Charlotte and Victoria: A Tale of Two Princesses

Cat 243 Dover by Mary Jo

This past weekend I watched the DVD of Young Victoria, the recent movie that covers the early years of Queen Victoria.  A friend of mine called the movie “set design porn <g>,” and it certainly is a gorgeous production.  It’s also reasonably accurate historically in how it depicts Victoria’s youth and her courtship with Albert.

Since I’m currently researching the life of Princess Charlotte for my WIP, Young-victoria-poster-0 the movie got me to thinking about the haunting similarities and differences between these two royal princess. 

Their lives span three centuries.  Charlotte was born in 1796, while Victoria died in 1901. I tend to think of them as belonging to very different eras, yet they were first cousins.  They didn’t look much alike—Charlotte was tall and robust and outgoing, while Victoria was very petite, barely five feet tall, and retiring in nature. 

And Victoria would never have been born if not for Charlotte’s tragic early death.

The Prince Regent

Regular readers of Regency set romances know the outlines of Princess Charlotte’s life.  Her father, George, the Prince of Wales, was the extravagant and undisciplined 422px-George_IV_bust1 eldest son of George III.  The Prince was so volatile and emotional that if he were female, he’d have been accused of permanent PMS.  Our Regency period was named for the years 1811-1820, when he ruled during his father’s madness.  From 1820-1830, he ruled as George IV in his own right. 

The Prince and his brothers were all profoundly marriage averse.  They much preferred mistresses and illegal marriages that were not approved by the king.  Children of such unions could not inherit titles and ranks.  This is in stark contrast to George III and his wife, who had a loving and faithful marriage, and fifteen (!) children, nine of them sons.

Caroline_of_Brunswick With no legitimate grandchildren in sight, at age 32 Prince of Wales was coerced into marriage in return for Parliament paying off his massive debts.  The bride chosen was his first cousin, Caroline of Brunswick, a smallish German state. 

In the 18th and 19th century, there were many marriages between English and Germanic royals, partly because you tend to go with people you know, and the English House of Hanover was itself rooted in the German state of Hanover. 

Even more important, it was necessary for English royals to marry Protestants of royal rank,  That generally meant Northern Europeans, and the largest number of such royals were from Germanic states.

So George married his cousin Caroline, and loathed her so much it’s amazing that even one child was conceived.  They fought for years, he tried to divorce her, and banned her from his coronation. 

The Princess Charlotte Augusta

Princess Charlotte Augusta The casualty in all this was their daughter Charlotte.  She had her own household from infancy, where she was ignored by her father, and her mother was allowed only limited access.  Her father had her raised under smothering restrictions.  She was the heiress to the United Kingdom, yet she was ill-educated, rather wild, and considered awkward and even gauche in her manners when she was young.

Yet even though Charlotte felt unloved and insecure, she retained a basic strength of character and a generosity of spirit.  She loved animals and riding.  She had the will power to break an unwanted betrothal to the Prince of Orange, since it would have meant she had to live in Holland half of each year. (This is why two reigning monarchs should never marry!) 

In 1816, Charlotte married Prince Leopold of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfield, and it seems to Charlotte and Leopold have been a happy marriage.  He was a sober but handsome young man who wished to guide her to better understanding and behavior.  Sadly, Charlotte died of complications after childbirth in 1817.  Her son was still born, and the distraught doctor who had botched the handling of her pregnancy committed suicide three months later.  (It’s known as the triple obstetrical tragedy, since three lives were lost.)

The Princess Victoria

In many ways, the short unhappy life of Princess Charlotte seems like a sketch for the more successful life of her cousin Victoria.  After Charlotte’s death, the Prince Regent’s brothers went into a mad scramble to marry approved wives so they could produce a legitimate heir to the throne.  In the process, long-term partners and children were tossed aside. 

The second brother of the family, the Duke of York, predeceased his brother, who was by now George VI.  The third brother became William the IV.  Called the Sailor King because he’d served in the navy, William was soberer and less wild than his older brothers, but his happy marriage to Adelaide of Saxe-Meiningen produced no surviving children.

The fathering-the-heir sweepstakes were won by the fourth brother, the Duke of Kent, who married Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfield—sister to the widowed Prince Leopold, who suggested the match to the Duke of Kent.  A widow, Princess Victoria had proven her fertility, and she gave birth to Princess Alexandrina Victoria, who was nicknamed Dreena as a girl, but who took the name Victoria when she inherited the throne.

Victoria was raised with appalling strictness—she wasn’t even permitted to go up and down stairs unless she was holding the hand of an adult.  Her father died when she was an infant, and Victoria’s mother, the Duchess of Kent, was determined that the young princess would be raised as a moral and modest young lady. 

This was not a bad goal, given that the sons of George III had behaved so badly that the monarchy had become massively unpopular, and this was an age of revolutions.  But in practice, the “Kensington System” of raising the little princess was perilously close to child abuse. 

The Duchess and John Conroy, controller of her household and quite possibly her lover, tried to bully Victoria into signing an agreement that would have made her subject to her mother’s regency until Victoria reached the age of 25, though 18 was the age at which she could inherit the throne directly.  The movie shows this happening when Victoria was lying on a sickbed, but even then, she had the strength of character to resist their coercion.

The elderly King William loathed the Duchess, and he managed to stay alive until a few weeks after Victoria’s eighteenth birthday in 1837.  When he died, a petite, isolated teenager became titular ruler of a large proportion of the world’s surface. 

442px-The_Young_Queen_Victoria
Yet here the stories of Charlotte and Victoria diverge—and the family relationships become complicated.  One of Victoria’s principal advisors in the early years of her reign was her Uncle Leopold, who had become the King of the Belgians.  Recall that he was the brother of Victoria’s mother—AND the widower of Princess Charlotte.

Moreover—and this the movie shows beautifully—Leopold cultivated his nephew, Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, as a potential consort for Victoria.  They were almost exactly the same age, with Albert a few months younger. 

It took several years for Victoria to feel ready for marriage—she inherited the throne at eighteen, and married at age twenty-one—but when the time came, she chose Albert, and they lived—well, not quite happily ever after, but for twenty-one happy years.

800px-Victoria_Marriage01

Like his Uncle Leopold and Charlotte, Albert became a guide and support to his royal wife.  He was socially liberal and interested in technology, and he was virtually a co-ruler with Victoria.  He also established the principle that the royal family should be above politics, since Britain was a constitutional monarchy. 

Victoria was so proper and formal in her public demeanor that “Victorian” has come to mean prudish, yet she and her husband had a passionate marriage.  Nine children do not happen by accident!  I read in a biography of Victoria that she and her husband had rather erotic art hanging on the walls of their private rooms of Osborne House, their retreat on the Isle of Wight.

427px-Prince_Albert-1842 Albert died at age 42 of what was diagnosed as typhoid fever, possibly aggravated by bad medical treatment, as in the case of Princess Charlotte.  The moral here is that being rich and famous and having the best possible medical treatment could kill you in past centuries.  (I’ve read that both Charles II and George Washington might have died because of too much of the wrong kind of treatment.) 

Victoria retreated into seclusion and became known as the Widow of Windsor, wearing black the rest of her life.  But she was always very conscientious about her responsibilities, and she was called the “grandmother of Europe” because her children made so many royal marriages. 

In an ironic twist, Victoria seems to have had spontaneous mutation for the blood 510px-Queen_Victoria_-Diamond_Jubilee_-1_croppedclotting disorder haemophila, with her son Leopold a hemophiliac and the disorder being passed through two of her daughters into the royal houses of Russia, Germany, and Spain. 

Being a fanciful sort, I like to speculate that perhaps the spirit of Charlotte returned in Victoria so that this time things would work out right.  What kind of queen would Charlotte have made if she had survived?  Perhaps a good one, especially with the support of her sober, reliable husband.  But we’ll never know.

We do know that her cousin Victoria restored dignity and respect to the British throne.  In fact, England has done rather well with queens regnant, from the magnificent Elizabeth I to today’s Elizabeth II.  Both of those princesses inherited the throne at the age of 25, and did quite a good job with it.

Young-Victoria_movie 2 Have you seen Young Victoria?  What do you think of these two princesses, in their similarities and differences?  Would you like to have grown up as a princess?  Romantic that I am, when Charlotte shows up in my next historical, I intend to see that she’s treated right. <G>

Mary Jo

140 thoughts on “Charlotte and Victoria: A Tale of Two Princesses”

  1. Thank you, Mary Jo, for an excellent article about Young Victoria. I haven’t seen the movie yet but now I am excited to buy the DVD! Funny that Emily Blunt (Young Victoria) also portrayed a repressed housewife in another movie, Jane Austen Book Club (which is rerunning on Lifetime TV). I look forward to reading how well you treat Charlotte in your next book!

    Reply
  2. Thank you, Mary Jo, for an excellent article about Young Victoria. I haven’t seen the movie yet but now I am excited to buy the DVD! Funny that Emily Blunt (Young Victoria) also portrayed a repressed housewife in another movie, Jane Austen Book Club (which is rerunning on Lifetime TV). I look forward to reading how well you treat Charlotte in your next book!

    Reply
  3. Thank you, Mary Jo, for an excellent article about Young Victoria. I haven’t seen the movie yet but now I am excited to buy the DVD! Funny that Emily Blunt (Young Victoria) also portrayed a repressed housewife in another movie, Jane Austen Book Club (which is rerunning on Lifetime TV). I look forward to reading how well you treat Charlotte in your next book!

    Reply
  4. Thank you, Mary Jo, for an excellent article about Young Victoria. I haven’t seen the movie yet but now I am excited to buy the DVD! Funny that Emily Blunt (Young Victoria) also portrayed a repressed housewife in another movie, Jane Austen Book Club (which is rerunning on Lifetime TV). I look forward to reading how well you treat Charlotte in your next book!

    Reply
  5. Thank you, Mary Jo, for an excellent article about Young Victoria. I haven’t seen the movie yet but now I am excited to buy the DVD! Funny that Emily Blunt (Young Victoria) also portrayed a repressed housewife in another movie, Jane Austen Book Club (which is rerunning on Lifetime TV). I look forward to reading how well you treat Charlotte in your next book!

    Reply
  6. Great article. I’ve added Young Victoria to my Netflix queue.
    One correction, though. The Regent became George IV, not George VI.
    Thanks for the info!

    Reply
  7. Great article. I’ve added Young Victoria to my Netflix queue.
    One correction, though. The Regent became George IV, not George VI.
    Thanks for the info!

    Reply
  8. Great article. I’ve added Young Victoria to my Netflix queue.
    One correction, though. The Regent became George IV, not George VI.
    Thanks for the info!

    Reply
  9. Great article. I’ve added Young Victoria to my Netflix queue.
    One correction, though. The Regent became George IV, not George VI.
    Thanks for the info!

    Reply
  10. Great article. I’ve added Young Victoria to my Netflix queue.
    One correction, though. The Regent became George IV, not George VI.
    Thanks for the info!

    Reply
  11. From MJP:
    Kim, now I’ll have to put The Jane Austen Book Club in the Netflix queue!
    Gucci Shoes, this sure isn’t the vision of princesshood that Disney gives us!
    Julie, you’re absolutely right–he was George IV. This is the touch of dysgraphia that has always made my life more exciting. *g* I’ll go in and fix it. Thanks!

    Reply
  12. From MJP:
    Kim, now I’ll have to put The Jane Austen Book Club in the Netflix queue!
    Gucci Shoes, this sure isn’t the vision of princesshood that Disney gives us!
    Julie, you’re absolutely right–he was George IV. This is the touch of dysgraphia that has always made my life more exciting. *g* I’ll go in and fix it. Thanks!

    Reply
  13. From MJP:
    Kim, now I’ll have to put The Jane Austen Book Club in the Netflix queue!
    Gucci Shoes, this sure isn’t the vision of princesshood that Disney gives us!
    Julie, you’re absolutely right–he was George IV. This is the touch of dysgraphia that has always made my life more exciting. *g* I’ll go in and fix it. Thanks!

    Reply
  14. From MJP:
    Kim, now I’ll have to put The Jane Austen Book Club in the Netflix queue!
    Gucci Shoes, this sure isn’t the vision of princesshood that Disney gives us!
    Julie, you’re absolutely right–he was George IV. This is the touch of dysgraphia that has always made my life more exciting. *g* I’ll go in and fix it. Thanks!

    Reply
  15. From MJP:
    Kim, now I’ll have to put The Jane Austen Book Club in the Netflix queue!
    Gucci Shoes, this sure isn’t the vision of princesshood that Disney gives us!
    Julie, you’re absolutely right–he was George IV. This is the touch of dysgraphia that has always made my life more exciting. *g* I’ll go in and fix it. Thanks!

    Reply
  16. I’ve heard enough good things about this movie that I intend on seeing it. But, like with books, I’ll start with the library copy. if I like it, then I’ll buy it.
    Would I have liked to grow up as a princess? Sure. One thing both Charlotte and Victoria had in common was they were rich. Rich beats poor anytime. And whatever anyone could do to them, they were royal. Charlotte chose her husband against her father’s wishes, and probably would have reigned as she saw fit. Victoria did exactly that. Makes up for what she had to put up with as a child.

    Reply
  17. I’ve heard enough good things about this movie that I intend on seeing it. But, like with books, I’ll start with the library copy. if I like it, then I’ll buy it.
    Would I have liked to grow up as a princess? Sure. One thing both Charlotte and Victoria had in common was they were rich. Rich beats poor anytime. And whatever anyone could do to them, they were royal. Charlotte chose her husband against her father’s wishes, and probably would have reigned as she saw fit. Victoria did exactly that. Makes up for what she had to put up with as a child.

    Reply
  18. I’ve heard enough good things about this movie that I intend on seeing it. But, like with books, I’ll start with the library copy. if I like it, then I’ll buy it.
    Would I have liked to grow up as a princess? Sure. One thing both Charlotte and Victoria had in common was they were rich. Rich beats poor anytime. And whatever anyone could do to them, they were royal. Charlotte chose her husband against her father’s wishes, and probably would have reigned as she saw fit. Victoria did exactly that. Makes up for what she had to put up with as a child.

    Reply
  19. I’ve heard enough good things about this movie that I intend on seeing it. But, like with books, I’ll start with the library copy. if I like it, then I’ll buy it.
    Would I have liked to grow up as a princess? Sure. One thing both Charlotte and Victoria had in common was they were rich. Rich beats poor anytime. And whatever anyone could do to them, they were royal. Charlotte chose her husband against her father’s wishes, and probably would have reigned as she saw fit. Victoria did exactly that. Makes up for what she had to put up with as a child.

    Reply
  20. I’ve heard enough good things about this movie that I intend on seeing it. But, like with books, I’ll start with the library copy. if I like it, then I’ll buy it.
    Would I have liked to grow up as a princess? Sure. One thing both Charlotte and Victoria had in common was they were rich. Rich beats poor anytime. And whatever anyone could do to them, they were royal. Charlotte chose her husband against her father’s wishes, and probably would have reigned as she saw fit. Victoria did exactly that. Makes up for what she had to put up with as a child.

    Reply
  21. What a beautifully lucid explanation of all those tangled relationships, Mary Jo. Thank you.
    I saw The Young Victoria just this week. It’s easy to see why it won awards for costume design. I rented the DVD from Netflix, but it’s one I will certainly be buying since I know I will want to watch it again.

    Reply
  22. What a beautifully lucid explanation of all those tangled relationships, Mary Jo. Thank you.
    I saw The Young Victoria just this week. It’s easy to see why it won awards for costume design. I rented the DVD from Netflix, but it’s one I will certainly be buying since I know I will want to watch it again.

    Reply
  23. What a beautifully lucid explanation of all those tangled relationships, Mary Jo. Thank you.
    I saw The Young Victoria just this week. It’s easy to see why it won awards for costume design. I rented the DVD from Netflix, but it’s one I will certainly be buying since I know I will want to watch it again.

    Reply
  24. What a beautifully lucid explanation of all those tangled relationships, Mary Jo. Thank you.
    I saw The Young Victoria just this week. It’s easy to see why it won awards for costume design. I rented the DVD from Netflix, but it’s one I will certainly be buying since I know I will want to watch it again.

    Reply
  25. What a beautifully lucid explanation of all those tangled relationships, Mary Jo. Thank you.
    I saw The Young Victoria just this week. It’s easy to see why it won awards for costume design. I rented the DVD from Netflix, but it’s one I will certainly be buying since I know I will want to watch it again.

    Reply
  26. From MJP:
    Linda–rich is good, no question, but I think it would have been a lot easier to be the daughter of a well-off but not royal family. The Hanoverian princesses were treated abominably–it was only a step away from a women’s prison from what I’ve read. Granted, it was a well furnished prison. *g*
    I might end up buying the DVD myself–it certainly was lovely and well done.
    Elizabeth, I wasn’t familiar with the Williams book, but I shall certainly look for it!

    Reply
  27. From MJP:
    Linda–rich is good, no question, but I think it would have been a lot easier to be the daughter of a well-off but not royal family. The Hanoverian princesses were treated abominably–it was only a step away from a women’s prison from what I’ve read. Granted, it was a well furnished prison. *g*
    I might end up buying the DVD myself–it certainly was lovely and well done.
    Elizabeth, I wasn’t familiar with the Williams book, but I shall certainly look for it!

    Reply
  28. From MJP:
    Linda–rich is good, no question, but I think it would have been a lot easier to be the daughter of a well-off but not royal family. The Hanoverian princesses were treated abominably–it was only a step away from a women’s prison from what I’ve read. Granted, it was a well furnished prison. *g*
    I might end up buying the DVD myself–it certainly was lovely and well done.
    Elizabeth, I wasn’t familiar with the Williams book, but I shall certainly look for it!

    Reply
  29. From MJP:
    Linda–rich is good, no question, but I think it would have been a lot easier to be the daughter of a well-off but not royal family. The Hanoverian princesses were treated abominably–it was only a step away from a women’s prison from what I’ve read. Granted, it was a well furnished prison. *g*
    I might end up buying the DVD myself–it certainly was lovely and well done.
    Elizabeth, I wasn’t familiar with the Williams book, but I shall certainly look for it!

    Reply
  30. From MJP:
    Linda–rich is good, no question, but I think it would have been a lot easier to be the daughter of a well-off but not royal family. The Hanoverian princesses were treated abominably–it was only a step away from a women’s prison from what I’ve read. Granted, it was a well furnished prison. *g*
    I might end up buying the DVD myself–it certainly was lovely and well done.
    Elizabeth, I wasn’t familiar with the Williams book, but I shall certainly look for it!

    Reply
  31. If I ever sell my alternative history series, y’all can see my speculation on what might’ve happened if Charlotte had survived and got the chance to rule. 🙂 That’s not the only part of the timeline I altered, or even the most important thing, but I’ve always liked Charlotte. So it was fun to take her vivid young personality and put her into entirely different circumstances that gave her more of a chance to shine.

    Reply
  32. If I ever sell my alternative history series, y’all can see my speculation on what might’ve happened if Charlotte had survived and got the chance to rule. 🙂 That’s not the only part of the timeline I altered, or even the most important thing, but I’ve always liked Charlotte. So it was fun to take her vivid young personality and put her into entirely different circumstances that gave her more of a chance to shine.

    Reply
  33. If I ever sell my alternative history series, y’all can see my speculation on what might’ve happened if Charlotte had survived and got the chance to rule. 🙂 That’s not the only part of the timeline I altered, or even the most important thing, but I’ve always liked Charlotte. So it was fun to take her vivid young personality and put her into entirely different circumstances that gave her more of a chance to shine.

    Reply
  34. If I ever sell my alternative history series, y’all can see my speculation on what might’ve happened if Charlotte had survived and got the chance to rule. 🙂 That’s not the only part of the timeline I altered, or even the most important thing, but I’ve always liked Charlotte. So it was fun to take her vivid young personality and put her into entirely different circumstances that gave her more of a chance to shine.

    Reply
  35. If I ever sell my alternative history series, y’all can see my speculation on what might’ve happened if Charlotte had survived and got the chance to rule. 🙂 That’s not the only part of the timeline I altered, or even the most important thing, but I’ve always liked Charlotte. So it was fun to take her vivid young personality and put her into entirely different circumstances that gave her more of a chance to shine.

    Reply
  36. From MJP:
    What a great idea, Susanna! I’d love to see Charlotte surviving to become queen. She might have had a long, productive reign like Victoria’s–and Victoria wouldn’t have been born. Fascinating material to play with. Good luck at selling the series!

    Reply
  37. From MJP:
    What a great idea, Susanna! I’d love to see Charlotte surviving to become queen. She might have had a long, productive reign like Victoria’s–and Victoria wouldn’t have been born. Fascinating material to play with. Good luck at selling the series!

    Reply
  38. From MJP:
    What a great idea, Susanna! I’d love to see Charlotte surviving to become queen. She might have had a long, productive reign like Victoria’s–and Victoria wouldn’t have been born. Fascinating material to play with. Good luck at selling the series!

    Reply
  39. From MJP:
    What a great idea, Susanna! I’d love to see Charlotte surviving to become queen. She might have had a long, productive reign like Victoria’s–and Victoria wouldn’t have been born. Fascinating material to play with. Good luck at selling the series!

    Reply
  40. From MJP:
    What a great idea, Susanna! I’d love to see Charlotte surviving to become queen. She might have had a long, productive reign like Victoria’s–and Victoria wouldn’t have been born. Fascinating material to play with. Good luck at selling the series!

    Reply
  41. This was a really interesting post, Mary Jo. Thank you for sharing. I always find history fascinating and I really didn’t know much about Charlotte. It’s always fun to put a “what if” into a real-life historical situation; in this case, what if Charlotte had lived and reigned?

    Reply
  42. This was a really interesting post, Mary Jo. Thank you for sharing. I always find history fascinating and I really didn’t know much about Charlotte. It’s always fun to put a “what if” into a real-life historical situation; in this case, what if Charlotte had lived and reigned?

    Reply
  43. This was a really interesting post, Mary Jo. Thank you for sharing. I always find history fascinating and I really didn’t know much about Charlotte. It’s always fun to put a “what if” into a real-life historical situation; in this case, what if Charlotte had lived and reigned?

    Reply
  44. This was a really interesting post, Mary Jo. Thank you for sharing. I always find history fascinating and I really didn’t know much about Charlotte. It’s always fun to put a “what if” into a real-life historical situation; in this case, what if Charlotte had lived and reigned?

    Reply
  45. This was a really interesting post, Mary Jo. Thank you for sharing. I always find history fascinating and I really didn’t know much about Charlotte. It’s always fun to put a “what if” into a real-life historical situation; in this case, what if Charlotte had lived and reigned?

    Reply
  46. This was a fabulous post. I have a four volume set of “The Life of Queen Victoria” that goes into great detail about her life. I had somehow forgotten that Charlotte and Victoria were cousins. Charlotte wouldn’t have been queen though if she hadn’t died in childbirth as her son would have probably lived too and gone on to become King George V – maybe?

    Reply
  47. This was a fabulous post. I have a four volume set of “The Life of Queen Victoria” that goes into great detail about her life. I had somehow forgotten that Charlotte and Victoria were cousins. Charlotte wouldn’t have been queen though if she hadn’t died in childbirth as her son would have probably lived too and gone on to become King George V – maybe?

    Reply
  48. This was a fabulous post. I have a four volume set of “The Life of Queen Victoria” that goes into great detail about her life. I had somehow forgotten that Charlotte and Victoria were cousins. Charlotte wouldn’t have been queen though if she hadn’t died in childbirth as her son would have probably lived too and gone on to become King George V – maybe?

    Reply
  49. This was a fabulous post. I have a four volume set of “The Life of Queen Victoria” that goes into great detail about her life. I had somehow forgotten that Charlotte and Victoria were cousins. Charlotte wouldn’t have been queen though if she hadn’t died in childbirth as her son would have probably lived too and gone on to become King George V – maybe?

    Reply
  50. This was a fabulous post. I have a four volume set of “The Life of Queen Victoria” that goes into great detail about her life. I had somehow forgotten that Charlotte and Victoria were cousins. Charlotte wouldn’t have been queen though if she hadn’t died in childbirth as her son would have probably lived too and gone on to become King George V – maybe?

    Reply
  51. From MJP:
    Sue–Charlotte would have taken the throne when her father died, and her son would have followed her. The title doesn’t skip a generation even if that means letting a gurrrrl wear the crown. *g*

    Reply
  52. From MJP:
    Sue–Charlotte would have taken the throne when her father died, and her son would have followed her. The title doesn’t skip a generation even if that means letting a gurrrrl wear the crown. *g*

    Reply
  53. From MJP:
    Sue–Charlotte would have taken the throne when her father died, and her son would have followed her. The title doesn’t skip a generation even if that means letting a gurrrrl wear the crown. *g*

    Reply
  54. From MJP:
    Sue–Charlotte would have taken the throne when her father died, and her son would have followed her. The title doesn’t skip a generation even if that means letting a gurrrrl wear the crown. *g*

    Reply
  55. From MJP:
    Sue–Charlotte would have taken the throne when her father died, and her son would have followed her. The title doesn’t skip a generation even if that means letting a gurrrrl wear the crown. *g*

    Reply
  56. Thank-you for the lovely history lesson! I haven’t seen the movie yet (though it’s been on my list since it was in theaters) now it has become a must see!It’s always interesting to learn more about the lives of those who have gone before, particularly women, as they tend to get left out of the history books.

    Reply
  57. Thank-you for the lovely history lesson! I haven’t seen the movie yet (though it’s been on my list since it was in theaters) now it has become a must see!It’s always interesting to learn more about the lives of those who have gone before, particularly women, as they tend to get left out of the history books.

    Reply
  58. Thank-you for the lovely history lesson! I haven’t seen the movie yet (though it’s been on my list since it was in theaters) now it has become a must see!It’s always interesting to learn more about the lives of those who have gone before, particularly women, as they tend to get left out of the history books.

    Reply
  59. Thank-you for the lovely history lesson! I haven’t seen the movie yet (though it’s been on my list since it was in theaters) now it has become a must see!It’s always interesting to learn more about the lives of those who have gone before, particularly women, as they tend to get left out of the history books.

    Reply
  60. Thank-you for the lovely history lesson! I haven’t seen the movie yet (though it’s been on my list since it was in theaters) now it has become a must see!It’s always interesting to learn more about the lives of those who have gone before, particularly women, as they tend to get left out of the history books.

    Reply
  61. From MJP:
    Charlotte is a footnote to history at most, except for those of us who like history and historical novels. But her life mattered. If she’d lived and ruled for fifty years, would we call it the “Charlottian age?”
    BTW, a nice tidbit: Her widower, Leopold, who later became King of the Belgians, married a French princess, and he named one of their children Charlotte in memory of his first wife. That daughter became Empress Carlotta of Mexico. Here’s a link for Leopold:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopold_I_of_Belgium
    He was seriously good looking!

    Reply
  62. From MJP:
    Charlotte is a footnote to history at most, except for those of us who like history and historical novels. But her life mattered. If she’d lived and ruled for fifty years, would we call it the “Charlottian age?”
    BTW, a nice tidbit: Her widower, Leopold, who later became King of the Belgians, married a French princess, and he named one of their children Charlotte in memory of his first wife. That daughter became Empress Carlotta of Mexico. Here’s a link for Leopold:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopold_I_of_Belgium
    He was seriously good looking!

    Reply
  63. From MJP:
    Charlotte is a footnote to history at most, except for those of us who like history and historical novels. But her life mattered. If she’d lived and ruled for fifty years, would we call it the “Charlottian age?”
    BTW, a nice tidbit: Her widower, Leopold, who later became King of the Belgians, married a French princess, and he named one of their children Charlotte in memory of his first wife. That daughter became Empress Carlotta of Mexico. Here’s a link for Leopold:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopold_I_of_Belgium
    He was seriously good looking!

    Reply
  64. From MJP:
    Charlotte is a footnote to history at most, except for those of us who like history and historical novels. But her life mattered. If she’d lived and ruled for fifty years, would we call it the “Charlottian age?”
    BTW, a nice tidbit: Her widower, Leopold, who later became King of the Belgians, married a French princess, and he named one of their children Charlotte in memory of his first wife. That daughter became Empress Carlotta of Mexico. Here’s a link for Leopold:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopold_I_of_Belgium
    He was seriously good looking!

    Reply
  65. From MJP:
    Charlotte is a footnote to history at most, except for those of us who like history and historical novels. But her life mattered. If she’d lived and ruled for fifty years, would we call it the “Charlottian age?”
    BTW, a nice tidbit: Her widower, Leopold, who later became King of the Belgians, married a French princess, and he named one of their children Charlotte in memory of his first wife. That daughter became Empress Carlotta of Mexico. Here’s a link for Leopold:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopold_I_of_Belgium
    He was seriously good looking!

    Reply
  66. I had the pleasure of seeing The Young Victoria on the big screen when I was in London a year ago and then again just this last Tuesday for my birthday. Love it! Rupert Friend really brings Albert’s sex appeal to life. 😉

    Reply
  67. I had the pleasure of seeing The Young Victoria on the big screen when I was in London a year ago and then again just this last Tuesday for my birthday. Love it! Rupert Friend really brings Albert’s sex appeal to life. 😉

    Reply
  68. I had the pleasure of seeing The Young Victoria on the big screen when I was in London a year ago and then again just this last Tuesday for my birthday. Love it! Rupert Friend really brings Albert’s sex appeal to life. 😉

    Reply
  69. I had the pleasure of seeing The Young Victoria on the big screen when I was in London a year ago and then again just this last Tuesday for my birthday. Love it! Rupert Friend really brings Albert’s sex appeal to life. 😉

    Reply
  70. I had the pleasure of seeing The Young Victoria on the big screen when I was in London a year ago and then again just this last Tuesday for my birthday. Love it! Rupert Friend really brings Albert’s sex appeal to life. 😉

    Reply
  71. I’ve never seen this movie either, but now I think I have to :o)
    Victoria repressed? I have found that some of the most outwordly repressed people are the most passionate, erotic lovers when the blinds are closed. Maybe Victoria made up for her smotheringly rigid upbringing in a way that satisfied her and her husband and still maintained a facade of “Victorian” sensibility to her people?
    Food for thought, that one.
    (and please forgive the adjectives. Sometimes, I just can’t help myself ;o) )

    Reply
  72. I’ve never seen this movie either, but now I think I have to :o)
    Victoria repressed? I have found that some of the most outwordly repressed people are the most passionate, erotic lovers when the blinds are closed. Maybe Victoria made up for her smotheringly rigid upbringing in a way that satisfied her and her husband and still maintained a facade of “Victorian” sensibility to her people?
    Food for thought, that one.
    (and please forgive the adjectives. Sometimes, I just can’t help myself ;o) )

    Reply
  73. I’ve never seen this movie either, but now I think I have to :o)
    Victoria repressed? I have found that some of the most outwordly repressed people are the most passionate, erotic lovers when the blinds are closed. Maybe Victoria made up for her smotheringly rigid upbringing in a way that satisfied her and her husband and still maintained a facade of “Victorian” sensibility to her people?
    Food for thought, that one.
    (and please forgive the adjectives. Sometimes, I just can’t help myself ;o) )

    Reply
  74. I’ve never seen this movie either, but now I think I have to :o)
    Victoria repressed? I have found that some of the most outwordly repressed people are the most passionate, erotic lovers when the blinds are closed. Maybe Victoria made up for her smotheringly rigid upbringing in a way that satisfied her and her husband and still maintained a facade of “Victorian” sensibility to her people?
    Food for thought, that one.
    (and please forgive the adjectives. Sometimes, I just can’t help myself ;o) )

    Reply
  75. I’ve never seen this movie either, but now I think I have to :o)
    Victoria repressed? I have found that some of the most outwordly repressed people are the most passionate, erotic lovers when the blinds are closed. Maybe Victoria made up for her smotheringly rigid upbringing in a way that satisfied her and her husband and still maintained a facade of “Victorian” sensibility to her people?
    Food for thought, that one.
    (and please forgive the adjectives. Sometimes, I just can’t help myself ;o) )

    Reply
  76. From MJP:
    Theo, LOL about the runaway adjectives. *g* Used judiciously, like spices, they supply necessary flavor to our writing.
    Certainly Victoria believed it was her duty to set a moral standard for her people–if she hadn’t, the UK might be a republic today.
    But certainly she and Albert loved each other passionately. She didn’t love all those pregnancies–some of them were because the best medical version of rhythm control thought that the least fertile time to make love was in the middle of a woman’s cycle, which is in fact the MOST fertile.
    But they were a couple of hormonal kids, madly in love, and hence, the nine children. I’m pretty sure Victoria was just lying there and thinking of England. *g*

    Reply
  77. From MJP:
    Theo, LOL about the runaway adjectives. *g* Used judiciously, like spices, they supply necessary flavor to our writing.
    Certainly Victoria believed it was her duty to set a moral standard for her people–if she hadn’t, the UK might be a republic today.
    But certainly she and Albert loved each other passionately. She didn’t love all those pregnancies–some of them were because the best medical version of rhythm control thought that the least fertile time to make love was in the middle of a woman’s cycle, which is in fact the MOST fertile.
    But they were a couple of hormonal kids, madly in love, and hence, the nine children. I’m pretty sure Victoria was just lying there and thinking of England. *g*

    Reply
  78. From MJP:
    Theo, LOL about the runaway adjectives. *g* Used judiciously, like spices, they supply necessary flavor to our writing.
    Certainly Victoria believed it was her duty to set a moral standard for her people–if she hadn’t, the UK might be a republic today.
    But certainly she and Albert loved each other passionately. She didn’t love all those pregnancies–some of them were because the best medical version of rhythm control thought that the least fertile time to make love was in the middle of a woman’s cycle, which is in fact the MOST fertile.
    But they were a couple of hormonal kids, madly in love, and hence, the nine children. I’m pretty sure Victoria was just lying there and thinking of England. *g*

    Reply
  79. From MJP:
    Theo, LOL about the runaway adjectives. *g* Used judiciously, like spices, they supply necessary flavor to our writing.
    Certainly Victoria believed it was her duty to set a moral standard for her people–if she hadn’t, the UK might be a republic today.
    But certainly she and Albert loved each other passionately. She didn’t love all those pregnancies–some of them were because the best medical version of rhythm control thought that the least fertile time to make love was in the middle of a woman’s cycle, which is in fact the MOST fertile.
    But they were a couple of hormonal kids, madly in love, and hence, the nine children. I’m pretty sure Victoria was just lying there and thinking of England. *g*

    Reply
  80. From MJP:
    Theo, LOL about the runaway adjectives. *g* Used judiciously, like spices, they supply necessary flavor to our writing.
    Certainly Victoria believed it was her duty to set a moral standard for her people–if she hadn’t, the UK might be a republic today.
    But certainly she and Albert loved each other passionately. She didn’t love all those pregnancies–some of them were because the best medical version of rhythm control thought that the least fertile time to make love was in the middle of a woman’s cycle, which is in fact the MOST fertile.
    But they were a couple of hormonal kids, madly in love, and hence, the nine children. I’m pretty sure Victoria was just lying there and thinking of England. *g*

    Reply
  81. Thank you for the wonderful history lesson. I really enjoyed reading about the Royals.
    I haven’t seen the movie, but it sounds as though it would be a good one.

    Reply
  82. Thank you for the wonderful history lesson. I really enjoyed reading about the Royals.
    I haven’t seen the movie, but it sounds as though it would be a good one.

    Reply
  83. Thank you for the wonderful history lesson. I really enjoyed reading about the Royals.
    I haven’t seen the movie, but it sounds as though it would be a good one.

    Reply
  84. Thank you for the wonderful history lesson. I really enjoyed reading about the Royals.
    I haven’t seen the movie, but it sounds as though it would be a good one.

    Reply
  85. Thank you for the wonderful history lesson. I really enjoyed reading about the Royals.
    I haven’t seen the movie, but it sounds as though it would be a good one.

    Reply
  86. I saw “The Young Victoria” recently–it was part of the in-flight entertainment on a trans-atlantic trip to Amsterdam via London. I enjoyed the movie very much, and yes, there were several scenes which showed Victoria being led up and down staircases by various attendants. Glad you noted the fact that it was because so many of Victoria’s descendants married into the royal houses of Europe that hemophilia became known as the “royal” disease. Robert Massie’s excellent biography of the last czar of Russia and his wife “Nicholas and Alexandra” goes into the ramifications of hemophilia in the Romanov house and how it affected the rise of communism in Russia. Fascinating information about Princess Charlotte–another “what-if” of history had she survived!

    Reply
  87. I saw “The Young Victoria” recently–it was part of the in-flight entertainment on a trans-atlantic trip to Amsterdam via London. I enjoyed the movie very much, and yes, there were several scenes which showed Victoria being led up and down staircases by various attendants. Glad you noted the fact that it was because so many of Victoria’s descendants married into the royal houses of Europe that hemophilia became known as the “royal” disease. Robert Massie’s excellent biography of the last czar of Russia and his wife “Nicholas and Alexandra” goes into the ramifications of hemophilia in the Romanov house and how it affected the rise of communism in Russia. Fascinating information about Princess Charlotte–another “what-if” of history had she survived!

    Reply
  88. I saw “The Young Victoria” recently–it was part of the in-flight entertainment on a trans-atlantic trip to Amsterdam via London. I enjoyed the movie very much, and yes, there were several scenes which showed Victoria being led up and down staircases by various attendants. Glad you noted the fact that it was because so many of Victoria’s descendants married into the royal houses of Europe that hemophilia became known as the “royal” disease. Robert Massie’s excellent biography of the last czar of Russia and his wife “Nicholas and Alexandra” goes into the ramifications of hemophilia in the Romanov house and how it affected the rise of communism in Russia. Fascinating information about Princess Charlotte–another “what-if” of history had she survived!

    Reply
  89. I saw “The Young Victoria” recently–it was part of the in-flight entertainment on a trans-atlantic trip to Amsterdam via London. I enjoyed the movie very much, and yes, there were several scenes which showed Victoria being led up and down staircases by various attendants. Glad you noted the fact that it was because so many of Victoria’s descendants married into the royal houses of Europe that hemophilia became known as the “royal” disease. Robert Massie’s excellent biography of the last czar of Russia and his wife “Nicholas and Alexandra” goes into the ramifications of hemophilia in the Romanov house and how it affected the rise of communism in Russia. Fascinating information about Princess Charlotte–another “what-if” of history had she survived!

    Reply
  90. I saw “The Young Victoria” recently–it was part of the in-flight entertainment on a trans-atlantic trip to Amsterdam via London. I enjoyed the movie very much, and yes, there were several scenes which showed Victoria being led up and down staircases by various attendants. Glad you noted the fact that it was because so many of Victoria’s descendants married into the royal houses of Europe that hemophilia became known as the “royal” disease. Robert Massie’s excellent biography of the last czar of Russia and his wife “Nicholas and Alexandra” goes into the ramifications of hemophilia in the Romanov house and how it affected the rise of communism in Russia. Fascinating information about Princess Charlotte–another “what-if” of history had she survived!

    Reply
  91. Thank you for a wonderfully informative and interesting post. In America, we don’t study much about the rulers of other countries. Like most we concentrate on our leaders. We may be familiar with the names of the foreign leaders, but rarely know many of the details. I have not yet seen the movie, YOUNG VICTORIA, but do plan to watch it. The more I read, the more things fall into place giving reason for events and national atmosphere. That is one reason I enjoy well researched Historical Fiction.

    Reply
  92. Thank you for a wonderfully informative and interesting post. In America, we don’t study much about the rulers of other countries. Like most we concentrate on our leaders. We may be familiar with the names of the foreign leaders, but rarely know many of the details. I have not yet seen the movie, YOUNG VICTORIA, but do plan to watch it. The more I read, the more things fall into place giving reason for events and national atmosphere. That is one reason I enjoy well researched Historical Fiction.

    Reply
  93. Thank you for a wonderfully informative and interesting post. In America, we don’t study much about the rulers of other countries. Like most we concentrate on our leaders. We may be familiar with the names of the foreign leaders, but rarely know many of the details. I have not yet seen the movie, YOUNG VICTORIA, but do plan to watch it. The more I read, the more things fall into place giving reason for events and national atmosphere. That is one reason I enjoy well researched Historical Fiction.

    Reply
  94. Thank you for a wonderfully informative and interesting post. In America, we don’t study much about the rulers of other countries. Like most we concentrate on our leaders. We may be familiar with the names of the foreign leaders, but rarely know many of the details. I have not yet seen the movie, YOUNG VICTORIA, but do plan to watch it. The more I read, the more things fall into place giving reason for events and national atmosphere. That is one reason I enjoy well researched Historical Fiction.

    Reply
  95. Thank you for a wonderfully informative and interesting post. In America, we don’t study much about the rulers of other countries. Like most we concentrate on our leaders. We may be familiar with the names of the foreign leaders, but rarely know many of the details. I have not yet seen the movie, YOUNG VICTORIA, but do plan to watch it. The more I read, the more things fall into place giving reason for events and national atmosphere. That is one reason I enjoy well researched Historical Fiction.

    Reply
  96. Do you know, that Leopold never got over Charlotte? I had read the book Charlotte and Leopold by chambers. It was a very beautiful but sad story.. strange how it can be beautiful and sad.Kind of makes one think if Jane Austen will write a tragedy this is how it would be…especialy that part after Charlotte died and Leopold walked round and round the park with charlotte’s miniature clutch in his hand. How he would go late at night in Charlotte’s room where she was lying and would stay there for a long time.
    A preganant portrait of Charlotte commissioned by Charlotte just a month before she gave birth was delievered on Leopold’s birtday. The entire household burst into tears and Prince Leopold an ultimate “Mr. Darcy” who was always calm and formal was greatly affected he could not keep his tone normal.
    Anyway, Leopold, it was said, was never the same again. He became cold and weary… Always has a melancholy look in his eyes…aside from naming his daughter(by his 2nd wife whom he married for political reasons) Charlotte, he also “married” a woman who looked exactly like princess charlotte, a year before he married his “2nd wife”. He saw her in a play. And proposed marriage the following day in the hopes of having again the happiness taken away from him so soon. But she was not Charlotte and so it did not work. It was said that not a day passed that he did not mourn her.
    He took the portrait given by Charlotte and taken it to Belgium when He became King. It was said taht everytime he looks at it he is overcome by a very powerful emotions
    Before he died he had requested to be buried in Windsor beside Charlotte, but the ministers in Belgium (or maybe his children( wound’nt allow it as he is the King of the Belgians)He died saying,”Charlotte…Charlotte..”
    Victoria and Albert and Charlotte and Leopold both had an equaly romantic marriage. A&V was given by providence longer time together and their love shine through the entire time and what you would expect of a fairytale romance While Leopold and Charlotte makes me think of Heloise and Abelard and Romeo and Juliet. Which was such a shame because the two did marry for their own selfish reasons. For Charlotte to have her freedom and ambitious Leopold to have the throne of England. And what do you know just like how you would read it in a romance novel, the two have a very different personality. Leopold, cautious, calculating, formal, charming, intelligent and and extrmely handsome. While Charlotte, is impulsive,feisty, anxious, naive and have shocking manners but very interesting personality. I’m sure there were conflicts in the beginning, but Leopold who’s an excellent diplomat and couragoues soldier, was successful in taming his wife. The two somehow fell deeply in love and Leopold’s ambition was supplanted by his heart. He calmed her anxiousness, and gently taught her how a princess should behave. And she who was so fast in exercising her authority when she was crossed became very submissive and attached to her husband. Everyone who had observed was struck by their attachment to each other.
    It is somewhat poignant if not surprising that Leopold due to his wisdom and good judgements in politics did go places and still end up a King (which he never would have been if charlotte lived, he would only be a Queen consort like Prince Albert)…but without Charlotte by her side. During his old years he remembers with nostalgia. He told Queen Victoria that she looked like Princess Charlotte physically. Perhaps that’s why he seemed to be more concerned about her than his own children. I wondered how he must feel when Albert and Victoria married. Since it would have been him and Charlotte. You really should make a book about these two (Charlotte and Leopold) in alternate reality where the two of them can have a happy ending like Albert and Victoria.

    Reply
  97. Do you know, that Leopold never got over Charlotte? I had read the book Charlotte and Leopold by chambers. It was a very beautiful but sad story.. strange how it can be beautiful and sad.Kind of makes one think if Jane Austen will write a tragedy this is how it would be…especialy that part after Charlotte died and Leopold walked round and round the park with charlotte’s miniature clutch in his hand. How he would go late at night in Charlotte’s room where she was lying and would stay there for a long time.
    A preganant portrait of Charlotte commissioned by Charlotte just a month before she gave birth was delievered on Leopold’s birtday. The entire household burst into tears and Prince Leopold an ultimate “Mr. Darcy” who was always calm and formal was greatly affected he could not keep his tone normal.
    Anyway, Leopold, it was said, was never the same again. He became cold and weary… Always has a melancholy look in his eyes…aside from naming his daughter(by his 2nd wife whom he married for political reasons) Charlotte, he also “married” a woman who looked exactly like princess charlotte, a year before he married his “2nd wife”. He saw her in a play. And proposed marriage the following day in the hopes of having again the happiness taken away from him so soon. But she was not Charlotte and so it did not work. It was said that not a day passed that he did not mourn her.
    He took the portrait given by Charlotte and taken it to Belgium when He became King. It was said taht everytime he looks at it he is overcome by a very powerful emotions
    Before he died he had requested to be buried in Windsor beside Charlotte, but the ministers in Belgium (or maybe his children( wound’nt allow it as he is the King of the Belgians)He died saying,”Charlotte…Charlotte..”
    Victoria and Albert and Charlotte and Leopold both had an equaly romantic marriage. A&V was given by providence longer time together and their love shine through the entire time and what you would expect of a fairytale romance While Leopold and Charlotte makes me think of Heloise and Abelard and Romeo and Juliet. Which was such a shame because the two did marry for their own selfish reasons. For Charlotte to have her freedom and ambitious Leopold to have the throne of England. And what do you know just like how you would read it in a romance novel, the two have a very different personality. Leopold, cautious, calculating, formal, charming, intelligent and and extrmely handsome. While Charlotte, is impulsive,feisty, anxious, naive and have shocking manners but very interesting personality. I’m sure there were conflicts in the beginning, but Leopold who’s an excellent diplomat and couragoues soldier, was successful in taming his wife. The two somehow fell deeply in love and Leopold’s ambition was supplanted by his heart. He calmed her anxiousness, and gently taught her how a princess should behave. And she who was so fast in exercising her authority when she was crossed became very submissive and attached to her husband. Everyone who had observed was struck by their attachment to each other.
    It is somewhat poignant if not surprising that Leopold due to his wisdom and good judgements in politics did go places and still end up a King (which he never would have been if charlotte lived, he would only be a Queen consort like Prince Albert)…but without Charlotte by her side. During his old years he remembers with nostalgia. He told Queen Victoria that she looked like Princess Charlotte physically. Perhaps that’s why he seemed to be more concerned about her than his own children. I wondered how he must feel when Albert and Victoria married. Since it would have been him and Charlotte. You really should make a book about these two (Charlotte and Leopold) in alternate reality where the two of them can have a happy ending like Albert and Victoria.

    Reply
  98. Do you know, that Leopold never got over Charlotte? I had read the book Charlotte and Leopold by chambers. It was a very beautiful but sad story.. strange how it can be beautiful and sad.Kind of makes one think if Jane Austen will write a tragedy this is how it would be…especialy that part after Charlotte died and Leopold walked round and round the park with charlotte’s miniature clutch in his hand. How he would go late at night in Charlotte’s room where she was lying and would stay there for a long time.
    A preganant portrait of Charlotte commissioned by Charlotte just a month before she gave birth was delievered on Leopold’s birtday. The entire household burst into tears and Prince Leopold an ultimate “Mr. Darcy” who was always calm and formal was greatly affected he could not keep his tone normal.
    Anyway, Leopold, it was said, was never the same again. He became cold and weary… Always has a melancholy look in his eyes…aside from naming his daughter(by his 2nd wife whom he married for political reasons) Charlotte, he also “married” a woman who looked exactly like princess charlotte, a year before he married his “2nd wife”. He saw her in a play. And proposed marriage the following day in the hopes of having again the happiness taken away from him so soon. But she was not Charlotte and so it did not work. It was said that not a day passed that he did not mourn her.
    He took the portrait given by Charlotte and taken it to Belgium when He became King. It was said taht everytime he looks at it he is overcome by a very powerful emotions
    Before he died he had requested to be buried in Windsor beside Charlotte, but the ministers in Belgium (or maybe his children( wound’nt allow it as he is the King of the Belgians)He died saying,”Charlotte…Charlotte..”
    Victoria and Albert and Charlotte and Leopold both had an equaly romantic marriage. A&V was given by providence longer time together and their love shine through the entire time and what you would expect of a fairytale romance While Leopold and Charlotte makes me think of Heloise and Abelard and Romeo and Juliet. Which was such a shame because the two did marry for their own selfish reasons. For Charlotte to have her freedom and ambitious Leopold to have the throne of England. And what do you know just like how you would read it in a romance novel, the two have a very different personality. Leopold, cautious, calculating, formal, charming, intelligent and and extrmely handsome. While Charlotte, is impulsive,feisty, anxious, naive and have shocking manners but very interesting personality. I’m sure there were conflicts in the beginning, but Leopold who’s an excellent diplomat and couragoues soldier, was successful in taming his wife. The two somehow fell deeply in love and Leopold’s ambition was supplanted by his heart. He calmed her anxiousness, and gently taught her how a princess should behave. And she who was so fast in exercising her authority when she was crossed became very submissive and attached to her husband. Everyone who had observed was struck by their attachment to each other.
    It is somewhat poignant if not surprising that Leopold due to his wisdom and good judgements in politics did go places and still end up a King (which he never would have been if charlotte lived, he would only be a Queen consort like Prince Albert)…but without Charlotte by her side. During his old years he remembers with nostalgia. He told Queen Victoria that she looked like Princess Charlotte physically. Perhaps that’s why he seemed to be more concerned about her than his own children. I wondered how he must feel when Albert and Victoria married. Since it would have been him and Charlotte. You really should make a book about these two (Charlotte and Leopold) in alternate reality where the two of them can have a happy ending like Albert and Victoria.

    Reply
  99. Do you know, that Leopold never got over Charlotte? I had read the book Charlotte and Leopold by chambers. It was a very beautiful but sad story.. strange how it can be beautiful and sad.Kind of makes one think if Jane Austen will write a tragedy this is how it would be…especialy that part after Charlotte died and Leopold walked round and round the park with charlotte’s miniature clutch in his hand. How he would go late at night in Charlotte’s room where she was lying and would stay there for a long time.
    A preganant portrait of Charlotte commissioned by Charlotte just a month before she gave birth was delievered on Leopold’s birtday. The entire household burst into tears and Prince Leopold an ultimate “Mr. Darcy” who was always calm and formal was greatly affected he could not keep his tone normal.
    Anyway, Leopold, it was said, was never the same again. He became cold and weary… Always has a melancholy look in his eyes…aside from naming his daughter(by his 2nd wife whom he married for political reasons) Charlotte, he also “married” a woman who looked exactly like princess charlotte, a year before he married his “2nd wife”. He saw her in a play. And proposed marriage the following day in the hopes of having again the happiness taken away from him so soon. But she was not Charlotte and so it did not work. It was said that not a day passed that he did not mourn her.
    He took the portrait given by Charlotte and taken it to Belgium when He became King. It was said taht everytime he looks at it he is overcome by a very powerful emotions
    Before he died he had requested to be buried in Windsor beside Charlotte, but the ministers in Belgium (or maybe his children( wound’nt allow it as he is the King of the Belgians)He died saying,”Charlotte…Charlotte..”
    Victoria and Albert and Charlotte and Leopold both had an equaly romantic marriage. A&V was given by providence longer time together and their love shine through the entire time and what you would expect of a fairytale romance While Leopold and Charlotte makes me think of Heloise and Abelard and Romeo and Juliet. Which was such a shame because the two did marry for their own selfish reasons. For Charlotte to have her freedom and ambitious Leopold to have the throne of England. And what do you know just like how you would read it in a romance novel, the two have a very different personality. Leopold, cautious, calculating, formal, charming, intelligent and and extrmely handsome. While Charlotte, is impulsive,feisty, anxious, naive and have shocking manners but very interesting personality. I’m sure there were conflicts in the beginning, but Leopold who’s an excellent diplomat and couragoues soldier, was successful in taming his wife. The two somehow fell deeply in love and Leopold’s ambition was supplanted by his heart. He calmed her anxiousness, and gently taught her how a princess should behave. And she who was so fast in exercising her authority when she was crossed became very submissive and attached to her husband. Everyone who had observed was struck by their attachment to each other.
    It is somewhat poignant if not surprising that Leopold due to his wisdom and good judgements in politics did go places and still end up a King (which he never would have been if charlotte lived, he would only be a Queen consort like Prince Albert)…but without Charlotte by her side. During his old years he remembers with nostalgia. He told Queen Victoria that she looked like Princess Charlotte physically. Perhaps that’s why he seemed to be more concerned about her than his own children. I wondered how he must feel when Albert and Victoria married. Since it would have been him and Charlotte. You really should make a book about these two (Charlotte and Leopold) in alternate reality where the two of them can have a happy ending like Albert and Victoria.

    Reply
  100. Do you know, that Leopold never got over Charlotte? I had read the book Charlotte and Leopold by chambers. It was a very beautiful but sad story.. strange how it can be beautiful and sad.Kind of makes one think if Jane Austen will write a tragedy this is how it would be…especialy that part after Charlotte died and Leopold walked round and round the park with charlotte’s miniature clutch in his hand. How he would go late at night in Charlotte’s room where she was lying and would stay there for a long time.
    A preganant portrait of Charlotte commissioned by Charlotte just a month before she gave birth was delievered on Leopold’s birtday. The entire household burst into tears and Prince Leopold an ultimate “Mr. Darcy” who was always calm and formal was greatly affected he could not keep his tone normal.
    Anyway, Leopold, it was said, was never the same again. He became cold and weary… Always has a melancholy look in his eyes…aside from naming his daughter(by his 2nd wife whom he married for political reasons) Charlotte, he also “married” a woman who looked exactly like princess charlotte, a year before he married his “2nd wife”. He saw her in a play. And proposed marriage the following day in the hopes of having again the happiness taken away from him so soon. But she was not Charlotte and so it did not work. It was said that not a day passed that he did not mourn her.
    He took the portrait given by Charlotte and taken it to Belgium when He became King. It was said taht everytime he looks at it he is overcome by a very powerful emotions
    Before he died he had requested to be buried in Windsor beside Charlotte, but the ministers in Belgium (or maybe his children( wound’nt allow it as he is the King of the Belgians)He died saying,”Charlotte…Charlotte..”
    Victoria and Albert and Charlotte and Leopold both had an equaly romantic marriage. A&V was given by providence longer time together and their love shine through the entire time and what you would expect of a fairytale romance While Leopold and Charlotte makes me think of Heloise and Abelard and Romeo and Juliet. Which was such a shame because the two did marry for their own selfish reasons. For Charlotte to have her freedom and ambitious Leopold to have the throne of England. And what do you know just like how you would read it in a romance novel, the two have a very different personality. Leopold, cautious, calculating, formal, charming, intelligent and and extrmely handsome. While Charlotte, is impulsive,feisty, anxious, naive and have shocking manners but very interesting personality. I’m sure there were conflicts in the beginning, but Leopold who’s an excellent diplomat and couragoues soldier, was successful in taming his wife. The two somehow fell deeply in love and Leopold’s ambition was supplanted by his heart. He calmed her anxiousness, and gently taught her how a princess should behave. And she who was so fast in exercising her authority when she was crossed became very submissive and attached to her husband. Everyone who had observed was struck by their attachment to each other.
    It is somewhat poignant if not surprising that Leopold due to his wisdom and good judgements in politics did go places and still end up a King (which he never would have been if charlotte lived, he would only be a Queen consort like Prince Albert)…but without Charlotte by her side. During his old years he remembers with nostalgia. He told Queen Victoria that she looked like Princess Charlotte physically. Perhaps that’s why he seemed to be more concerned about her than his own children. I wondered how he must feel when Albert and Victoria married. Since it would have been him and Charlotte. You really should make a book about these two (Charlotte and Leopold) in alternate reality where the two of them can have a happy ending like Albert and Victoria.

    Reply
  101. From MJP:
    It’s a tragic story, Maria. It is interesting to speculate how different things would have been if Charlotte had had a better doctorand hadn’t died in childbirth. We might talk of the Charlottean Age because Victoria would never have been born.
    Victorian and Albert did have more time than Charlotte and Leopold, but still not a lot. The deaths of both Charlotte and Albert emphasize how much medical treatment has improved. It’s sad when a great romance ends too soon.

    Reply
  102. From MJP:
    It’s a tragic story, Maria. It is interesting to speculate how different things would have been if Charlotte had had a better doctorand hadn’t died in childbirth. We might talk of the Charlottean Age because Victoria would never have been born.
    Victorian and Albert did have more time than Charlotte and Leopold, but still not a lot. The deaths of both Charlotte and Albert emphasize how much medical treatment has improved. It’s sad when a great romance ends too soon.

    Reply
  103. From MJP:
    It’s a tragic story, Maria. It is interesting to speculate how different things would have been if Charlotte had had a better doctorand hadn’t died in childbirth. We might talk of the Charlottean Age because Victoria would never have been born.
    Victorian and Albert did have more time than Charlotte and Leopold, but still not a lot. The deaths of both Charlotte and Albert emphasize how much medical treatment has improved. It’s sad when a great romance ends too soon.

    Reply
  104. From MJP:
    It’s a tragic story, Maria. It is interesting to speculate how different things would have been if Charlotte had had a better doctorand hadn’t died in childbirth. We might talk of the Charlottean Age because Victoria would never have been born.
    Victorian and Albert did have more time than Charlotte and Leopold, but still not a lot. The deaths of both Charlotte and Albert emphasize how much medical treatment has improved. It’s sad when a great romance ends too soon.

    Reply
  105. From MJP:
    It’s a tragic story, Maria. It is interesting to speculate how different things would have been if Charlotte had had a better doctorand hadn’t died in childbirth. We might talk of the Charlottean Age because Victoria would never have been born.
    Victorian and Albert did have more time than Charlotte and Leopold, but still not a lot. The deaths of both Charlotte and Albert emphasize how much medical treatment has improved. It’s sad when a great romance ends too soon.

    Reply
  106. It is funny that Queen Charlotte (Princess Charlotte’s grandma) who had many children survived as well as Queen Victoria (who is quite small in stature) who had nine children! Princess Charlotte, I read in a Royal Fashion book somewhere, was about 5’7 1/2″ in height! The problem was the baby was too large. He weighs 9pounds!And to make matters worse, the baby was also in traverse position. Although, I thought even then that midwives have knowledge of manipulating the baby to the ‘right position’. Is it not done now also? Her prenatal was also terrible. They bled the poor girl regularly and restricted her diet. How can one have the strength nor the energy to give birth especially in the worse combination of circumstances? Then the doctor knew of forceps and he correctly diagnosed the baby’s position but he was trained by a ‘conventional’ doctor (his father-in-law)who did not really advocate medical intervention. After the birth, she was given a warm (instead of cold) patch or something like that to put at her abdomen! I mean that was just common sense..WAsnt it? I felt bad for the doctor though. I am sure he did not want to make those mistakes especially on the most popular member of the Royal Family who was loved by the people.Even though he was absolved of any guilt by Leopold and the King, He became depressed because I am sure he must have gone over and over in his mind all decisions he made and could have made and during these realized all the erroneous judgement he made. One mistake on the side of Princess Charlotte was saying no to Queen Charlotte to be there. Who knows it may have made a differnce she could have said something or done something. On the part of Prince Leopold he should have insisted on Stockmar attending her because they said he was the most clever and qualified physician present there. Hhttp://www.innominatesociety.com/Articles/The%20Death%20of%20Princess%20Charlotte%20of%20Wales.htmlere is a link in how she died

    Reply
  107. It is funny that Queen Charlotte (Princess Charlotte’s grandma) who had many children survived as well as Queen Victoria (who is quite small in stature) who had nine children! Princess Charlotte, I read in a Royal Fashion book somewhere, was about 5’7 1/2″ in height! The problem was the baby was too large. He weighs 9pounds!And to make matters worse, the baby was also in traverse position. Although, I thought even then that midwives have knowledge of manipulating the baby to the ‘right position’. Is it not done now also? Her prenatal was also terrible. They bled the poor girl regularly and restricted her diet. How can one have the strength nor the energy to give birth especially in the worse combination of circumstances? Then the doctor knew of forceps and he correctly diagnosed the baby’s position but he was trained by a ‘conventional’ doctor (his father-in-law)who did not really advocate medical intervention. After the birth, she was given a warm (instead of cold) patch or something like that to put at her abdomen! I mean that was just common sense..WAsnt it? I felt bad for the doctor though. I am sure he did not want to make those mistakes especially on the most popular member of the Royal Family who was loved by the people.Even though he was absolved of any guilt by Leopold and the King, He became depressed because I am sure he must have gone over and over in his mind all decisions he made and could have made and during these realized all the erroneous judgement he made. One mistake on the side of Princess Charlotte was saying no to Queen Charlotte to be there. Who knows it may have made a differnce she could have said something or done something. On the part of Prince Leopold he should have insisted on Stockmar attending her because they said he was the most clever and qualified physician present there. Hhttp://www.innominatesociety.com/Articles/The%20Death%20of%20Princess%20Charlotte%20of%20Wales.htmlere is a link in how she died

    Reply
  108. It is funny that Queen Charlotte (Princess Charlotte’s grandma) who had many children survived as well as Queen Victoria (who is quite small in stature) who had nine children! Princess Charlotte, I read in a Royal Fashion book somewhere, was about 5’7 1/2″ in height! The problem was the baby was too large. He weighs 9pounds!And to make matters worse, the baby was also in traverse position. Although, I thought even then that midwives have knowledge of manipulating the baby to the ‘right position’. Is it not done now also? Her prenatal was also terrible. They bled the poor girl regularly and restricted her diet. How can one have the strength nor the energy to give birth especially in the worse combination of circumstances? Then the doctor knew of forceps and he correctly diagnosed the baby’s position but he was trained by a ‘conventional’ doctor (his father-in-law)who did not really advocate medical intervention. After the birth, she was given a warm (instead of cold) patch or something like that to put at her abdomen! I mean that was just common sense..WAsnt it? I felt bad for the doctor though. I am sure he did not want to make those mistakes especially on the most popular member of the Royal Family who was loved by the people.Even though he was absolved of any guilt by Leopold and the King, He became depressed because I am sure he must have gone over and over in his mind all decisions he made and could have made and during these realized all the erroneous judgement he made. One mistake on the side of Princess Charlotte was saying no to Queen Charlotte to be there. Who knows it may have made a differnce she could have said something or done something. On the part of Prince Leopold he should have insisted on Stockmar attending her because they said he was the most clever and qualified physician present there. Hhttp://www.innominatesociety.com/Articles/The%20Death%20of%20Princess%20Charlotte%20of%20Wales.htmlere is a link in how she died

    Reply
  109. It is funny that Queen Charlotte (Princess Charlotte’s grandma) who had many children survived as well as Queen Victoria (who is quite small in stature) who had nine children! Princess Charlotte, I read in a Royal Fashion book somewhere, was about 5’7 1/2″ in height! The problem was the baby was too large. He weighs 9pounds!And to make matters worse, the baby was also in traverse position. Although, I thought even then that midwives have knowledge of manipulating the baby to the ‘right position’. Is it not done now also? Her prenatal was also terrible. They bled the poor girl regularly and restricted her diet. How can one have the strength nor the energy to give birth especially in the worse combination of circumstances? Then the doctor knew of forceps and he correctly diagnosed the baby’s position but he was trained by a ‘conventional’ doctor (his father-in-law)who did not really advocate medical intervention. After the birth, she was given a warm (instead of cold) patch or something like that to put at her abdomen! I mean that was just common sense..WAsnt it? I felt bad for the doctor though. I am sure he did not want to make those mistakes especially on the most popular member of the Royal Family who was loved by the people.Even though he was absolved of any guilt by Leopold and the King, He became depressed because I am sure he must have gone over and over in his mind all decisions he made and could have made and during these realized all the erroneous judgement he made. One mistake on the side of Princess Charlotte was saying no to Queen Charlotte to be there. Who knows it may have made a differnce she could have said something or done something. On the part of Prince Leopold he should have insisted on Stockmar attending her because they said he was the most clever and qualified physician present there. Hhttp://www.innominatesociety.com/Articles/The%20Death%20of%20Princess%20Charlotte%20of%20Wales.htmlere is a link in how she died

    Reply
  110. It is funny that Queen Charlotte (Princess Charlotte’s grandma) who had many children survived as well as Queen Victoria (who is quite small in stature) who had nine children! Princess Charlotte, I read in a Royal Fashion book somewhere, was about 5’7 1/2″ in height! The problem was the baby was too large. He weighs 9pounds!And to make matters worse, the baby was also in traverse position. Although, I thought even then that midwives have knowledge of manipulating the baby to the ‘right position’. Is it not done now also? Her prenatal was also terrible. They bled the poor girl regularly and restricted her diet. How can one have the strength nor the energy to give birth especially in the worse combination of circumstances? Then the doctor knew of forceps and he correctly diagnosed the baby’s position but he was trained by a ‘conventional’ doctor (his father-in-law)who did not really advocate medical intervention. After the birth, she was given a warm (instead of cold) patch or something like that to put at her abdomen! I mean that was just common sense..WAsnt it? I felt bad for the doctor though. I am sure he did not want to make those mistakes especially on the most popular member of the Royal Family who was loved by the people.Even though he was absolved of any guilt by Leopold and the King, He became depressed because I am sure he must have gone over and over in his mind all decisions he made and could have made and during these realized all the erroneous judgement he made. One mistake on the side of Princess Charlotte was saying no to Queen Charlotte to be there. Who knows it may have made a differnce she could have said something or done something. On the part of Prince Leopold he should have insisted on Stockmar attending her because they said he was the most clever and qualified physician present there. Hhttp://www.innominatesociety.com/Articles/The%20Death%20of%20Princess%20Charlotte%20of%20Wales.htmlere is a link in how she died

    Reply
  111. It’s sad that poor medical treatment resulted in Charlotte’s death since she was basically a big, healthy girl. Ironically, she probably would have been better off with a nice sensible midwife.

    Reply
  112. It’s sad that poor medical treatment resulted in Charlotte’s death since she was basically a big, healthy girl. Ironically, she probably would have been better off with a nice sensible midwife.

    Reply
  113. It’s sad that poor medical treatment resulted in Charlotte’s death since she was basically a big, healthy girl. Ironically, she probably would have been better off with a nice sensible midwife.

    Reply
  114. It’s sad that poor medical treatment resulted in Charlotte’s death since she was basically a big, healthy girl. Ironically, she probably would have been better off with a nice sensible midwife.

    Reply
  115. It’s sad that poor medical treatment resulted in Charlotte’s death since she was basically a big, healthy girl. Ironically, she probably would have been better off with a nice sensible midwife.

    Reply
  116. I am also amazed on how Leopold’s love for Charlotte survived over the years. He survived her 48 years! I just find it really amazing how one can love and continue to yearn for someone that long when he was only with her for 1 and a half year. Before he met Charlotte they said he was an accomplished lothario and even been involved with Hortense(step-daughter of Emperor Napoleon)Before dying he asked to be buried with her even though he was the king of a country and was married to his second wife for almost 20 years. I sometime wonder what it is about Charlotte that made him love her that much. Forty-eight years is a very long time to love and yearn for someone you cannot be with. I know of some people who are almost out of their minds after a few years only! Do you also know that Queen Victoria also survived Prince Albert for 48 years? The difference between the 2 – Even though Prince Albert died at 42 years of age,Queen Victoria lived long (90 years old)While Charlotte died at 21 years of age and Leopold 74. There is also a memoir of the woman who looked like Princess Charlotte whom Prince Leopold married. I bought the book. BUt it is also available online.It is called Memoirs of Karoline Bauer. She did not paint a very good picture of Leopold. But I think it is part anger on her part and ‘post-charlotte’ change of Prince Leopold’s personality. But if one reads it one can really tell how desperately Leopold wanted to have Charlotte back. This is the link of the part when she talked and eventually met Prince Leopold.
    http://books.google.com/books?id=zkFAAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA26&output=text

    Reply
  117. I am also amazed on how Leopold’s love for Charlotte survived over the years. He survived her 48 years! I just find it really amazing how one can love and continue to yearn for someone that long when he was only with her for 1 and a half year. Before he met Charlotte they said he was an accomplished lothario and even been involved with Hortense(step-daughter of Emperor Napoleon)Before dying he asked to be buried with her even though he was the king of a country and was married to his second wife for almost 20 years. I sometime wonder what it is about Charlotte that made him love her that much. Forty-eight years is a very long time to love and yearn for someone you cannot be with. I know of some people who are almost out of their minds after a few years only! Do you also know that Queen Victoria also survived Prince Albert for 48 years? The difference between the 2 – Even though Prince Albert died at 42 years of age,Queen Victoria lived long (90 years old)While Charlotte died at 21 years of age and Leopold 74. There is also a memoir of the woman who looked like Princess Charlotte whom Prince Leopold married. I bought the book. BUt it is also available online.It is called Memoirs of Karoline Bauer. She did not paint a very good picture of Leopold. But I think it is part anger on her part and ‘post-charlotte’ change of Prince Leopold’s personality. But if one reads it one can really tell how desperately Leopold wanted to have Charlotte back. This is the link of the part when she talked and eventually met Prince Leopold.
    http://books.google.com/books?id=zkFAAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA26&output=text

    Reply
  118. I am also amazed on how Leopold’s love for Charlotte survived over the years. He survived her 48 years! I just find it really amazing how one can love and continue to yearn for someone that long when he was only with her for 1 and a half year. Before he met Charlotte they said he was an accomplished lothario and even been involved with Hortense(step-daughter of Emperor Napoleon)Before dying he asked to be buried with her even though he was the king of a country and was married to his second wife for almost 20 years. I sometime wonder what it is about Charlotte that made him love her that much. Forty-eight years is a very long time to love and yearn for someone you cannot be with. I know of some people who are almost out of their minds after a few years only! Do you also know that Queen Victoria also survived Prince Albert for 48 years? The difference between the 2 – Even though Prince Albert died at 42 years of age,Queen Victoria lived long (90 years old)While Charlotte died at 21 years of age and Leopold 74. There is also a memoir of the woman who looked like Princess Charlotte whom Prince Leopold married. I bought the book. BUt it is also available online.It is called Memoirs of Karoline Bauer. She did not paint a very good picture of Leopold. But I think it is part anger on her part and ‘post-charlotte’ change of Prince Leopold’s personality. But if one reads it one can really tell how desperately Leopold wanted to have Charlotte back. This is the link of the part when she talked and eventually met Prince Leopold.
    http://books.google.com/books?id=zkFAAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA26&output=text

    Reply
  119. I am also amazed on how Leopold’s love for Charlotte survived over the years. He survived her 48 years! I just find it really amazing how one can love and continue to yearn for someone that long when he was only with her for 1 and a half year. Before he met Charlotte they said he was an accomplished lothario and even been involved with Hortense(step-daughter of Emperor Napoleon)Before dying he asked to be buried with her even though he was the king of a country and was married to his second wife for almost 20 years. I sometime wonder what it is about Charlotte that made him love her that much. Forty-eight years is a very long time to love and yearn for someone you cannot be with. I know of some people who are almost out of their minds after a few years only! Do you also know that Queen Victoria also survived Prince Albert for 48 years? The difference between the 2 – Even though Prince Albert died at 42 years of age,Queen Victoria lived long (90 years old)While Charlotte died at 21 years of age and Leopold 74. There is also a memoir of the woman who looked like Princess Charlotte whom Prince Leopold married. I bought the book. BUt it is also available online.It is called Memoirs of Karoline Bauer. She did not paint a very good picture of Leopold. But I think it is part anger on her part and ‘post-charlotte’ change of Prince Leopold’s personality. But if one reads it one can really tell how desperately Leopold wanted to have Charlotte back. This is the link of the part when she talked and eventually met Prince Leopold.
    http://books.google.com/books?id=zkFAAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA26&output=text

    Reply
  120. I am also amazed on how Leopold’s love for Charlotte survived over the years. He survived her 48 years! I just find it really amazing how one can love and continue to yearn for someone that long when he was only with her for 1 and a half year. Before he met Charlotte they said he was an accomplished lothario and even been involved with Hortense(step-daughter of Emperor Napoleon)Before dying he asked to be buried with her even though he was the king of a country and was married to his second wife for almost 20 years. I sometime wonder what it is about Charlotte that made him love her that much. Forty-eight years is a very long time to love and yearn for someone you cannot be with. I know of some people who are almost out of their minds after a few years only! Do you also know that Queen Victoria also survived Prince Albert for 48 years? The difference between the 2 – Even though Prince Albert died at 42 years of age,Queen Victoria lived long (90 years old)While Charlotte died at 21 years of age and Leopold 74. There is also a memoir of the woman who looked like Princess Charlotte whom Prince Leopold married. I bought the book. BUt it is also available online.It is called Memoirs of Karoline Bauer. She did not paint a very good picture of Leopold. But I think it is part anger on her part and ‘post-charlotte’ change of Prince Leopold’s personality. But if one reads it one can really tell how desperately Leopold wanted to have Charlotte back. This is the link of the part when she talked and eventually met Prince Leopold.
    http://books.google.com/books?id=zkFAAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA26&output=text

    Reply

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