Ask-A-Wench — Movies and TV

Anne here, and today we’re responding to the question: “What have the wenches been watching lately?”

Andrea said: I have been binging through ‘Lewis,’ a wonderful British police procedural spin-off of “Morse.” (Lewis was his sidekick.) It’s based in Oxford, with the mysteries always involving members of the university, so the plots are often cleverly erudite and tie into some arcane academic element. I find the ambiance, the scenery and the twists a lot of fun. I also really enjoy the chemistry between Lewis and his sidekick, Hathaway, who is a bit of an odd duck, (apparently both on and off the screen.) Hathaway is pretty tightly wound and adds an interesting edginess to the series. It ran for nine seasons . . .and I’m getting sad that I’m working my way closer to “THE END.”

Given the the political and cultural turmoil in this country right now, I also was moved to re-watch the amazing Ken Burns PBS documentary series on The Civil War. It is extraordinarily well-done, using letters and vintage pictures to tell the poignant story of the conflict. it really brings home the horrendous suffering and death on both sides caused by passions that sparked into hatred and extremism. It’s incredibly sobering and a chilling reminder of the awful consequences of violence.

Christina here. I’ve been in the mood for some very light entertainment and I found the perfect thing on Swedish TV when visiting my mother  – Hudson & Rex. It’s a Canadian crime series/police procedural drama set in St. John’s, Newfoundland, which is an unusual and very beautiful setting. Detective Charlie Hudson solves murders and other crimes with the help of his canine sidekick Rex, a very clever Alsatian/German Shepherd.

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Welcoming Summer

Christina here. So apparently summer has arrived in the northern hemisphere even if it doesn’t really feel like it much! Last week was May Day which is supposedly the beginning of summer, and it has been celebrated in various ways since ancient times. Most of us don’t bother to mark it these days, but in the past it was important as it heralded the warmer months to come.

One of the earliest known celebrations was Floralia, the Roman festival of Flora, goddess of flowers, spring and fertility. This took place during the last days of April and the first of May and included the Ludi Florae, the special “Games of Flora” that lasted for days.

Floralia – Hobbe Smith 1898

The festival was all about pleasure-seeking and was plebeian, rather than patrician as most other festivals were (even prostitutes took part). There were various spectacles like theatrical performances and other entertainments and it all sounds like great fun! (If you want to know more about Roman spring celebrations, check out this post on Alison Morton’s blog.)

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Life in a Roman Legion

Christina here. Do you believe in serendipity? I definitely do! I happen to be working on another book set during Roman times (although in Britain, not Italy) and guess what happened? The British Museum put on an exhibition about Roman legions! Although my hero is not a legionary, the villain is, so this was the perfect research opportunity and naturally, I had to go and see it.

The exhibition was called Legion – Life in the Roman Army – and it was amazing! A collection of fabulous artefacts, with plenty of backstory and historical information. Here’s a brief summary of what I learned, including my favourite exhibits:-

Rome’s first emperor, Augustus (63 BC – AD 14), ruled over a vast empire, based on military dominance. To maintain power everywhere, he created the first professional army of full-time career soldiers divided into regiments – legions. Together these consisted of approximately 150,000 male Roman citizens, plus an equal number of non-citizens in so-called auxiliary units. This vast army was incredibly efficient and well-trained, and for the most part invincible. Although not always – in AD 9 on the Danube frontier at Teutoburg Forest three whole legions (around 20,000 men) were completely annihilated by ‘barbarians’ (Germanic tribes)!

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AAW: Out My Window

Pat Rice here: Today, we’re going to play a little game called Looking Out My Window. The idea originally came from https://www.window-swap.com/Window at the start of Covid. Anne Gracie blogged about it.

We’ll turn the idea about a bit. Each of us has written a short piece about what we see from the window of our writing space—but I won’t name who wrote the piece. Instead, I have labeled them A, B, C, etc. Let’s have a little fun guessing who wrote which piece, and it would be lovely if you add what you see out your window!

A.

garden and wallThis is a bit tough. I can’t actually see out my office window unless I stand up. I can see the flash of raven shadows as they stop by for a drink from our birdbath. Locating my desk this way is deliberate. I’d never get anything done elsewise. But here’s what I see if I stand and look out. We’re going on vacation shortly, and our daughter is leaving at the same time, and consequently, we have no one to hand water the potted plants. So this is not the usual view. Most of the pretty plants have been moved to a corner where they’re not visible from this angle. We’ve set up a sprinkler to rain on that corner. The hardy geranium is the main pot you see, and the irrigation system should take care of it. There is no tomato in the tomato cage yet, but that’s a small corner of my husband’s vegetable garden. The orange tree is covered with oranges, although they’re hard to see from here. We’ve grown that immense staghorn fern on the fence since it was a little fella. Had to divide it at one point because it got too heavy. The clivia is getting way too much sun now that the carrotwood tree has been trimmed. I can’t see the blooms on the camellia, but I know they’re there. I’ll have to hope that back corner survives while we’re gone!

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