The Cats of 2019

A Panda pondersby Mary Jo

Cats of 2019

Anyone who has read many of my stories is probably not surprised when a cat wanders through the pages, much as they wander through real life.  It's worth noting that while my characters are fictional (apart from cameos of real historical figures), my cats are just about always real cats, often but not always mine. (That's my Panda on the left.)

Since I finished the Book That Ate My Life just before Christmas, I've been in a light-minded mode, which is why I got the idea of talking about the cats that have appeared in my 2019 books.

 

Dearly Beloved MM COMPFirst was the re-release of my very first historical romance, Dearly BelovedThe heroine's young son has a thumbed tabby cat called Tiger, who was really my sweet Pandora.  I grew up on a farm where we usually had about five indoor/outdoor cats, so they've always been part of my life. 

In my young adult years when I lived in an apartment, I couldn't have a pet, but one of the first things I did when I bought my first townhouse was start looking for a cat.

I found Pandora through a 'free to good home' ad in the local newspaper.  A nice woman had taken her in.  She was a stray who was clearly domesticated.  She was a fine cat, and I had her for 18 1/2 years.  This scene is when my hero, Gervase, first meets Diana's young son:

            His remark was undercut by a wide yawn. As if it were a signal, a young tabby cat jumped on the bed. Geoffrey lifted the little animal in his hands. “When I had the seizure, Tiger was frightened and jumped off. I’ve only had her a few weeks, and she’s already learned to sleep on my bed.”

            “Clever cat,” the viscount said, suppressing a smile.

Once A Spy MM.My major new book of the year was Once a Spy, Rogues Redeemed #4.    The story cat was a young gray tabby who found my heroine, Suzanne, when she and her husband Simon were sleeping in a barn on their way out of France.  He came in the middle of the night looking for food, lucked out, and literally attached himself to Suzanne. <G> 

            The three of them ate in companionable silence.  Then it was time to pack up, saddle the horses, and resume their journey. 

            Suzanne thought the cat had gone about his feline business, but after Simon helped her into the gray's saddle, the tabby appeared from nowhere and leaped onto her stirruped left foot.  Then he began earnestly hauling himself up her trousered leg, his nails tiny little needles that stabbed through fabric and into skin.  He made it up to her knee and jumped on the saddle between her legs, looking vastly pleased with himself.

            "I think our scouting party has acquired a new recruit," she said, unable to resist scratching his scrawny little neck. "Can I keep him?" 

            "As long as you're both willing, I don't see why not," Simon replied.  "He wouldn't have shown up here if he had a real home."

Suzanne named him Leo, and he traveled with them all the way back to their home in Smokey and the Pashmina  Feb. 2015England.  In the very last scene, he lands neatly in the middle of a tray of sandwiches.  A true cat all the way! 

Leo is really my Smokey Cat, who I found in the adoption cage of my local cat hospital under the horrible kennel name of Toonces.   (Four of our cats came from that cage, proving that I'm a sucker for adult cats who need homes! <G> The cage is stocked by Cat Rescue of Maryland, which mostly feeds feral colonies and does trap, neuter, and release, but if a cat shows up at a colony who is clearly domesticated, they take him to a vet for a medical check up and shots, then put him up for adoption. We changed his name to Smokey before we even took him home.)

The cat then known as Toonces looked very sad but well behaved.  He'd been left in a carrier on the cat hospital's back porch.  It was during the fallout from the last recession and my guess is that his owners couldn't keep him longer, but they wanted to make sure he'd be all right. 

He didn't seem to have a lot of personality, but he needed a home, so I decided to take him on approval and see if he got along with the other cats.  He did, and he developed a lot more personality!  Not for nothing is he now known as "Smokey the Destroyer!"  <G>  He like testing the laws of physics: if he pushes if off the table, will it fall?  So far, gravity is proving itself every time!

Seduction on a snowy nightRounding out the year, I had a novella in the Seduction on a Snowy Night anthology.  My story, One Wicked Night, had several cats, chief of which was the heroine's cat Panda.  He was a very large black and white tuxedo cat whom she found in India.  (At that time the word 'panda' probably wasn't known in England, so I had Diana meet some Chinese pandas in a maharajah's private menagerie.) 

Panda is a vital catalyst in bringing the characters together.  (Sorry, I can never resist a bad pun. <G>)  He's named for my very real and very large PandaMax (because he's a maximum Panda!)  Here's a bit from when Diana returns to England and has arrived at the home of her niece Rory, who was the heroine of Once a Scoundrel:

            Rory entered the drawing room followed by a footman pushing a well-stocked tea cart.  Seeing the cat, she bent over and rubbed her fingers together enticingly.  “Panda, do you remember me?  You were only half-grown when I met you in India, but look at you now!  What a fine, substantial cat you’ve become. In fact, you might have a touch of elephant in your ancestry.” 

            He loftily turned his back on her, so she took a cheese puff from a platter on the tea cart and offered it.  He immediately came to her and took the morsel daintily from her fingers.  It disappeared instantly, after which the Panda politely indicated that another cheese puff would be welcomed by a cat who had just traveled halfway around the world.  Rory obliged and rubbed his head affectionately as she set a third puff on the floor.  “That’s my Panda! Always willing to be bribed.”

Panda also came from the cat hospital.  He was a stray who hung around a housing for the elderly complex and a number or residents would give him food. When someone reported him to Animal Control, a cat rescuer whose mother lived in the complex swooped in and captured.  He was very well mannered and surely he'd had a home once.  He looked like a nice cat; he sat on the cat hospital reception desk and played with the pens. 

IMG_3710So I took him home, opened the carrier in the middle of the living room–and he vanished for a week. <G>  We came to terms eventually and he is now a very friendly cat, the Patriarch of the Pack.  He's on the desk next to me as a I type this, close enough for regular petting. 

Also appearing in One Wicked Winter Night was the Spook, who had made his debut in my previous book, Once a Scoundrel.  He was Gabriel's ship's cat and a mighty slayer of vermin.  Here is Rory's first meeting with him:

            It was a relief to feel something rub against her ankles.  She looked down to see a strange cat, mostly white with splotches of gray.  "Who is this come to visit?"

            "The ship's cat," Gabriel said, accepting a topic less personal.  "He's rather odd looking.  His eyes are crossed and he has long legs like a deer and there's something about the angle of his ears, but he's very good at his job.  We hired him as soon as he applied for the position."

            "What are his duties?" She bent and made small feline noises in attempt to coax him closer, but he skittered back, watching her warily.

            "He's the official ship's mouser.  Cats have gone to sea on sailing ships Spook  cross-eyedas long as men have sailed, I think." 

            She smiled. "So useful for keeping the ship's supplies from being ruined by vermin.  How did he apply for his position?"

            "He presented himself to me with a still struggling rat in his mouth.  Then he looked me in the eye and snapped its neck.  I hired him on the spot."

The Spook is another of my Cat Rescue of Maryland cats from the adoption cage at the cat hospital.  He was living under a construction trailer with the head of CROM took him in.  She called him Pretty Boy, and her first thought when she saw him was "crossbred apple-head lavender-point Siamese."  Crossed blue eyes are a common trait with part Siamese cats, and I assume lavender point refers to the softer of the two grays on him. 

He's pretty shy and I'm not sure if he'd make a good ship's cat, but he's sweet natured and loooooooves having his head scratched.  When I brought him home, he fit in just fine.  He and Panda are pals. And Spook is even larger than Panda! 

IMG_4374So those are the cats who have graced my pages during 2019.  Do you enjoy pets in books?  Cats and dogs are most common, but macaws and hedgehogs and others sometimes make appearances.  Tell me your favorite book critters!

Mary Jo, sadly adding that her accountant never let declare her cats as office assistants so she could deduct their expenses.

210 thoughts on “The Cats of 2019”

  1. I love having a critter in a story, though Anne and that puppy… 😉 Seriously, I think, if they’re written as a full character and not a passing thought, they bring a lot to the page. Whether cat, dog, horse or what have you, they certainly always bring a smile.
    Your cats are beautiful!

    Reply
  2. I love having a critter in a story, though Anne and that puppy… 😉 Seriously, I think, if they’re written as a full character and not a passing thought, they bring a lot to the page. Whether cat, dog, horse or what have you, they certainly always bring a smile.
    Your cats are beautiful!

    Reply
  3. I love having a critter in a story, though Anne and that puppy… 😉 Seriously, I think, if they’re written as a full character and not a passing thought, they bring a lot to the page. Whether cat, dog, horse or what have you, they certainly always bring a smile.
    Your cats are beautiful!

    Reply
  4. I love having a critter in a story, though Anne and that puppy… 😉 Seriously, I think, if they’re written as a full character and not a passing thought, they bring a lot to the page. Whether cat, dog, horse or what have you, they certainly always bring a smile.
    Your cats are beautiful!

    Reply
  5. I love having a critter in a story, though Anne and that puppy… 😉 Seriously, I think, if they’re written as a full character and not a passing thought, they bring a lot to the page. Whether cat, dog, horse or what have you, they certainly always bring a smile.
    Your cats are beautiful!

    Reply
  6. One of my favorite authors is Barbara Metzger. I love her books because they make me laugh out loud. Laughing makes me feel good (when I don’t feel good) and that is a gift.
    All of her books include animals – mostly cats and dogs – but she doesn’t limit herself. One of her short stories begins “They were as poor as church mice. No, they were church mice.” The mice proceed to help the vicar find the hidden treasure in the church and save the day.
    As I was growing up, we always had both cats and dogs. I can no longer have a dog. It would not be fair to them. For the last 10 years (after my last dog died) I had two cats. When the last one died about a year ago, I swore I’d have no more animals. But my sister talked me into visiting a local animal shelter … just to look. Well, I fell in love with a sweet little calico who has turned out to be the perfect loving friend for this period in my life.
    Your cats are lovely Mary Jo. And how lucky they are to be the inspiration for some of your furry “characters.”

    Reply
  7. One of my favorite authors is Barbara Metzger. I love her books because they make me laugh out loud. Laughing makes me feel good (when I don’t feel good) and that is a gift.
    All of her books include animals – mostly cats and dogs – but she doesn’t limit herself. One of her short stories begins “They were as poor as church mice. No, they were church mice.” The mice proceed to help the vicar find the hidden treasure in the church and save the day.
    As I was growing up, we always had both cats and dogs. I can no longer have a dog. It would not be fair to them. For the last 10 years (after my last dog died) I had two cats. When the last one died about a year ago, I swore I’d have no more animals. But my sister talked me into visiting a local animal shelter … just to look. Well, I fell in love with a sweet little calico who has turned out to be the perfect loving friend for this period in my life.
    Your cats are lovely Mary Jo. And how lucky they are to be the inspiration for some of your furry “characters.”

    Reply
  8. One of my favorite authors is Barbara Metzger. I love her books because they make me laugh out loud. Laughing makes me feel good (when I don’t feel good) and that is a gift.
    All of her books include animals – mostly cats and dogs – but she doesn’t limit herself. One of her short stories begins “They were as poor as church mice. No, they were church mice.” The mice proceed to help the vicar find the hidden treasure in the church and save the day.
    As I was growing up, we always had both cats and dogs. I can no longer have a dog. It would not be fair to them. For the last 10 years (after my last dog died) I had two cats. When the last one died about a year ago, I swore I’d have no more animals. But my sister talked me into visiting a local animal shelter … just to look. Well, I fell in love with a sweet little calico who has turned out to be the perfect loving friend for this period in my life.
    Your cats are lovely Mary Jo. And how lucky they are to be the inspiration for some of your furry “characters.”

    Reply
  9. One of my favorite authors is Barbara Metzger. I love her books because they make me laugh out loud. Laughing makes me feel good (when I don’t feel good) and that is a gift.
    All of her books include animals – mostly cats and dogs – but she doesn’t limit herself. One of her short stories begins “They were as poor as church mice. No, they were church mice.” The mice proceed to help the vicar find the hidden treasure in the church and save the day.
    As I was growing up, we always had both cats and dogs. I can no longer have a dog. It would not be fair to them. For the last 10 years (after my last dog died) I had two cats. When the last one died about a year ago, I swore I’d have no more animals. But my sister talked me into visiting a local animal shelter … just to look. Well, I fell in love with a sweet little calico who has turned out to be the perfect loving friend for this period in my life.
    Your cats are lovely Mary Jo. And how lucky they are to be the inspiration for some of your furry “characters.”

    Reply
  10. One of my favorite authors is Barbara Metzger. I love her books because they make me laugh out loud. Laughing makes me feel good (when I don’t feel good) and that is a gift.
    All of her books include animals – mostly cats and dogs – but she doesn’t limit herself. One of her short stories begins “They were as poor as church mice. No, they were church mice.” The mice proceed to help the vicar find the hidden treasure in the church and save the day.
    As I was growing up, we always had both cats and dogs. I can no longer have a dog. It would not be fair to them. For the last 10 years (after my last dog died) I had two cats. When the last one died about a year ago, I swore I’d have no more animals. But my sister talked me into visiting a local animal shelter … just to look. Well, I fell in love with a sweet little calico who has turned out to be the perfect loving friend for this period in my life.
    Your cats are lovely Mary Jo. And how lucky they are to be the inspiration for some of your furry “characters.”

    Reply
  11. Yes, please, more animals in stories. I don’t remember all of the people I have ever met, but I do remember all of my animals. Currently I share space with two humans and one cat, one dog. One of the humans is looking for a space to move out. but the animals will stay and the world will have balance again. Thanks for the animals in your stories.

    Reply
  12. Yes, please, more animals in stories. I don’t remember all of the people I have ever met, but I do remember all of my animals. Currently I share space with two humans and one cat, one dog. One of the humans is looking for a space to move out. but the animals will stay and the world will have balance again. Thanks for the animals in your stories.

    Reply
  13. Yes, please, more animals in stories. I don’t remember all of the people I have ever met, but I do remember all of my animals. Currently I share space with two humans and one cat, one dog. One of the humans is looking for a space to move out. but the animals will stay and the world will have balance again. Thanks for the animals in your stories.

    Reply
  14. Yes, please, more animals in stories. I don’t remember all of the people I have ever met, but I do remember all of my animals. Currently I share space with two humans and one cat, one dog. One of the humans is looking for a space to move out. but the animals will stay and the world will have balance again. Thanks for the animals in your stories.

    Reply
  15. Yes, please, more animals in stories. I don’t remember all of the people I have ever met, but I do remember all of my animals. Currently I share space with two humans and one cat, one dog. One of the humans is looking for a space to move out. but the animals will stay and the world will have balance again. Thanks for the animals in your stories.

    Reply
  16. Mary T, Barbara Metzger writes animals WONDERFLLY! I missed the church mice story–I should look for it. *G* I’m so glad you’ve found a love feline companion who is a perfect fit for where you are now.

    Reply
  17. Mary T, Barbara Metzger writes animals WONDERFLLY! I missed the church mice story–I should look for it. *G* I’m so glad you’ve found a love feline companion who is a perfect fit for where you are now.

    Reply
  18. Mary T, Barbara Metzger writes animals WONDERFLLY! I missed the church mice story–I should look for it. *G* I’m so glad you’ve found a love feline companion who is a perfect fit for where you are now.

    Reply
  19. Mary T, Barbara Metzger writes animals WONDERFLLY! I missed the church mice story–I should look for it. *G* I’m so glad you’ve found a love feline companion who is a perfect fit for where you are now.

    Reply
  20. Mary T, Barbara Metzger writes animals WONDERFLLY! I missed the church mice story–I should look for it. *G* I’m so glad you’ve found a love feline companion who is a perfect fit for where you are now.

    Reply
  21. Both my husband and I have always been cat people, but when our last cat died about 5 years ago, he decreed that we would not have another cat. I didn’t believe he’d be able to hold to that; but in spite of some dangerous encounters (please adopt one of this litter) at the malll and the supermarkets, he has indeed done so.
    And he was correct; we’re aging, we have trouble caring for ourselves, we should no longer have a reall-live pet.
    So, PLEASE keep the cats and dogs (horses, goldfishes, whatever) in your stories, ladies.. Supply me with virtual pets in the same gracious way you supply me with virtual travels..

    Reply
  22. Both my husband and I have always been cat people, but when our last cat died about 5 years ago, he decreed that we would not have another cat. I didn’t believe he’d be able to hold to that; but in spite of some dangerous encounters (please adopt one of this litter) at the malll and the supermarkets, he has indeed done so.
    And he was correct; we’re aging, we have trouble caring for ourselves, we should no longer have a reall-live pet.
    So, PLEASE keep the cats and dogs (horses, goldfishes, whatever) in your stories, ladies.. Supply me with virtual pets in the same gracious way you supply me with virtual travels..

    Reply
  23. Both my husband and I have always been cat people, but when our last cat died about 5 years ago, he decreed that we would not have another cat. I didn’t believe he’d be able to hold to that; but in spite of some dangerous encounters (please adopt one of this litter) at the malll and the supermarkets, he has indeed done so.
    And he was correct; we’re aging, we have trouble caring for ourselves, we should no longer have a reall-live pet.
    So, PLEASE keep the cats and dogs (horses, goldfishes, whatever) in your stories, ladies.. Supply me with virtual pets in the same gracious way you supply me with virtual travels..

    Reply
  24. Both my husband and I have always been cat people, but when our last cat died about 5 years ago, he decreed that we would not have another cat. I didn’t believe he’d be able to hold to that; but in spite of some dangerous encounters (please adopt one of this litter) at the malll and the supermarkets, he has indeed done so.
    And he was correct; we’re aging, we have trouble caring for ourselves, we should no longer have a reall-live pet.
    So, PLEASE keep the cats and dogs (horses, goldfishes, whatever) in your stories, ladies.. Supply me with virtual pets in the same gracious way you supply me with virtual travels..

    Reply
  25. Both my husband and I have always been cat people, but when our last cat died about 5 years ago, he decreed that we would not have another cat. I didn’t believe he’d be able to hold to that; but in spite of some dangerous encounters (please adopt one of this litter) at the malll and the supermarkets, he has indeed done so.
    And he was correct; we’re aging, we have trouble caring for ourselves, we should no longer have a reall-live pet.
    So, PLEASE keep the cats and dogs (horses, goldfishes, whatever) in your stories, ladies.. Supply me with virtual pets in the same gracious way you supply me with virtual travels..

    Reply
  26. Your animals always tell something about the hero or heroine and most definitely add to the story. Two of my favorites are the dog and cat in The Rake. I’m ruled by my own two cats who are trouble in fur!

    Reply
  27. Your animals always tell something about the hero or heroine and most definitely add to the story. Two of my favorites are the dog and cat in The Rake. I’m ruled by my own two cats who are trouble in fur!

    Reply
  28. Your animals always tell something about the hero or heroine and most definitely add to the story. Two of my favorites are the dog and cat in The Rake. I’m ruled by my own two cats who are trouble in fur!

    Reply
  29. Your animals always tell something about the hero or heroine and most definitely add to the story. Two of my favorites are the dog and cat in The Rake. I’m ruled by my own two cats who are trouble in fur!

    Reply
  30. Your animals always tell something about the hero or heroine and most definitely add to the story. Two of my favorites are the dog and cat in The Rake. I’m ruled by my own two cats who are trouble in fur!

    Reply
  31. I was joking about the goldfish in my above post, but something about fish as pets has been bugging me for the past 4 hours. C. J. Cherry did something interesting about developing several characters and critical plot points involving guppies in her connected novels Cyteen and Regenesis. I just dug Cyten out of storage in order to go back and visit those points. So even non personality pets can be important to stories.

    Reply
  32. I was joking about the goldfish in my above post, but something about fish as pets has been bugging me for the past 4 hours. C. J. Cherry did something interesting about developing several characters and critical plot points involving guppies in her connected novels Cyteen and Regenesis. I just dug Cyten out of storage in order to go back and visit those points. So even non personality pets can be important to stories.

    Reply
  33. I was joking about the goldfish in my above post, but something about fish as pets has been bugging me for the past 4 hours. C. J. Cherry did something interesting about developing several characters and critical plot points involving guppies in her connected novels Cyteen and Regenesis. I just dug Cyten out of storage in order to go back and visit those points. So even non personality pets can be important to stories.

    Reply
  34. I was joking about the goldfish in my above post, but something about fish as pets has been bugging me for the past 4 hours. C. J. Cherry did something interesting about developing several characters and critical plot points involving guppies in her connected novels Cyteen and Regenesis. I just dug Cyten out of storage in order to go back and visit those points. So even non personality pets can be important to stories.

    Reply
  35. I was joking about the goldfish in my above post, but something about fish as pets has been bugging me for the past 4 hours. C. J. Cherry did something interesting about developing several characters and critical plot points involving guppies in her connected novels Cyteen and Regenesis. I just dug Cyten out of storage in order to go back and visit those points. So even non personality pets can be important to stories.

    Reply
  36. Jan Hubbell, I agree that Attila and Nemesis enhance the characters in The Rake! They were nice critter in real life, too. As for trouble in fur–that’s one of the definitions of cats. *G*

    Reply
  37. Jan Hubbell, I agree that Attila and Nemesis enhance the characters in The Rake! They were nice critter in real life, too. As for trouble in fur–that’s one of the definitions of cats. *G*

    Reply
  38. Jan Hubbell, I agree that Attila and Nemesis enhance the characters in The Rake! They were nice critter in real life, too. As for trouble in fur–that’s one of the definitions of cats. *G*

    Reply
  39. Jan Hubbell, I agree that Attila and Nemesis enhance the characters in The Rake! They were nice critter in real life, too. As for trouble in fur–that’s one of the definitions of cats. *G*

    Reply
  40. Jan Hubbell, I agree that Attila and Nemesis enhance the characters in The Rake! They were nice critter in real life, too. As for trouble in fur–that’s one of the definitions of cats. *G*

    Reply
  41. We don’t have pets; however, I’m generally happy to encounter fictional animals. I’m rather fond of the fictional and fictitious dust bunnies in books by Jayne Ann Krentz.

    Reply
  42. We don’t have pets; however, I’m generally happy to encounter fictional animals. I’m rather fond of the fictional and fictitious dust bunnies in books by Jayne Ann Krentz.

    Reply
  43. We don’t have pets; however, I’m generally happy to encounter fictional animals. I’m rather fond of the fictional and fictitious dust bunnies in books by Jayne Ann Krentz.

    Reply
  44. We don’t have pets; however, I’m generally happy to encounter fictional animals. I’m rather fond of the fictional and fictitious dust bunnies in books by Jayne Ann Krentz.

    Reply
  45. We don’t have pets; however, I’m generally happy to encounter fictional animals. I’m rather fond of the fictional and fictitious dust bunnies in books by Jayne Ann Krentz.

    Reply
  46. Kareni, I really enjoyed those dust bunnies. *G* Actually, my Flufferbella looks like one: she gray and Maine Coon-ish and the dh says she looks like a dust mop. True, but a very charming dust mop!

    Reply
  47. Kareni, I really enjoyed those dust bunnies. *G* Actually, my Flufferbella looks like one: she gray and Maine Coon-ish and the dh says she looks like a dust mop. True, but a very charming dust mop!

    Reply
  48. Kareni, I really enjoyed those dust bunnies. *G* Actually, my Flufferbella looks like one: she gray and Maine Coon-ish and the dh says she looks like a dust mop. True, but a very charming dust mop!

    Reply
  49. Kareni, I really enjoyed those dust bunnies. *G* Actually, my Flufferbella looks like one: she gray and Maine Coon-ish and the dh says she looks like a dust mop. True, but a very charming dust mop!

    Reply
  50. Kareni, I really enjoyed those dust bunnies. *G* Actually, my Flufferbella looks like one: she gray and Maine Coon-ish and the dh says she looks like a dust mop. True, but a very charming dust mop!

    Reply
  51. Mary Jo –
    I think the Barbara Metzger book you are looking for is an anthology by her called Greetings of the Season and Other Stories. The “church mice” story is actually called “Little Miracles.” I always love books that have critters that are an integral part of the story. In addition to your cats, I adore the always (supposedly) starving Finn in Anne Gracie’s “Convenient Marriage” series. I’ve also become very fond of some of Grace Burrowes’ horses. I do admire animals with personality! Thanks for a miaow-velous column!

    Reply
  52. Mary Jo –
    I think the Barbara Metzger book you are looking for is an anthology by her called Greetings of the Season and Other Stories. The “church mice” story is actually called “Little Miracles.” I always love books that have critters that are an integral part of the story. In addition to your cats, I adore the always (supposedly) starving Finn in Anne Gracie’s “Convenient Marriage” series. I’ve also become very fond of some of Grace Burrowes’ horses. I do admire animals with personality! Thanks for a miaow-velous column!

    Reply
  53. Mary Jo –
    I think the Barbara Metzger book you are looking for is an anthology by her called Greetings of the Season and Other Stories. The “church mice” story is actually called “Little Miracles.” I always love books that have critters that are an integral part of the story. In addition to your cats, I adore the always (supposedly) starving Finn in Anne Gracie’s “Convenient Marriage” series. I’ve also become very fond of some of Grace Burrowes’ horses. I do admire animals with personality! Thanks for a miaow-velous column!

    Reply
  54. Mary Jo –
    I think the Barbara Metzger book you are looking for is an anthology by her called Greetings of the Season and Other Stories. The “church mice” story is actually called “Little Miracles.” I always love books that have critters that are an integral part of the story. In addition to your cats, I adore the always (supposedly) starving Finn in Anne Gracie’s “Convenient Marriage” series. I’ve also become very fond of some of Grace Burrowes’ horses. I do admire animals with personality! Thanks for a miaow-velous column!

    Reply
  55. Mary Jo –
    I think the Barbara Metzger book you are looking for is an anthology by her called Greetings of the Season and Other Stories. The “church mice” story is actually called “Little Miracles.” I always love books that have critters that are an integral part of the story. In addition to your cats, I adore the always (supposedly) starving Finn in Anne Gracie’s “Convenient Marriage” series. I’ve also become very fond of some of Grace Burrowes’ horses. I do admire animals with personality! Thanks for a miaow-velous column!

    Reply
  56. I really enjoy reading books with animals characters /side kicks! Thanks for sharing the origin of how your feline friends came to life in your books! I have rescued a feral cat family, a mom and her 2 sons. It took a long time for me to befriend them and get them fixed. Once they came inside, they decided to stay. Great post Mary Jo!!

    Reply
  57. I really enjoy reading books with animals characters /side kicks! Thanks for sharing the origin of how your feline friends came to life in your books! I have rescued a feral cat family, a mom and her 2 sons. It took a long time for me to befriend them and get them fixed. Once they came inside, they decided to stay. Great post Mary Jo!!

    Reply
  58. I really enjoy reading books with animals characters /side kicks! Thanks for sharing the origin of how your feline friends came to life in your books! I have rescued a feral cat family, a mom and her 2 sons. It took a long time for me to befriend them and get them fixed. Once they came inside, they decided to stay. Great post Mary Jo!!

    Reply
  59. I really enjoy reading books with animals characters /side kicks! Thanks for sharing the origin of how your feline friends came to life in your books! I have rescued a feral cat family, a mom and her 2 sons. It took a long time for me to befriend them and get them fixed. Once they came inside, they decided to stay. Great post Mary Jo!!

    Reply
  60. I really enjoy reading books with animals characters /side kicks! Thanks for sharing the origin of how your feline friends came to life in your books! I have rescued a feral cat family, a mom and her 2 sons. It took a long time for me to befriend them and get them fixed. Once they came inside, they decided to stay. Great post Mary Jo!!

    Reply
  61. Mary Jo – Binnie Syril Braunstein is correct about where you will find Ms. Metzger’s “Little Miracles” story. I have the book in e-book form. Would recommend it to anyone.

    Reply
  62. Mary Jo – Binnie Syril Braunstein is correct about where you will find Ms. Metzger’s “Little Miracles” story. I have the book in e-book form. Would recommend it to anyone.

    Reply
  63. Mary Jo – Binnie Syril Braunstein is correct about where you will find Ms. Metzger’s “Little Miracles” story. I have the book in e-book form. Would recommend it to anyone.

    Reply
  64. Mary Jo – Binnie Syril Braunstein is correct about where you will find Ms. Metzger’s “Little Miracles” story. I have the book in e-book form. Would recommend it to anyone.

    Reply
  65. Mary Jo – Binnie Syril Braunstein is correct about where you will find Ms. Metzger’s “Little Miracles” story. I have the book in e-book form. Would recommend it to anyone.

    Reply
  66. I loved this blog about your cats! Some of them remind me of ones I have had, also all rescues. I just finished Barbara Metzger’s Miss Westlake’s Windfall with the dog, Tally, who won Ada’s heart over. The best cat characters are Poona and Ping in Elsie Lee’s The Nabob’s Widow. They are also from India and play quite a large role. Now, a question: I love Edith Layton’s two Christmas short stories, The Hounds of Heaven and Dogstar. In the beginning of each story a litter of puppies is born and they all take off in separate directions, guided to help a human or two. Does anyone know if the rest of the litter of pups appears in any other of Ms. Layton’s books or stories? I really want to know where they others went.

    Reply
  67. I loved this blog about your cats! Some of them remind me of ones I have had, also all rescues. I just finished Barbara Metzger’s Miss Westlake’s Windfall with the dog, Tally, who won Ada’s heart over. The best cat characters are Poona and Ping in Elsie Lee’s The Nabob’s Widow. They are also from India and play quite a large role. Now, a question: I love Edith Layton’s two Christmas short stories, The Hounds of Heaven and Dogstar. In the beginning of each story a litter of puppies is born and they all take off in separate directions, guided to help a human or two. Does anyone know if the rest of the litter of pups appears in any other of Ms. Layton’s books or stories? I really want to know where they others went.

    Reply
  68. I loved this blog about your cats! Some of them remind me of ones I have had, also all rescues. I just finished Barbara Metzger’s Miss Westlake’s Windfall with the dog, Tally, who won Ada’s heart over. The best cat characters are Poona and Ping in Elsie Lee’s The Nabob’s Widow. They are also from India and play quite a large role. Now, a question: I love Edith Layton’s two Christmas short stories, The Hounds of Heaven and Dogstar. In the beginning of each story a litter of puppies is born and they all take off in separate directions, guided to help a human or two. Does anyone know if the rest of the litter of pups appears in any other of Ms. Layton’s books or stories? I really want to know where they others went.

    Reply
  69. I loved this blog about your cats! Some of them remind me of ones I have had, also all rescues. I just finished Barbara Metzger’s Miss Westlake’s Windfall with the dog, Tally, who won Ada’s heart over. The best cat characters are Poona and Ping in Elsie Lee’s The Nabob’s Widow. They are also from India and play quite a large role. Now, a question: I love Edith Layton’s two Christmas short stories, The Hounds of Heaven and Dogstar. In the beginning of each story a litter of puppies is born and they all take off in separate directions, guided to help a human or two. Does anyone know if the rest of the litter of pups appears in any other of Ms. Layton’s books or stories? I really want to know where they others went.

    Reply
  70. I loved this blog about your cats! Some of them remind me of ones I have had, also all rescues. I just finished Barbara Metzger’s Miss Westlake’s Windfall with the dog, Tally, who won Ada’s heart over. The best cat characters are Poona and Ping in Elsie Lee’s The Nabob’s Widow. They are also from India and play quite a large role. Now, a question: I love Edith Layton’s two Christmas short stories, The Hounds of Heaven and Dogstar. In the beginning of each story a litter of puppies is born and they all take off in separate directions, guided to help a human or two. Does anyone know if the rest of the litter of pups appears in any other of Ms. Layton’s books or stories? I really want to know where they others went.

    Reply
  71. I read every one of those books you mentioned. I love the way these cats worked into the story with their personalities woven into the characters’ lives. Adding an animal, whether a cat, dog or a horse, brings warmth to any story and makes the characters more lifelike.

    Reply
  72. I read every one of those books you mentioned. I love the way these cats worked into the story with their personalities woven into the characters’ lives. Adding an animal, whether a cat, dog or a horse, brings warmth to any story and makes the characters more lifelike.

    Reply
  73. I read every one of those books you mentioned. I love the way these cats worked into the story with their personalities woven into the characters’ lives. Adding an animal, whether a cat, dog or a horse, brings warmth to any story and makes the characters more lifelike.

    Reply
  74. I read every one of those books you mentioned. I love the way these cats worked into the story with their personalities woven into the characters’ lives. Adding an animal, whether a cat, dog or a horse, brings warmth to any story and makes the characters more lifelike.

    Reply
  75. I read every one of those books you mentioned. I love the way these cats worked into the story with their personalities woven into the characters’ lives. Adding an animal, whether a cat, dog or a horse, brings warmth to any story and makes the characters more lifelike.

    Reply
  76. I really enjoy your story animals and delighted in seeing pictures of your own animals. I think a dog, cat, horse, or whatever adds an extra dimension to a book. While I am typing this my own black and white cat Bryan is demanding attention. Thanks for your cat stories.

    Reply
  77. I really enjoy your story animals and delighted in seeing pictures of your own animals. I think a dog, cat, horse, or whatever adds an extra dimension to a book. While I am typing this my own black and white cat Bryan is demanding attention. Thanks for your cat stories.

    Reply
  78. I really enjoy your story animals and delighted in seeing pictures of your own animals. I think a dog, cat, horse, or whatever adds an extra dimension to a book. While I am typing this my own black and white cat Bryan is demanding attention. Thanks for your cat stories.

    Reply
  79. I really enjoy your story animals and delighted in seeing pictures of your own animals. I think a dog, cat, horse, or whatever adds an extra dimension to a book. While I am typing this my own black and white cat Bryan is demanding attention. Thanks for your cat stories.

    Reply
  80. I really enjoy your story animals and delighted in seeing pictures of your own animals. I think a dog, cat, horse, or whatever adds an extra dimension to a book. While I am typing this my own black and white cat Bryan is demanding attention. Thanks for your cat stories.

    Reply
  81. Having just one animal in the house is a must, so I love the stories that have one or more in them. Any pet will do except maybe a snake. For me cats have been the best. I worry if there is no one to look after the pet when the family leaves the house. Luckily in the historic times there is at least one servant left to mind the house. Writing in a pet for the main characters adds to their personality.
    In your story “One Wicked Winter Night” I loved the breed names you came up with. (multi name breed) That was amusing.
    I have had two cats most of the time who tolerate each other and do not share much love (despite my last two being sisters). Now I am down to just one. Not sure if I will be able to take on any more since I am getting on in age, but I love their company, so only time will tell. The cat shelters are always looking to find homes. I would, just once, love to have two cats who really love each other.

    Reply
  82. Having just one animal in the house is a must, so I love the stories that have one or more in them. Any pet will do except maybe a snake. For me cats have been the best. I worry if there is no one to look after the pet when the family leaves the house. Luckily in the historic times there is at least one servant left to mind the house. Writing in a pet for the main characters adds to their personality.
    In your story “One Wicked Winter Night” I loved the breed names you came up with. (multi name breed) That was amusing.
    I have had two cats most of the time who tolerate each other and do not share much love (despite my last two being sisters). Now I am down to just one. Not sure if I will be able to take on any more since I am getting on in age, but I love their company, so only time will tell. The cat shelters are always looking to find homes. I would, just once, love to have two cats who really love each other.

    Reply
  83. Having just one animal in the house is a must, so I love the stories that have one or more in them. Any pet will do except maybe a snake. For me cats have been the best. I worry if there is no one to look after the pet when the family leaves the house. Luckily in the historic times there is at least one servant left to mind the house. Writing in a pet for the main characters adds to their personality.
    In your story “One Wicked Winter Night” I loved the breed names you came up with. (multi name breed) That was amusing.
    I have had two cats most of the time who tolerate each other and do not share much love (despite my last two being sisters). Now I am down to just one. Not sure if I will be able to take on any more since I am getting on in age, but I love their company, so only time will tell. The cat shelters are always looking to find homes. I would, just once, love to have two cats who really love each other.

    Reply
  84. Having just one animal in the house is a must, so I love the stories that have one or more in them. Any pet will do except maybe a snake. For me cats have been the best. I worry if there is no one to look after the pet when the family leaves the house. Luckily in the historic times there is at least one servant left to mind the house. Writing in a pet for the main characters adds to their personality.
    In your story “One Wicked Winter Night” I loved the breed names you came up with. (multi name breed) That was amusing.
    I have had two cats most of the time who tolerate each other and do not share much love (despite my last two being sisters). Now I am down to just one. Not sure if I will be able to take on any more since I am getting on in age, but I love their company, so only time will tell. The cat shelters are always looking to find homes. I would, just once, love to have two cats who really love each other.

    Reply
  85. Having just one animal in the house is a must, so I love the stories that have one or more in them. Any pet will do except maybe a snake. For me cats have been the best. I worry if there is no one to look after the pet when the family leaves the house. Luckily in the historic times there is at least one servant left to mind the house. Writing in a pet for the main characters adds to their personality.
    In your story “One Wicked Winter Night” I loved the breed names you came up with. (multi name breed) That was amusing.
    I have had two cats most of the time who tolerate each other and do not share much love (despite my last two being sisters). Now I am down to just one. Not sure if I will be able to take on any more since I am getting on in age, but I love their company, so only time will tell. The cat shelters are always looking to find homes. I would, just once, love to have two cats who really love each other.

    Reply
  86. Over the past two weeks, my husband and I have been adopted by two cats who just showed up and of course when we started to feed them, they keep coming back. Have no idea if they have homes in the area or if they are strays – they do not much like to be touched or come into the house but we will keep trying. We have always had either cats or dogs but we are both getting on in years so a dog might be a problem. Love the cats in all the books beginning with “The cat who….” and Deborah Crombie always has dogs in her mysteries.

    Reply
  87. Over the past two weeks, my husband and I have been adopted by two cats who just showed up and of course when we started to feed them, they keep coming back. Have no idea if they have homes in the area or if they are strays – they do not much like to be touched or come into the house but we will keep trying. We have always had either cats or dogs but we are both getting on in years so a dog might be a problem. Love the cats in all the books beginning with “The cat who….” and Deborah Crombie always has dogs in her mysteries.

    Reply
  88. Over the past two weeks, my husband and I have been adopted by two cats who just showed up and of course when we started to feed them, they keep coming back. Have no idea if they have homes in the area or if they are strays – they do not much like to be touched or come into the house but we will keep trying. We have always had either cats or dogs but we are both getting on in years so a dog might be a problem. Love the cats in all the books beginning with “The cat who….” and Deborah Crombie always has dogs in her mysteries.

    Reply
  89. Over the past two weeks, my husband and I have been adopted by two cats who just showed up and of course when we started to feed them, they keep coming back. Have no idea if they have homes in the area or if they are strays – they do not much like to be touched or come into the house but we will keep trying. We have always had either cats or dogs but we are both getting on in years so a dog might be a problem. Love the cats in all the books beginning with “The cat who….” and Deborah Crombie always has dogs in her mysteries.

    Reply
  90. Over the past two weeks, my husband and I have been adopted by two cats who just showed up and of course when we started to feed them, they keep coming back. Have no idea if they have homes in the area or if they are strays – they do not much like to be touched or come into the house but we will keep trying. We have always had either cats or dogs but we are both getting on in years so a dog might be a problem. Love the cats in all the books beginning with “The cat who….” and Deborah Crombie always has dogs in her mysteries.

    Reply
  91. I love the pictures of your cats and can’t believe it but MY Panda is almost a replica of yours!! One difference is that my Panda is female. I enjoy animals in stories. They make it more real somehow. Lovely post.

    Reply
  92. I love the pictures of your cats and can’t believe it but MY Panda is almost a replica of yours!! One difference is that my Panda is female. I enjoy animals in stories. They make it more real somehow. Lovely post.

    Reply
  93. I love the pictures of your cats and can’t believe it but MY Panda is almost a replica of yours!! One difference is that my Panda is female. I enjoy animals in stories. They make it more real somehow. Lovely post.

    Reply
  94. I love the pictures of your cats and can’t believe it but MY Panda is almost a replica of yours!! One difference is that my Panda is female. I enjoy animals in stories. They make it more real somehow. Lovely post.

    Reply
  95. I love the pictures of your cats and can’t believe it but MY Panda is almost a replica of yours!! One difference is that my Panda is female. I enjoy animals in stories. They make it more real somehow. Lovely post.

    Reply
  96. I love cats in your books Thank you for this post I just lost one of mine after 18 years last week and this just made me smile Thanks

    Reply
  97. I love cats in your books Thank you for this post I just lost one of mine after 18 years last week and this just made me smile Thanks

    Reply
  98. I love cats in your books Thank you for this post I just lost one of mine after 18 years last week and this just made me smile Thanks

    Reply
  99. I love cats in your books Thank you for this post I just lost one of mine after 18 years last week and this just made me smile Thanks

    Reply
  100. I love cats in your books Thank you for this post I just lost one of mine after 18 years last week and this just made me smile Thanks

    Reply
  101. Margot, even snakes have their fans. *G* I got a kick out of the weird cat breed names in that story. The DH and I have always though that the Spook has Scandinavian qualities!
    Maybe when current kitty makes his transition, you can find an older bonded pair that had to be given up, but have spent their lives together? That would be nice for all of you.

    Reply
  102. Margot, even snakes have their fans. *G* I got a kick out of the weird cat breed names in that story. The DH and I have always though that the Spook has Scandinavian qualities!
    Maybe when current kitty makes his transition, you can find an older bonded pair that had to be given up, but have spent their lives together? That would be nice for all of you.

    Reply
  103. Margot, even snakes have their fans. *G* I got a kick out of the weird cat breed names in that story. The DH and I have always though that the Spook has Scandinavian qualities!
    Maybe when current kitty makes his transition, you can find an older bonded pair that had to be given up, but have spent their lives together? That would be nice for all of you.

    Reply
  104. Margot, even snakes have their fans. *G* I got a kick out of the weird cat breed names in that story. The DH and I have always though that the Spook has Scandinavian qualities!
    Maybe when current kitty makes his transition, you can find an older bonded pair that had to be given up, but have spent their lives together? That would be nice for all of you.

    Reply
  105. Margot, even snakes have their fans. *G* I got a kick out of the weird cat breed names in that story. The DH and I have always though that the Spook has Scandinavian qualities!
    Maybe when current kitty makes his transition, you can find an older bonded pair that had to be given up, but have spent their lives together? That would be nice for all of you.

    Reply
  106. I have an idea! I think it could be clever if there was some animal insight into the actions of the main characters in a book. It would probably be put in the epigraph of each chapter. And, yes I know some people skip epigraphs (not naming names.) I would also think that each type of animal would have a different kind of reaction to what their human being is doing. There could be both a dog and cat commenting on the actions of their humans. The hero would have a dog, and the heroine a cat. Or vise versa.
    I’m always a sucker for animals in books, and I always know when an author has a pet they are basing their fictional pet on.

    Reply
  107. I have an idea! I think it could be clever if there was some animal insight into the actions of the main characters in a book. It would probably be put in the epigraph of each chapter. And, yes I know some people skip epigraphs (not naming names.) I would also think that each type of animal would have a different kind of reaction to what their human being is doing. There could be both a dog and cat commenting on the actions of their humans. The hero would have a dog, and the heroine a cat. Or vise versa.
    I’m always a sucker for animals in books, and I always know when an author has a pet they are basing their fictional pet on.

    Reply
  108. I have an idea! I think it could be clever if there was some animal insight into the actions of the main characters in a book. It would probably be put in the epigraph of each chapter. And, yes I know some people skip epigraphs (not naming names.) I would also think that each type of animal would have a different kind of reaction to what their human being is doing. There could be both a dog and cat commenting on the actions of their humans. The hero would have a dog, and the heroine a cat. Or vise versa.
    I’m always a sucker for animals in books, and I always know when an author has a pet they are basing their fictional pet on.

    Reply
  109. I have an idea! I think it could be clever if there was some animal insight into the actions of the main characters in a book. It would probably be put in the epigraph of each chapter. And, yes I know some people skip epigraphs (not naming names.) I would also think that each type of animal would have a different kind of reaction to what their human being is doing. There could be both a dog and cat commenting on the actions of their humans. The hero would have a dog, and the heroine a cat. Or vise versa.
    I’m always a sucker for animals in books, and I always know when an author has a pet they are basing their fictional pet on.

    Reply
  110. I have an idea! I think it could be clever if there was some animal insight into the actions of the main characters in a book. It would probably be put in the epigraph of each chapter. And, yes I know some people skip epigraphs (not naming names.) I would also think that each type of animal would have a different kind of reaction to what their human being is doing. There could be both a dog and cat commenting on the actions of their humans. The hero would have a dog, and the heroine a cat. Or vise versa.
    I’m always a sucker for animals in books, and I always know when an author has a pet they are basing their fictional pet on.

    Reply
  111. Yes I may consider getting two older cats next time. I also had a Smokie (black with just a little white) and still have her sister Chessie (named after railroad symbols as my husband loved the rails)

    Reply
  112. Yes I may consider getting two older cats next time. I also had a Smokie (black with just a little white) and still have her sister Chessie (named after railroad symbols as my husband loved the rails)

    Reply
  113. Yes I may consider getting two older cats next time. I also had a Smokie (black with just a little white) and still have her sister Chessie (named after railroad symbols as my husband loved the rails)

    Reply
  114. Yes I may consider getting two older cats next time. I also had a Smokie (black with just a little white) and still have her sister Chessie (named after railroad symbols as my husband loved the rails)

    Reply
  115. Yes I may consider getting two older cats next time. I also had a Smokie (black with just a little white) and still have her sister Chessie (named after railroad symbols as my husband loved the rails)

    Reply
  116. Hi Deb! And Thanks Mary Jo for the heads up. Indeed there are more appearances but she wrote so many books I can’t recall right now exactly where they show up again. I know that she said she likes readers to find them, “like easter eggs she has hidden.”
    If you don’t know it, after she died, I had Untreed Reads publish a Victorian cat-themed novella, and of course, a sweet old dog makes an appearance. It was set to be published but she wanted it in print not just ebook format (this was before ebooks were a THING). It’s called Peaches and the Queen and it’s only 99 cents so… if you have a animal-Layton thing check it out! https://www.amazon.com/Peaches-Queen-Edith-Layton-ebook/dp/B017YFUGNY. Thanks for being a reader and if I remember with a brain jog I will let you know!

    Reply
  117. Hi Deb! And Thanks Mary Jo for the heads up. Indeed there are more appearances but she wrote so many books I can’t recall right now exactly where they show up again. I know that she said she likes readers to find them, “like easter eggs she has hidden.”
    If you don’t know it, after she died, I had Untreed Reads publish a Victorian cat-themed novella, and of course, a sweet old dog makes an appearance. It was set to be published but she wanted it in print not just ebook format (this was before ebooks were a THING). It’s called Peaches and the Queen and it’s only 99 cents so… if you have a animal-Layton thing check it out! https://www.amazon.com/Peaches-Queen-Edith-Layton-ebook/dp/B017YFUGNY. Thanks for being a reader and if I remember with a brain jog I will let you know!

    Reply
  118. Hi Deb! And Thanks Mary Jo for the heads up. Indeed there are more appearances but she wrote so many books I can’t recall right now exactly where they show up again. I know that she said she likes readers to find them, “like easter eggs she has hidden.”
    If you don’t know it, after she died, I had Untreed Reads publish a Victorian cat-themed novella, and of course, a sweet old dog makes an appearance. It was set to be published but she wanted it in print not just ebook format (this was before ebooks were a THING). It’s called Peaches and the Queen and it’s only 99 cents so… if you have a animal-Layton thing check it out! https://www.amazon.com/Peaches-Queen-Edith-Layton-ebook/dp/B017YFUGNY. Thanks for being a reader and if I remember with a brain jog I will let you know!

    Reply
  119. Hi Deb! And Thanks Mary Jo for the heads up. Indeed there are more appearances but she wrote so many books I can’t recall right now exactly where they show up again. I know that she said she likes readers to find them, “like easter eggs she has hidden.”
    If you don’t know it, after she died, I had Untreed Reads publish a Victorian cat-themed novella, and of course, a sweet old dog makes an appearance. It was set to be published but she wanted it in print not just ebook format (this was before ebooks were a THING). It’s called Peaches and the Queen and it’s only 99 cents so… if you have a animal-Layton thing check it out! https://www.amazon.com/Peaches-Queen-Edith-Layton-ebook/dp/B017YFUGNY. Thanks for being a reader and if I remember with a brain jog I will let you know!

    Reply
  120. Hi Deb! And Thanks Mary Jo for the heads up. Indeed there are more appearances but she wrote so many books I can’t recall right now exactly where they show up again. I know that she said she likes readers to find them, “like easter eggs she has hidden.”
    If you don’t know it, after she died, I had Untreed Reads publish a Victorian cat-themed novella, and of course, a sweet old dog makes an appearance. It was set to be published but she wanted it in print not just ebook format (this was before ebooks were a THING). It’s called Peaches and the Queen and it’s only 99 cents so… if you have a animal-Layton thing check it out! https://www.amazon.com/Peaches-Queen-Edith-Layton-ebook/dp/B017YFUGNY. Thanks for being a reader and if I remember with a brain jog I will let you know!

    Reply
  121. That could be fun, Kay! I believe that Barbara Meztger once wrote a Regency from the point of view of a dog. And Melinda Metz has written a couple of books about a matchmaker cat named MacGyver: TALK TO THE PAW and THE SECRET LIFE OF MAC. Fun!

    Reply
  122. That could be fun, Kay! I believe that Barbara Meztger once wrote a Regency from the point of view of a dog. And Melinda Metz has written a couple of books about a matchmaker cat named MacGyver: TALK TO THE PAW and THE SECRET LIFE OF MAC. Fun!

    Reply
  123. That could be fun, Kay! I believe that Barbara Meztger once wrote a Regency from the point of view of a dog. And Melinda Metz has written a couple of books about a matchmaker cat named MacGyver: TALK TO THE PAW and THE SECRET LIFE OF MAC. Fun!

    Reply
  124. That could be fun, Kay! I believe that Barbara Meztger once wrote a Regency from the point of view of a dog. And Melinda Metz has written a couple of books about a matchmaker cat named MacGyver: TALK TO THE PAW and THE SECRET LIFE OF MAC. Fun!

    Reply
  125. That could be fun, Kay! I believe that Barbara Meztger once wrote a Regency from the point of view of a dog. And Melinda Metz has written a couple of books about a matchmaker cat named MacGyver: TALK TO THE PAW and THE SECRET LIFE OF MAC. Fun!

    Reply
  126. Thank you for the reply and the book suggestion. I will go there right away. And if I find any more of the puppies from that magical litter in her other books and stories I will post it here too.

    Reply
  127. Thank you for the reply and the book suggestion. I will go there right away. And if I find any more of the puppies from that magical litter in her other books and stories I will post it here too.

    Reply
  128. Thank you for the reply and the book suggestion. I will go there right away. And if I find any more of the puppies from that magical litter in her other books and stories I will post it here too.

    Reply
  129. Thank you for the reply and the book suggestion. I will go there right away. And if I find any more of the puppies from that magical litter in her other books and stories I will post it here too.

    Reply
  130. Thank you for the reply and the book suggestion. I will go there right away. And if I find any more of the puppies from that magical litter in her other books and stories I will post it here too.

    Reply
  131. Animals have always been my dearest friends, so finding truly wonderful depictions of them in books is like finding a handful of diamonds. Sally McKenzie has some charming cats in her fiction, as do you, Mary Jo, always. Growing up, I was either The Black Stallion or Misty of Chincoteaque depending on my mood, so animals in books… love ’em.

    Reply
  132. Animals have always been my dearest friends, so finding truly wonderful depictions of them in books is like finding a handful of diamonds. Sally McKenzie has some charming cats in her fiction, as do you, Mary Jo, always. Growing up, I was either The Black Stallion or Misty of Chincoteaque depending on my mood, so animals in books… love ’em.

    Reply
  133. Animals have always been my dearest friends, so finding truly wonderful depictions of them in books is like finding a handful of diamonds. Sally McKenzie has some charming cats in her fiction, as do you, Mary Jo, always. Growing up, I was either The Black Stallion or Misty of Chincoteaque depending on my mood, so animals in books… love ’em.

    Reply
  134. Animals have always been my dearest friends, so finding truly wonderful depictions of them in books is like finding a handful of diamonds. Sally McKenzie has some charming cats in her fiction, as do you, Mary Jo, always. Growing up, I was either The Black Stallion or Misty of Chincoteaque depending on my mood, so animals in books… love ’em.

    Reply
  135. Animals have always been my dearest friends, so finding truly wonderful depictions of them in books is like finding a handful of diamonds. Sally McKenzie has some charming cats in her fiction, as do you, Mary Jo, always. Growing up, I was either The Black Stallion or Misty of Chincoteaque depending on my mood, so animals in books… love ’em.

    Reply
  136. Mary Jo, this was so much fun to read.
    One question, though. All of my cats seem to know from birth that carpet—even woollen Persian rugs—contain alligators waiting to pounce upon any unsuspecting feline. Therefore, any and all above-floor surfaces must be utilised to tranverse a room even if the distance is longer.
    Has this been your experience with your CROM assistants?

    Reply
  137. Mary Jo, this was so much fun to read.
    One question, though. All of my cats seem to know from birth that carpet—even woollen Persian rugs—contain alligators waiting to pounce upon any unsuspecting feline. Therefore, any and all above-floor surfaces must be utilised to tranverse a room even if the distance is longer.
    Has this been your experience with your CROM assistants?

    Reply
  138. Mary Jo, this was so much fun to read.
    One question, though. All of my cats seem to know from birth that carpet—even woollen Persian rugs—contain alligators waiting to pounce upon any unsuspecting feline. Therefore, any and all above-floor surfaces must be utilised to tranverse a room even if the distance is longer.
    Has this been your experience with your CROM assistants?

    Reply
  139. Mary Jo, this was so much fun to read.
    One question, though. All of my cats seem to know from birth that carpet—even woollen Persian rugs—contain alligators waiting to pounce upon any unsuspecting feline. Therefore, any and all above-floor surfaces must be utilised to tranverse a room even if the distance is longer.
    Has this been your experience with your CROM assistants?

    Reply
  140. Mary Jo, this was so much fun to read.
    One question, though. All of my cats seem to know from birth that carpet—even woollen Persian rugs—contain alligators waiting to pounce upon any unsuspecting feline. Therefore, any and all above-floor surfaces must be utilised to tranverse a room even if the distance is longer.
    Has this been your experience with your CROM assistants?

    Reply

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