Catching up! From zero to published: Edith’s story.

Mom_thumbnail_8Happy Sunday – Here’s Edith!

First, a huge thanks to all the wenches for filling in for me last week, and posting about when I greeted my first grandchild: Susie and Ed’s amazingly gorgeous and totally wonderful HUGO NORBERT! Susie wanted to pass on how touched she was by your posts.

Here’s the little snapper:
hugo10

And thanks to all of you, for your patience with me. I promised to tell you about how I got published, didn’t I? But that puts me way behind all the sparkling new topics that have come up here. Ah, how easy to fall out of step in a mere week’s time on the internet!

So, here’s a brief precis: I started out writing for a local newspaper – gratis. Then I worked my way up to writing opinion pieces and features for local magazines. Then for NEWSDAY and THE NEW YORK TIMES. And then, I decided to write novels. When the children (all 3) were abed, I’d sit at the kitchen table and write.

Now, here’s a strange but true fact. I wrote three novels: a mystery, a science fiction, and a regency omance, and decided to go with whichever drew the most interest.

My first reader was my late husband, Norbert.

My critique group was an interested friend.

Neither were writers.

I sent out the three books. The one that showed the most promise was the Regency Romance. In fact, there were two offers to buy it – if I changed the ending. Seemed no one wanted a romance where the villian got the girl.

But I stuck by my guns, and didn’t sell it.

(Now, imagine calendar pages blowing in the wind…)

Finally, an editor said she’d be interested in buying it, if I just added a chapter more, showing why I thought the villain deserved the heroine.

I did.
I sent it to her.
She sent it back to me with a note saying it was perfect. But she’d run ove budget for the year, and couldn’t buy it.

I put the book in a drawer. And then, a year later, an old friend in the writing biz asked about my career. I told her the story. She asked if I had resubmitted the novel.

“Nah,” said I. “She was just being kind.”

“Edith,” said the old friend, “Editors are NEVER kind.”

I resubmitted it.

That was “THE DUKE’S WAGER” and it has since gone into several printings.
Dukeswager
Ta da!

The question is, would I do that again? I mean stick to my opinions that firmly? I think so – for the really important plot points. Would you?

And now back to important stuff.

Isn’t Hugo Norbert just beautiful!!!!!!!!!!!
Hugo 11.2.06 en69 -- 6 days old

45 thoughts on “Catching up! From zero to published: Edith’s story.”

  1. Edith, he IS gorgeous! I’ve never seen a newborn smile like that. That’s not wind!
    Humph. Mine look like Churchill, and Edith’s geneline are angels.*g*
    It’s always interesting to deal with suggested changes. I’ve had very few in my career that I didn’t feel comfortable about, for which I bless the stars. Or the muse.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  2. Edith, he IS gorgeous! I’ve never seen a newborn smile like that. That’s not wind!
    Humph. Mine look like Churchill, and Edith’s geneline are angels.*g*
    It’s always interesting to deal with suggested changes. I’ve had very few in my career that I didn’t feel comfortable about, for which I bless the stars. Or the muse.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  3. Edith, he IS gorgeous! I’ve never seen a newborn smile like that. That’s not wind!
    Humph. Mine look like Churchill, and Edith’s geneline are angels.*g*
    It’s always interesting to deal with suggested changes. I’ve had very few in my career that I didn’t feel comfortable about, for which I bless the stars. Or the muse.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  4. What a gorgeous baby!
    I’m with Jo–I do not believe babies’ smiles are gas. My grandmother used to say angels were tickling them.
    Truly, he’s beautiful. And I’m not just being nice.
    Congratulations to all!

    Reply
  5. What a gorgeous baby!
    I’m with Jo–I do not believe babies’ smiles are gas. My grandmother used to say angels were tickling them.
    Truly, he’s beautiful. And I’m not just being nice.
    Congratulations to all!

    Reply
  6. What a gorgeous baby!
    I’m with Jo–I do not believe babies’ smiles are gas. My grandmother used to say angels were tickling them.
    Truly, he’s beautiful. And I’m not just being nice.
    Congratulations to all!

    Reply
  7. Awww, Susie’s little guy is beautiful! Congratulations again to all of you. What an adorable smile! He looks like a Felber, already laughing. 🙂
    An interesting story, Edith, I never knew how you got your start. Now I want to know how the villain got the girl….
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  8. Awww, Susie’s little guy is beautiful! Congratulations again to all of you. What an adorable smile! He looks like a Felber, already laughing. 🙂
    An interesting story, Edith, I never knew how you got your start. Now I want to know how the villain got the girl….
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  9. Awww, Susie’s little guy is beautiful! Congratulations again to all of you. What an adorable smile! He looks like a Felber, already laughing. 🙂
    An interesting story, Edith, I never knew how you got your start. Now I want to know how the villain got the girl….
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  10. He’s ready for his close up, isn’t he? I generally think babies look pretty odd – but that is a striking young gentleman. if he decides he likes older women in the very distant future, I’ve a pair of redheads here….. one of whom just said “wow! He IS beautiful!” Of course, she’s holding out for someone rich, so he’ll have to get busy.
    What a month for you!

    Reply
  11. He’s ready for his close up, isn’t he? I generally think babies look pretty odd – but that is a striking young gentleman. if he decides he likes older women in the very distant future, I’ve a pair of redheads here….. one of whom just said “wow! He IS beautiful!” Of course, she’s holding out for someone rich, so he’ll have to get busy.
    What a month for you!

    Reply
  12. He’s ready for his close up, isn’t he? I generally think babies look pretty odd – but that is a striking young gentleman. if he decides he likes older women in the very distant future, I’ve a pair of redheads here….. one of whom just said “wow! He IS beautiful!” Of course, she’s holding out for someone rich, so he’ll have to get busy.
    What a month for you!

    Reply
  13. Hijacking the thread – way back in the fantasy sections someone was asking me about Sharon shinn – I’ve changed my mind – 13th house is better than the book before it. Go read it!
    Me, I’m counting down for that Felber book, because That Layton Woman said it’s pretty far up my alley.

    Reply
  14. Hijacking the thread – way back in the fantasy sections someone was asking me about Sharon shinn – I’ve changed my mind – 13th house is better than the book before it. Go read it!
    Me, I’m counting down for that Felber book, because That Layton Woman said it’s pretty far up my alley.

    Reply
  15. Hijacking the thread – way back in the fantasy sections someone was asking me about Sharon shinn – I’ve changed my mind – 13th house is better than the book before it. Go read it!
    Me, I’m counting down for that Felber book, because That Layton Woman said it’s pretty far up my alley.

    Reply
  16. Edith, your grandson is just the most BEAUTIFUL baby! (My 14 year old daughter would be quick to point out to you that he shares the name “Norbert” not only with Hagrid’s dragon but with Norbert Leo Butz (sp?), the Broadway star of “Wicked” and “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” who I gather is sort of a sex symbol in her crowd.)
    Speaking of language AND my 14 year old daughter–she is an avid Harry Potter fan and is just inhaling British novels and movies. I wish I could say she was developing more elevated/distinguished verbal habits from this experience but the word she relishes saying most right now is “bugger!” (always with an English accent)
    Dear speakers (and writers) of British English, is this something I should be worrying about? Should I be insisting on this word being on the “not in my presence” list?–the “not at a dinner party” list?–or is it regarded as a harmless colloquialism across the ocean?

    Reply
  17. Edith, your grandson is just the most BEAUTIFUL baby! (My 14 year old daughter would be quick to point out to you that he shares the name “Norbert” not only with Hagrid’s dragon but with Norbert Leo Butz (sp?), the Broadway star of “Wicked” and “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” who I gather is sort of a sex symbol in her crowd.)
    Speaking of language AND my 14 year old daughter–she is an avid Harry Potter fan and is just inhaling British novels and movies. I wish I could say she was developing more elevated/distinguished verbal habits from this experience but the word she relishes saying most right now is “bugger!” (always with an English accent)
    Dear speakers (and writers) of British English, is this something I should be worrying about? Should I be insisting on this word being on the “not in my presence” list?–the “not at a dinner party” list?–or is it regarded as a harmless colloquialism across the ocean?

    Reply
  18. Edith, your grandson is just the most BEAUTIFUL baby! (My 14 year old daughter would be quick to point out to you that he shares the name “Norbert” not only with Hagrid’s dragon but with Norbert Leo Butz (sp?), the Broadway star of “Wicked” and “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels” who I gather is sort of a sex symbol in her crowd.)
    Speaking of language AND my 14 year old daughter–she is an avid Harry Potter fan and is just inhaling British novels and movies. I wish I could say she was developing more elevated/distinguished verbal habits from this experience but the word she relishes saying most right now is “bugger!” (always with an English accent)
    Dear speakers (and writers) of British English, is this something I should be worrying about? Should I be insisting on this word being on the “not in my presence” list?–the “not at a dinner party” list?–or is it regarded as a harmless colloquialism across the ocean?

    Reply
  19. RevMelinda – ‘bugger’ is not regarded as very serious swearing in BE, but on the other hand, one would probably try to discourage its over-frequent use by a teenager! It is one of the expletives that has been in use for so long, and is so widespread, that its literal meaning is ignored, and may even be unknown to many of those who use it.
    🙂

    Reply
  20. RevMelinda – ‘bugger’ is not regarded as very serious swearing in BE, but on the other hand, one would probably try to discourage its over-frequent use by a teenager! It is one of the expletives that has been in use for so long, and is so widespread, that its literal meaning is ignored, and may even be unknown to many of those who use it.
    🙂

    Reply
  21. RevMelinda – ‘bugger’ is not regarded as very serious swearing in BE, but on the other hand, one would probably try to discourage its over-frequent use by a teenager! It is one of the expletives that has been in use for so long, and is so widespread, that its literal meaning is ignored, and may even be unknown to many of those who use it.
    🙂

    Reply
  22. Oh, I just want to reach through the screen and hug little Hugo. I hope he’s as good-humored as his smile indicates!
    And my mind is so steeped in ancient history that I cringe at the term “bugger,” but I guess if Harry Potter says it…

    Reply
  23. Oh, I just want to reach through the screen and hug little Hugo. I hope he’s as good-humored as his smile indicates!
    And my mind is so steeped in ancient history that I cringe at the term “bugger,” but I guess if Harry Potter says it…

    Reply
  24. Oh, I just want to reach through the screen and hug little Hugo. I hope he’s as good-humored as his smile indicates!
    And my mind is so steeped in ancient history that I cringe at the term “bugger,” but I guess if Harry Potter says it…

    Reply
  25. OK, Edith, I just can’t stop myself clicking over here to look at Hugo Norbert again and again and again. (He’s an internet pinup already!)
    AgTigress, thank you so much for your authoritative reading. I’m glad I need not get TOO worried about my daughter being outrageous (although I guess that’s the task of adolescence, isn’t it?). Despite all that, I can’t help cringing with you, Pat–I hope she’ll outgrow it soon!

    Reply
  26. OK, Edith, I just can’t stop myself clicking over here to look at Hugo Norbert again and again and again. (He’s an internet pinup already!)
    AgTigress, thank you so much for your authoritative reading. I’m glad I need not get TOO worried about my daughter being outrageous (although I guess that’s the task of adolescence, isn’t it?). Despite all that, I can’t help cringing with you, Pat–I hope she’ll outgrow it soon!

    Reply
  27. OK, Edith, I just can’t stop myself clicking over here to look at Hugo Norbert again and again and again. (He’s an internet pinup already!)
    AgTigress, thank you so much for your authoritative reading. I’m glad I need not get TOO worried about my daughter being outrageous (although I guess that’s the task of adolescence, isn’t it?). Despite all that, I can’t help cringing with you, Pat–I hope she’ll outgrow it soon!

    Reply
  28. Edith, that has to be one of the most delightful baby pictures I’ve ever seen! Every time I look at it, he just seems so happy and content, so free from worry, so everything-is-right-with-my-world.
    I can see why RevMelinda keeps coming back to look at him. So do I! There is just something so appealing about that picture!

    Reply
  29. Edith, that has to be one of the most delightful baby pictures I’ve ever seen! Every time I look at it, he just seems so happy and content, so free from worry, so everything-is-right-with-my-world.
    I can see why RevMelinda keeps coming back to look at him. So do I! There is just something so appealing about that picture!

    Reply
  30. Edith, that has to be one of the most delightful baby pictures I’ve ever seen! Every time I look at it, he just seems so happy and content, so free from worry, so everything-is-right-with-my-world.
    I can see why RevMelinda keeps coming back to look at him. So do I! There is just something so appealing about that picture!

    Reply

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