Change

  Bookmark I’ve been thinking a lot about “change” lately. Obviously, Obama’s campaign touted change as a good thing, and on the whole, I enjoy doing and seeing different things and believe change is required for progress. But sometimes, change comes so fast and furious that resistance sets in. I found this great website that covers predictable human behavior when faced with change: http://tinyurl.com/26786jv . The writer doesn’t solve anything, but he does a good job of explaining how and why various people react as they do when faced with any kind of shift in their circumstances.

One of the reasons I’m starting to drag my feet on the enormous changes the publishing industry is facing is explained quite succinctly on the website: “my needs are met, I’m heavily invested” in print publishing, and I really don’t want to change totally to this brave new world because “the journey there looks painful.”

I’m probably a bit ahead of the curve on my resistance because I’ve already experienced the rosy optimism part of the change, and now I’m heading to the downside as I see what we’re facing. I am dabbling with two books I want to sell electronically, and the heavy issues of editing, cover selection, and promotion are giving me headaches before I even get started. I really need a publisher to handle all of this for me. I just want to write the blamed books. But that’s not necessarily how the next chapter of publishing will work.

I, at least, have the advantage of being able to make choices based on the huge amount of information at my fingertips. But can you imagine how our historical characters felt as the enormous changes between the Georgian era and the Train industrial revolution took place? If you’re afraid to try an e-reader, just imagine how Our Heroine felt when faced with her first steamboat or train ride.  We all know how the Luddites reacted to machine manufacturing, and I can certainly relate to wanting to smash machines to bits—if only because I don’t grasp the technology and I’m convinced computers hate me.  (photo credit: http://tinyurl.com/2dmzaff)

Men who were interested in the changes happening around them probably belonged to the various scientific, philosophical, and technical societies that formed, but on the whole, women had only each Spinning-Wheel other to rely on for information. How did they feel when their wool was no longer spun by the local weaver but mass-produced by some smelly plant miles from home? And the new chemicals used for dyeing fabric (see Kill Your Hero with Wallpaper) created fabulous wallpapers and gowns, but would Our Heroine be leery of fabrics shipped all the way from exotic places like India? Obviously, the Kasmir shawl became popular at some point. Did mothers agree to the expensive purchase simply because Lady Neighbor had one? Or did some resist such wasteful extravagance when a good English wool would suffice? (photo credit: http://tinyurl.com/2bbn358)

But shawls and gowns were just material evidence of change. The underlying, volatile change was the Cashmere-Shawl raising of the lower and middle classes to wealth as merchants turned industrial technologies to new uses. Child and slave labor became social issues that divided a complacent society in two. New science raised awareness of the dangers of inadequate housing, poor diet, and disease, and suddenly, people had to think of others besides themselves and their tenants. Their worlds grew larger rapidly—and it would be simpler if they could just turn a blind to eye to those changes. I’m sure many did. (photo credit: http://tinyurl.com/24j2xdn)

I’m thinking the modern world is also undergoing such a sea change, where underdeveloped countries are suddenly growing fast—at the expense of the wealthiest countries, and technology is speeding ahead so rapidly that many of us would rather bury our heads in the sand than face another new iPhone. 

At what point do you draw your figurative line in the sand and say “heck, no” to change? And do you understand why you’re suffering from resistance and denial of the changes ahead?

65 thoughts on “Change”

  1. A really thoughtful post, Pat. It really does feel daunting in so many ways. I like to think of myself as open to new ideas and new technologies, but there does reach a point where the brain screams, ENOUGH! I think we can only process so much information at a time, without making the synapses go a little haywire. That is what I think is happening to many people these days—and its affecting concentration and rational thought. Balance is the answer for me. I do draw a line and accept that there are some places I’m just not going, LOL. But I think many people feel stressed and bewildered about how to say no. It’s a huge problem, and it’s only getting worse.

    Reply
  2. A really thoughtful post, Pat. It really does feel daunting in so many ways. I like to think of myself as open to new ideas and new technologies, but there does reach a point where the brain screams, ENOUGH! I think we can only process so much information at a time, without making the synapses go a little haywire. That is what I think is happening to many people these days—and its affecting concentration and rational thought. Balance is the answer for me. I do draw a line and accept that there are some places I’m just not going, LOL. But I think many people feel stressed and bewildered about how to say no. It’s a huge problem, and it’s only getting worse.

    Reply
  3. A really thoughtful post, Pat. It really does feel daunting in so many ways. I like to think of myself as open to new ideas and new technologies, but there does reach a point where the brain screams, ENOUGH! I think we can only process so much information at a time, without making the synapses go a little haywire. That is what I think is happening to many people these days—and its affecting concentration and rational thought. Balance is the answer for me. I do draw a line and accept that there are some places I’m just not going, LOL. But I think many people feel stressed and bewildered about how to say no. It’s a huge problem, and it’s only getting worse.

    Reply
  4. A really thoughtful post, Pat. It really does feel daunting in so many ways. I like to think of myself as open to new ideas and new technologies, but there does reach a point where the brain screams, ENOUGH! I think we can only process so much information at a time, without making the synapses go a little haywire. That is what I think is happening to many people these days—and its affecting concentration and rational thought. Balance is the answer for me. I do draw a line and accept that there are some places I’m just not going, LOL. But I think many people feel stressed and bewildered about how to say no. It’s a huge problem, and it’s only getting worse.

    Reply
  5. A really thoughtful post, Pat. It really does feel daunting in so many ways. I like to think of myself as open to new ideas and new technologies, but there does reach a point where the brain screams, ENOUGH! I think we can only process so much information at a time, without making the synapses go a little haywire. That is what I think is happening to many people these days—and its affecting concentration and rational thought. Balance is the answer for me. I do draw a line and accept that there are some places I’m just not going, LOL. But I think many people feel stressed and bewildered about how to say no. It’s a huge problem, and it’s only getting worse.

    Reply
  6. Daunting topic, Pat! This is definitely ‘bury your head in the sand’ country. I think I fall somewhere in the middle–I adopt changes that I think will benefit me and that I have time to learn, and ignore the ones that seem like unnecessary timewasters.
    I got my first computer when I decided I had to learn how to use one, or just fade into fuddy-duddyhood. That purchase led to my whole writing career. But I have absolutely no use for a smart phone. I can barely tolerate my stupid phone! But I work at home, so I simply don’t have the need for a mini-computer in my pocket.
    Contemplating the rapid pace of change explains why historical romance is popular as a counteractant!

    Reply
  7. Daunting topic, Pat! This is definitely ‘bury your head in the sand’ country. I think I fall somewhere in the middle–I adopt changes that I think will benefit me and that I have time to learn, and ignore the ones that seem like unnecessary timewasters.
    I got my first computer when I decided I had to learn how to use one, or just fade into fuddy-duddyhood. That purchase led to my whole writing career. But I have absolutely no use for a smart phone. I can barely tolerate my stupid phone! But I work at home, so I simply don’t have the need for a mini-computer in my pocket.
    Contemplating the rapid pace of change explains why historical romance is popular as a counteractant!

    Reply
  8. Daunting topic, Pat! This is definitely ‘bury your head in the sand’ country. I think I fall somewhere in the middle–I adopt changes that I think will benefit me and that I have time to learn, and ignore the ones that seem like unnecessary timewasters.
    I got my first computer when I decided I had to learn how to use one, or just fade into fuddy-duddyhood. That purchase led to my whole writing career. But I have absolutely no use for a smart phone. I can barely tolerate my stupid phone! But I work at home, so I simply don’t have the need for a mini-computer in my pocket.
    Contemplating the rapid pace of change explains why historical romance is popular as a counteractant!

    Reply
  9. Daunting topic, Pat! This is definitely ‘bury your head in the sand’ country. I think I fall somewhere in the middle–I adopt changes that I think will benefit me and that I have time to learn, and ignore the ones that seem like unnecessary timewasters.
    I got my first computer when I decided I had to learn how to use one, or just fade into fuddy-duddyhood. That purchase led to my whole writing career. But I have absolutely no use for a smart phone. I can barely tolerate my stupid phone! But I work at home, so I simply don’t have the need for a mini-computer in my pocket.
    Contemplating the rapid pace of change explains why historical romance is popular as a counteractant!

    Reply
  10. Daunting topic, Pat! This is definitely ‘bury your head in the sand’ country. I think I fall somewhere in the middle–I adopt changes that I think will benefit me and that I have time to learn, and ignore the ones that seem like unnecessary timewasters.
    I got my first computer when I decided I had to learn how to use one, or just fade into fuddy-duddyhood. That purchase led to my whole writing career. But I have absolutely no use for a smart phone. I can barely tolerate my stupid phone! But I work at home, so I simply don’t have the need for a mini-computer in my pocket.
    Contemplating the rapid pace of change explains why historical romance is popular as a counteractant!

    Reply
  11. Well, there’s change, and then there’s change. Some change is simply thrashing–movement for the sake of movement and that’s a waste of time and effort. But some change will replace older practices and things. And some are improvements. The only certain thing is that you can’t go back. I don’t think most of us would want to.
    The trick, and it’s a hard one, is to pick out the stuff that will work for me. I hate phones and I still have a land line. There is no way I’m going to tie myself to a phone unless someone pays me. For where I used “phone”, insert your own bugbear. For the record, I’m overwhelmed, too.

    Reply
  12. Well, there’s change, and then there’s change. Some change is simply thrashing–movement for the sake of movement and that’s a waste of time and effort. But some change will replace older practices and things. And some are improvements. The only certain thing is that you can’t go back. I don’t think most of us would want to.
    The trick, and it’s a hard one, is to pick out the stuff that will work for me. I hate phones and I still have a land line. There is no way I’m going to tie myself to a phone unless someone pays me. For where I used “phone”, insert your own bugbear. For the record, I’m overwhelmed, too.

    Reply
  13. Well, there’s change, and then there’s change. Some change is simply thrashing–movement for the sake of movement and that’s a waste of time and effort. But some change will replace older practices and things. And some are improvements. The only certain thing is that you can’t go back. I don’t think most of us would want to.
    The trick, and it’s a hard one, is to pick out the stuff that will work for me. I hate phones and I still have a land line. There is no way I’m going to tie myself to a phone unless someone pays me. For where I used “phone”, insert your own bugbear. For the record, I’m overwhelmed, too.

    Reply
  14. Well, there’s change, and then there’s change. Some change is simply thrashing–movement for the sake of movement and that’s a waste of time and effort. But some change will replace older practices and things. And some are improvements. The only certain thing is that you can’t go back. I don’t think most of us would want to.
    The trick, and it’s a hard one, is to pick out the stuff that will work for me. I hate phones and I still have a land line. There is no way I’m going to tie myself to a phone unless someone pays me. For where I used “phone”, insert your own bugbear. For the record, I’m overwhelmed, too.

    Reply
  15. Well, there’s change, and then there’s change. Some change is simply thrashing–movement for the sake of movement and that’s a waste of time and effort. But some change will replace older practices and things. And some are improvements. The only certain thing is that you can’t go back. I don’t think most of us would want to.
    The trick, and it’s a hard one, is to pick out the stuff that will work for me. I hate phones and I still have a land line. There is no way I’m going to tie myself to a phone unless someone pays me. For where I used “phone”, insert your own bugbear. For the record, I’m overwhelmed, too.

    Reply
  16. As a self-confessed Luddite with a text-call-only phone, I’m an anachronism in this day and age. And given my engineering past, I’m more of an, um, oddity.
    @MaryJo: I want to write an app that’ll jam the signals so people can’t text or call or data download in a high-end restaurant. I’m sure I’ll have interested restaurateurs to buy my product.

    Reply
  17. As a self-confessed Luddite with a text-call-only phone, I’m an anachronism in this day and age. And given my engineering past, I’m more of an, um, oddity.
    @MaryJo: I want to write an app that’ll jam the signals so people can’t text or call or data download in a high-end restaurant. I’m sure I’ll have interested restaurateurs to buy my product.

    Reply
  18. As a self-confessed Luddite with a text-call-only phone, I’m an anachronism in this day and age. And given my engineering past, I’m more of an, um, oddity.
    @MaryJo: I want to write an app that’ll jam the signals so people can’t text or call or data download in a high-end restaurant. I’m sure I’ll have interested restaurateurs to buy my product.

    Reply
  19. As a self-confessed Luddite with a text-call-only phone, I’m an anachronism in this day and age. And given my engineering past, I’m more of an, um, oddity.
    @MaryJo: I want to write an app that’ll jam the signals so people can’t text or call or data download in a high-end restaurant. I’m sure I’ll have interested restaurateurs to buy my product.

    Reply
  20. As a self-confessed Luddite with a text-call-only phone, I’m an anachronism in this day and age. And given my engineering past, I’m more of an, um, oddity.
    @MaryJo: I want to write an app that’ll jam the signals so people can’t text or call or data download in a high-end restaurant. I’m sure I’ll have interested restaurateurs to buy my product.

    Reply
  21. Patricia
    A very interesting post and as most people I don’t think change is always good when it happens so fast the old saying “why fix something that isn’t broken” comes up a lot where I work at the moment they are making so many changes and so fast and at the moment it just seems to be making more work for all of the staff on the floor LOL. I need to retire so as I can take things easy and have more time for reading LOL
    Have Fun
    Hele

    Reply
  22. Patricia
    A very interesting post and as most people I don’t think change is always good when it happens so fast the old saying “why fix something that isn’t broken” comes up a lot where I work at the moment they are making so many changes and so fast and at the moment it just seems to be making more work for all of the staff on the floor LOL. I need to retire so as I can take things easy and have more time for reading LOL
    Have Fun
    Hele

    Reply
  23. Patricia
    A very interesting post and as most people I don’t think change is always good when it happens so fast the old saying “why fix something that isn’t broken” comes up a lot where I work at the moment they are making so many changes and so fast and at the moment it just seems to be making more work for all of the staff on the floor LOL. I need to retire so as I can take things easy and have more time for reading LOL
    Have Fun
    Hele

    Reply
  24. Patricia
    A very interesting post and as most people I don’t think change is always good when it happens so fast the old saying “why fix something that isn’t broken” comes up a lot where I work at the moment they are making so many changes and so fast and at the moment it just seems to be making more work for all of the staff on the floor LOL. I need to retire so as I can take things easy and have more time for reading LOL
    Have Fun
    Hele

    Reply
  25. Patricia
    A very interesting post and as most people I don’t think change is always good when it happens so fast the old saying “why fix something that isn’t broken” comes up a lot where I work at the moment they are making so many changes and so fast and at the moment it just seems to be making more work for all of the staff on the floor LOL. I need to retire so as I can take things easy and have more time for reading LOL
    Have Fun
    Hele

    Reply
  26. Change for the sake of change or “because we can” makes me at turns sad and angry. I like paper books. I like holding them in my hand and reading them and using a bookmark when I finally get to a place to stop. I love to see them on my bookshelves. I love to be able to put my hand on a certain book because I want to read it again or because I knew some research bit is in that particular book.
    We now have the technology to make books nothing but a gloried video game. Sorry, I just don’t see that as a good thing. Children spend entirely too much time plugged into their video games, computers, etc. Reading is a separate thing. There is magic there in the translation of words to pictures painted by our imaginations. Just because we can put books on a computer screen doesn’t mean we should.
    Crawling back into my dinosaur cave now. It is lined with bookshelves full of my oldest and dearest friends and we like it here very much.

    Reply
  27. Change for the sake of change or “because we can” makes me at turns sad and angry. I like paper books. I like holding them in my hand and reading them and using a bookmark when I finally get to a place to stop. I love to see them on my bookshelves. I love to be able to put my hand on a certain book because I want to read it again or because I knew some research bit is in that particular book.
    We now have the technology to make books nothing but a gloried video game. Sorry, I just don’t see that as a good thing. Children spend entirely too much time plugged into their video games, computers, etc. Reading is a separate thing. There is magic there in the translation of words to pictures painted by our imaginations. Just because we can put books on a computer screen doesn’t mean we should.
    Crawling back into my dinosaur cave now. It is lined with bookshelves full of my oldest and dearest friends and we like it here very much.

    Reply
  28. Change for the sake of change or “because we can” makes me at turns sad and angry. I like paper books. I like holding them in my hand and reading them and using a bookmark when I finally get to a place to stop. I love to see them on my bookshelves. I love to be able to put my hand on a certain book because I want to read it again or because I knew some research bit is in that particular book.
    We now have the technology to make books nothing but a gloried video game. Sorry, I just don’t see that as a good thing. Children spend entirely too much time plugged into their video games, computers, etc. Reading is a separate thing. There is magic there in the translation of words to pictures painted by our imaginations. Just because we can put books on a computer screen doesn’t mean we should.
    Crawling back into my dinosaur cave now. It is lined with bookshelves full of my oldest and dearest friends and we like it here very much.

    Reply
  29. Change for the sake of change or “because we can” makes me at turns sad and angry. I like paper books. I like holding them in my hand and reading them and using a bookmark when I finally get to a place to stop. I love to see them on my bookshelves. I love to be able to put my hand on a certain book because I want to read it again or because I knew some research bit is in that particular book.
    We now have the technology to make books nothing but a gloried video game. Sorry, I just don’t see that as a good thing. Children spend entirely too much time plugged into their video games, computers, etc. Reading is a separate thing. There is magic there in the translation of words to pictures painted by our imaginations. Just because we can put books on a computer screen doesn’t mean we should.
    Crawling back into my dinosaur cave now. It is lined with bookshelves full of my oldest and dearest friends and we like it here very much.

    Reply
  30. Change for the sake of change or “because we can” makes me at turns sad and angry. I like paper books. I like holding them in my hand and reading them and using a bookmark when I finally get to a place to stop. I love to see them on my bookshelves. I love to be able to put my hand on a certain book because I want to read it again or because I knew some research bit is in that particular book.
    We now have the technology to make books nothing but a gloried video game. Sorry, I just don’t see that as a good thing. Children spend entirely too much time plugged into their video games, computers, etc. Reading is a separate thing. There is magic there in the translation of words to pictures painted by our imaginations. Just because we can put books on a computer screen doesn’t mean we should.
    Crawling back into my dinosaur cave now. It is lined with bookshelves full of my oldest and dearest friends and we like it here very much.

    Reply
  31. I can hear all of you singing my song. “G” Since I work at home and have no reason to be running around anywhere else, I’ve resisted any mobile phone but the very simple one I have for emergencies. That one is easy to shove aside. But the other changes are so difficult to avoid…taxes, cars, computer programs, the list is endless.
    And while I love my books, I’m really tired of moving them, so I’m learning to buy electronically. Carrying a library in my purse is kind of fun. Writing that library from scratch and providing covers is not.

    Reply
  32. I can hear all of you singing my song. “G” Since I work at home and have no reason to be running around anywhere else, I’ve resisted any mobile phone but the very simple one I have for emergencies. That one is easy to shove aside. But the other changes are so difficult to avoid…taxes, cars, computer programs, the list is endless.
    And while I love my books, I’m really tired of moving them, so I’m learning to buy electronically. Carrying a library in my purse is kind of fun. Writing that library from scratch and providing covers is not.

    Reply
  33. I can hear all of you singing my song. “G” Since I work at home and have no reason to be running around anywhere else, I’ve resisted any mobile phone but the very simple one I have for emergencies. That one is easy to shove aside. But the other changes are so difficult to avoid…taxes, cars, computer programs, the list is endless.
    And while I love my books, I’m really tired of moving them, so I’m learning to buy electronically. Carrying a library in my purse is kind of fun. Writing that library from scratch and providing covers is not.

    Reply
  34. I can hear all of you singing my song. “G” Since I work at home and have no reason to be running around anywhere else, I’ve resisted any mobile phone but the very simple one I have for emergencies. That one is easy to shove aside. But the other changes are so difficult to avoid…taxes, cars, computer programs, the list is endless.
    And while I love my books, I’m really tired of moving them, so I’m learning to buy electronically. Carrying a library in my purse is kind of fun. Writing that library from scratch and providing covers is not.

    Reply
  35. I can hear all of you singing my song. “G” Since I work at home and have no reason to be running around anywhere else, I’ve resisted any mobile phone but the very simple one I have for emergencies. That one is easy to shove aside. But the other changes are so difficult to avoid…taxes, cars, computer programs, the list is endless.
    And while I love my books, I’m really tired of moving them, so I’m learning to buy electronically. Carrying a library in my purse is kind of fun. Writing that library from scratch and providing covers is not.

    Reply
  36. Joanna, e-readers are insidious. First, you pull them out at dr and dentist appts. And then you take them on a plane flight. And then…they start creeping into every corner of your life!

    Reply
  37. Joanna, e-readers are insidious. First, you pull them out at dr and dentist appts. And then you take them on a plane flight. And then…they start creeping into every corner of your life!

    Reply
  38. Joanna, e-readers are insidious. First, you pull them out at dr and dentist appts. And then you take them on a plane flight. And then…they start creeping into every corner of your life!

    Reply
  39. Joanna, e-readers are insidious. First, you pull them out at dr and dentist appts. And then you take them on a plane flight. And then…they start creeping into every corner of your life!

    Reply
  40. Joanna, e-readers are insidious. First, you pull them out at dr and dentist appts. And then you take them on a plane flight. And then…they start creeping into every corner of your life!

    Reply
  41. Very interesting post, Patricia.
    I think Cara/Andrea is spot on – it’s a question of balance. The temple to the oracle at Delphi had ‘Nothing too much’ carved on it as a warning, and I think the Ancient Greeks were right.
    My own approach is ‘slow and steady’. I’m not a natural IT person; if I try to take too much on board at once, I promptly forget the lot!

    Reply
  42. Very interesting post, Patricia.
    I think Cara/Andrea is spot on – it’s a question of balance. The temple to the oracle at Delphi had ‘Nothing too much’ carved on it as a warning, and I think the Ancient Greeks were right.
    My own approach is ‘slow and steady’. I’m not a natural IT person; if I try to take too much on board at once, I promptly forget the lot!

    Reply
  43. Very interesting post, Patricia.
    I think Cara/Andrea is spot on – it’s a question of balance. The temple to the oracle at Delphi had ‘Nothing too much’ carved on it as a warning, and I think the Ancient Greeks were right.
    My own approach is ‘slow and steady’. I’m not a natural IT person; if I try to take too much on board at once, I promptly forget the lot!

    Reply
  44. Very interesting post, Patricia.
    I think Cara/Andrea is spot on – it’s a question of balance. The temple to the oracle at Delphi had ‘Nothing too much’ carved on it as a warning, and I think the Ancient Greeks were right.
    My own approach is ‘slow and steady’. I’m not a natural IT person; if I try to take too much on board at once, I promptly forget the lot!

    Reply
  45. Very interesting post, Patricia.
    I think Cara/Andrea is spot on – it’s a question of balance. The temple to the oracle at Delphi had ‘Nothing too much’ carved on it as a warning, and I think the Ancient Greeks were right.
    My own approach is ‘slow and steady’. I’m not a natural IT person; if I try to take too much on board at once, I promptly forget the lot!

    Reply
  46. Another addage we’ve had in our family is “all things in moderation”. Says the same thing as you Elizabeth. But, my mother-in-law would take bags & bags full of books with her when traveling to her husband’s dismay. They both would have loved the e-books! I too, was a bit afraid to do anything on the computer when they were new in homes. My 8 yr. old (then) granddaughter led me to ours & proceeded to teach me how to use it! I was sure I would screw everything up & it would implode! She’d just pat my hand tell me it was all right to write my “cheat sheet” in long hand so I could turn it on & navigate around. And look, I come to The Word Wenches site often ! 🙂 Now she’s the one to encourage me to use the new Kindle I received for my birthday(she’s now 24). Youth & courage that’s where it’s at! She gives me both. Love your blogs & books, they educate & help me stretch my mind & maybe bury my head in something less scary than “modern” “changes”!!

    Reply
  47. Another addage we’ve had in our family is “all things in moderation”. Says the same thing as you Elizabeth. But, my mother-in-law would take bags & bags full of books with her when traveling to her husband’s dismay. They both would have loved the e-books! I too, was a bit afraid to do anything on the computer when they were new in homes. My 8 yr. old (then) granddaughter led me to ours & proceeded to teach me how to use it! I was sure I would screw everything up & it would implode! She’d just pat my hand tell me it was all right to write my “cheat sheet” in long hand so I could turn it on & navigate around. And look, I come to The Word Wenches site often ! 🙂 Now she’s the one to encourage me to use the new Kindle I received for my birthday(she’s now 24). Youth & courage that’s where it’s at! She gives me both. Love your blogs & books, they educate & help me stretch my mind & maybe bury my head in something less scary than “modern” “changes”!!

    Reply
  48. Another addage we’ve had in our family is “all things in moderation”. Says the same thing as you Elizabeth. But, my mother-in-law would take bags & bags full of books with her when traveling to her husband’s dismay. They both would have loved the e-books! I too, was a bit afraid to do anything on the computer when they were new in homes. My 8 yr. old (then) granddaughter led me to ours & proceeded to teach me how to use it! I was sure I would screw everything up & it would implode! She’d just pat my hand tell me it was all right to write my “cheat sheet” in long hand so I could turn it on & navigate around. And look, I come to The Word Wenches site often ! 🙂 Now she’s the one to encourage me to use the new Kindle I received for my birthday(she’s now 24). Youth & courage that’s where it’s at! She gives me both. Love your blogs & books, they educate & help me stretch my mind & maybe bury my head in something less scary than “modern” “changes”!!

    Reply
  49. Another addage we’ve had in our family is “all things in moderation”. Says the same thing as you Elizabeth. But, my mother-in-law would take bags & bags full of books with her when traveling to her husband’s dismay. They both would have loved the e-books! I too, was a bit afraid to do anything on the computer when they were new in homes. My 8 yr. old (then) granddaughter led me to ours & proceeded to teach me how to use it! I was sure I would screw everything up & it would implode! She’d just pat my hand tell me it was all right to write my “cheat sheet” in long hand so I could turn it on & navigate around. And look, I come to The Word Wenches site often ! 🙂 Now she’s the one to encourage me to use the new Kindle I received for my birthday(she’s now 24). Youth & courage that’s where it’s at! She gives me both. Love your blogs & books, they educate & help me stretch my mind & maybe bury my head in something less scary than “modern” “changes”!!

    Reply
  50. Another addage we’ve had in our family is “all things in moderation”. Says the same thing as you Elizabeth. But, my mother-in-law would take bags & bags full of books with her when traveling to her husband’s dismay. They both would have loved the e-books! I too, was a bit afraid to do anything on the computer when they were new in homes. My 8 yr. old (then) granddaughter led me to ours & proceeded to teach me how to use it! I was sure I would screw everything up & it would implode! She’d just pat my hand tell me it was all right to write my “cheat sheet” in long hand so I could turn it on & navigate around. And look, I come to The Word Wenches site often ! 🙂 Now she’s the one to encourage me to use the new Kindle I received for my birthday(she’s now 24). Youth & courage that’s where it’s at! She gives me both. Love your blogs & books, they educate & help me stretch my mind & maybe bury my head in something less scary than “modern” “changes”!!

    Reply
  51. It’s all a matter of comfort level, to be sure. Some people find it very difficult to make changes when confronted with the unfamiliar, like technology, although they might be more comfortable making changes where they feel well grounded–new faces in the neighborhood, maybe. But I agree, too many changes at once and the head spins and we lose touch with reality! I’m comfortable with computers now, but I still want to kick them. “G”

    Reply
  52. It’s all a matter of comfort level, to be sure. Some people find it very difficult to make changes when confronted with the unfamiliar, like technology, although they might be more comfortable making changes where they feel well grounded–new faces in the neighborhood, maybe. But I agree, too many changes at once and the head spins and we lose touch with reality! I’m comfortable with computers now, but I still want to kick them. “G”

    Reply
  53. It’s all a matter of comfort level, to be sure. Some people find it very difficult to make changes when confronted with the unfamiliar, like technology, although they might be more comfortable making changes where they feel well grounded–new faces in the neighborhood, maybe. But I agree, too many changes at once and the head spins and we lose touch with reality! I’m comfortable with computers now, but I still want to kick them. “G”

    Reply
  54. It’s all a matter of comfort level, to be sure. Some people find it very difficult to make changes when confronted with the unfamiliar, like technology, although they might be more comfortable making changes where they feel well grounded–new faces in the neighborhood, maybe. But I agree, too many changes at once and the head spins and we lose touch with reality! I’m comfortable with computers now, but I still want to kick them. “G”

    Reply
  55. It’s all a matter of comfort level, to be sure. Some people find it very difficult to make changes when confronted with the unfamiliar, like technology, although they might be more comfortable making changes where they feel well grounded–new faces in the neighborhood, maybe. But I agree, too many changes at once and the head spins and we lose touch with reality! I’m comfortable with computers now, but I still want to kick them. “G”

    Reply
  56. I will probably not purchase an e-reader until forced to. Until my authors no longer publish paper. Until the price comes down and I don’t have to have a computer glare when I read. What happens if you drop you reader in the tub while reading? Does it just mushroom into something that doesn’t fit anymore or does it die? These questions must be addressed before I change.

    Reply
  57. I will probably not purchase an e-reader until forced to. Until my authors no longer publish paper. Until the price comes down and I don’t have to have a computer glare when I read. What happens if you drop you reader in the tub while reading? Does it just mushroom into something that doesn’t fit anymore or does it die? These questions must be addressed before I change.

    Reply
  58. I will probably not purchase an e-reader until forced to. Until my authors no longer publish paper. Until the price comes down and I don’t have to have a computer glare when I read. What happens if you drop you reader in the tub while reading? Does it just mushroom into something that doesn’t fit anymore or does it die? These questions must be addressed before I change.

    Reply
  59. I will probably not purchase an e-reader until forced to. Until my authors no longer publish paper. Until the price comes down and I don’t have to have a computer glare when I read. What happens if you drop you reader in the tub while reading? Does it just mushroom into something that doesn’t fit anymore or does it die? These questions must be addressed before I change.

    Reply
  60. I will probably not purchase an e-reader until forced to. Until my authors no longer publish paper. Until the price comes down and I don’t have to have a computer glare when I read. What happens if you drop you reader in the tub while reading? Does it just mushroom into something that doesn’t fit anymore or does it die? These questions must be addressed before I change.

    Reply

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