing out a silver cigarette case from his pocket.

“Bordeaux, eh?” said Godfrey, cocking an eyebrow at Paddy. “Ah, of course. You must have been one of the evacuees.”

“That’s right,” said Paddy. “I’m surprised Commander Fleming remembers me.”

“Of course I remember. Your effrontery was only matched by your efficiency.” He turned to Godfrey. “Tell her she’s hired.”

Anne: Effrontery and efficiency— I loved that line. I've thoroughly enjoyed your WW2 stories (and for readers, I'll just confess that I cheated with One Woman's War and skipped to the end to see if ended well, and it did.)
I saw on your FaceBook page that you'd just handed in your next novel. Would you care to tell us a little about it? 

Christine: Thank you, Anne. I’m chuckling about the skip to the end, and yes, all ends well in my books! 

Shepheards8

My next story is a bit of a departure because although it is partly set during WWII, it’s not really about the war. It’s about Cleo Davenport, who is an orphan living with her English guardian (a female Egyptian scholar) at the famous Shepheard’s Hotel in Cairo. (If you’ve read the marvellous Amelia Peabody mysteries, you will know all about Shepheard’s!) When Cleo travels to England and Paris in search of her real parents, she is told she is the secret love child of Edward VIII and an infamous Parisian courtesan. 

This novel is a “what if” based on the true story of Princess Marguerite Fahmy and her affair with the Prince of Wales, (as he was then, later to become Edward VIII before finally ending as the Duke of Windsor after abdicating the throne). This has more of a romance thread than my other historical fiction, and I was excited to write a love story again.

ChristineWells (1)Anne: Will you be giving away a copy of ONE WOMAN'S WAR?

Christine: I’d love to give away a copy of ONE WOMAN’S WAR to one lucky person who answers the question: What was the best book you read in the past year (excluding present company and Word Wenches’ books as they are already on my list!) Not that my TBR pile needs to grow any taller…

Anne: Thanks so much for visiting the WordWenches, Christine.

Christine: It’s been a pleasure. Thanks very much to you and the other Wenches, Anne!

 

280 thoughts on “Christine Wells and One Woman’s War”

  1. Christine, welcome back to the Wenches! And Anne, thanks for the cracking good interview. Just reading that short excerpt got me salivating. (But don’t put me in for the book–I like to support other authors.)
    WWII is fascinating (and it shows up in several of my books), and I figure the odds of satisfying ending are high with anyone who started in romance. *G* I love that you’re doing stories about the heroines of WWII.

    Reply
  2. Christine, welcome back to the Wenches! And Anne, thanks for the cracking good interview. Just reading that short excerpt got me salivating. (But don’t put me in for the book–I like to support other authors.)
    WWII is fascinating (and it shows up in several of my books), and I figure the odds of satisfying ending are high with anyone who started in romance. *G* I love that you’re doing stories about the heroines of WWII.

    Reply
  3. Christine, welcome back to the Wenches! And Anne, thanks for the cracking good interview. Just reading that short excerpt got me salivating. (But don’t put me in for the book–I like to support other authors.)
    WWII is fascinating (and it shows up in several of my books), and I figure the odds of satisfying ending are high with anyone who started in romance. *G* I love that you’re doing stories about the heroines of WWII.

    Reply
  4. Christine, welcome back to the Wenches! And Anne, thanks for the cracking good interview. Just reading that short excerpt got me salivating. (But don’t put me in for the book–I like to support other authors.)
    WWII is fascinating (and it shows up in several of my books), and I figure the odds of satisfying ending are high with anyone who started in romance. *G* I love that you’re doing stories about the heroines of WWII.

    Reply
  5. Christine, welcome back to the Wenches! And Anne, thanks for the cracking good interview. Just reading that short excerpt got me salivating. (But don’t put me in for the book–I like to support other authors.)
    WWII is fascinating (and it shows up in several of my books), and I figure the odds of satisfying ending are high with anyone who started in romance. *G* I love that you’re doing stories about the heroines of WWII.

    Reply
  6. One of the best books I’ve read this year was “The Ink Black Heart” by Robert Galbraith, aka J.K. Rowling.
    It’s brilliantly written representing social media in a murder investigation.

    Reply
  7. One of the best books I’ve read this year was “The Ink Black Heart” by Robert Galbraith, aka J.K. Rowling.
    It’s brilliantly written representing social media in a murder investigation.

    Reply
  8. One of the best books I’ve read this year was “The Ink Black Heart” by Robert Galbraith, aka J.K. Rowling.
    It’s brilliantly written representing social media in a murder investigation.

    Reply
  9. One of the best books I’ve read this year was “The Ink Black Heart” by Robert Galbraith, aka J.K. Rowling.
    It’s brilliantly written representing social media in a murder investigation.

    Reply
  10. One of the best books I’ve read this year was “The Ink Black Heart” by Robert Galbraith, aka J.K. Rowling.
    It’s brilliantly written representing social media in a murder investigation.

    Reply
  11. I really enjoyed Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus. It was quite different to anything I have read but I enjoyed the quirkiness , the humour, and loved the determination of Elizabeth Zott who succeeded in the scientific world considered only suitable for men!!!!

    Reply
  12. I really enjoyed Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus. It was quite different to anything I have read but I enjoyed the quirkiness , the humour, and loved the determination of Elizabeth Zott who succeeded in the scientific world considered only suitable for men!!!!

    Reply
  13. I really enjoyed Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus. It was quite different to anything I have read but I enjoyed the quirkiness , the humour, and loved the determination of Elizabeth Zott who succeeded in the scientific world considered only suitable for men!!!!

    Reply
  14. I really enjoyed Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus. It was quite different to anything I have read but I enjoyed the quirkiness , the humour, and loved the determination of Elizabeth Zott who succeeded in the scientific world considered only suitable for men!!!!

    Reply
  15. I really enjoyed Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus. It was quite different to anything I have read but I enjoyed the quirkiness , the humour, and loved the determination of Elizabeth Zott who succeeded in the scientific world considered only suitable for men!!!!

    Reply
  16. Hello, Mary Jo! I am so pleased to be back with you again and how lovely to “see” you after all these years. I will never forget my very first RWA getting into the elevator with you and fan-girling all over you. And yes, a happy ending for Paddy in the story, as in real life, thank goodness!

    Reply
  17. Hello, Mary Jo! I am so pleased to be back with you again and how lovely to “see” you after all these years. I will never forget my very first RWA getting into the elevator with you and fan-girling all over you. And yes, a happy ending for Paddy in the story, as in real life, thank goodness!

    Reply
  18. Hello, Mary Jo! I am so pleased to be back with you again and how lovely to “see” you after all these years. I will never forget my very first RWA getting into the elevator with you and fan-girling all over you. And yes, a happy ending for Paddy in the story, as in real life, thank goodness!

    Reply
  19. Hello, Mary Jo! I am so pleased to be back with you again and how lovely to “see” you after all these years. I will never forget my very first RWA getting into the elevator with you and fan-girling all over you. And yes, a happy ending for Paddy in the story, as in real life, thank goodness!

    Reply
  20. Hello, Mary Jo! I am so pleased to be back with you again and how lovely to “see” you after all these years. I will never forget my very first RWA getting into the elevator with you and fan-girling all over you. And yes, a happy ending for Paddy in the story, as in real life, thank goodness!

    Reply
  21. I read so many really good books that I could never pick one as the best. It is already September.
    I am thankful for sites like Word Wenches to help me learn of some authors that are new to me.

    Reply
  22. I read so many really good books that I could never pick one as the best. It is already September.
    I am thankful for sites like Word Wenches to help me learn of some authors that are new to me.

    Reply
  23. I read so many really good books that I could never pick one as the best. It is already September.
    I am thankful for sites like Word Wenches to help me learn of some authors that are new to me.

    Reply
  24. I read so many really good books that I could never pick one as the best. It is already September.
    I am thankful for sites like Word Wenches to help me learn of some authors that are new to me.

    Reply
  25. I read so many really good books that I could never pick one as the best. It is already September.
    I am thankful for sites like Word Wenches to help me learn of some authors that are new to me.

    Reply
  26. I’ve read so many awesome books this year I’m having a great deal of difficulty culling it down to one. I did really like Lessons in Chemistry as suggested by Lesley but I also got entirely hooked by a sci fi series by Nathan Lowell – The Golden Age of the Solar Clipper. Astonishingly awesome! Christine your new book really interests me and has definitely joined my TBR pile – which is huge and growing ever larger!! Thank you for a very interesting post.

    Reply
  27. I’ve read so many awesome books this year I’m having a great deal of difficulty culling it down to one. I did really like Lessons in Chemistry as suggested by Lesley but I also got entirely hooked by a sci fi series by Nathan Lowell – The Golden Age of the Solar Clipper. Astonishingly awesome! Christine your new book really interests me and has definitely joined my TBR pile – which is huge and growing ever larger!! Thank you for a very interesting post.

    Reply
  28. I’ve read so many awesome books this year I’m having a great deal of difficulty culling it down to one. I did really like Lessons in Chemistry as suggested by Lesley but I also got entirely hooked by a sci fi series by Nathan Lowell – The Golden Age of the Solar Clipper. Astonishingly awesome! Christine your new book really interests me and has definitely joined my TBR pile – which is huge and growing ever larger!! Thank you for a very interesting post.

    Reply
  29. I’ve read so many awesome books this year I’m having a great deal of difficulty culling it down to one. I did really like Lessons in Chemistry as suggested by Lesley but I also got entirely hooked by a sci fi series by Nathan Lowell – The Golden Age of the Solar Clipper. Astonishingly awesome! Christine your new book really interests me and has definitely joined my TBR pile – which is huge and growing ever larger!! Thank you for a very interesting post.

    Reply
  30. I’ve read so many awesome books this year I’m having a great deal of difficulty culling it down to one. I did really like Lessons in Chemistry as suggested by Lesley but I also got entirely hooked by a sci fi series by Nathan Lowell – The Golden Age of the Solar Clipper. Astonishingly awesome! Christine your new book really interests me and has definitely joined my TBR pile – which is huge and growing ever larger!! Thank you for a very interesting post.

    Reply
  31. I don’t either – it was a recommend on one of my reading sites and my library had some so I thought – why not? I intended to just peruse the first chapter but when I looked up and it was four hours later – I knew I was hooked. You would really be expanding your horizons as the whole series takes place in outer space – the deep dark!

    Reply
  32. I don’t either – it was a recommend on one of my reading sites and my library had some so I thought – why not? I intended to just peruse the first chapter but when I looked up and it was four hours later – I knew I was hooked. You would really be expanding your horizons as the whole series takes place in outer space – the deep dark!

    Reply
  33. I don’t either – it was a recommend on one of my reading sites and my library had some so I thought – why not? I intended to just peruse the first chapter but when I looked up and it was four hours later – I knew I was hooked. You would really be expanding your horizons as the whole series takes place in outer space – the deep dark!

    Reply
  34. I don’t either – it was a recommend on one of my reading sites and my library had some so I thought – why not? I intended to just peruse the first chapter but when I looked up and it was four hours later – I knew I was hooked. You would really be expanding your horizons as the whole series takes place in outer space – the deep dark!

    Reply
  35. I don’t either – it was a recommend on one of my reading sites and my library had some so I thought – why not? I intended to just peruse the first chapter but when I looked up and it was four hours later – I knew I was hooked. You would really be expanding your horizons as the whole series takes place in outer space – the deep dark!

    Reply
  36. Anna, that was one of my favorites as a child, too. I also loved the TV series that was made of it. Unlike many TV adaptations, I felt it was quite faithful to the book. The little actor who played Dickon was just as I’d imagined him.

    Reply
  37. Anna, that was one of my favorites as a child, too. I also loved the TV series that was made of it. Unlike many TV adaptations, I felt it was quite faithful to the book. The little actor who played Dickon was just as I’d imagined him.

    Reply
  38. Anna, that was one of my favorites as a child, too. I also loved the TV series that was made of it. Unlike many TV adaptations, I felt it was quite faithful to the book. The little actor who played Dickon was just as I’d imagined him.

    Reply
  39. Anna, that was one of my favorites as a child, too. I also loved the TV series that was made of it. Unlike many TV adaptations, I felt it was quite faithful to the book. The little actor who played Dickon was just as I’d imagined him.

    Reply
  40. Anna, that was one of my favorites as a child, too. I also loved the TV series that was made of it. Unlike many TV adaptations, I felt it was quite faithful to the book. The little actor who played Dickon was just as I’d imagined him.

    Reply
  41. Janet after reading your comments I popped over to amazon to buy it, and discovered I already had, in June. Did you recommend it in a WWR comment? I haven’t read it yet, but will very soon.
    I do enjoy fantasy and sci-fi. Have you ever seen the video series Firefly, with a young Nathan Fillion as a sci-fi deep space sort-of-cowboy. Wonderful. In fact, having mentioned it now, I think I’m going to have to watch it again. It’s a cult classic.

    Reply
  42. Janet after reading your comments I popped over to amazon to buy it, and discovered I already had, in June. Did you recommend it in a WWR comment? I haven’t read it yet, but will very soon.
    I do enjoy fantasy and sci-fi. Have you ever seen the video series Firefly, with a young Nathan Fillion as a sci-fi deep space sort-of-cowboy. Wonderful. In fact, having mentioned it now, I think I’m going to have to watch it again. It’s a cult classic.

    Reply
  43. Janet after reading your comments I popped over to amazon to buy it, and discovered I already had, in June. Did you recommend it in a WWR comment? I haven’t read it yet, but will very soon.
    I do enjoy fantasy and sci-fi. Have you ever seen the video series Firefly, with a young Nathan Fillion as a sci-fi deep space sort-of-cowboy. Wonderful. In fact, having mentioned it now, I think I’m going to have to watch it again. It’s a cult classic.

    Reply
  44. Janet after reading your comments I popped over to amazon to buy it, and discovered I already had, in June. Did you recommend it in a WWR comment? I haven’t read it yet, but will very soon.
    I do enjoy fantasy and sci-fi. Have you ever seen the video series Firefly, with a young Nathan Fillion as a sci-fi deep space sort-of-cowboy. Wonderful. In fact, having mentioned it now, I think I’m going to have to watch it again. It’s a cult classic.

    Reply
  45. Janet after reading your comments I popped over to amazon to buy it, and discovered I already had, in June. Did you recommend it in a WWR comment? I haven’t read it yet, but will very soon.
    I do enjoy fantasy and sci-fi. Have you ever seen the video series Firefly, with a young Nathan Fillion as a sci-fi deep space sort-of-cowboy. Wonderful. In fact, having mentioned it now, I think I’m going to have to watch it again. It’s a cult classic.

    Reply
  46. Christine and Anne, thank you for a wonderful interview. I wish your book every success, Christine; it, and the women who inspired it, sound fascinating.
    I will second recommendations for Nathan Lowell’s The Golden Age of the Solar Clipper (which my husband recently enjoyed for the first time) as well as Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus. I’ll nominate a different book, the first in a science fiction series, Linesman by SK Dunstsll.

    Reply
  47. Christine and Anne, thank you for a wonderful interview. I wish your book every success, Christine; it, and the women who inspired it, sound fascinating.
    I will second recommendations for Nathan Lowell’s The Golden Age of the Solar Clipper (which my husband recently enjoyed for the first time) as well as Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus. I’ll nominate a different book, the first in a science fiction series, Linesman by SK Dunstsll.

    Reply
  48. Christine and Anne, thank you for a wonderful interview. I wish your book every success, Christine; it, and the women who inspired it, sound fascinating.
    I will second recommendations for Nathan Lowell’s The Golden Age of the Solar Clipper (which my husband recently enjoyed for the first time) as well as Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus. I’ll nominate a different book, the first in a science fiction series, Linesman by SK Dunstsll.

    Reply
  49. Christine and Anne, thank you for a wonderful interview. I wish your book every success, Christine; it, and the women who inspired it, sound fascinating.
    I will second recommendations for Nathan Lowell’s The Golden Age of the Solar Clipper (which my husband recently enjoyed for the first time) as well as Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus. I’ll nominate a different book, the first in a science fiction series, Linesman by SK Dunstsll.

    Reply
  50. Christine and Anne, thank you for a wonderful interview. I wish your book every success, Christine; it, and the women who inspired it, sound fascinating.
    I will second recommendations for Nathan Lowell’s The Golden Age of the Solar Clipper (which my husband recently enjoyed for the first time) as well as Lessons in Chemistry by Bonnie Garmus. I’ll nominate a different book, the first in a science fiction series, Linesman by SK Dunstsll.

    Reply
  51. Welcome, Christine (waving madly!) So wonderful to have you back at the Wenches.
    Fabulous interview! Paddy sounds absolutely fascinating! I can’t wait to read the book. I love that so many unsung women in WWII are getting the credit that they deserve.

    Reply
  52. Welcome, Christine (waving madly!) So wonderful to have you back at the Wenches.
    Fabulous interview! Paddy sounds absolutely fascinating! I can’t wait to read the book. I love that so many unsung women in WWII are getting the credit that they deserve.

    Reply
  53. Welcome, Christine (waving madly!) So wonderful to have you back at the Wenches.
    Fabulous interview! Paddy sounds absolutely fascinating! I can’t wait to read the book. I love that so many unsung women in WWII are getting the credit that they deserve.

    Reply
  54. Welcome, Christine (waving madly!) So wonderful to have you back at the Wenches.
    Fabulous interview! Paddy sounds absolutely fascinating! I can’t wait to read the book. I love that so many unsung women in WWII are getting the credit that they deserve.

    Reply
  55. Welcome, Christine (waving madly!) So wonderful to have you back at the Wenches.
    Fabulous interview! Paddy sounds absolutely fascinating! I can’t wait to read the book. I love that so many unsung women in WWII are getting the credit that they deserve.

    Reply
  56. The most interesting book I’ve read so far this year has been Code Girls by Liza Mundy. “the untold story of the American women code breakers of World War II” – women from many different backgrounds who were sought out for their wild talent for cryptography, and worked in relative obscurity with little acknowledgement of their importance – and what happened to some of them after the war. A real time capsule 🙂

    Reply
  57. The most interesting book I’ve read so far this year has been Code Girls by Liza Mundy. “the untold story of the American women code breakers of World War II” – women from many different backgrounds who were sought out for their wild talent for cryptography, and worked in relative obscurity with little acknowledgement of their importance – and what happened to some of them after the war. A real time capsule 🙂

    Reply
  58. The most interesting book I’ve read so far this year has been Code Girls by Liza Mundy. “the untold story of the American women code breakers of World War II” – women from many different backgrounds who were sought out for their wild talent for cryptography, and worked in relative obscurity with little acknowledgement of their importance – and what happened to some of them after the war. A real time capsule 🙂

    Reply
  59. The most interesting book I’ve read so far this year has been Code Girls by Liza Mundy. “the untold story of the American women code breakers of World War II” – women from many different backgrounds who were sought out for their wild talent for cryptography, and worked in relative obscurity with little acknowledgement of their importance – and what happened to some of them after the war. A real time capsule 🙂

    Reply
  60. The most interesting book I’ve read so far this year has been Code Girls by Liza Mundy. “the untold story of the American women code breakers of World War II” – women from many different backgrounds who were sought out for their wild talent for cryptography, and worked in relative obscurity with little acknowledgement of their importance – and what happened to some of them after the war. A real time capsule 🙂

    Reply
  61. Christine-I cam’t wait to add The Juliet Code to my TBR list. As to my favorite book of the year, I’m afraid I’ll have to offer two titles. The first is by Susan Wiggs: The Ocean Between Us, which to me was a real tour de force. And the second is Sharon Sala’s The Best of Me, the 13th and concluding book of her lovely small town Blessings, Georgia, series. And I’ll close with thanking Anne for orchestrating a wonderful interview.

    Reply
  62. Christine-I cam’t wait to add The Juliet Code to my TBR list. As to my favorite book of the year, I’m afraid I’ll have to offer two titles. The first is by Susan Wiggs: The Ocean Between Us, which to me was a real tour de force. And the second is Sharon Sala’s The Best of Me, the 13th and concluding book of her lovely small town Blessings, Georgia, series. And I’ll close with thanking Anne for orchestrating a wonderful interview.

    Reply
  63. Christine-I cam’t wait to add The Juliet Code to my TBR list. As to my favorite book of the year, I’m afraid I’ll have to offer two titles. The first is by Susan Wiggs: The Ocean Between Us, which to me was a real tour de force. And the second is Sharon Sala’s The Best of Me, the 13th and concluding book of her lovely small town Blessings, Georgia, series. And I’ll close with thanking Anne for orchestrating a wonderful interview.

    Reply
  64. Christine-I cam’t wait to add The Juliet Code to my TBR list. As to my favorite book of the year, I’m afraid I’ll have to offer two titles. The first is by Susan Wiggs: The Ocean Between Us, which to me was a real tour de force. And the second is Sharon Sala’s The Best of Me, the 13th and concluding book of her lovely small town Blessings, Georgia, series. And I’ll close with thanking Anne for orchestrating a wonderful interview.

    Reply
  65. Christine-I cam’t wait to add The Juliet Code to my TBR list. As to my favorite book of the year, I’m afraid I’ll have to offer two titles. The first is by Susan Wiggs: The Ocean Between Us, which to me was a real tour de force. And the second is Sharon Sala’s The Best of Me, the 13th and concluding book of her lovely small town Blessings, Georgia, series. And I’ll close with thanking Anne for orchestrating a wonderful interview.

    Reply
  66. I’m not sure I can name just one book from the last year but I read a cracker last week – Nightwork by Nora Roberts.
    One Woman’s War sounds fascinating – is it available as an audiobook as well? (If so, who is the narrator?)
    Thx Anne & Christine for an interesting and entertaining interview. 😊👏

    Reply
  67. I’m not sure I can name just one book from the last year but I read a cracker last week – Nightwork by Nora Roberts.
    One Woman’s War sounds fascinating – is it available as an audiobook as well? (If so, who is the narrator?)
    Thx Anne & Christine for an interesting and entertaining interview. 😊👏

    Reply
  68. I’m not sure I can name just one book from the last year but I read a cracker last week – Nightwork by Nora Roberts.
    One Woman’s War sounds fascinating – is it available as an audiobook as well? (If so, who is the narrator?)
    Thx Anne & Christine for an interesting and entertaining interview. 😊👏

    Reply
  69. I’m not sure I can name just one book from the last year but I read a cracker last week – Nightwork by Nora Roberts.
    One Woman’s War sounds fascinating – is it available as an audiobook as well? (If so, who is the narrator?)
    Thx Anne & Christine for an interesting and entertaining interview. 😊👏

    Reply
  70. I’m not sure I can name just one book from the last year but I read a cracker last week – Nightwork by Nora Roberts.
    One Woman’s War sounds fascinating – is it available as an audiobook as well? (If so, who is the narrator?)
    Thx Anne & Christine for an interesting and entertaining interview. 😊👏

    Reply
  71. The Lost Lieutenant by Erica Vetsch
    The darkest Hour by Jennifer Robson
    The Gown by Jennifer Robson
    Jeb’s Wife by Patricia Johns
    Marriage of Inconvenience by Cheryl Bolen

    Reply
  72. The Lost Lieutenant by Erica Vetsch
    The darkest Hour by Jennifer Robson
    The Gown by Jennifer Robson
    Jeb’s Wife by Patricia Johns
    Marriage of Inconvenience by Cheryl Bolen

    Reply
  73. The Lost Lieutenant by Erica Vetsch
    The darkest Hour by Jennifer Robson
    The Gown by Jennifer Robson
    Jeb’s Wife by Patricia Johns
    Marriage of Inconvenience by Cheryl Bolen

    Reply
  74. The Lost Lieutenant by Erica Vetsch
    The darkest Hour by Jennifer Robson
    The Gown by Jennifer Robson
    Jeb’s Wife by Patricia Johns
    Marriage of Inconvenience by Cheryl Bolen

    Reply
  75. The Lost Lieutenant by Erica Vetsch
    The darkest Hour by Jennifer Robson
    The Gown by Jennifer Robson
    Jeb’s Wife by Patricia Johns
    Marriage of Inconvenience by Cheryl Bolen

    Reply
  76. Welcome Christine! I will be reading your novel which sounds unforgettable. I have read many memorable novels but my favorite this year was The Girl They Left Behind by Roxanne Veletzos. Enthralling, meaningful and profound.

    Reply
  77. Welcome Christine! I will be reading your novel which sounds unforgettable. I have read many memorable novels but my favorite this year was The Girl They Left Behind by Roxanne Veletzos. Enthralling, meaningful and profound.

    Reply
  78. Welcome Christine! I will be reading your novel which sounds unforgettable. I have read many memorable novels but my favorite this year was The Girl They Left Behind by Roxanne Veletzos. Enthralling, meaningful and profound.

    Reply
  79. Welcome Christine! I will be reading your novel which sounds unforgettable. I have read many memorable novels but my favorite this year was The Girl They Left Behind by Roxanne Veletzos. Enthralling, meaningful and profound.

    Reply
  80. Welcome Christine! I will be reading your novel which sounds unforgettable. I have read many memorable novels but my favorite this year was The Girl They Left Behind by Roxanne Veletzos. Enthralling, meaningful and profound.

    Reply
  81. I enjoyed your wonderful interview and learning about your historicals. My favorite era and subject is WW11 as it was such a vital time in our lives. Being born in the 1940’s I gravitate to novels set during that time. A book which I read this year and will always think about was The Only Woman in the Room by Marie Benedict.

    Reply
  82. I enjoyed your wonderful interview and learning about your historicals. My favorite era and subject is WW11 as it was such a vital time in our lives. Being born in the 1940’s I gravitate to novels set during that time. A book which I read this year and will always think about was The Only Woman in the Room by Marie Benedict.

    Reply
  83. I enjoyed your wonderful interview and learning about your historicals. My favorite era and subject is WW11 as it was such a vital time in our lives. Being born in the 1940’s I gravitate to novels set during that time. A book which I read this year and will always think about was The Only Woman in the Room by Marie Benedict.

    Reply
  84. I enjoyed your wonderful interview and learning about your historicals. My favorite era and subject is WW11 as it was such a vital time in our lives. Being born in the 1940’s I gravitate to novels set during that time. A book which I read this year and will always think about was The Only Woman in the Room by Marie Benedict.

    Reply
  85. I enjoyed your wonderful interview and learning about your historicals. My favorite era and subject is WW11 as it was such a vital time in our lives. Being born in the 1940’s I gravitate to novels set during that time. A book which I read this year and will always think about was The Only Woman in the Room by Marie Benedict.

    Reply
  86. WOW! Where do I begin? I loved the interview and the excerpt and the introductions to so many books. I thank you both for sharing such wonderful information.
    In the past year – a mystery – The Birdcage Murders by Karen Baugh Menuhin. It is a mystery but with lots of humor and fun. There is another book, The Pink House by Cindy Kirk. It is a little magical story about finding what we truly need in our lives. Normally, I would not be a fan of magical, but this one drew me into the story. I read a lot of terrific books in the past year. So many I found it difficult to name just these two. These two books are fun reads.
    Your excerpt showing Paddy being such a confident woman made me really fall in love with who she was. Aren’t we fortunate that history has shown us women who knew how to use their power for good?

    Reply
  87. WOW! Where do I begin? I loved the interview and the excerpt and the introductions to so many books. I thank you both for sharing such wonderful information.
    In the past year – a mystery – The Birdcage Murders by Karen Baugh Menuhin. It is a mystery but with lots of humor and fun. There is another book, The Pink House by Cindy Kirk. It is a little magical story about finding what we truly need in our lives. Normally, I would not be a fan of magical, but this one drew me into the story. I read a lot of terrific books in the past year. So many I found it difficult to name just these two. These two books are fun reads.
    Your excerpt showing Paddy being such a confident woman made me really fall in love with who she was. Aren’t we fortunate that history has shown us women who knew how to use their power for good?

    Reply
  88. WOW! Where do I begin? I loved the interview and the excerpt and the introductions to so many books. I thank you both for sharing such wonderful information.
    In the past year – a mystery – The Birdcage Murders by Karen Baugh Menuhin. It is a mystery but with lots of humor and fun. There is another book, The Pink House by Cindy Kirk. It is a little magical story about finding what we truly need in our lives. Normally, I would not be a fan of magical, but this one drew me into the story. I read a lot of terrific books in the past year. So many I found it difficult to name just these two. These two books are fun reads.
    Your excerpt showing Paddy being such a confident woman made me really fall in love with who she was. Aren’t we fortunate that history has shown us women who knew how to use their power for good?

    Reply
  89. WOW! Where do I begin? I loved the interview and the excerpt and the introductions to so many books. I thank you both for sharing such wonderful information.
    In the past year – a mystery – The Birdcage Murders by Karen Baugh Menuhin. It is a mystery but with lots of humor and fun. There is another book, The Pink House by Cindy Kirk. It is a little magical story about finding what we truly need in our lives. Normally, I would not be a fan of magical, but this one drew me into the story. I read a lot of terrific books in the past year. So many I found it difficult to name just these two. These two books are fun reads.
    Your excerpt showing Paddy being such a confident woman made me really fall in love with who she was. Aren’t we fortunate that history has shown us women who knew how to use their power for good?

    Reply
  90. WOW! Where do I begin? I loved the interview and the excerpt and the introductions to so many books. I thank you both for sharing such wonderful information.
    In the past year – a mystery – The Birdcage Murders by Karen Baugh Menuhin. It is a mystery but with lots of humor and fun. There is another book, The Pink House by Cindy Kirk. It is a little magical story about finding what we truly need in our lives. Normally, I would not be a fan of magical, but this one drew me into the story. I read a lot of terrific books in the past year. So many I found it difficult to name just these two. These two books are fun reads.
    Your excerpt showing Paddy being such a confident woman made me really fall in love with who she was. Aren’t we fortunate that history has shown us women who knew how to use their power for good?

    Reply
  91. That does sound fascinating, Janice. We hear a lot about Bletchley Park but there were codebreakers all over the world, including in Australia, where I live. There’s another book by Alli Sinclair called “The Codebreakers” about the Australians.

    Reply
  92. That does sound fascinating, Janice. We hear a lot about Bletchley Park but there were codebreakers all over the world, including in Australia, where I live. There’s another book by Alli Sinclair called “The Codebreakers” about the Australians.

    Reply
  93. That does sound fascinating, Janice. We hear a lot about Bletchley Park but there were codebreakers all over the world, including in Australia, where I live. There’s another book by Alli Sinclair called “The Codebreakers” about the Australians.

    Reply
  94. That does sound fascinating, Janice. We hear a lot about Bletchley Park but there were codebreakers all over the world, including in Australia, where I live. There’s another book by Alli Sinclair called “The Codebreakers” about the Australians.

    Reply
  95. That does sound fascinating, Janice. We hear a lot about Bletchley Park but there were codebreakers all over the world, including in Australia, where I live. There’s another book by Alli Sinclair called “The Codebreakers” about the Australians.

    Reply
  96. Hi Kaetrin, I love Nora Roberts–must check out Nightwork. Yes, One Woman’s War is in audiobook, narrated by Saskia Maarleveld, who also narrates Kate Quinn’s books and is wonderful. I particularly love that she can do accents well, which is always required in my books! Being a keen audiobook listener, I know how important the narrator is. Thanks for dropping in!

    Reply
  97. Hi Kaetrin, I love Nora Roberts–must check out Nightwork. Yes, One Woman’s War is in audiobook, narrated by Saskia Maarleveld, who also narrates Kate Quinn’s books and is wonderful. I particularly love that she can do accents well, which is always required in my books! Being a keen audiobook listener, I know how important the narrator is. Thanks for dropping in!

    Reply
  98. Hi Kaetrin, I love Nora Roberts–must check out Nightwork. Yes, One Woman’s War is in audiobook, narrated by Saskia Maarleveld, who also narrates Kate Quinn’s books and is wonderful. I particularly love that she can do accents well, which is always required in my books! Being a keen audiobook listener, I know how important the narrator is. Thanks for dropping in!

    Reply
  99. Hi Kaetrin, I love Nora Roberts–must check out Nightwork. Yes, One Woman’s War is in audiobook, narrated by Saskia Maarleveld, who also narrates Kate Quinn’s books and is wonderful. I particularly love that she can do accents well, which is always required in my books! Being a keen audiobook listener, I know how important the narrator is. Thanks for dropping in!

    Reply
  100. Hi Kaetrin, I love Nora Roberts–must check out Nightwork. Yes, One Woman’s War is in audiobook, narrated by Saskia Maarleveld, who also narrates Kate Quinn’s books and is wonderful. I particularly love that she can do accents well, which is always required in my books! Being a keen audiobook listener, I know how important the narrator is. Thanks for dropping in!

    Reply
  101. That’s a lovely sentiment, Annette. Thank you, I’m glad you enjoyed the interview. Your recommendations sound delightful. I agree, I’m not usually one for magic but I occasionally it works brilliantly for me. I do love a book with a sense of humour–even in the darkest times, people usually manage to laugh about something, don’t they? Despite Paddy’s story being set during the war, there is plenty of humour in the everyday. Glad you liked the excerpt. I would have loved to have known Paddy in real life.

    Reply
  102. That’s a lovely sentiment, Annette. Thank you, I’m glad you enjoyed the interview. Your recommendations sound delightful. I agree, I’m not usually one for magic but I occasionally it works brilliantly for me. I do love a book with a sense of humour–even in the darkest times, people usually manage to laugh about something, don’t they? Despite Paddy’s story being set during the war, there is plenty of humour in the everyday. Glad you liked the excerpt. I would have loved to have known Paddy in real life.

    Reply
  103. That’s a lovely sentiment, Annette. Thank you, I’m glad you enjoyed the interview. Your recommendations sound delightful. I agree, I’m not usually one for magic but I occasionally it works brilliantly for me. I do love a book with a sense of humour–even in the darkest times, people usually manage to laugh about something, don’t they? Despite Paddy’s story being set during the war, there is plenty of humour in the everyday. Glad you liked the excerpt. I would have loved to have known Paddy in real life.

    Reply
  104. That’s a lovely sentiment, Annette. Thank you, I’m glad you enjoyed the interview. Your recommendations sound delightful. I agree, I’m not usually one for magic but I occasionally it works brilliantly for me. I do love a book with a sense of humour–even in the darkest times, people usually manage to laugh about something, don’t they? Despite Paddy’s story being set during the war, there is plenty of humour in the everyday. Glad you liked the excerpt. I would have loved to have known Paddy in real life.

    Reply
  105. That’s a lovely sentiment, Annette. Thank you, I’m glad you enjoyed the interview. Your recommendations sound delightful. I agree, I’m not usually one for magic but I occasionally it works brilliantly for me. I do love a book with a sense of humour–even in the darkest times, people usually manage to laugh about something, don’t they? Despite Paddy’s story being set during the war, there is plenty of humour in the everyday. Glad you liked the excerpt. I would have loved to have known Paddy in real life.

    Reply
  106. what an informative and extremely interesting interview especially about the research. Ever since I was young my reading interests concentrated on sagas about World War 2. They made me think about the courage, and strength required in order to thrive and survive during this horrendous time. My ultimate favorite novel is The House at Tyneford by Natasha Solomons.

    Reply
  107. what an informative and extremely interesting interview especially about the research. Ever since I was young my reading interests concentrated on sagas about World War 2. They made me think about the courage, and strength required in order to thrive and survive during this horrendous time. My ultimate favorite novel is The House at Tyneford by Natasha Solomons.

    Reply
  108. what an informative and extremely interesting interview especially about the research. Ever since I was young my reading interests concentrated on sagas about World War 2. They made me think about the courage, and strength required in order to thrive and survive during this horrendous time. My ultimate favorite novel is The House at Tyneford by Natasha Solomons.

    Reply
  109. what an informative and extremely interesting interview especially about the research. Ever since I was young my reading interests concentrated on sagas about World War 2. They made me think about the courage, and strength required in order to thrive and survive during this horrendous time. My ultimate favorite novel is The House at Tyneford by Natasha Solomons.

    Reply
  110. what an informative and extremely interesting interview especially about the research. Ever since I was young my reading interests concentrated on sagas about World War 2. They made me think about the courage, and strength required in order to thrive and survive during this horrendous time. My ultimate favorite novel is The House at Tyneford by Natasha Solomons.

    Reply
  111. Your book sounds fabulous! I’ve read a number of good books so far but I’ll recommend the first in a new series by Mark Pryor. Die Around Sundown is set in Paris at the start of the German occupation. Its hero is a WWI veteran who is now a police detective and is required to work along with the Nazis in solving crimes. It has some great characters and twists in the plot.

    Reply
  112. Your book sounds fabulous! I’ve read a number of good books so far but I’ll recommend the first in a new series by Mark Pryor. Die Around Sundown is set in Paris at the start of the German occupation. Its hero is a WWI veteran who is now a police detective and is required to work along with the Nazis in solving crimes. It has some great characters and twists in the plot.

    Reply
  113. Your book sounds fabulous! I’ve read a number of good books so far but I’ll recommend the first in a new series by Mark Pryor. Die Around Sundown is set in Paris at the start of the German occupation. Its hero is a WWI veteran who is now a police detective and is required to work along with the Nazis in solving crimes. It has some great characters and twists in the plot.

    Reply
  114. Your book sounds fabulous! I’ve read a number of good books so far but I’ll recommend the first in a new series by Mark Pryor. Die Around Sundown is set in Paris at the start of the German occupation. Its hero is a WWI veteran who is now a police detective and is required to work along with the Nazis in solving crimes. It has some great characters and twists in the plot.

    Reply
  115. Your book sounds fabulous! I’ve read a number of good books so far but I’ll recommend the first in a new series by Mark Pryor. Die Around Sundown is set in Paris at the start of the German occupation. Its hero is a WWI veteran who is now a police detective and is required to work along with the Nazis in solving crimes. It has some great characters and twists in the plot.

    Reply
  116. Thanks so much, Pat! Love the sound of this series. It reminds me a bit of the British alternative history, SS Great Britain where the Nazis occupy England and the police have to work with the S.S. It must have been a very difficult tightrope to walk. Thank you for the recommendation.

    Reply
  117. Thanks so much, Pat! Love the sound of this series. It reminds me a bit of the British alternative history, SS Great Britain where the Nazis occupy England and the police have to work with the S.S. It must have been a very difficult tightrope to walk. Thank you for the recommendation.

    Reply
  118. Thanks so much, Pat! Love the sound of this series. It reminds me a bit of the British alternative history, SS Great Britain where the Nazis occupy England and the police have to work with the S.S. It must have been a very difficult tightrope to walk. Thank you for the recommendation.

    Reply
  119. Thanks so much, Pat! Love the sound of this series. It reminds me a bit of the British alternative history, SS Great Britain where the Nazis occupy England and the police have to work with the S.S. It must have been a very difficult tightrope to walk. Thank you for the recommendation.

    Reply
  120. Thanks so much, Pat! Love the sound of this series. It reminds me a bit of the British alternative history, SS Great Britain where the Nazis occupy England and the police have to work with the S.S. It must have been a very difficult tightrope to walk. Thank you for the recommendation.

    Reply
  121. I’ve read many excellent books this year, but just to pick something a bit off the beaten track, I am loving Joyce Harmon’s traditional Regency romances. They are fairly recent, but read like something that could have been written decades ago. The one to start with is “A Feather To Fly With” and it is funny and delightful. There are 4 more in the series that revolves around the same group of characters.
    One Woman’s War sounds great, I am definitely adding it to my TBR list.

    Reply
  122. I’ve read many excellent books this year, but just to pick something a bit off the beaten track, I am loving Joyce Harmon’s traditional Regency romances. They are fairly recent, but read like something that could have been written decades ago. The one to start with is “A Feather To Fly With” and it is funny and delightful. There are 4 more in the series that revolves around the same group of characters.
    One Woman’s War sounds great, I am definitely adding it to my TBR list.

    Reply
  123. I’ve read many excellent books this year, but just to pick something a bit off the beaten track, I am loving Joyce Harmon’s traditional Regency romances. They are fairly recent, but read like something that could have been written decades ago. The one to start with is “A Feather To Fly With” and it is funny and delightful. There are 4 more in the series that revolves around the same group of characters.
    One Woman’s War sounds great, I am definitely adding it to my TBR list.

    Reply
  124. I’ve read many excellent books this year, but just to pick something a bit off the beaten track, I am loving Joyce Harmon’s traditional Regency romances. They are fairly recent, but read like something that could have been written decades ago. The one to start with is “A Feather To Fly With” and it is funny and delightful. There are 4 more in the series that revolves around the same group of characters.
    One Woman’s War sounds great, I am definitely adding it to my TBR list.

    Reply
  125. I’ve read many excellent books this year, but just to pick something a bit off the beaten track, I am loving Joyce Harmon’s traditional Regency romances. They are fairly recent, but read like something that could have been written decades ago. The one to start with is “A Feather To Fly With” and it is funny and delightful. There are 4 more in the series that revolves around the same group of characters.
    One Woman’s War sounds great, I am definitely adding it to my TBR list.

    Reply
  126. P.S. Christine, your books seem to be improperly classified on U.S. Amazon. When I go to your author page, One Woman’s War is the only book that appears, and I had trouble locating your previous writings. Searching for The Juliet Code brings up many, many listings of Shakespeare’s play!

    Reply
  127. P.S. Christine, your books seem to be improperly classified on U.S. Amazon. When I go to your author page, One Woman’s War is the only book that appears, and I had trouble locating your previous writings. Searching for The Juliet Code brings up many, many listings of Shakespeare’s play!

    Reply
  128. P.S. Christine, your books seem to be improperly classified on U.S. Amazon. When I go to your author page, One Woman’s War is the only book that appears, and I had trouble locating your previous writings. Searching for The Juliet Code brings up many, many listings of Shakespeare’s play!

    Reply
  129. P.S. Christine, your books seem to be improperly classified on U.S. Amazon. When I go to your author page, One Woman’s War is the only book that appears, and I had trouble locating your previous writings. Searching for The Juliet Code brings up many, many listings of Shakespeare’s play!

    Reply
  130. P.S. Christine, your books seem to be improperly classified on U.S. Amazon. When I go to your author page, One Woman’s War is the only book that appears, and I had trouble locating your previous writings. Searching for The Juliet Code brings up many, many listings of Shakespeare’s play!

    Reply
  131. Thanks for letting us know, Alice. It’s a problem sometimes, as Amazon recognizes (by some sneaky means) that Christine and I are from Australia and so they don’t always show us the same things as US people looking at the same page on the same site. I often have to ask the wenches to check things for me — links, prices, covers, sometimes even titles can vary. It’s very frustrating, and there’s seemingly no way around it.

    Reply
  132. Thanks for letting us know, Alice. It’s a problem sometimes, as Amazon recognizes (by some sneaky means) that Christine and I are from Australia and so they don’t always show us the same things as US people looking at the same page on the same site. I often have to ask the wenches to check things for me — links, prices, covers, sometimes even titles can vary. It’s very frustrating, and there’s seemingly no way around it.

    Reply
  133. Thanks for letting us know, Alice. It’s a problem sometimes, as Amazon recognizes (by some sneaky means) that Christine and I are from Australia and so they don’t always show us the same things as US people looking at the same page on the same site. I often have to ask the wenches to check things for me — links, prices, covers, sometimes even titles can vary. It’s very frustrating, and there’s seemingly no way around it.

    Reply
  134. Thanks for letting us know, Alice. It’s a problem sometimes, as Amazon recognizes (by some sneaky means) that Christine and I are from Australia and so they don’t always show us the same things as US people looking at the same page on the same site. I often have to ask the wenches to check things for me — links, prices, covers, sometimes even titles can vary. It’s very frustrating, and there’s seemingly no way around it.

    Reply
  135. Thanks for letting us know, Alice. It’s a problem sometimes, as Amazon recognizes (by some sneaky means) that Christine and I are from Australia and so they don’t always show us the same things as US people looking at the same page on the same site. I often have to ask the wenches to check things for me — links, prices, covers, sometimes even titles can vary. It’s very frustrating, and there’s seemingly no way around it.

    Reply

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