AAW: Out My Window

Pat Rice here: Today, we’re going to play a little game called Looking Out My Window. The idea originally came from https://www.window-swap.com/Window at the start of Covid. Anne Gracie blogged about it.

We’ll turn the idea about a bit. Each of us has written a short piece about what we see from the window of our writing space—but I won’t name who wrote the piece. Instead, I have labeled them A, B, C, etc. Let’s have a little fun guessing who wrote which piece, and it would be lovely if you add what you see out your window!

A.

garden and wallThis is a bit tough. I can’t actually see out my office window unless I stand up. I can see the flash of raven shadows as they stop by for a drink from our birdbath. Locating my desk this way is deliberate. I’d never get anything done elsewise. But here’s what I see if I stand and look out. We’re going on vacation shortly, and our daughter is leaving at the same time, and consequently, we have no one to hand water the potted plants. So this is not the usual view. Most of the pretty plants have been moved to a corner where they’re not visible from this angle. We’ve set up a sprinkler to rain on that corner. The hardy geranium is the main pot you see, and the irrigation system should take care of it. There is no tomato in the tomato cage yet, but that’s a small corner of my husband’s vegetable garden. The orange tree is covered with oranges, although they’re hard to see from here. We’ve grown that immense staghorn fern on the fence since it was a little fella. Had to divide it at one point because it got too heavy. The clivia is getting way too much sun now that the carrotwood tree has been trimmed. I can’t see the blooms on the camellia, but I know they’re there. I’ll have to hope that back corner survives while we’re gone!

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Introducing The Hawk Laird

Susan here, with some adventures in research. Many of my books–-historical romance and mainstream historical fiction too—are based on actual historical events, real people and real places interwoven with fiction. I’m grateful to have had some great research luck over the years—deep research, luck, and synchronicity can help bring various elements together to strengthen a story.

My latest release is The Hawk Laird—now available for preorder in a gorgeous new edition from Dragonblade Publishing. It’s the newly revised and updated edition of my award-winning, USAToday-bestselling Laird of the Wind (originally published by Penguin). In revising the book, I made no changes to the story, but it is way less wordy (truly) and has lots more punch. I like this update very much, and I hope you will too.

In 14th century Scotland, a Scottish outlaw and falconer must undo the grim destiny foretold by a beautiful prophetess–while dealing with that stubborn lady and a bratty goshawk . . . James Lindsay was wrongly accused of betraying his friend, William Wallace. Then he discovers that Lady Isobel Seton, a beautiful young prophetess, made a dire prediction that implicated him, and he must act to prevent that. James has a secret to protect, and so does Isobel. The story grows from there …

“A complex, mesmerizing story of betrayal, retribution, and healing . . . a lyrical, compelling love story.”     – Library Journal

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What We’re Reading — Jan 2024

Anne here, with our regular end-of-the-month post about the books we’ve read and enjoyed in the last month. This is a favorite post with Wenches and readers alike, as we share and discuss the books we have enjoyed.

We start with Christina, on Check & Mate by Ali Hazelwood.

Christina says:  I’ve loved all Ms Hazelwood’s books before this one and was excited to read her latest. It was good and I liked it, but not as much as the others. The heroine, Mallory, is not a STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics) one as in previous stories, although she is clearly intelligent and gifted in a different way to other people. Her super-power, as it were, is chess. Her father was a Grand Master and he taught her from a young age, but when he betrayed her mother and left the family, Mallory stopped playing. Anything to do with chess was simply too painful and she feels guilty because she was the one who alerted her mother to the fact that her dad was cheating, thus breaking up the family.

Four years later, she is once again drawn into the world of chess (against her will but forced by circumstances as she needs money) and meets enigmatic World Champion Nolan. Their relationship is difficult, but the attraction between them is undeniable. They are both keeping secrets, however, and the path to true love does not run smooth.

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Happy New Year 2024!

 

Here’s wishing that 2024 is the year we’ve all been waiting for — a year of peace and harmony in homes and communities, of healing and happiness, love and kindness. We wish you dreams come true and wonderful luck.

We’re looking forward to a great year of blogging, giveaways, great new books, and the fun of connecting with readers. Thank you for your support of our blog and our books!