The Changing World of Publishing

Anne here. When I was trying to decide what to blog about today, I glanced through the list of topics sent in by wenchly readers over the years, looking right back to the earliest of those lists. So many of those early questions were from aspiring authors asking about the publishing process, how to get an agent, tips for catching an editor's eye, which conferences were you most likely to meet good editors —and many more.

Those were the days of relative certainty — there was a process for getting published, a clear pathway, with steps. Now there are so many ways to get published that the difficulty is in choosing which one to take — to seek traditional publishing, or to go with a small digital-first press (many of which are unproven) or to self-publish. 3*Wenches

There's no longer the hierarchy there was: many major traditional bestsellers are also self-publishing and publishing through small e-presses — witness the wenches.

And there are no experts: what works for one writer might prove a dismal failure for another. Trickier still, what works well for the first book by an author might not work for the second or third. So many writers I know are trying everything, flinging all kinds of books — like literary spaghetti thrown at various walls, to see what sticks.

It's just as tricky for readers, I suspect.

The thing that traditional publishers did that authors could not was to distribute the books, getting them into bookshops across the country, across the world, getting them into the places where readers could buy them.

With the advent of e-books, distribution is no longer the big issue: anyone can upload a book to the web and pretty much anyone in the world can buy or read it (unless there is a geographical restriction agreement in place.)

MillyRibbonThe issue now is visibility. With half the world and their dog (this is mine) writing and uploading their stories, the e-book market is utterly swamped with every kind of book — well written, badly written, in every genre you've ever read and plenty more you've never even heard of.

How to choose? It used to be that a publisher was a gatekeeper — their imprint on a book was a guarantee of quality. A book might not be to your taste, but it would be well-written and well-produced. Now e-published books — whether self-published or put out by a digital-first-press — vary widely in the amount of care and attention each book is given in preparation. I've seen self-published novels published to an immaculate standard (better than some traditional publishers) and I've seen sloppy, slapdash, ill-edited novels published. And again, how is the reader to know?

Visibility is all. Because of this, authors (no matter how they're published) are under more and more pressure to promote and market their books themselves. And market. And market. So we're all madly tweeting and FBing and Tumblring and Wattpadding and blogging and making a lot of noise. To what effect? We don't really know. Everyone's looking for The Key.

Currently the hot topic for author promotion is newsletters. At the Romantic Times Convention the other day I'm told authors were advised by marketing experts and publicists not only to have a regular newsletter, but to put them out more frequently — not just monthly (as many do) but weekly. Or even more often. 1SpringBridemed

I'm guessing there was a collective sigh from the authors in the audience. But it's not only people at RT who are being told this — it seems to be the current marketing advice to a wide range of authors — some wenches included. As well as contributing to the word-wenches newsletter, I have a newsletter of my own, but I usually only send out one or two issues a year, generally to announce the publication of a new book (The book on your left will be out in June) or some other particularly newsworthy event.

So now I'm wondering — and I'm asking you readers to help us out here, please.

    Would you like weekly newsletters from your favorite authors?
    Do you subscribe to many author newsletters?
    Do you actually read the newsletters you currently get? (I confess I don't — I often just register that author X has a new book out, order it, and then delete the email.)
    What attracts you in a newsletter?

Someone who leaves a comment will win a prize from me. And if you'd like to subscribe to my newsletter (she says shamelessly) it's on the left-hand column on my website. And the word-wenches newsletter subscription is at the top of this page.

270 thoughts on “The Changing World of Publishing”

  1. NOT weekly, please. I receive enough email as it is. I look forward to the newsletters I do get, but value them for information about forthcoming titles, or news about what’s going on the the author’s creative life. Personal anecdotes are a bonus but not vital. I don’t get so many that I would find it hard to read them through. I only subscribe to newsletters from authors on my auto-buy list and that’s about a dozen and not all have newsletters or even web pages.
    Personally, I’d rather “my” authors use their time go write novels rather than churning out newsletters.

    Reply
  2. NOT weekly, please. I receive enough email as it is. I look forward to the newsletters I do get, but value them for information about forthcoming titles, or news about what’s going on the the author’s creative life. Personal anecdotes are a bonus but not vital. I don’t get so many that I would find it hard to read them through. I only subscribe to newsletters from authors on my auto-buy list and that’s about a dozen and not all have newsletters or even web pages.
    Personally, I’d rather “my” authors use their time go write novels rather than churning out newsletters.

    Reply
  3. NOT weekly, please. I receive enough email as it is. I look forward to the newsletters I do get, but value them for information about forthcoming titles, or news about what’s going on the the author’s creative life. Personal anecdotes are a bonus but not vital. I don’t get so many that I would find it hard to read them through. I only subscribe to newsletters from authors on my auto-buy list and that’s about a dozen and not all have newsletters or even web pages.
    Personally, I’d rather “my” authors use their time go write novels rather than churning out newsletters.

    Reply
  4. NOT weekly, please. I receive enough email as it is. I look forward to the newsletters I do get, but value them for information about forthcoming titles, or news about what’s going on the the author’s creative life. Personal anecdotes are a bonus but not vital. I don’t get so many that I would find it hard to read them through. I only subscribe to newsletters from authors on my auto-buy list and that’s about a dozen and not all have newsletters or even web pages.
    Personally, I’d rather “my” authors use their time go write novels rather than churning out newsletters.

    Reply
  5. NOT weekly, please. I receive enough email as it is. I look forward to the newsletters I do get, but value them for information about forthcoming titles, or news about what’s going on the the author’s creative life. Personal anecdotes are a bonus but not vital. I don’t get so many that I would find it hard to read them through. I only subscribe to newsletters from authors on my auto-buy list and that’s about a dozen and not all have newsletters or even web pages.
    Personally, I’d rather “my” authors use their time go write novels rather than churning out newsletters.

    Reply
  6. Hi Anne, Please DEFINITELY NOT WEEKLY. We readers are inundated by authors asking us to subscribe to their newsletters. While I’m sure a lot of us are happy to do so for a lot of authors. But no one wants their mailbox to be so filled up, that family and personal emails get lost in cyberspace in that mad shuffle. Lord knows we have all not been created equal. So all of us do not have the same space available on our computers to accommodate all the incoming and the outgoing responses they may require. Then what? Big dilemma! Whose responsibility? What to do?

    Reply
  7. Hi Anne, Please DEFINITELY NOT WEEKLY. We readers are inundated by authors asking us to subscribe to their newsletters. While I’m sure a lot of us are happy to do so for a lot of authors. But no one wants their mailbox to be so filled up, that family and personal emails get lost in cyberspace in that mad shuffle. Lord knows we have all not been created equal. So all of us do not have the same space available on our computers to accommodate all the incoming and the outgoing responses they may require. Then what? Big dilemma! Whose responsibility? What to do?

    Reply
  8. Hi Anne, Please DEFINITELY NOT WEEKLY. We readers are inundated by authors asking us to subscribe to their newsletters. While I’m sure a lot of us are happy to do so for a lot of authors. But no one wants their mailbox to be so filled up, that family and personal emails get lost in cyberspace in that mad shuffle. Lord knows we have all not been created equal. So all of us do not have the same space available on our computers to accommodate all the incoming and the outgoing responses they may require. Then what? Big dilemma! Whose responsibility? What to do?

    Reply
  9. Hi Anne, Please DEFINITELY NOT WEEKLY. We readers are inundated by authors asking us to subscribe to their newsletters. While I’m sure a lot of us are happy to do so for a lot of authors. But no one wants their mailbox to be so filled up, that family and personal emails get lost in cyberspace in that mad shuffle. Lord knows we have all not been created equal. So all of us do not have the same space available on our computers to accommodate all the incoming and the outgoing responses they may require. Then what? Big dilemma! Whose responsibility? What to do?

    Reply
  10. Hi Anne, Please DEFINITELY NOT WEEKLY. We readers are inundated by authors asking us to subscribe to their newsletters. While I’m sure a lot of us are happy to do so for a lot of authors. But no one wants their mailbox to be so filled up, that family and personal emails get lost in cyberspace in that mad shuffle. Lord knows we have all not been created equal. So all of us do not have the same space available on our computers to accommodate all the incoming and the outgoing responses they may require. Then what? Big dilemma! Whose responsibility? What to do?

    Reply
  11. Me too. Definitely not weekly! I would always at least skim any Word Wench newsletter, because I know who you all are and I am interested in what you have to say — but weekly x a couple of dozen authors = overkill.
    But you are all established authors. I have no idea at all how a new author could or should do newsletters. I suspect if I wasn’t already familiar with that new author in some way, I’d delete it; I certainly wouldn’t subscribe.
    What attracts me in a newsletter is just simple information about a new book or rerelease of an older book. With a cover photo. Maybe something personal if the writer is so inclined; that’s always nice. But really, I could get by with a tweet.
    I don’t know what authors can do nowadays. Your skills are being great storytellers and superlative prose stylists; you shouldn’t have to be publicists, marketers, publishers and hypesters as well. It’s too much to ask of any one person. It must be mentally confusing, having to code switch between writing and selling. I doubt if there’s enough money from your books (unless you’re wildly mainstream popular) for you to pay other people to do these things for you. I wouldn’t know what to advise.
    I can only say as a reader, it is getting *very* difficult to find good new authors. Sturgeon’s Law says 90% of evertythng is ****, but when he said that, publishers were (as you say) acting as the gatekeepers. Now there are no gatekeepers 🙁 I feel that as a potential customer, it’s now my job to go through the universe’s slushpile, and it’s not only time-consuming but exhausting, and I’m beginning to feel like it’s not worth the effort anymore.

    Reply
  12. Me too. Definitely not weekly! I would always at least skim any Word Wench newsletter, because I know who you all are and I am interested in what you have to say — but weekly x a couple of dozen authors = overkill.
    But you are all established authors. I have no idea at all how a new author could or should do newsletters. I suspect if I wasn’t already familiar with that new author in some way, I’d delete it; I certainly wouldn’t subscribe.
    What attracts me in a newsletter is just simple information about a new book or rerelease of an older book. With a cover photo. Maybe something personal if the writer is so inclined; that’s always nice. But really, I could get by with a tweet.
    I don’t know what authors can do nowadays. Your skills are being great storytellers and superlative prose stylists; you shouldn’t have to be publicists, marketers, publishers and hypesters as well. It’s too much to ask of any one person. It must be mentally confusing, having to code switch between writing and selling. I doubt if there’s enough money from your books (unless you’re wildly mainstream popular) for you to pay other people to do these things for you. I wouldn’t know what to advise.
    I can only say as a reader, it is getting *very* difficult to find good new authors. Sturgeon’s Law says 90% of evertythng is ****, but when he said that, publishers were (as you say) acting as the gatekeepers. Now there are no gatekeepers 🙁 I feel that as a potential customer, it’s now my job to go through the universe’s slushpile, and it’s not only time-consuming but exhausting, and I’m beginning to feel like it’s not worth the effort anymore.

    Reply
  13. Me too. Definitely not weekly! I would always at least skim any Word Wench newsletter, because I know who you all are and I am interested in what you have to say — but weekly x a couple of dozen authors = overkill.
    But you are all established authors. I have no idea at all how a new author could or should do newsletters. I suspect if I wasn’t already familiar with that new author in some way, I’d delete it; I certainly wouldn’t subscribe.
    What attracts me in a newsletter is just simple information about a new book or rerelease of an older book. With a cover photo. Maybe something personal if the writer is so inclined; that’s always nice. But really, I could get by with a tweet.
    I don’t know what authors can do nowadays. Your skills are being great storytellers and superlative prose stylists; you shouldn’t have to be publicists, marketers, publishers and hypesters as well. It’s too much to ask of any one person. It must be mentally confusing, having to code switch between writing and selling. I doubt if there’s enough money from your books (unless you’re wildly mainstream popular) for you to pay other people to do these things for you. I wouldn’t know what to advise.
    I can only say as a reader, it is getting *very* difficult to find good new authors. Sturgeon’s Law says 90% of evertythng is ****, but when he said that, publishers were (as you say) acting as the gatekeepers. Now there are no gatekeepers 🙁 I feel that as a potential customer, it’s now my job to go through the universe’s slushpile, and it’s not only time-consuming but exhausting, and I’m beginning to feel like it’s not worth the effort anymore.

    Reply
  14. Me too. Definitely not weekly! I would always at least skim any Word Wench newsletter, because I know who you all are and I am interested in what you have to say — but weekly x a couple of dozen authors = overkill.
    But you are all established authors. I have no idea at all how a new author could or should do newsletters. I suspect if I wasn’t already familiar with that new author in some way, I’d delete it; I certainly wouldn’t subscribe.
    What attracts me in a newsletter is just simple information about a new book or rerelease of an older book. With a cover photo. Maybe something personal if the writer is so inclined; that’s always nice. But really, I could get by with a tweet.
    I don’t know what authors can do nowadays. Your skills are being great storytellers and superlative prose stylists; you shouldn’t have to be publicists, marketers, publishers and hypesters as well. It’s too much to ask of any one person. It must be mentally confusing, having to code switch between writing and selling. I doubt if there’s enough money from your books (unless you’re wildly mainstream popular) for you to pay other people to do these things for you. I wouldn’t know what to advise.
    I can only say as a reader, it is getting *very* difficult to find good new authors. Sturgeon’s Law says 90% of evertythng is ****, but when he said that, publishers were (as you say) acting as the gatekeepers. Now there are no gatekeepers 🙁 I feel that as a potential customer, it’s now my job to go through the universe’s slushpile, and it’s not only time-consuming but exhausting, and I’m beginning to feel like it’s not worth the effort anymore.

    Reply
  15. Me too. Definitely not weekly! I would always at least skim any Word Wench newsletter, because I know who you all are and I am interested in what you have to say — but weekly x a couple of dozen authors = overkill.
    But you are all established authors. I have no idea at all how a new author could or should do newsletters. I suspect if I wasn’t already familiar with that new author in some way, I’d delete it; I certainly wouldn’t subscribe.
    What attracts me in a newsletter is just simple information about a new book or rerelease of an older book. With a cover photo. Maybe something personal if the writer is so inclined; that’s always nice. But really, I could get by with a tweet.
    I don’t know what authors can do nowadays. Your skills are being great storytellers and superlative prose stylists; you shouldn’t have to be publicists, marketers, publishers and hypesters as well. It’s too much to ask of any one person. It must be mentally confusing, having to code switch between writing and selling. I doubt if there’s enough money from your books (unless you’re wildly mainstream popular) for you to pay other people to do these things for you. I wouldn’t know what to advise.
    I can only say as a reader, it is getting *very* difficult to find good new authors. Sturgeon’s Law says 90% of evertythng is ****, but when he said that, publishers were (as you say) acting as the gatekeepers. Now there are no gatekeepers 🙁 I feel that as a potential customer, it’s now my job to go through the universe’s slushpile, and it’s not only time-consuming but exhausting, and I’m beginning to feel like it’s not worth the effort anymore.

    Reply
  16. My interests and activities are so varied that my mind would blow out in a week if I accepted all the related info available. I don’t sign up for individual newsletters/blogs, only for collective ones like the Wenches that offer interesting background information as well as book promos.

    Reply
  17. My interests and activities are so varied that my mind would blow out in a week if I accepted all the related info available. I don’t sign up for individual newsletters/blogs, only for collective ones like the Wenches that offer interesting background information as well as book promos.

    Reply
  18. My interests and activities are so varied that my mind would blow out in a week if I accepted all the related info available. I don’t sign up for individual newsletters/blogs, only for collective ones like the Wenches that offer interesting background information as well as book promos.

    Reply
  19. My interests and activities are so varied that my mind would blow out in a week if I accepted all the related info available. I don’t sign up for individual newsletters/blogs, only for collective ones like the Wenches that offer interesting background information as well as book promos.

    Reply
  20. My interests and activities are so varied that my mind would blow out in a week if I accepted all the related info available. I don’t sign up for individual newsletters/blogs, only for collective ones like the Wenches that offer interesting background information as well as book promos.

    Reply
  21. I like the collective newsletters from the wenches. The fact that different authors produce them keeps them fresh and interesting. I only subscribe to a couple of individual author newsletters and they publish randomly, when a new book is due out or they have something interesting to say. I don’t have time to read a lot of different newsletters from multiple authors. I probably wouldn’t read a newsletter from an author I didn’t know – but I will look at an author new to me if an author I like recommended them. I know this makes it difficult for new authors to get noticed, but I have a ‘to be read pile’ so large already that it would keep me occupied for the rest of the year (at least) and that doesn’t include books from my favourite authors that I know will be coming out later in the year!

    Reply
  22. I like the collective newsletters from the wenches. The fact that different authors produce them keeps them fresh and interesting. I only subscribe to a couple of individual author newsletters and they publish randomly, when a new book is due out or they have something interesting to say. I don’t have time to read a lot of different newsletters from multiple authors. I probably wouldn’t read a newsletter from an author I didn’t know – but I will look at an author new to me if an author I like recommended them. I know this makes it difficult for new authors to get noticed, but I have a ‘to be read pile’ so large already that it would keep me occupied for the rest of the year (at least) and that doesn’t include books from my favourite authors that I know will be coming out later in the year!

    Reply
  23. I like the collective newsletters from the wenches. The fact that different authors produce them keeps them fresh and interesting. I only subscribe to a couple of individual author newsletters and they publish randomly, when a new book is due out or they have something interesting to say. I don’t have time to read a lot of different newsletters from multiple authors. I probably wouldn’t read a newsletter from an author I didn’t know – but I will look at an author new to me if an author I like recommended them. I know this makes it difficult for new authors to get noticed, but I have a ‘to be read pile’ so large already that it would keep me occupied for the rest of the year (at least) and that doesn’t include books from my favourite authors that I know will be coming out later in the year!

    Reply
  24. I like the collective newsletters from the wenches. The fact that different authors produce them keeps them fresh and interesting. I only subscribe to a couple of individual author newsletters and they publish randomly, when a new book is due out or they have something interesting to say. I don’t have time to read a lot of different newsletters from multiple authors. I probably wouldn’t read a newsletter from an author I didn’t know – but I will look at an author new to me if an author I like recommended them. I know this makes it difficult for new authors to get noticed, but I have a ‘to be read pile’ so large already that it would keep me occupied for the rest of the year (at least) and that doesn’t include books from my favourite authors that I know will be coming out later in the year!

    Reply
  25. I like the collective newsletters from the wenches. The fact that different authors produce them keeps them fresh and interesting. I only subscribe to a couple of individual author newsletters and they publish randomly, when a new book is due out or they have something interesting to say. I don’t have time to read a lot of different newsletters from multiple authors. I probably wouldn’t read a newsletter from an author I didn’t know – but I will look at an author new to me if an author I like recommended them. I know this makes it difficult for new authors to get noticed, but I have a ‘to be read pile’ so large already that it would keep me occupied for the rest of the year (at least) and that doesn’t include books from my favourite authors that I know will be coming out later in the year!

    Reply
  26. Love newsletters! I have a hard time keeping up with blogs and Facebook to get the news. I don’t mind more than once a month newsletter, even once a week. But not so much daily because I’ll get behind. Know it’s appreciated that you do the newsletters with everything else you do!
    Since you mentioned spaghetti Anne, I told my son a number of times to not let dad make spaghetti. Well he must of forgotten and he made it and my son said “let’s not let dad make spaghetti again!” I rest my case. His sticks horribly. Lol

    Reply
  27. Love newsletters! I have a hard time keeping up with blogs and Facebook to get the news. I don’t mind more than once a month newsletter, even once a week. But not so much daily because I’ll get behind. Know it’s appreciated that you do the newsletters with everything else you do!
    Since you mentioned spaghetti Anne, I told my son a number of times to not let dad make spaghetti. Well he must of forgotten and he made it and my son said “let’s not let dad make spaghetti again!” I rest my case. His sticks horribly. Lol

    Reply
  28. Love newsletters! I have a hard time keeping up with blogs and Facebook to get the news. I don’t mind more than once a month newsletter, even once a week. But not so much daily because I’ll get behind. Know it’s appreciated that you do the newsletters with everything else you do!
    Since you mentioned spaghetti Anne, I told my son a number of times to not let dad make spaghetti. Well he must of forgotten and he made it and my son said “let’s not let dad make spaghetti again!” I rest my case. His sticks horribly. Lol

    Reply
  29. Love newsletters! I have a hard time keeping up with blogs and Facebook to get the news. I don’t mind more than once a month newsletter, even once a week. But not so much daily because I’ll get behind. Know it’s appreciated that you do the newsletters with everything else you do!
    Since you mentioned spaghetti Anne, I told my son a number of times to not let dad make spaghetti. Well he must of forgotten and he made it and my son said “let’s not let dad make spaghetti again!” I rest my case. His sticks horribly. Lol

    Reply
  30. Love newsletters! I have a hard time keeping up with blogs and Facebook to get the news. I don’t mind more than once a month newsletter, even once a week. But not so much daily because I’ll get behind. Know it’s appreciated that you do the newsletters with everything else you do!
    Since you mentioned spaghetti Anne, I told my son a number of times to not let dad make spaghetti. Well he must of forgotten and he made it and my son said “let’s not let dad make spaghetti again!” I rest my case. His sticks horribly. Lol

    Reply
  31. I’m with the ‘not weekly’ crowd.. If an author has something new to offer, that’s fine with me. But please, keep it simple and direct. I’m also happy to hear recommendations of authors regarding books/authors they are reading.. But keep writing the books.. I use newsletters and web sites to stay up to date. Heck you could send me a newsletter to tell me to go to your website for an update.

    Reply
  32. I’m with the ‘not weekly’ crowd.. If an author has something new to offer, that’s fine with me. But please, keep it simple and direct. I’m also happy to hear recommendations of authors regarding books/authors they are reading.. But keep writing the books.. I use newsletters and web sites to stay up to date. Heck you could send me a newsletter to tell me to go to your website for an update.

    Reply
  33. I’m with the ‘not weekly’ crowd.. If an author has something new to offer, that’s fine with me. But please, keep it simple and direct. I’m also happy to hear recommendations of authors regarding books/authors they are reading.. But keep writing the books.. I use newsletters and web sites to stay up to date. Heck you could send me a newsletter to tell me to go to your website for an update.

    Reply
  34. I’m with the ‘not weekly’ crowd.. If an author has something new to offer, that’s fine with me. But please, keep it simple and direct. I’m also happy to hear recommendations of authors regarding books/authors they are reading.. But keep writing the books.. I use newsletters and web sites to stay up to date. Heck you could send me a newsletter to tell me to go to your website for an update.

    Reply
  35. I’m with the ‘not weekly’ crowd.. If an author has something new to offer, that’s fine with me. But please, keep it simple and direct. I’m also happy to hear recommendations of authors regarding books/authors they are reading.. But keep writing the books.. I use newsletters and web sites to stay up to date. Heck you could send me a newsletter to tell me to go to your website for an update.

    Reply
  36. I enjoy the newsletters, I would prefer monthly or quarterly. I want to know about upcoming books and excerpts from upcoming books. I subscribe to about a dozen newsletters.

    Reply
  37. I enjoy the newsletters, I would prefer monthly or quarterly. I want to know about upcoming books and excerpts from upcoming books. I subscribe to about a dozen newsletters.

    Reply
  38. I enjoy the newsletters, I would prefer monthly or quarterly. I want to know about upcoming books and excerpts from upcoming books. I subscribe to about a dozen newsletters.

    Reply
  39. I enjoy the newsletters, I would prefer monthly or quarterly. I want to know about upcoming books and excerpts from upcoming books. I subscribe to about a dozen newsletters.

    Reply
  40. I enjoy the newsletters, I would prefer monthly or quarterly. I want to know about upcoming books and excerpts from upcoming books. I subscribe to about a dozen newsletters.

    Reply
  41. I couldn’t keep up with weekly newsletters. As it is, I have a few *thousand* unread emails (some of them author newsletters!) in my inbox at the moment.
    Maybe a newsletter when there’s actually news – a new book, for example.
    I can tell you what I HATE: social media spamming. Goodreads events. Facebook release parties. Twitter cover reveal parties. Parties, parties, Buy My Book! Parties. Sometimes it just seems like authors spamming other authors and achieving nothing…
    I read The Spring Bride a few weeks ago (ARC). Loved it.:)

    Reply
  42. I couldn’t keep up with weekly newsletters. As it is, I have a few *thousand* unread emails (some of them author newsletters!) in my inbox at the moment.
    Maybe a newsletter when there’s actually news – a new book, for example.
    I can tell you what I HATE: social media spamming. Goodreads events. Facebook release parties. Twitter cover reveal parties. Parties, parties, Buy My Book! Parties. Sometimes it just seems like authors spamming other authors and achieving nothing…
    I read The Spring Bride a few weeks ago (ARC). Loved it.:)

    Reply
  43. I couldn’t keep up with weekly newsletters. As it is, I have a few *thousand* unread emails (some of them author newsletters!) in my inbox at the moment.
    Maybe a newsletter when there’s actually news – a new book, for example.
    I can tell you what I HATE: social media spamming. Goodreads events. Facebook release parties. Twitter cover reveal parties. Parties, parties, Buy My Book! Parties. Sometimes it just seems like authors spamming other authors and achieving nothing…
    I read The Spring Bride a few weeks ago (ARC). Loved it.:)

    Reply
  44. I couldn’t keep up with weekly newsletters. As it is, I have a few *thousand* unread emails (some of them author newsletters!) in my inbox at the moment.
    Maybe a newsletter when there’s actually news – a new book, for example.
    I can tell you what I HATE: social media spamming. Goodreads events. Facebook release parties. Twitter cover reveal parties. Parties, parties, Buy My Book! Parties. Sometimes it just seems like authors spamming other authors and achieving nothing…
    I read The Spring Bride a few weeks ago (ARC). Loved it.:)

    Reply
  45. I couldn’t keep up with weekly newsletters. As it is, I have a few *thousand* unread emails (some of them author newsletters!) in my inbox at the moment.
    Maybe a newsletter when there’s actually news – a new book, for example.
    I can tell you what I HATE: social media spamming. Goodreads events. Facebook release parties. Twitter cover reveal parties. Parties, parties, Buy My Book! Parties. Sometimes it just seems like authors spamming other authors and achieving nothing…
    I read The Spring Bride a few weeks ago (ARC). Loved it.:)

    Reply
  46. Like many others, I couldn’t keep up with weekly newsletters. I really appreciate it when an author lets me know they have a new book coming out (or an old one in a new format e.g. e-book)and also like recommendations for new authors to read.

    Reply
  47. Like many others, I couldn’t keep up with weekly newsletters. I really appreciate it when an author lets me know they have a new book coming out (or an old one in a new format e.g. e-book)and also like recommendations for new authors to read.

    Reply
  48. Like many others, I couldn’t keep up with weekly newsletters. I really appreciate it when an author lets me know they have a new book coming out (or an old one in a new format e.g. e-book)and also like recommendations for new authors to read.

    Reply
  49. Like many others, I couldn’t keep up with weekly newsletters. I really appreciate it when an author lets me know they have a new book coming out (or an old one in a new format e.g. e-book)and also like recommendations for new authors to read.

    Reply
  50. Like many others, I couldn’t keep up with weekly newsletters. I really appreciate it when an author lets me know they have a new book coming out (or an old one in a new format e.g. e-book)and also like recommendations for new authors to read.

    Reply
  51. I too say, please…no weekly newsletters. Just as an FYI…I don’t use FB or twitter or any other media to follow any authors. Now that I think about it, that isn’t true. I do follow/read 2 multiple writer blogs (this being one) and 2 or 3 individual author blogs.
    If I really want to know something in between a MONTHLY newsletter I will make an effort to go look at FB.
    The way I’ve been trying new authors these days is when I see mentions in the above blogs or BookBub has a freebie that sounds interesting. Or through Paperback Swap….
    Or…I go to a library book sale and make a point of buying books by authors I haven’t read yet.
    There have been a number recently where I was going, really? I’m glad I didn’t spend full price on this book, especially since I couldn’t even finish reading it.(with the usual disclaimer that the wenches books ARE worth full price AND reading every word…)

    Reply
  52. I too say, please…no weekly newsletters. Just as an FYI…I don’t use FB or twitter or any other media to follow any authors. Now that I think about it, that isn’t true. I do follow/read 2 multiple writer blogs (this being one) and 2 or 3 individual author blogs.
    If I really want to know something in between a MONTHLY newsletter I will make an effort to go look at FB.
    The way I’ve been trying new authors these days is when I see mentions in the above blogs or BookBub has a freebie that sounds interesting. Or through Paperback Swap….
    Or…I go to a library book sale and make a point of buying books by authors I haven’t read yet.
    There have been a number recently where I was going, really? I’m glad I didn’t spend full price on this book, especially since I couldn’t even finish reading it.(with the usual disclaimer that the wenches books ARE worth full price AND reading every word…)

    Reply
  53. I too say, please…no weekly newsletters. Just as an FYI…I don’t use FB or twitter or any other media to follow any authors. Now that I think about it, that isn’t true. I do follow/read 2 multiple writer blogs (this being one) and 2 or 3 individual author blogs.
    If I really want to know something in between a MONTHLY newsletter I will make an effort to go look at FB.
    The way I’ve been trying new authors these days is when I see mentions in the above blogs or BookBub has a freebie that sounds interesting. Or through Paperback Swap….
    Or…I go to a library book sale and make a point of buying books by authors I haven’t read yet.
    There have been a number recently where I was going, really? I’m glad I didn’t spend full price on this book, especially since I couldn’t even finish reading it.(with the usual disclaimer that the wenches books ARE worth full price AND reading every word…)

    Reply
  54. I too say, please…no weekly newsletters. Just as an FYI…I don’t use FB or twitter or any other media to follow any authors. Now that I think about it, that isn’t true. I do follow/read 2 multiple writer blogs (this being one) and 2 or 3 individual author blogs.
    If I really want to know something in between a MONTHLY newsletter I will make an effort to go look at FB.
    The way I’ve been trying new authors these days is when I see mentions in the above blogs or BookBub has a freebie that sounds interesting. Or through Paperback Swap….
    Or…I go to a library book sale and make a point of buying books by authors I haven’t read yet.
    There have been a number recently where I was going, really? I’m glad I didn’t spend full price on this book, especially since I couldn’t even finish reading it.(with the usual disclaimer that the wenches books ARE worth full price AND reading every word…)

    Reply
  55. I too say, please…no weekly newsletters. Just as an FYI…I don’t use FB or twitter or any other media to follow any authors. Now that I think about it, that isn’t true. I do follow/read 2 multiple writer blogs (this being one) and 2 or 3 individual author blogs.
    If I really want to know something in between a MONTHLY newsletter I will make an effort to go look at FB.
    The way I’ve been trying new authors these days is when I see mentions in the above blogs or BookBub has a freebie that sounds interesting. Or through Paperback Swap….
    Or…I go to a library book sale and make a point of buying books by authors I haven’t read yet.
    There have been a number recently where I was going, really? I’m glad I didn’t spend full price on this book, especially since I couldn’t even finish reading it.(with the usual disclaimer that the wenches books ARE worth full price AND reading every word…)

    Reply
  56. Speaking as a reader, not a writer, I don’t subscribe to any e-newsletters, although some writers still send them to me. I use favorite blogs,visited over morning coffee, for news on new releases, etc. Then again, I’m an odd duck. As a writer, I’m still not on Facebook, Twitter, or any of the rest and haven’t had a newsletter since they were sent out by snail mail. Would I be doing better if I did all that? No way to tell, but the good news is that I’m still managing to make a living writing for traditional publishers.
    Kathy/Kaitlyn

    Reply
  57. Speaking as a reader, not a writer, I don’t subscribe to any e-newsletters, although some writers still send them to me. I use favorite blogs,visited over morning coffee, for news on new releases, etc. Then again, I’m an odd duck. As a writer, I’m still not on Facebook, Twitter, or any of the rest and haven’t had a newsletter since they were sent out by snail mail. Would I be doing better if I did all that? No way to tell, but the good news is that I’m still managing to make a living writing for traditional publishers.
    Kathy/Kaitlyn

    Reply
  58. Speaking as a reader, not a writer, I don’t subscribe to any e-newsletters, although some writers still send them to me. I use favorite blogs,visited over morning coffee, for news on new releases, etc. Then again, I’m an odd duck. As a writer, I’m still not on Facebook, Twitter, or any of the rest and haven’t had a newsletter since they were sent out by snail mail. Would I be doing better if I did all that? No way to tell, but the good news is that I’m still managing to make a living writing for traditional publishers.
    Kathy/Kaitlyn

    Reply
  59. Speaking as a reader, not a writer, I don’t subscribe to any e-newsletters, although some writers still send them to me. I use favorite blogs,visited over morning coffee, for news on new releases, etc. Then again, I’m an odd duck. As a writer, I’m still not on Facebook, Twitter, or any of the rest and haven’t had a newsletter since they were sent out by snail mail. Would I be doing better if I did all that? No way to tell, but the good news is that I’m still managing to make a living writing for traditional publishers.
    Kathy/Kaitlyn

    Reply
  60. Speaking as a reader, not a writer, I don’t subscribe to any e-newsletters, although some writers still send them to me. I use favorite blogs,visited over morning coffee, for news on new releases, etc. Then again, I’m an odd duck. As a writer, I’m still not on Facebook, Twitter, or any of the rest and haven’t had a newsletter since they were sent out by snail mail. Would I be doing better if I did all that? No way to tell, but the good news is that I’m still managing to make a living writing for traditional publishers.
    Kathy/Kaitlyn

    Reply
  61. I work with indie published authors almost exclusively, so it’s great to have your viewpoint. I’d like to add one thing from a reader’s perspective…in many, if not most cases, I have noticed that the big, traditional publishers are not doing as good a job editing as they used to do. The covers by and large keep getting better, but the contents don’t seem to be as meticulously combed and re-combed as I was used to. And indies are catching up in that department, thank goodness.
    Now, newsletters:
    Weekly: good heavens, no! You’ll see why in a minute, beyond already having too much to read.
    How many? Four…and interestingly, three are Wenches.
    Do I ready them? Yes, indeed, because I want them and am interested in the content.
    What attracts me? Finding out about upcoming and new releases, mostly. Reissues, freebies (!), rare or occasional bits of info about inspiration for a particular book, although in the case of Wenches, I get that here.
    Great discussion, thanks!
    Faith

    Reply
  62. I work with indie published authors almost exclusively, so it’s great to have your viewpoint. I’d like to add one thing from a reader’s perspective…in many, if not most cases, I have noticed that the big, traditional publishers are not doing as good a job editing as they used to do. The covers by and large keep getting better, but the contents don’t seem to be as meticulously combed and re-combed as I was used to. And indies are catching up in that department, thank goodness.
    Now, newsletters:
    Weekly: good heavens, no! You’ll see why in a minute, beyond already having too much to read.
    How many? Four…and interestingly, three are Wenches.
    Do I ready them? Yes, indeed, because I want them and am interested in the content.
    What attracts me? Finding out about upcoming and new releases, mostly. Reissues, freebies (!), rare or occasional bits of info about inspiration for a particular book, although in the case of Wenches, I get that here.
    Great discussion, thanks!
    Faith

    Reply
  63. I work with indie published authors almost exclusively, so it’s great to have your viewpoint. I’d like to add one thing from a reader’s perspective…in many, if not most cases, I have noticed that the big, traditional publishers are not doing as good a job editing as they used to do. The covers by and large keep getting better, but the contents don’t seem to be as meticulously combed and re-combed as I was used to. And indies are catching up in that department, thank goodness.
    Now, newsletters:
    Weekly: good heavens, no! You’ll see why in a minute, beyond already having too much to read.
    How many? Four…and interestingly, three are Wenches.
    Do I ready them? Yes, indeed, because I want them and am interested in the content.
    What attracts me? Finding out about upcoming and new releases, mostly. Reissues, freebies (!), rare or occasional bits of info about inspiration for a particular book, although in the case of Wenches, I get that here.
    Great discussion, thanks!
    Faith

    Reply
  64. I work with indie published authors almost exclusively, so it’s great to have your viewpoint. I’d like to add one thing from a reader’s perspective…in many, if not most cases, I have noticed that the big, traditional publishers are not doing as good a job editing as they used to do. The covers by and large keep getting better, but the contents don’t seem to be as meticulously combed and re-combed as I was used to. And indies are catching up in that department, thank goodness.
    Now, newsletters:
    Weekly: good heavens, no! You’ll see why in a minute, beyond already having too much to read.
    How many? Four…and interestingly, three are Wenches.
    Do I ready them? Yes, indeed, because I want them and am interested in the content.
    What attracts me? Finding out about upcoming and new releases, mostly. Reissues, freebies (!), rare or occasional bits of info about inspiration for a particular book, although in the case of Wenches, I get that here.
    Great discussion, thanks!
    Faith

    Reply
  65. I work with indie published authors almost exclusively, so it’s great to have your viewpoint. I’d like to add one thing from a reader’s perspective…in many, if not most cases, I have noticed that the big, traditional publishers are not doing as good a job editing as they used to do. The covers by and large keep getting better, but the contents don’t seem to be as meticulously combed and re-combed as I was used to. And indies are catching up in that department, thank goodness.
    Now, newsletters:
    Weekly: good heavens, no! You’ll see why in a minute, beyond already having too much to read.
    How many? Four…and interestingly, three are Wenches.
    Do I ready them? Yes, indeed, because I want them and am interested in the content.
    What attracts me? Finding out about upcoming and new releases, mostly. Reissues, freebies (!), rare or occasional bits of info about inspiration for a particular book, although in the case of Wenches, I get that here.
    Great discussion, thanks!
    Faith

    Reply
  66. Oops. Left out two things:
    In newsletters, I love to find out about freebies AND SALES.
    In terms of traditional publishers and editing, I mean no criticism of Wenches or any of my other long-time favorite authors, but rather of publishers who probably still take the same cut but don’t provide the excellence of support that I’d gotten used to.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  67. Oops. Left out two things:
    In newsletters, I love to find out about freebies AND SALES.
    In terms of traditional publishers and editing, I mean no criticism of Wenches or any of my other long-time favorite authors, but rather of publishers who probably still take the same cut but don’t provide the excellence of support that I’d gotten used to.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  68. Oops. Left out two things:
    In newsletters, I love to find out about freebies AND SALES.
    In terms of traditional publishers and editing, I mean no criticism of Wenches or any of my other long-time favorite authors, but rather of publishers who probably still take the same cut but don’t provide the excellence of support that I’d gotten used to.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  69. Oops. Left out two things:
    In newsletters, I love to find out about freebies AND SALES.
    In terms of traditional publishers and editing, I mean no criticism of Wenches or any of my other long-time favorite authors, but rather of publishers who probably still take the same cut but don’t provide the excellence of support that I’d gotten used to.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  70. Oops. Left out two things:
    In newsletters, I love to find out about freebies AND SALES.
    In terms of traditional publishers and editing, I mean no criticism of Wenches or any of my other long-time favorite authors, but rather of publishers who probably still take the same cut but don’t provide the excellence of support that I’d gotten used to.
    Cheers,
    Faith

    Reply
  71. I want to know when a book from a favorite author is due to be published. Other than that I like group blogs. I like regency based blogs and newsletters.the Wenches’ blog is one of the few not dedicated to the Regency I like.

    Reply
  72. I want to know when a book from a favorite author is due to be published. Other than that I like group blogs. I like regency based blogs and newsletters.the Wenches’ blog is one of the few not dedicated to the Regency I like.

    Reply
  73. I want to know when a book from a favorite author is due to be published. Other than that I like group blogs. I like regency based blogs and newsletters.the Wenches’ blog is one of the few not dedicated to the Regency I like.

    Reply
  74. I want to know when a book from a favorite author is due to be published. Other than that I like group blogs. I like regency based blogs and newsletters.the Wenches’ blog is one of the few not dedicated to the Regency I like.

    Reply
  75. I want to know when a book from a favorite author is due to be published. Other than that I like group blogs. I like regency based blogs and newsletters.the Wenches’ blog is one of the few not dedicated to the Regency I like.

    Reply
  76. Non, no no, weekly is way too often for an author newsletter, although I am happy to get weekly updates from this blog and SBTB. I only get a few individual author newsletters, and they are few and far between, which is just fine. The ones I subscribe to, I do read, or at least skim. Mainly I just like to know when the next book is coming out, or if there’s a sale. What attracts me are bonus scenes for past books, or preview scenes of upcoming books.

    Reply
  77. Non, no no, weekly is way too often for an author newsletter, although I am happy to get weekly updates from this blog and SBTB. I only get a few individual author newsletters, and they are few and far between, which is just fine. The ones I subscribe to, I do read, or at least skim. Mainly I just like to know when the next book is coming out, or if there’s a sale. What attracts me are bonus scenes for past books, or preview scenes of upcoming books.

    Reply
  78. Non, no no, weekly is way too often for an author newsletter, although I am happy to get weekly updates from this blog and SBTB. I only get a few individual author newsletters, and they are few and far between, which is just fine. The ones I subscribe to, I do read, or at least skim. Mainly I just like to know when the next book is coming out, or if there’s a sale. What attracts me are bonus scenes for past books, or preview scenes of upcoming books.

    Reply
  79. Non, no no, weekly is way too often for an author newsletter, although I am happy to get weekly updates from this blog and SBTB. I only get a few individual author newsletters, and they are few and far between, which is just fine. The ones I subscribe to, I do read, or at least skim. Mainly I just like to know when the next book is coming out, or if there’s a sale. What attracts me are bonus scenes for past books, or preview scenes of upcoming books.

    Reply
  80. Non, no no, weekly is way too often for an author newsletter, although I am happy to get weekly updates from this blog and SBTB. I only get a few individual author newsletters, and they are few and far between, which is just fine. The ones I subscribe to, I do read, or at least skim. Mainly I just like to know when the next book is coming out, or if there’s a sale. What attracts me are bonus scenes for past books, or preview scenes of upcoming books.

    Reply
  81. You make a good point. There aren’t enough blogs like this one (PLEASE, people, start more of them!). I would rather check in with my favourite historical romance blogs than be spammed with promotion.

    Reply
  82. You make a good point. There aren’t enough blogs like this one (PLEASE, people, start more of them!). I would rather check in with my favourite historical romance blogs than be spammed with promotion.

    Reply
  83. You make a good point. There aren’t enough blogs like this one (PLEASE, people, start more of them!). I would rather check in with my favourite historical romance blogs than be spammed with promotion.

    Reply
  84. You make a good point. There aren’t enough blogs like this one (PLEASE, people, start more of them!). I would rather check in with my favourite historical romance blogs than be spammed with promotion.

    Reply
  85. You make a good point. There aren’t enough blogs like this one (PLEASE, people, start more of them!). I would rather check in with my favourite historical romance blogs than be spammed with promotion.

    Reply
  86. I totally agree with the not weekly crowd. I do subscribe to several authors’ newsletters. I don’t mind weekly newsletter editions if they are like Word Wenches and have a rotation of authors.
    What I love to see is freebies and contests. Recipes are also great. I admit I will skim a newsletter to see if it is interesting.

    Reply
  87. I totally agree with the not weekly crowd. I do subscribe to several authors’ newsletters. I don’t mind weekly newsletter editions if they are like Word Wenches and have a rotation of authors.
    What I love to see is freebies and contests. Recipes are also great. I admit I will skim a newsletter to see if it is interesting.

    Reply
  88. I totally agree with the not weekly crowd. I do subscribe to several authors’ newsletters. I don’t mind weekly newsletter editions if they are like Word Wenches and have a rotation of authors.
    What I love to see is freebies and contests. Recipes are also great. I admit I will skim a newsletter to see if it is interesting.

    Reply
  89. I totally agree with the not weekly crowd. I do subscribe to several authors’ newsletters. I don’t mind weekly newsletter editions if they are like Word Wenches and have a rotation of authors.
    What I love to see is freebies and contests. Recipes are also great. I admit I will skim a newsletter to see if it is interesting.

    Reply
  90. I totally agree with the not weekly crowd. I do subscribe to several authors’ newsletters. I don’t mind weekly newsletter editions if they are like Word Wenches and have a rotation of authors.
    What I love to see is freebies and contests. Recipes are also great. I admit I will skim a newsletter to see if it is interesting.

    Reply
  91. My answer is no, yes and yes to the questions you asked. I do subscribe to many of my favorite authors as well as others who have potential to become favorites and although there are times I do skim (I won’t lie), I usually read through each newsletter. However, weekly newsletters would be overwhelming; a monthly (or longer) basis seems more manageable both for me and for the author who I must believe would rather be writing new material instead of press releases. I do read the Wenches regularly because I can keep up with a group of my favorite writers, but I also subscribe to yours as well, Anne.
    The content of newsletters on whatever time schedule they arrive makes the greatest impact on me if I can read excerpts, bonus scenes and expanded information on the characters. I also like to know if older books are being reissued or if a book is being done in audio.
    Thanks for asking!

    Reply
  92. My answer is no, yes and yes to the questions you asked. I do subscribe to many of my favorite authors as well as others who have potential to become favorites and although there are times I do skim (I won’t lie), I usually read through each newsletter. However, weekly newsletters would be overwhelming; a monthly (or longer) basis seems more manageable both for me and for the author who I must believe would rather be writing new material instead of press releases. I do read the Wenches regularly because I can keep up with a group of my favorite writers, but I also subscribe to yours as well, Anne.
    The content of newsletters on whatever time schedule they arrive makes the greatest impact on me if I can read excerpts, bonus scenes and expanded information on the characters. I also like to know if older books are being reissued or if a book is being done in audio.
    Thanks for asking!

    Reply
  93. My answer is no, yes and yes to the questions you asked. I do subscribe to many of my favorite authors as well as others who have potential to become favorites and although there are times I do skim (I won’t lie), I usually read through each newsletter. However, weekly newsletters would be overwhelming; a monthly (or longer) basis seems more manageable both for me and for the author who I must believe would rather be writing new material instead of press releases. I do read the Wenches regularly because I can keep up with a group of my favorite writers, but I also subscribe to yours as well, Anne.
    The content of newsletters on whatever time schedule they arrive makes the greatest impact on me if I can read excerpts, bonus scenes and expanded information on the characters. I also like to know if older books are being reissued or if a book is being done in audio.
    Thanks for asking!

    Reply
  94. My answer is no, yes and yes to the questions you asked. I do subscribe to many of my favorite authors as well as others who have potential to become favorites and although there are times I do skim (I won’t lie), I usually read through each newsletter. However, weekly newsletters would be overwhelming; a monthly (or longer) basis seems more manageable both for me and for the author who I must believe would rather be writing new material instead of press releases. I do read the Wenches regularly because I can keep up with a group of my favorite writers, but I also subscribe to yours as well, Anne.
    The content of newsletters on whatever time schedule they arrive makes the greatest impact on me if I can read excerpts, bonus scenes and expanded information on the characters. I also like to know if older books are being reissued or if a book is being done in audio.
    Thanks for asking!

    Reply
  95. My answer is no, yes and yes to the questions you asked. I do subscribe to many of my favorite authors as well as others who have potential to become favorites and although there are times I do skim (I won’t lie), I usually read through each newsletter. However, weekly newsletters would be overwhelming; a monthly (or longer) basis seems more manageable both for me and for the author who I must believe would rather be writing new material instead of press releases. I do read the Wenches regularly because I can keep up with a group of my favorite writers, but I also subscribe to yours as well, Anne.
    The content of newsletters on whatever time schedule they arrive makes the greatest impact on me if I can read excerpts, bonus scenes and expanded information on the characters. I also like to know if older books are being reissued or if a book is being done in audio.
    Thanks for asking!

    Reply
  96. To develop loyal readers write good stories! I buy ALL the books that my favorite authors write! If marketing takes away writing time, keep writing!
    I like to know when you’ve got a new book dropping. I do check your websites often. I also buy your old titles in e-format, even if I have read them in the past, if the sale price is good.
    I appreciate the effort that it takes to keep all the balls in the air. Has the revolution made it easier or harder to make a living writing?

    Reply
  97. To develop loyal readers write good stories! I buy ALL the books that my favorite authors write! If marketing takes away writing time, keep writing!
    I like to know when you’ve got a new book dropping. I do check your websites often. I also buy your old titles in e-format, even if I have read them in the past, if the sale price is good.
    I appreciate the effort that it takes to keep all the balls in the air. Has the revolution made it easier or harder to make a living writing?

    Reply
  98. To develop loyal readers write good stories! I buy ALL the books that my favorite authors write! If marketing takes away writing time, keep writing!
    I like to know when you’ve got a new book dropping. I do check your websites often. I also buy your old titles in e-format, even if I have read them in the past, if the sale price is good.
    I appreciate the effort that it takes to keep all the balls in the air. Has the revolution made it easier or harder to make a living writing?

    Reply
  99. To develop loyal readers write good stories! I buy ALL the books that my favorite authors write! If marketing takes away writing time, keep writing!
    I like to know when you’ve got a new book dropping. I do check your websites often. I also buy your old titles in e-format, even if I have read them in the past, if the sale price is good.
    I appreciate the effort that it takes to keep all the balls in the air. Has the revolution made it easier or harder to make a living writing?

    Reply
  100. To develop loyal readers write good stories! I buy ALL the books that my favorite authors write! If marketing takes away writing time, keep writing!
    I like to know when you’ve got a new book dropping. I do check your websites often. I also buy your old titles in e-format, even if I have read them in the past, if the sale price is good.
    I appreciate the effort that it takes to keep all the balls in the air. Has the revolution made it easier or harder to make a living writing?

    Reply
  101. Anne, what a marvelous summary of the confusing, multiple pathways for both readers and writers these days.
    Also, every time I see your SPRING BRIDE cover–SWOON!!!!! So beautiful. As is your lovely puppy girl. I’m sure whatever she publishes will be charming.

    Reply
  102. Anne, what a marvelous summary of the confusing, multiple pathways for both readers and writers these days.
    Also, every time I see your SPRING BRIDE cover–SWOON!!!!! So beautiful. As is your lovely puppy girl. I’m sure whatever she publishes will be charming.

    Reply
  103. Anne, what a marvelous summary of the confusing, multiple pathways for both readers and writers these days.
    Also, every time I see your SPRING BRIDE cover–SWOON!!!!! So beautiful. As is your lovely puppy girl. I’m sure whatever she publishes will be charming.

    Reply
  104. Anne, what a marvelous summary of the confusing, multiple pathways for both readers and writers these days.
    Also, every time I see your SPRING BRIDE cover–SWOON!!!!! So beautiful. As is your lovely puppy girl. I’m sure whatever she publishes will be charming.

    Reply
  105. Anne, what a marvelous summary of the confusing, multiple pathways for both readers and writers these days.
    Also, every time I see your SPRING BRIDE cover–SWOON!!!!! So beautiful. As is your lovely puppy girl. I’m sure whatever she publishes will be charming.

    Reply
  106. I’ve published dozens of newsletters over the years, and subscribed to possibly hundreds. No one frequency is perfect for every topic, author or audience. Watch your metrics – by which I mean open rate, and any conversions you count (purchases, forwards, clicks, etc). Unsubscribe rates are largely useless.
    Remember, if you are a Goodreads author and have hooked your blog there, that anyone following you is getting the headline of each blog in their “news from authors you follow” weekly newsletter already. Also remember when they click through, goodreads only picks up the first slice of the post online and then further links to you…most readers don’t click on the second link so get your point across very early on. (Few writers do.)
    And please avoid annoying the crap out of your fans by writing lots of content that’s not about your books – such as all about your personal life – month after month for years, when the latest book in your series is massively delayed. Especially if you ended on a cliffhanger. If you must do a personal blog to keep the juices flowing until your block resolves, use a pen name for it! I don’t want to hear about your cat when I’ve been waiting four years for a book sequel.
    Also, don’t use a weekly newsletter as an excuse to publish endless glowing fan mail. 90% of fan questions should be answered already in your site FAQ, which you should include a link to in every issue of your newsletter.
    On the other hand, it is nice to get a little insight into a favorite author’s world now and then, as it relates to his or her books. Interesting background research, behind the scenes stories from publishing events, etc. one author I know publishes “man candy” photos every Wednesday just to bring a smile to reader’s faces.
    Key: if the only thing you put in your newsletter is your cover reveal, your pub date, your sale, your arc offers…it’s too self promotional. It makes me feel like a customer instead of a fan and supporter.
    The nice thing is, unlike ad-driven newsletters or other media properties, as an author you don’t have to stick to a routine frequency. You can send every now and again. Mostly an author newsletter schedule is for the author’s ass-kicking not for the reader.

    Reply
  107. I’ve published dozens of newsletters over the years, and subscribed to possibly hundreds. No one frequency is perfect for every topic, author or audience. Watch your metrics – by which I mean open rate, and any conversions you count (purchases, forwards, clicks, etc). Unsubscribe rates are largely useless.
    Remember, if you are a Goodreads author and have hooked your blog there, that anyone following you is getting the headline of each blog in their “news from authors you follow” weekly newsletter already. Also remember when they click through, goodreads only picks up the first slice of the post online and then further links to you…most readers don’t click on the second link so get your point across very early on. (Few writers do.)
    And please avoid annoying the crap out of your fans by writing lots of content that’s not about your books – such as all about your personal life – month after month for years, when the latest book in your series is massively delayed. Especially if you ended on a cliffhanger. If you must do a personal blog to keep the juices flowing until your block resolves, use a pen name for it! I don’t want to hear about your cat when I’ve been waiting four years for a book sequel.
    Also, don’t use a weekly newsletter as an excuse to publish endless glowing fan mail. 90% of fan questions should be answered already in your site FAQ, which you should include a link to in every issue of your newsletter.
    On the other hand, it is nice to get a little insight into a favorite author’s world now and then, as it relates to his or her books. Interesting background research, behind the scenes stories from publishing events, etc. one author I know publishes “man candy” photos every Wednesday just to bring a smile to reader’s faces.
    Key: if the only thing you put in your newsletter is your cover reveal, your pub date, your sale, your arc offers…it’s too self promotional. It makes me feel like a customer instead of a fan and supporter.
    The nice thing is, unlike ad-driven newsletters or other media properties, as an author you don’t have to stick to a routine frequency. You can send every now and again. Mostly an author newsletter schedule is for the author’s ass-kicking not for the reader.

    Reply
  108. I’ve published dozens of newsletters over the years, and subscribed to possibly hundreds. No one frequency is perfect for every topic, author or audience. Watch your metrics – by which I mean open rate, and any conversions you count (purchases, forwards, clicks, etc). Unsubscribe rates are largely useless.
    Remember, if you are a Goodreads author and have hooked your blog there, that anyone following you is getting the headline of each blog in their “news from authors you follow” weekly newsletter already. Also remember when they click through, goodreads only picks up the first slice of the post online and then further links to you…most readers don’t click on the second link so get your point across very early on. (Few writers do.)
    And please avoid annoying the crap out of your fans by writing lots of content that’s not about your books – such as all about your personal life – month after month for years, when the latest book in your series is massively delayed. Especially if you ended on a cliffhanger. If you must do a personal blog to keep the juices flowing until your block resolves, use a pen name for it! I don’t want to hear about your cat when I’ve been waiting four years for a book sequel.
    Also, don’t use a weekly newsletter as an excuse to publish endless glowing fan mail. 90% of fan questions should be answered already in your site FAQ, which you should include a link to in every issue of your newsletter.
    On the other hand, it is nice to get a little insight into a favorite author’s world now and then, as it relates to his or her books. Interesting background research, behind the scenes stories from publishing events, etc. one author I know publishes “man candy” photos every Wednesday just to bring a smile to reader’s faces.
    Key: if the only thing you put in your newsletter is your cover reveal, your pub date, your sale, your arc offers…it’s too self promotional. It makes me feel like a customer instead of a fan and supporter.
    The nice thing is, unlike ad-driven newsletters or other media properties, as an author you don’t have to stick to a routine frequency. You can send every now and again. Mostly an author newsletter schedule is for the author’s ass-kicking not for the reader.

    Reply
  109. I’ve published dozens of newsletters over the years, and subscribed to possibly hundreds. No one frequency is perfect for every topic, author or audience. Watch your metrics – by which I mean open rate, and any conversions you count (purchases, forwards, clicks, etc). Unsubscribe rates are largely useless.
    Remember, if you are a Goodreads author and have hooked your blog there, that anyone following you is getting the headline of each blog in their “news from authors you follow” weekly newsletter already. Also remember when they click through, goodreads only picks up the first slice of the post online and then further links to you…most readers don’t click on the second link so get your point across very early on. (Few writers do.)
    And please avoid annoying the crap out of your fans by writing lots of content that’s not about your books – such as all about your personal life – month after month for years, when the latest book in your series is massively delayed. Especially if you ended on a cliffhanger. If you must do a personal blog to keep the juices flowing until your block resolves, use a pen name for it! I don’t want to hear about your cat when I’ve been waiting four years for a book sequel.
    Also, don’t use a weekly newsletter as an excuse to publish endless glowing fan mail. 90% of fan questions should be answered already in your site FAQ, which you should include a link to in every issue of your newsletter.
    On the other hand, it is nice to get a little insight into a favorite author’s world now and then, as it relates to his or her books. Interesting background research, behind the scenes stories from publishing events, etc. one author I know publishes “man candy” photos every Wednesday just to bring a smile to reader’s faces.
    Key: if the only thing you put in your newsletter is your cover reveal, your pub date, your sale, your arc offers…it’s too self promotional. It makes me feel like a customer instead of a fan and supporter.
    The nice thing is, unlike ad-driven newsletters or other media properties, as an author you don’t have to stick to a routine frequency. You can send every now and again. Mostly an author newsletter schedule is for the author’s ass-kicking not for the reader.

    Reply
  110. I’ve published dozens of newsletters over the years, and subscribed to possibly hundreds. No one frequency is perfect for every topic, author or audience. Watch your metrics – by which I mean open rate, and any conversions you count (purchases, forwards, clicks, etc). Unsubscribe rates are largely useless.
    Remember, if you are a Goodreads author and have hooked your blog there, that anyone following you is getting the headline of each blog in their “news from authors you follow” weekly newsletter already. Also remember when they click through, goodreads only picks up the first slice of the post online and then further links to you…most readers don’t click on the second link so get your point across very early on. (Few writers do.)
    And please avoid annoying the crap out of your fans by writing lots of content that’s not about your books – such as all about your personal life – month after month for years, when the latest book in your series is massively delayed. Especially if you ended on a cliffhanger. If you must do a personal blog to keep the juices flowing until your block resolves, use a pen name for it! I don’t want to hear about your cat when I’ve been waiting four years for a book sequel.
    Also, don’t use a weekly newsletter as an excuse to publish endless glowing fan mail. 90% of fan questions should be answered already in your site FAQ, which you should include a link to in every issue of your newsletter.
    On the other hand, it is nice to get a little insight into a favorite author’s world now and then, as it relates to his or her books. Interesting background research, behind the scenes stories from publishing events, etc. one author I know publishes “man candy” photos every Wednesday just to bring a smile to reader’s faces.
    Key: if the only thing you put in your newsletter is your cover reveal, your pub date, your sale, your arc offers…it’s too self promotional. It makes me feel like a customer instead of a fan and supporter.
    The nice thing is, unlike ad-driven newsletters or other media properties, as an author you don’t have to stick to a routine frequency. You can send every now and again. Mostly an author newsletter schedule is for the author’s ass-kicking not for the reader.

    Reply
  111. I’m happy to find I’m not alone in noticing the sloppy editing being done in print books. I get the impression that printers are leaning more heavily on spell check and there is less (trained) human involvement in the proofreading process. I have always read every letter in every word on the page, and thus was quick to spot spelling errors. It has always been easy for me to spot misuse of words, punctuation errors (I’m a believer in the Oxford comma), and grammatical errors. I also agree that weekly newsletters are extreme. If you beat me over the head with too much mail, you will lose me. I tend to be a literary grazer, and resist “force feeding” presentations.

    Reply
  112. I’m happy to find I’m not alone in noticing the sloppy editing being done in print books. I get the impression that printers are leaning more heavily on spell check and there is less (trained) human involvement in the proofreading process. I have always read every letter in every word on the page, and thus was quick to spot spelling errors. It has always been easy for me to spot misuse of words, punctuation errors (I’m a believer in the Oxford comma), and grammatical errors. I also agree that weekly newsletters are extreme. If you beat me over the head with too much mail, you will lose me. I tend to be a literary grazer, and resist “force feeding” presentations.

    Reply
  113. I’m happy to find I’m not alone in noticing the sloppy editing being done in print books. I get the impression that printers are leaning more heavily on spell check and there is less (trained) human involvement in the proofreading process. I have always read every letter in every word on the page, and thus was quick to spot spelling errors. It has always been easy for me to spot misuse of words, punctuation errors (I’m a believer in the Oxford comma), and grammatical errors. I also agree that weekly newsletters are extreme. If you beat me over the head with too much mail, you will lose me. I tend to be a literary grazer, and resist “force feeding” presentations.

    Reply
  114. I’m happy to find I’m not alone in noticing the sloppy editing being done in print books. I get the impression that printers are leaning more heavily on spell check and there is less (trained) human involvement in the proofreading process. I have always read every letter in every word on the page, and thus was quick to spot spelling errors. It has always been easy for me to spot misuse of words, punctuation errors (I’m a believer in the Oxford comma), and grammatical errors. I also agree that weekly newsletters are extreme. If you beat me over the head with too much mail, you will lose me. I tend to be a literary grazer, and resist “force feeding” presentations.

    Reply
  115. I’m happy to find I’m not alone in noticing the sloppy editing being done in print books. I get the impression that printers are leaning more heavily on spell check and there is less (trained) human involvement in the proofreading process. I have always read every letter in every word on the page, and thus was quick to spot spelling errors. It has always been easy for me to spot misuse of words, punctuation errors (I’m a believer in the Oxford comma), and grammatical errors. I also agree that weekly newsletters are extreme. If you beat me over the head with too much mail, you will lose me. I tend to be a literary grazer, and resist “force feeding” presentations.

    Reply
  116. I subscribe to way too many newsletters such that I have had to practically create one email account just for such subscriptions (more than books or authors). I have started to notice that some authors or publishers are using the subscription to their newsletter as a gatekeeper to their website, ie: you cannot access a contest, free content, or blogs, unless you sign up for the newsletter. I find that to be incredibly annoying. Usually, I will comply, get what I came for, exit, and then unsubscribe. So, to the extent newsletters would be bundled that works great. Another suggestion, I have seen is just to post via social media that a new blog or newsletter is now available on the author’s site.

    Reply
  117. I subscribe to way too many newsletters such that I have had to practically create one email account just for such subscriptions (more than books or authors). I have started to notice that some authors or publishers are using the subscription to their newsletter as a gatekeeper to their website, ie: you cannot access a contest, free content, or blogs, unless you sign up for the newsletter. I find that to be incredibly annoying. Usually, I will comply, get what I came for, exit, and then unsubscribe. So, to the extent newsletters would be bundled that works great. Another suggestion, I have seen is just to post via social media that a new blog or newsletter is now available on the author’s site.

    Reply
  118. I subscribe to way too many newsletters such that I have had to practically create one email account just for such subscriptions (more than books or authors). I have started to notice that some authors or publishers are using the subscription to their newsletter as a gatekeeper to their website, ie: you cannot access a contest, free content, or blogs, unless you sign up for the newsletter. I find that to be incredibly annoying. Usually, I will comply, get what I came for, exit, and then unsubscribe. So, to the extent newsletters would be bundled that works great. Another suggestion, I have seen is just to post via social media that a new blog or newsletter is now available on the author’s site.

    Reply
  119. I subscribe to way too many newsletters such that I have had to practically create one email account just for such subscriptions (more than books or authors). I have started to notice that some authors or publishers are using the subscription to their newsletter as a gatekeeper to their website, ie: you cannot access a contest, free content, or blogs, unless you sign up for the newsletter. I find that to be incredibly annoying. Usually, I will comply, get what I came for, exit, and then unsubscribe. So, to the extent newsletters would be bundled that works great. Another suggestion, I have seen is just to post via social media that a new blog or newsletter is now available on the author’s site.

    Reply
  120. I subscribe to way too many newsletters such that I have had to practically create one email account just for such subscriptions (more than books or authors). I have started to notice that some authors or publishers are using the subscription to their newsletter as a gatekeeper to their website, ie: you cannot access a contest, free content, or blogs, unless you sign up for the newsletter. I find that to be incredibly annoying. Usually, I will comply, get what I came for, exit, and then unsubscribe. So, to the extent newsletters would be bundled that works great. Another suggestion, I have seen is just to post via social media that a new blog or newsletter is now available on the author’s site.

    Reply
  121. I like the newsletters, but not on weekly basis. I subscribe to more author newsletters than I can count, so I don’t always read every single word from them. I usually check out if there are new books/ebooks, if there are any special offers on ebooks and contests are always fun -author contests are just about the only ones where I ever win anything.

    Reply
  122. I like the newsletters, but not on weekly basis. I subscribe to more author newsletters than I can count, so I don’t always read every single word from them. I usually check out if there are new books/ebooks, if there are any special offers on ebooks and contests are always fun -author contests are just about the only ones where I ever win anything.

    Reply
  123. I like the newsletters, but not on weekly basis. I subscribe to more author newsletters than I can count, so I don’t always read every single word from them. I usually check out if there are new books/ebooks, if there are any special offers on ebooks and contests are always fun -author contests are just about the only ones where I ever win anything.

    Reply
  124. I like the newsletters, but not on weekly basis. I subscribe to more author newsletters than I can count, so I don’t always read every single word from them. I usually check out if there are new books/ebooks, if there are any special offers on ebooks and contests are always fun -author contests are just about the only ones where I ever win anything.

    Reply
  125. I like the newsletters, but not on weekly basis. I subscribe to more author newsletters than I can count, so I don’t always read every single word from them. I usually check out if there are new books/ebooks, if there are any special offers on ebooks and contests are always fun -author contests are just about the only ones where I ever win anything.

    Reply
  126. I currently get 4 or 5 newsletters from authors I read. Most are monthly. I think monthly is a nice amount. Keeps me in the loop on what they are working on and any contests they are running. Weekly newsletters would be crazy. I can’t imagine a writer having enough fresh news to impart that often. I imagine after a while readers would just start deleting them without reading them–after all, how do you know which newsletters contain real news when you get them so often?

    Reply
  127. I currently get 4 or 5 newsletters from authors I read. Most are monthly. I think monthly is a nice amount. Keeps me in the loop on what they are working on and any contests they are running. Weekly newsletters would be crazy. I can’t imagine a writer having enough fresh news to impart that often. I imagine after a while readers would just start deleting them without reading them–after all, how do you know which newsletters contain real news when you get them so often?

    Reply
  128. I currently get 4 or 5 newsletters from authors I read. Most are monthly. I think monthly is a nice amount. Keeps me in the loop on what they are working on and any contests they are running. Weekly newsletters would be crazy. I can’t imagine a writer having enough fresh news to impart that often. I imagine after a while readers would just start deleting them without reading them–after all, how do you know which newsletters contain real news when you get them so often?

    Reply
  129. I currently get 4 or 5 newsletters from authors I read. Most are monthly. I think monthly is a nice amount. Keeps me in the loop on what they are working on and any contests they are running. Weekly newsletters would be crazy. I can’t imagine a writer having enough fresh news to impart that often. I imagine after a while readers would just start deleting them without reading them–after all, how do you know which newsletters contain real news when you get them so often?

    Reply
  130. I currently get 4 or 5 newsletters from authors I read. Most are monthly. I think monthly is a nice amount. Keeps me in the loop on what they are working on and any contests they are running. Weekly newsletters would be crazy. I can’t imagine a writer having enough fresh news to impart that often. I imagine after a while readers would just start deleting them without reading them–after all, how do you know which newsletters contain real news when you get them so often?

    Reply
  131. I do try to read newsletters, but often I don’t have time to read them right away so they sit in my inbox for a few days. Once a month is often enough — unless there is a special event/sale etc that needs to be mentioned in between newsletters.
    I’m more likely to read the once a month and occasional newsletters than the weekly, multiweekly, or god forbid daily newsletters. Daily newsletters are ok IF I subscribe to an author’s blog — I asked for those daily updates.

    Reply
  132. I do try to read newsletters, but often I don’t have time to read them right away so they sit in my inbox for a few days. Once a month is often enough — unless there is a special event/sale etc that needs to be mentioned in between newsletters.
    I’m more likely to read the once a month and occasional newsletters than the weekly, multiweekly, or god forbid daily newsletters. Daily newsletters are ok IF I subscribe to an author’s blog — I asked for those daily updates.

    Reply
  133. I do try to read newsletters, but often I don’t have time to read them right away so they sit in my inbox for a few days. Once a month is often enough — unless there is a special event/sale etc that needs to be mentioned in between newsletters.
    I’m more likely to read the once a month and occasional newsletters than the weekly, multiweekly, or god forbid daily newsletters. Daily newsletters are ok IF I subscribe to an author’s blog — I asked for those daily updates.

    Reply
  134. I do try to read newsletters, but often I don’t have time to read them right away so they sit in my inbox for a few days. Once a month is often enough — unless there is a special event/sale etc that needs to be mentioned in between newsletters.
    I’m more likely to read the once a month and occasional newsletters than the weekly, multiweekly, or god forbid daily newsletters. Daily newsletters are ok IF I subscribe to an author’s blog — I asked for those daily updates.

    Reply
  135. I do try to read newsletters, but often I don’t have time to read them right away so they sit in my inbox for a few days. Once a month is often enough — unless there is a special event/sale etc that needs to be mentioned in between newsletters.
    I’m more likely to read the once a month and occasional newsletters than the weekly, multiweekly, or god forbid daily newsletters. Daily newsletters are ok IF I subscribe to an author’s blog — I asked for those daily updates.

    Reply
  136. I subscribe to several author’s newsletters. I love reading about what is happening – with writing, publishing dates etc. But, if they become too frequent, I either delete before reading or unsubscribe.
    I would prefer monthly newsletters – because I get emails from friends and family and some organizations who are foolish enough to allow me membership. If I get the impression someone is trying to bury me in emails, I generally must evaluate how badly I want to get that newsletter.
    I am an addicted reader, but even I have a limit as to how much time I want to spend reading things on my computer.

    Reply
  137. I subscribe to several author’s newsletters. I love reading about what is happening – with writing, publishing dates etc. But, if they become too frequent, I either delete before reading or unsubscribe.
    I would prefer monthly newsletters – because I get emails from friends and family and some organizations who are foolish enough to allow me membership. If I get the impression someone is trying to bury me in emails, I generally must evaluate how badly I want to get that newsletter.
    I am an addicted reader, but even I have a limit as to how much time I want to spend reading things on my computer.

    Reply
  138. I subscribe to several author’s newsletters. I love reading about what is happening – with writing, publishing dates etc. But, if they become too frequent, I either delete before reading or unsubscribe.
    I would prefer monthly newsletters – because I get emails from friends and family and some organizations who are foolish enough to allow me membership. If I get the impression someone is trying to bury me in emails, I generally must evaluate how badly I want to get that newsletter.
    I am an addicted reader, but even I have a limit as to how much time I want to spend reading things on my computer.

    Reply
  139. I subscribe to several author’s newsletters. I love reading about what is happening – with writing, publishing dates etc. But, if they become too frequent, I either delete before reading or unsubscribe.
    I would prefer monthly newsletters – because I get emails from friends and family and some organizations who are foolish enough to allow me membership. If I get the impression someone is trying to bury me in emails, I generally must evaluate how badly I want to get that newsletter.
    I am an addicted reader, but even I have a limit as to how much time I want to spend reading things on my computer.

    Reply
  140. I subscribe to several author’s newsletters. I love reading about what is happening – with writing, publishing dates etc. But, if they become too frequent, I either delete before reading or unsubscribe.
    I would prefer monthly newsletters – because I get emails from friends and family and some organizations who are foolish enough to allow me membership. If I get the impression someone is trying to bury me in emails, I generally must evaluate how badly I want to get that newsletter.
    I am an addicted reader, but even I have a limit as to how much time I want to spend reading things on my computer.

    Reply
  141. I confess I don’t like newsletters, like you I often just register that author X has a new book out, but if they are too frequent I delete them and start treating them a spam. But I do like it when a favorite author has a blog or a Facebook presence. To sum things up, I prefer getting the information by my own initiative rather than have it pressed upon me.

    Reply
  142. I confess I don’t like newsletters, like you I often just register that author X has a new book out, but if they are too frequent I delete them and start treating them a spam. But I do like it when a favorite author has a blog or a Facebook presence. To sum things up, I prefer getting the information by my own initiative rather than have it pressed upon me.

    Reply
  143. I confess I don’t like newsletters, like you I often just register that author X has a new book out, but if they are too frequent I delete them and start treating them a spam. But I do like it when a favorite author has a blog or a Facebook presence. To sum things up, I prefer getting the information by my own initiative rather than have it pressed upon me.

    Reply
  144. I confess I don’t like newsletters, like you I often just register that author X has a new book out, but if they are too frequent I delete them and start treating them a spam. But I do like it when a favorite author has a blog or a Facebook presence. To sum things up, I prefer getting the information by my own initiative rather than have it pressed upon me.

    Reply
  145. I confess I don’t like newsletters, like you I often just register that author X has a new book out, but if they are too frequent I delete them and start treating them a spam. But I do like it when a favorite author has a blog or a Facebook presence. To sum things up, I prefer getting the information by my own initiative rather than have it pressed upon me.

    Reply
  146. I don’t want any more often than monthly newsletters but I do prefer newsletters. I’m always checking my mail but I don’t do Twitter and rarely do Facebook (well, except for Jon Paul’s page where he posts his gorgeous cover paintings!). I don’t have time to look at 25 FB pages the way I can look through 25 newsletters. I subscribe to lots of newsletters and read most everything, except excerpts (that’s because I have a very good memory and if I read an excerpt then I tend to think I’ve read the book when it comes out because it’s familiar to me). I like to hear about new releases and sales. I don’t mind snippets of the author’s life but I agree that I’d much rather writers spent their time writing books!

    Reply
  147. I don’t want any more often than monthly newsletters but I do prefer newsletters. I’m always checking my mail but I don’t do Twitter and rarely do Facebook (well, except for Jon Paul’s page where he posts his gorgeous cover paintings!). I don’t have time to look at 25 FB pages the way I can look through 25 newsletters. I subscribe to lots of newsletters and read most everything, except excerpts (that’s because I have a very good memory and if I read an excerpt then I tend to think I’ve read the book when it comes out because it’s familiar to me). I like to hear about new releases and sales. I don’t mind snippets of the author’s life but I agree that I’d much rather writers spent their time writing books!

    Reply
  148. I don’t want any more often than monthly newsletters but I do prefer newsletters. I’m always checking my mail but I don’t do Twitter and rarely do Facebook (well, except for Jon Paul’s page where he posts his gorgeous cover paintings!). I don’t have time to look at 25 FB pages the way I can look through 25 newsletters. I subscribe to lots of newsletters and read most everything, except excerpts (that’s because I have a very good memory and if I read an excerpt then I tend to think I’ve read the book when it comes out because it’s familiar to me). I like to hear about new releases and sales. I don’t mind snippets of the author’s life but I agree that I’d much rather writers spent their time writing books!

    Reply
  149. I don’t want any more often than monthly newsletters but I do prefer newsletters. I’m always checking my mail but I don’t do Twitter and rarely do Facebook (well, except for Jon Paul’s page where he posts his gorgeous cover paintings!). I don’t have time to look at 25 FB pages the way I can look through 25 newsletters. I subscribe to lots of newsletters and read most everything, except excerpts (that’s because I have a very good memory and if I read an excerpt then I tend to think I’ve read the book when it comes out because it’s familiar to me). I like to hear about new releases and sales. I don’t mind snippets of the author’s life but I agree that I’d much rather writers spent their time writing books!

    Reply
  150. I don’t want any more often than monthly newsletters but I do prefer newsletters. I’m always checking my mail but I don’t do Twitter and rarely do Facebook (well, except for Jon Paul’s page where he posts his gorgeous cover paintings!). I don’t have time to look at 25 FB pages the way I can look through 25 newsletters. I subscribe to lots of newsletters and read most everything, except excerpts (that’s because I have a very good memory and if I read an excerpt then I tend to think I’ve read the book when it comes out because it’s familiar to me). I like to hear about new releases and sales. I don’t mind snippets of the author’s life but I agree that I’d much rather writers spent their time writing books!

    Reply
  151. I wouldn’t like weekly newsletters. If I receive more than 10 newsletters a week, I’d probably not read them and then unsubscribe.
    Webpages like for instance Word Wenches, that publish several posts a week, I go directly to the web.
    I only subscribe to newsletters of author with webpages that have nothing interesting. I just want to be informed when the next book comes, or when comes the paperback of a book previously published in hardcover, for instance. I’m not interested in the opinion of the author or to see pictures about their personal lives. I just want information.
    As I receive no more than a dozen newsletters, I do actually read them. If they start sending newsletters weekly, I will probably unsubscribe.

    Reply
  152. I wouldn’t like weekly newsletters. If I receive more than 10 newsletters a week, I’d probably not read them and then unsubscribe.
    Webpages like for instance Word Wenches, that publish several posts a week, I go directly to the web.
    I only subscribe to newsletters of author with webpages that have nothing interesting. I just want to be informed when the next book comes, or when comes the paperback of a book previously published in hardcover, for instance. I’m not interested in the opinion of the author or to see pictures about their personal lives. I just want information.
    As I receive no more than a dozen newsletters, I do actually read them. If they start sending newsletters weekly, I will probably unsubscribe.

    Reply
  153. I wouldn’t like weekly newsletters. If I receive more than 10 newsletters a week, I’d probably not read them and then unsubscribe.
    Webpages like for instance Word Wenches, that publish several posts a week, I go directly to the web.
    I only subscribe to newsletters of author with webpages that have nothing interesting. I just want to be informed when the next book comes, or when comes the paperback of a book previously published in hardcover, for instance. I’m not interested in the opinion of the author or to see pictures about their personal lives. I just want information.
    As I receive no more than a dozen newsletters, I do actually read them. If they start sending newsletters weekly, I will probably unsubscribe.

    Reply
  154. I wouldn’t like weekly newsletters. If I receive more than 10 newsletters a week, I’d probably not read them and then unsubscribe.
    Webpages like for instance Word Wenches, that publish several posts a week, I go directly to the web.
    I only subscribe to newsletters of author with webpages that have nothing interesting. I just want to be informed when the next book comes, or when comes the paperback of a book previously published in hardcover, for instance. I’m not interested in the opinion of the author or to see pictures about their personal lives. I just want information.
    As I receive no more than a dozen newsletters, I do actually read them. If they start sending newsletters weekly, I will probably unsubscribe.

    Reply
  155. I wouldn’t like weekly newsletters. If I receive more than 10 newsletters a week, I’d probably not read them and then unsubscribe.
    Webpages like for instance Word Wenches, that publish several posts a week, I go directly to the web.
    I only subscribe to newsletters of author with webpages that have nothing interesting. I just want to be informed when the next book comes, or when comes the paperback of a book previously published in hardcover, for instance. I’m not interested in the opinion of the author or to see pictures about their personal lives. I just want information.
    As I receive no more than a dozen newsletters, I do actually read them. If they start sending newsletters weekly, I will probably unsubscribe.

    Reply
  156. Please, not a weekly newsletter. I actually got those from one author, and I ended up unsubscribing because the signal-to-noise ratio was sooooo low. I like monthly newsletters that share a few interesting tidbits about the author’s books (past or current), some cool research discoveries, info on upcoming titles, signings, appearances, etc. It’s the quality of the content, not the timing. There are other authors who send out “special” newsletters when a sale happens, etc., and those are also just fine for me.
    I do get a number of these, and I really like them as they remind me of the author and what she might be doing in a very crowded marketplace. So, yeah, I do read them. But not if they’re weekly. 🙂

    Reply
  157. Please, not a weekly newsletter. I actually got those from one author, and I ended up unsubscribing because the signal-to-noise ratio was sooooo low. I like monthly newsletters that share a few interesting tidbits about the author’s books (past or current), some cool research discoveries, info on upcoming titles, signings, appearances, etc. It’s the quality of the content, not the timing. There are other authors who send out “special” newsletters when a sale happens, etc., and those are also just fine for me.
    I do get a number of these, and I really like them as they remind me of the author and what she might be doing in a very crowded marketplace. So, yeah, I do read them. But not if they’re weekly. 🙂

    Reply
  158. Please, not a weekly newsletter. I actually got those from one author, and I ended up unsubscribing because the signal-to-noise ratio was sooooo low. I like monthly newsletters that share a few interesting tidbits about the author’s books (past or current), some cool research discoveries, info on upcoming titles, signings, appearances, etc. It’s the quality of the content, not the timing. There are other authors who send out “special” newsletters when a sale happens, etc., and those are also just fine for me.
    I do get a number of these, and I really like them as they remind me of the author and what she might be doing in a very crowded marketplace. So, yeah, I do read them. But not if they’re weekly. 🙂

    Reply
  159. Please, not a weekly newsletter. I actually got those from one author, and I ended up unsubscribing because the signal-to-noise ratio was sooooo low. I like monthly newsletters that share a few interesting tidbits about the author’s books (past or current), some cool research discoveries, info on upcoming titles, signings, appearances, etc. It’s the quality of the content, not the timing. There are other authors who send out “special” newsletters when a sale happens, etc., and those are also just fine for me.
    I do get a number of these, and I really like them as they remind me of the author and what she might be doing in a very crowded marketplace. So, yeah, I do read them. But not if they’re weekly. 🙂

    Reply
  160. Please, not a weekly newsletter. I actually got those from one author, and I ended up unsubscribing because the signal-to-noise ratio was sooooo low. I like monthly newsletters that share a few interesting tidbits about the author’s books (past or current), some cool research discoveries, info on upcoming titles, signings, appearances, etc. It’s the quality of the content, not the timing. There are other authors who send out “special” newsletters when a sale happens, etc., and those are also just fine for me.
    I do get a number of these, and I really like them as they remind me of the author and what she might be doing in a very crowded marketplace. So, yeah, I do read them. But not if they’re weekly. 🙂

    Reply
  161. Weekly isn’t necessary. I follow a lot of authors on social media and that’s usually enough. I like email updates with chapter teasers. One author sends postcards when new books are released and I love them as they’re my bookmarks. I also enjoy author blogs but I can see where that could be a lot of extra work if done regularly.

    Reply
  162. Weekly isn’t necessary. I follow a lot of authors on social media and that’s usually enough. I like email updates with chapter teasers. One author sends postcards when new books are released and I love them as they’re my bookmarks. I also enjoy author blogs but I can see where that could be a lot of extra work if done regularly.

    Reply
  163. Weekly isn’t necessary. I follow a lot of authors on social media and that’s usually enough. I like email updates with chapter teasers. One author sends postcards when new books are released and I love them as they’re my bookmarks. I also enjoy author blogs but I can see where that could be a lot of extra work if done regularly.

    Reply
  164. Weekly isn’t necessary. I follow a lot of authors on social media and that’s usually enough. I like email updates with chapter teasers. One author sends postcards when new books are released and I love them as they’re my bookmarks. I also enjoy author blogs but I can see where that could be a lot of extra work if done regularly.

    Reply
  165. Weekly isn’t necessary. I follow a lot of authors on social media and that’s usually enough. I like email updates with chapter teasers. One author sends postcards when new books are released and I love them as they’re my bookmarks. I also enjoy author blogs but I can see where that could be a lot of extra work if done regularly.

    Reply
  166. Hi Anne
    I do enjoy getting newsletters and do skim some and read others I do think that once a month or when the authors has news is often enough although I do get some weekly that have free and cheap books listed but I am more than happy with monthly 🙂
    Have fun
    Helen

    Reply
  167. Hi Anne
    I do enjoy getting newsletters and do skim some and read others I do think that once a month or when the authors has news is often enough although I do get some weekly that have free and cheap books listed but I am more than happy with monthly 🙂
    Have fun
    Helen

    Reply
  168. Hi Anne
    I do enjoy getting newsletters and do skim some and read others I do think that once a month or when the authors has news is often enough although I do get some weekly that have free and cheap books listed but I am more than happy with monthly 🙂
    Have fun
    Helen

    Reply
  169. Hi Anne
    I do enjoy getting newsletters and do skim some and read others I do think that once a month or when the authors has news is often enough although I do get some weekly that have free and cheap books listed but I am more than happy with monthly 🙂
    Have fun
    Helen

    Reply
  170. Hi Anne
    I do enjoy getting newsletters and do skim some and read others I do think that once a month or when the authors has news is often enough although I do get some weekly that have free and cheap books listed but I am more than happy with monthly 🙂
    Have fun
    Helen

    Reply
  171. Mentally exhausting is only close to how promotion feels some days! But I hadn’t considered how it must be from a reader’s perspective trying to find books in the giant online slush piles. It would be a shame if we all had to give up because we’re too exhausted to sort wheat from chaff.
    I’m sure a better way will develop. I just hope it’s soon!

    Reply
  172. Mentally exhausting is only close to how promotion feels some days! But I hadn’t considered how it must be from a reader’s perspective trying to find books in the giant online slush piles. It would be a shame if we all had to give up because we’re too exhausted to sort wheat from chaff.
    I’m sure a better way will develop. I just hope it’s soon!

    Reply
  173. Mentally exhausting is only close to how promotion feels some days! But I hadn’t considered how it must be from a reader’s perspective trying to find books in the giant online slush piles. It would be a shame if we all had to give up because we’re too exhausted to sort wheat from chaff.
    I’m sure a better way will develop. I just hope it’s soon!

    Reply
  174. Mentally exhausting is only close to how promotion feels some days! But I hadn’t considered how it must be from a reader’s perspective trying to find books in the giant online slush piles. It would be a shame if we all had to give up because we’re too exhausted to sort wheat from chaff.
    I’m sure a better way will develop. I just hope it’s soon!

    Reply
  175. Mentally exhausting is only close to how promotion feels some days! But I hadn’t considered how it must be from a reader’s perspective trying to find books in the giant online slush piles. It would be a shame if we all had to give up because we’re too exhausted to sort wheat from chaff.
    I’m sure a better way will develop. I just hope it’s soon!

    Reply
  176. Since I seldom buy print these days, I can’t comment on the quality. I do recall, however, that a number of my more recent copyeditors did fall for spell check as the final rule–which is a bit problematic in historicals where words like sapskull come up! (and that should actually be sapscull but that really made them cross their eyes)

    Reply
  177. Since I seldom buy print these days, I can’t comment on the quality. I do recall, however, that a number of my more recent copyeditors did fall for spell check as the final rule–which is a bit problematic in historicals where words like sapskull come up! (and that should actually be sapscull but that really made them cross their eyes)

    Reply
  178. Since I seldom buy print these days, I can’t comment on the quality. I do recall, however, that a number of my more recent copyeditors did fall for spell check as the final rule–which is a bit problematic in historicals where words like sapskull come up! (and that should actually be sapscull but that really made them cross their eyes)

    Reply
  179. Since I seldom buy print these days, I can’t comment on the quality. I do recall, however, that a number of my more recent copyeditors did fall for spell check as the final rule–which is a bit problematic in historicals where words like sapskull come up! (and that should actually be sapscull but that really made them cross their eyes)

    Reply
  180. Since I seldom buy print these days, I can’t comment on the quality. I do recall, however, that a number of my more recent copyeditors did fall for spell check as the final rule–which is a bit problematic in historicals where words like sapskull come up! (and that should actually be sapscull but that really made them cross their eyes)

    Reply
  181. I’m avidly reading all these posts because I’m working with a marketing person who is redesigning my website and newsletter and I’m eager to know what readers like.
    If you don’t want to sign up for a newsletter to received contests, etc, how else would you have us set them up? People get annoyed if we post promo on Facebook (and FB doesn’t allow a lot of it). Changing a website is difficult and expensive.
    Are you receiving contests,freebies, etc, somewhere else we should know about?

    Reply
  182. I’m avidly reading all these posts because I’m working with a marketing person who is redesigning my website and newsletter and I’m eager to know what readers like.
    If you don’t want to sign up for a newsletter to received contests, etc, how else would you have us set them up? People get annoyed if we post promo on Facebook (and FB doesn’t allow a lot of it). Changing a website is difficult and expensive.
    Are you receiving contests,freebies, etc, somewhere else we should know about?

    Reply
  183. I’m avidly reading all these posts because I’m working with a marketing person who is redesigning my website and newsletter and I’m eager to know what readers like.
    If you don’t want to sign up for a newsletter to received contests, etc, how else would you have us set them up? People get annoyed if we post promo on Facebook (and FB doesn’t allow a lot of it). Changing a website is difficult and expensive.
    Are you receiving contests,freebies, etc, somewhere else we should know about?

    Reply
  184. I’m avidly reading all these posts because I’m working with a marketing person who is redesigning my website and newsletter and I’m eager to know what readers like.
    If you don’t want to sign up for a newsletter to received contests, etc, how else would you have us set them up? People get annoyed if we post promo on Facebook (and FB doesn’t allow a lot of it). Changing a website is difficult and expensive.
    Are you receiving contests,freebies, etc, somewhere else we should know about?

    Reply
  185. I’m avidly reading all these posts because I’m working with a marketing person who is redesigning my website and newsletter and I’m eager to know what readers like.
    If you don’t want to sign up for a newsletter to received contests, etc, how else would you have us set them up? People get annoyed if we post promo on Facebook (and FB doesn’t allow a lot of it). Changing a website is difficult and expensive.
    Are you receiving contests,freebies, etc, somewhere else we should know about?

    Reply
  186. Interesting discussion. My marketing person said to me last night that I need to do a newsletter more often. I’m not even at the point where I “send” out an e-newsletter. I post it on my blog when I have real news (a new book out, usually) and I’ve just started a mailing list sign up, so I just sent them the link to the newsletter posted on the blog. As a reader I wouldn’t have time to read a bunch of newsletters. Weekly? How could you possibly have that much “news”? I’ve decided if I’m not having fun or enjoying marketing, no matter what form it takes, I don’t do it. I’d rather be writing.

    Reply
  187. Interesting discussion. My marketing person said to me last night that I need to do a newsletter more often. I’m not even at the point where I “send” out an e-newsletter. I post it on my blog when I have real news (a new book out, usually) and I’ve just started a mailing list sign up, so I just sent them the link to the newsletter posted on the blog. As a reader I wouldn’t have time to read a bunch of newsletters. Weekly? How could you possibly have that much “news”? I’ve decided if I’m not having fun or enjoying marketing, no matter what form it takes, I don’t do it. I’d rather be writing.

    Reply
  188. Interesting discussion. My marketing person said to me last night that I need to do a newsletter more often. I’m not even at the point where I “send” out an e-newsletter. I post it on my blog when I have real news (a new book out, usually) and I’ve just started a mailing list sign up, so I just sent them the link to the newsletter posted on the blog. As a reader I wouldn’t have time to read a bunch of newsletters. Weekly? How could you possibly have that much “news”? I’ve decided if I’m not having fun or enjoying marketing, no matter what form it takes, I don’t do it. I’d rather be writing.

    Reply
  189. Interesting discussion. My marketing person said to me last night that I need to do a newsletter more often. I’m not even at the point where I “send” out an e-newsletter. I post it on my blog when I have real news (a new book out, usually) and I’ve just started a mailing list sign up, so I just sent them the link to the newsletter posted on the blog. As a reader I wouldn’t have time to read a bunch of newsletters. Weekly? How could you possibly have that much “news”? I’ve decided if I’m not having fun or enjoying marketing, no matter what form it takes, I don’t do it. I’d rather be writing.

    Reply
  190. Interesting discussion. My marketing person said to me last night that I need to do a newsletter more often. I’m not even at the point where I “send” out an e-newsletter. I post it on my blog when I have real news (a new book out, usually) and I’ve just started a mailing list sign up, so I just sent them the link to the newsletter posted on the blog. As a reader I wouldn’t have time to read a bunch of newsletters. Weekly? How could you possibly have that much “news”? I’ve decided if I’m not having fun or enjoying marketing, no matter what form it takes, I don’t do it. I’d rather be writing.

    Reply
  191. Not weekly. As Madge said, already get way too much in the inbox. Monthly would be good. I already receive newsletters from my five favourite authors and I enjoy them because they are BRIEF. Checking on the authors’ next release is good for me.
    Strangely, I’m pulling back. Blog on OP’s blogs a lot and hardly ever on my own. I go with the yahoo groups thing.

    Reply
  192. Not weekly. As Madge said, already get way too much in the inbox. Monthly would be good. I already receive newsletters from my five favourite authors and I enjoy them because they are BRIEF. Checking on the authors’ next release is good for me.
    Strangely, I’m pulling back. Blog on OP’s blogs a lot and hardly ever on my own. I go with the yahoo groups thing.

    Reply
  193. Not weekly. As Madge said, already get way too much in the inbox. Monthly would be good. I already receive newsletters from my five favourite authors and I enjoy them because they are BRIEF. Checking on the authors’ next release is good for me.
    Strangely, I’m pulling back. Blog on OP’s blogs a lot and hardly ever on my own. I go with the yahoo groups thing.

    Reply
  194. Not weekly. As Madge said, already get way too much in the inbox. Monthly would be good. I already receive newsletters from my five favourite authors and I enjoy them because they are BRIEF. Checking on the authors’ next release is good for me.
    Strangely, I’m pulling back. Blog on OP’s blogs a lot and hardly ever on my own. I go with the yahoo groups thing.

    Reply
  195. Not weekly. As Madge said, already get way too much in the inbox. Monthly would be good. I already receive newsletters from my five favourite authors and I enjoy them because they are BRIEF. Checking on the authors’ next release is good for me.
    Strangely, I’m pulling back. Blog on OP’s blogs a lot and hardly ever on my own. I go with the yahoo groups thing.

    Reply
  196. I don’t subscribe to any author newsletters. I do subscribe to a bunch of feeds for author/review blogs that I find interesting/informative/entertaining – including the Wenches 🙂
    I do subscribe to a few e-newsletters in other areas of interest – they tend to be monthly, or less frequent, and include content / links to content created by a number of different people.
    Hyper-e-marketing-fluff-culture makes me unhappy. I do my best to keep away from it!

    Reply
  197. I don’t subscribe to any author newsletters. I do subscribe to a bunch of feeds for author/review blogs that I find interesting/informative/entertaining – including the Wenches 🙂
    I do subscribe to a few e-newsletters in other areas of interest – they tend to be monthly, or less frequent, and include content / links to content created by a number of different people.
    Hyper-e-marketing-fluff-culture makes me unhappy. I do my best to keep away from it!

    Reply
  198. I don’t subscribe to any author newsletters. I do subscribe to a bunch of feeds for author/review blogs that I find interesting/informative/entertaining – including the Wenches 🙂
    I do subscribe to a few e-newsletters in other areas of interest – they tend to be monthly, or less frequent, and include content / links to content created by a number of different people.
    Hyper-e-marketing-fluff-culture makes me unhappy. I do my best to keep away from it!

    Reply
  199. I don’t subscribe to any author newsletters. I do subscribe to a bunch of feeds for author/review blogs that I find interesting/informative/entertaining – including the Wenches 🙂
    I do subscribe to a few e-newsletters in other areas of interest – they tend to be monthly, or less frequent, and include content / links to content created by a number of different people.
    Hyper-e-marketing-fluff-culture makes me unhappy. I do my best to keep away from it!

    Reply
  200. I don’t subscribe to any author newsletters. I do subscribe to a bunch of feeds for author/review blogs that I find interesting/informative/entertaining – including the Wenches 🙂
    I do subscribe to a few e-newsletters in other areas of interest – they tend to be monthly, or less frequent, and include content / links to content created by a number of different people.
    Hyper-e-marketing-fluff-culture makes me unhappy. I do my best to keep away from it!

    Reply
  201. THanks so much for these thoughts, Janice, As an avid reader, I agree with you, and as a writer I have to say your points are exactly the one we wrestle with. I want to focus my creative energy on books. But the cold reality is that promo is the only way people will discover me. So, it’s the old story of being caught between a rock and a hard place. As Pat says, I hope it gets better soon!

    Reply
  202. THanks so much for these thoughts, Janice, As an avid reader, I agree with you, and as a writer I have to say your points are exactly the one we wrestle with. I want to focus my creative energy on books. But the cold reality is that promo is the only way people will discover me. So, it’s the old story of being caught between a rock and a hard place. As Pat says, I hope it gets better soon!

    Reply
  203. THanks so much for these thoughts, Janice, As an avid reader, I agree with you, and as a writer I have to say your points are exactly the one we wrestle with. I want to focus my creative energy on books. But the cold reality is that promo is the only way people will discover me. So, it’s the old story of being caught between a rock and a hard place. As Pat says, I hope it gets better soon!

    Reply
  204. THanks so much for these thoughts, Janice, As an avid reader, I agree with you, and as a writer I have to say your points are exactly the one we wrestle with. I want to focus my creative energy on books. But the cold reality is that promo is the only way people will discover me. So, it’s the old story of being caught between a rock and a hard place. As Pat says, I hope it gets better soon!

    Reply
  205. THanks so much for these thoughts, Janice, As an avid reader, I agree with you, and as a writer I have to say your points are exactly the one we wrestle with. I want to focus my creative energy on books. But the cold reality is that promo is the only way people will discover me. So, it’s the old story of being caught between a rock and a hard place. As Pat says, I hope it gets better soon!

    Reply
  206. Thanks, everyone for the really helpful responses. It’s incredibly valuable to get your feedback! Just goes to show you about expert advise . . .what ARE they getting all the push-push to do weekly newsletters. Sounded fishy to me, but now I’m convinced it’s a BAD idea.

    Reply
  207. Thanks, everyone for the really helpful responses. It’s incredibly valuable to get your feedback! Just goes to show you about expert advise . . .what ARE they getting all the push-push to do weekly newsletters. Sounded fishy to me, but now I’m convinced it’s a BAD idea.

    Reply
  208. Thanks, everyone for the really helpful responses. It’s incredibly valuable to get your feedback! Just goes to show you about expert advise . . .what ARE they getting all the push-push to do weekly newsletters. Sounded fishy to me, but now I’m convinced it’s a BAD idea.

    Reply
  209. Thanks, everyone for the really helpful responses. It’s incredibly valuable to get your feedback! Just goes to show you about expert advise . . .what ARE they getting all the push-push to do weekly newsletters. Sounded fishy to me, but now I’m convinced it’s a BAD idea.

    Reply
  210. Thanks, everyone for the really helpful responses. It’s incredibly valuable to get your feedback! Just goes to show you about expert advise . . .what ARE they getting all the push-push to do weekly newsletters. Sounded fishy to me, but now I’m convinced it’s a BAD idea.

    Reply
  211. Please do not send weekly newsletters. Monthly is more than enough, and quarterly is even better. I subscribe to six or eight authors’ newsletters (including a number of Wenches), and I read them. I may not read them the day I receive them, but I’ll read them within a week or so.
    In your newsletters, tell us about upcoming books, a bit about the book you’re currently writing, interesting research tidbits, and significant life events. Recipes are nice, too, particularly if the recipe was used or mentioned in a book.

    Reply
  212. Please do not send weekly newsletters. Monthly is more than enough, and quarterly is even better. I subscribe to six or eight authors’ newsletters (including a number of Wenches), and I read them. I may not read them the day I receive them, but I’ll read them within a week or so.
    In your newsletters, tell us about upcoming books, a bit about the book you’re currently writing, interesting research tidbits, and significant life events. Recipes are nice, too, particularly if the recipe was used or mentioned in a book.

    Reply
  213. Please do not send weekly newsletters. Monthly is more than enough, and quarterly is even better. I subscribe to six or eight authors’ newsletters (including a number of Wenches), and I read them. I may not read them the day I receive them, but I’ll read them within a week or so.
    In your newsletters, tell us about upcoming books, a bit about the book you’re currently writing, interesting research tidbits, and significant life events. Recipes are nice, too, particularly if the recipe was used or mentioned in a book.

    Reply
  214. Please do not send weekly newsletters. Monthly is more than enough, and quarterly is even better. I subscribe to six or eight authors’ newsletters (including a number of Wenches), and I read them. I may not read them the day I receive them, but I’ll read them within a week or so.
    In your newsletters, tell us about upcoming books, a bit about the book you’re currently writing, interesting research tidbits, and significant life events. Recipes are nice, too, particularly if the recipe was used or mentioned in a book.

    Reply
  215. Please do not send weekly newsletters. Monthly is more than enough, and quarterly is even better. I subscribe to six or eight authors’ newsletters (including a number of Wenches), and I read them. I may not read them the day I receive them, but I’ll read them within a week or so.
    In your newsletters, tell us about upcoming books, a bit about the book you’re currently writing, interesting research tidbits, and significant life events. Recipes are nice, too, particularly if the recipe was used or mentioned in a book.

    Reply
  216. What you said is pretty much perfect. I want news about upcoming books, and I don’t even mind the occasional personal update, but I don’t need nonstop pictures of the author’s children or grandchildren (something I’ve been noticing a lot recently).
    I’ve also discovered on Facebook that some authors I like have very extreme political views, and it is ruining their books for me now. I’m not American, so Democrat or Republican – fine. But when you start “liking” and “sharing” extreme political figures’ articles, then I don’t want to read your books.
    “one author I know publishes “man candy” photos every Wednesday just to bring a smile to reader’s faces”
    Authors just need to remember about copyright law. They wouldn’t want their books plagiarised, but they’re happy to post copyrighted pictures… There was that romance author who was recently taken to court for the “man candy” pictures on her blog…

    Reply
  217. What you said is pretty much perfect. I want news about upcoming books, and I don’t even mind the occasional personal update, but I don’t need nonstop pictures of the author’s children or grandchildren (something I’ve been noticing a lot recently).
    I’ve also discovered on Facebook that some authors I like have very extreme political views, and it is ruining their books for me now. I’m not American, so Democrat or Republican – fine. But when you start “liking” and “sharing” extreme political figures’ articles, then I don’t want to read your books.
    “one author I know publishes “man candy” photos every Wednesday just to bring a smile to reader’s faces”
    Authors just need to remember about copyright law. They wouldn’t want their books plagiarised, but they’re happy to post copyrighted pictures… There was that romance author who was recently taken to court for the “man candy” pictures on her blog…

    Reply
  218. What you said is pretty much perfect. I want news about upcoming books, and I don’t even mind the occasional personal update, but I don’t need nonstop pictures of the author’s children or grandchildren (something I’ve been noticing a lot recently).
    I’ve also discovered on Facebook that some authors I like have very extreme political views, and it is ruining their books for me now. I’m not American, so Democrat or Republican – fine. But when you start “liking” and “sharing” extreme political figures’ articles, then I don’t want to read your books.
    “one author I know publishes “man candy” photos every Wednesday just to bring a smile to reader’s faces”
    Authors just need to remember about copyright law. They wouldn’t want their books plagiarised, but they’re happy to post copyrighted pictures… There was that romance author who was recently taken to court for the “man candy” pictures on her blog…

    Reply
  219. What you said is pretty much perfect. I want news about upcoming books, and I don’t even mind the occasional personal update, but I don’t need nonstop pictures of the author’s children or grandchildren (something I’ve been noticing a lot recently).
    I’ve also discovered on Facebook that some authors I like have very extreme political views, and it is ruining their books for me now. I’m not American, so Democrat or Republican – fine. But when you start “liking” and “sharing” extreme political figures’ articles, then I don’t want to read your books.
    “one author I know publishes “man candy” photos every Wednesday just to bring a smile to reader’s faces”
    Authors just need to remember about copyright law. They wouldn’t want their books plagiarised, but they’re happy to post copyrighted pictures… There was that romance author who was recently taken to court for the “man candy” pictures on her blog…

    Reply
  220. What you said is pretty much perfect. I want news about upcoming books, and I don’t even mind the occasional personal update, but I don’t need nonstop pictures of the author’s children or grandchildren (something I’ve been noticing a lot recently).
    I’ve also discovered on Facebook that some authors I like have very extreme political views, and it is ruining their books for me now. I’m not American, so Democrat or Republican – fine. But when you start “liking” and “sharing” extreme political figures’ articles, then I don’t want to read your books.
    “one author I know publishes “man candy” photos every Wednesday just to bring a smile to reader’s faces”
    Authors just need to remember about copyright law. They wouldn’t want their books plagiarised, but they’re happy to post copyrighted pictures… There was that romance author who was recently taken to court for the “man candy” pictures on her blog…

    Reply
  221. Newsletters with ‘real’ book news are welcome.
    New books, background material for specific books or series etc
    A mechanism for readers to raise questions for discussion in newsletters could also be useful.
    Special offers on books are also a great way to publicise, eg free for a limited time, especially for the first book in a series.
    If readers like the first book they are likely to buy the rest!
    PS I looked to see if I had won any books … greedy bookbug I know … but couldn’t find any info on the site. How are winners informed?

    Reply
  222. Newsletters with ‘real’ book news are welcome.
    New books, background material for specific books or series etc
    A mechanism for readers to raise questions for discussion in newsletters could also be useful.
    Special offers on books are also a great way to publicise, eg free for a limited time, especially for the first book in a series.
    If readers like the first book they are likely to buy the rest!
    PS I looked to see if I had won any books … greedy bookbug I know … but couldn’t find any info on the site. How are winners informed?

    Reply
  223. Newsletters with ‘real’ book news are welcome.
    New books, background material for specific books or series etc
    A mechanism for readers to raise questions for discussion in newsletters could also be useful.
    Special offers on books are also a great way to publicise, eg free for a limited time, especially for the first book in a series.
    If readers like the first book they are likely to buy the rest!
    PS I looked to see if I had won any books … greedy bookbug I know … but couldn’t find any info on the site. How are winners informed?

    Reply
  224. Newsletters with ‘real’ book news are welcome.
    New books, background material for specific books or series etc
    A mechanism for readers to raise questions for discussion in newsletters could also be useful.
    Special offers on books are also a great way to publicise, eg free for a limited time, especially for the first book in a series.
    If readers like the first book they are likely to buy the rest!
    PS I looked to see if I had won any books … greedy bookbug I know … but couldn’t find any info on the site. How are winners informed?

    Reply
  225. Newsletters with ‘real’ book news are welcome.
    New books, background material for specific books or series etc
    A mechanism for readers to raise questions for discussion in newsletters could also be useful.
    Special offers on books are also a great way to publicise, eg free for a limited time, especially for the first book in a series.
    If readers like the first book they are likely to buy the rest!
    PS I looked to see if I had won any books … greedy bookbug I know … but couldn’t find any info on the site. How are winners informed?

    Reply
  226. I admit to not quite getting it with newsletters, and heaven forbid they come out weekly. As a reader, I really only want to know about new releases (including grandchildren and puppies). I don’t need a free copy or more recipes or make-me-jealous conference pictures.
    As a writer, my time is already stretched down to a really thin little thread. And I don’t have a newsletter at all. Sigh.

    Reply
  227. I admit to not quite getting it with newsletters, and heaven forbid they come out weekly. As a reader, I really only want to know about new releases (including grandchildren and puppies). I don’t need a free copy or more recipes or make-me-jealous conference pictures.
    As a writer, my time is already stretched down to a really thin little thread. And I don’t have a newsletter at all. Sigh.

    Reply
  228. I admit to not quite getting it with newsletters, and heaven forbid they come out weekly. As a reader, I really only want to know about new releases (including grandchildren and puppies). I don’t need a free copy or more recipes or make-me-jealous conference pictures.
    As a writer, my time is already stretched down to a really thin little thread. And I don’t have a newsletter at all. Sigh.

    Reply
  229. I admit to not quite getting it with newsletters, and heaven forbid they come out weekly. As a reader, I really only want to know about new releases (including grandchildren and puppies). I don’t need a free copy or more recipes or make-me-jealous conference pictures.
    As a writer, my time is already stretched down to a really thin little thread. And I don’t have a newsletter at all. Sigh.

    Reply
  230. I admit to not quite getting it with newsletters, and heaven forbid they come out weekly. As a reader, I really only want to know about new releases (including grandchildren and puppies). I don’t need a free copy or more recipes or make-me-jealous conference pictures.
    As a writer, my time is already stretched down to a really thin little thread. And I don’t have a newsletter at all. Sigh.

    Reply
  231. My comment comes as more of a vote since I agree with nearly all the other comments, especially regarding frequency and daily personal news sharing.
    The only opinion I don’t share is this. I do not like having the only option for an author’s newsletter being available via social media. I no longer check in with Facebook on a regular basis because of so much drek even close friends and family are posting, but do still connect as it seems people are abandoning email more and more these days. The content of Facebook newsletters seems closer to pure marketing. I know I’m a Luddite here. Sorry.
    I receive and read quite a number of newsletters, but then I did sign up for them. I have been known to unsusbscribe selectively. Mostly I just flush them after a quick scan. A few newsletters I get are sending the same one out repeatedly, which annoys me. Too many excerpts from the same book highly annoy me, because it just spoils the book. One excerpt should be sufficient.
    I DO read the Wenches newsletter/blog posting and it comes more frequently. But I love the range of subject matter and viewpoints of the multi-author format. And I cannot say enough good things about the sharing of an author’s research, or articles on history.

    Reply
  232. My comment comes as more of a vote since I agree with nearly all the other comments, especially regarding frequency and daily personal news sharing.
    The only opinion I don’t share is this. I do not like having the only option for an author’s newsletter being available via social media. I no longer check in with Facebook on a regular basis because of so much drek even close friends and family are posting, but do still connect as it seems people are abandoning email more and more these days. The content of Facebook newsletters seems closer to pure marketing. I know I’m a Luddite here. Sorry.
    I receive and read quite a number of newsletters, but then I did sign up for them. I have been known to unsusbscribe selectively. Mostly I just flush them after a quick scan. A few newsletters I get are sending the same one out repeatedly, which annoys me. Too many excerpts from the same book highly annoy me, because it just spoils the book. One excerpt should be sufficient.
    I DO read the Wenches newsletter/blog posting and it comes more frequently. But I love the range of subject matter and viewpoints of the multi-author format. And I cannot say enough good things about the sharing of an author’s research, or articles on history.

    Reply
  233. My comment comes as more of a vote since I agree with nearly all the other comments, especially regarding frequency and daily personal news sharing.
    The only opinion I don’t share is this. I do not like having the only option for an author’s newsletter being available via social media. I no longer check in with Facebook on a regular basis because of so much drek even close friends and family are posting, but do still connect as it seems people are abandoning email more and more these days. The content of Facebook newsletters seems closer to pure marketing. I know I’m a Luddite here. Sorry.
    I receive and read quite a number of newsletters, but then I did sign up for them. I have been known to unsusbscribe selectively. Mostly I just flush them after a quick scan. A few newsletters I get are sending the same one out repeatedly, which annoys me. Too many excerpts from the same book highly annoy me, because it just spoils the book. One excerpt should be sufficient.
    I DO read the Wenches newsletter/blog posting and it comes more frequently. But I love the range of subject matter and viewpoints of the multi-author format. And I cannot say enough good things about the sharing of an author’s research, or articles on history.

    Reply
  234. My comment comes as more of a vote since I agree with nearly all the other comments, especially regarding frequency and daily personal news sharing.
    The only opinion I don’t share is this. I do not like having the only option for an author’s newsletter being available via social media. I no longer check in with Facebook on a regular basis because of so much drek even close friends and family are posting, but do still connect as it seems people are abandoning email more and more these days. The content of Facebook newsletters seems closer to pure marketing. I know I’m a Luddite here. Sorry.
    I receive and read quite a number of newsletters, but then I did sign up for them. I have been known to unsusbscribe selectively. Mostly I just flush them after a quick scan. A few newsletters I get are sending the same one out repeatedly, which annoys me. Too many excerpts from the same book highly annoy me, because it just spoils the book. One excerpt should be sufficient.
    I DO read the Wenches newsletter/blog posting and it comes more frequently. But I love the range of subject matter and viewpoints of the multi-author format. And I cannot say enough good things about the sharing of an author’s research, or articles on history.

    Reply
  235. My comment comes as more of a vote since I agree with nearly all the other comments, especially regarding frequency and daily personal news sharing.
    The only opinion I don’t share is this. I do not like having the only option for an author’s newsletter being available via social media. I no longer check in with Facebook on a regular basis because of so much drek even close friends and family are posting, but do still connect as it seems people are abandoning email more and more these days. The content of Facebook newsletters seems closer to pure marketing. I know I’m a Luddite here. Sorry.
    I receive and read quite a number of newsletters, but then I did sign up for them. I have been known to unsusbscribe selectively. Mostly I just flush them after a quick scan. A few newsletters I get are sending the same one out repeatedly, which annoys me. Too many excerpts from the same book highly annoy me, because it just spoils the book. One excerpt should be sufficient.
    I DO read the Wenches newsletter/blog posting and it comes more frequently. But I love the range of subject matter and viewpoints of the multi-author format. And I cannot say enough good things about the sharing of an author’s research, or articles on history.

    Reply
  236. I enjoy a well put together newsletter. Do I want Weekly, no, monthly or bimonthly would work.
    I say that because the idea is to keep the authors name in front of me.
    But really biannually would work also.
    There is a well known author who posts (well her assistant) every few days on Facebook. Most of the postings are a waste of time. Yes I like to hear what is going on in publishing of her books, but really I am not that obsessed with it. And I have read the books they are talking about, I skip those postings.
    If the author wants to share a memory or hey this happened in my life that’s cool too. The other just smells and tastes of here I am, $$$$.

    Reply
  237. I enjoy a well put together newsletter. Do I want Weekly, no, monthly or bimonthly would work.
    I say that because the idea is to keep the authors name in front of me.
    But really biannually would work also.
    There is a well known author who posts (well her assistant) every few days on Facebook. Most of the postings are a waste of time. Yes I like to hear what is going on in publishing of her books, but really I am not that obsessed with it. And I have read the books they are talking about, I skip those postings.
    If the author wants to share a memory or hey this happened in my life that’s cool too. The other just smells and tastes of here I am, $$$$.

    Reply
  238. I enjoy a well put together newsletter. Do I want Weekly, no, monthly or bimonthly would work.
    I say that because the idea is to keep the authors name in front of me.
    But really biannually would work also.
    There is a well known author who posts (well her assistant) every few days on Facebook. Most of the postings are a waste of time. Yes I like to hear what is going on in publishing of her books, but really I am not that obsessed with it. And I have read the books they are talking about, I skip those postings.
    If the author wants to share a memory or hey this happened in my life that’s cool too. The other just smells and tastes of here I am, $$$$.

    Reply
  239. I enjoy a well put together newsletter. Do I want Weekly, no, monthly or bimonthly would work.
    I say that because the idea is to keep the authors name in front of me.
    But really biannually would work also.
    There is a well known author who posts (well her assistant) every few days on Facebook. Most of the postings are a waste of time. Yes I like to hear what is going on in publishing of her books, but really I am not that obsessed with it. And I have read the books they are talking about, I skip those postings.
    If the author wants to share a memory or hey this happened in my life that’s cool too. The other just smells and tastes of here I am, $$$$.

    Reply
  240. I enjoy a well put together newsletter. Do I want Weekly, no, monthly or bimonthly would work.
    I say that because the idea is to keep the authors name in front of me.
    But really biannually would work also.
    There is a well known author who posts (well her assistant) every few days on Facebook. Most of the postings are a waste of time. Yes I like to hear what is going on in publishing of her books, but really I am not that obsessed with it. And I have read the books they are talking about, I skip those postings.
    If the author wants to share a memory or hey this happened in my life that’s cool too. The other just smells and tastes of here I am, $$$$.

    Reply
  241. I get some newsletters. Weekly is tooooo many, monthly better. By the way, did you guys know that Romantic Times aka RtReviews is launching a online service for authors who epublish in June? Sounds like a good way to get self-published and ebooks into their review magazine. As a reader that’s one of my biggest problems with ebooks and self-published, I never know when they are out there.

    Reply
  242. I get some newsletters. Weekly is tooooo many, monthly better. By the way, did you guys know that Romantic Times aka RtReviews is launching a online service for authors who epublish in June? Sounds like a good way to get self-published and ebooks into their review magazine. As a reader that’s one of my biggest problems with ebooks and self-published, I never know when they are out there.

    Reply
  243. I get some newsletters. Weekly is tooooo many, monthly better. By the way, did you guys know that Romantic Times aka RtReviews is launching a online service for authors who epublish in June? Sounds like a good way to get self-published and ebooks into their review magazine. As a reader that’s one of my biggest problems with ebooks and self-published, I never know when they are out there.

    Reply
  244. I get some newsletters. Weekly is tooooo many, monthly better. By the way, did you guys know that Romantic Times aka RtReviews is launching a online service for authors who epublish in June? Sounds like a good way to get self-published and ebooks into their review magazine. As a reader that’s one of my biggest problems with ebooks and self-published, I never know when they are out there.

    Reply
  245. I get some newsletters. Weekly is tooooo many, monthly better. By the way, did you guys know that Romantic Times aka RtReviews is launching a online service for authors who epublish in June? Sounds like a good way to get self-published and ebooks into their review magazine. As a reader that’s one of my biggest problems with ebooks and self-published, I never know when they are out there.

    Reply
  246. Thank you everyone for the thoughtful comments. I’m sorry I didn’t reply to you all — I’ve been battling with internet and phone problems. I will choose a winner later on this week and announce it on Sunday. Thanks again — much appreciated.
    Anne Gracie

    Reply
  247. Thank you everyone for the thoughtful comments. I’m sorry I didn’t reply to you all — I’ve been battling with internet and phone problems. I will choose a winner later on this week and announce it on Sunday. Thanks again — much appreciated.
    Anne Gracie

    Reply
  248. Thank you everyone for the thoughtful comments. I’m sorry I didn’t reply to you all — I’ve been battling with internet and phone problems. I will choose a winner later on this week and announce it on Sunday. Thanks again — much appreciated.
    Anne Gracie

    Reply
  249. Thank you everyone for the thoughtful comments. I’m sorry I didn’t reply to you all — I’ve been battling with internet and phone problems. I will choose a winner later on this week and announce it on Sunday. Thanks again — much appreciated.
    Anne Gracie

    Reply
  250. Thank you everyone for the thoughtful comments. I’m sorry I didn’t reply to you all — I’ve been battling with internet and phone problems. I will choose a winner later on this week and announce it on Sunday. Thanks again — much appreciated.
    Anne Gracie

    Reply

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