Cat Tales

Nala's World bookNala's World

by Mary Jo

Today's blog was inspired by a comment Mary M. made in the June "What We're Reading" blog, always a great source of inspiration and credit card charges.  She specifically directed me toward the book Nala's World: One Man, His Rescue Cat, and a Bike Ride Around the Globe, by Dean Nicholson.  (Mary M., you've earned a book from me for inspiring a blog. Post in the comments and we'll talk about what you'd like.)

Dean was a big hairy tattooed laborer in Dunbar, Scotland, by whose own admission has spent much of his 20s drinking beer and smoking pot. With 30 approaching, he decided that he wanted to bicycle around the world: "take to the road to find his road."

He set off in September 2018 with a pal.  They split soon since they had different interests and Dean wanted the wild open spaces.  A couple of months later he was cycling through Montenegro when he heard a plaintive meowing behind him. He stopped and found that he was being pursued by a skinny tabby cat who desperately wanted to make friends.  Being a big old softy, he picked her up, fed her some pesto which she liked, and put her in his bicycle's carrier because he couldn't leave her in such a barren.

 


Thus began a great romance.  Nala, named after the lead lioness in The Lion King, proved to be fearless, charming, and utterly adorable, and Dean fell in love with her. She became his travel mate, and as in all good romances, the hero changes for the better through love for the heroine. He smuggled her through two Balkan border crossings before he realized that he needed to become more responsible.  He found vets and got a pet passport Nala snoozing on Dean's ChestHe started making decisions based on what was best for his beloved.

And everywhere he went, people fell in love with Nala, who sounds like one seriously great cat.  He was chronicling his cycling adventures on Instagram at @1bike1world and he had several thousand followers.  One day he was contacted by an editor from The Dodo animal channel who was interested in his travels, so he sent her some video clips and pictures.

Not thinking much about, Dean and Nala took a ferry from Athens to Santorini where he'd found a summer job at a kayak school because he needed to earn some money. As the ferry sailed into Santorini, his cell phone went berserk. When he got a chance to check it, he found that he now had 300,000 followers–and he and Nala had become Instagram rock stars.

Nala and Hot Air balloonsHe immediately started thinking about what he could do with that celebrity to help others, and he had a lot of followers who freely offered their help for different projects. He set up a youtube.com channel also called  1bike1world.   (This picture and the one above are from the book's Amazon page and are copyrighted by Dean Nicholson.)

He cautiously decided to do a Nala's World calendar with a print run of 4000.  It sold out immediately. Another print run the same size also sold out immediately.  He ended up making something like 90,000 pounds on the calendar and immediately starting give grants to small animal rescue and environmental groups. Is this a hero's journey or what????

They ended up spending the lockdown in Hungary, and while there, Dean and Nala co-wrote their story with Garry Jenkins, an experienced writer of cat/human chronicles.  The result is this charming book, so thank you, Mary M, for pointing me toward it!

Various Wenches have blogged about pets and animals before, but Nala's World inspired Lounging Smokeyme to mention several of my rescue cats that I've put in books.  Our sweet little gray tabby, Smokey, showed up Once a Soldier as a royal cat belonging to Her Royal Highness Princess Maria Sofia of San Gabriel.  He showed up again as little Leo, a hungry barn cat who attached himself quite literally to Suzanne Duval, the heroine of Once A Spy.  That's Smokey on the right.

 Then there's The Spook, a part Siamese goofball who became the ship's cat in Once a Scoundrel (he was a really fine ratter.)  He also FullSizeRendermade a brief appearance in my Christmas novella, One Wicked Winter Night in the holiday anthology Seduction on a Snowy Night A Panda ponders

But the star of that story was my very dignified black and white tom, Panda the Magnificent, who was a vital character in that story. (He also appeared in Not Quite a Wife and Not Always a Saint, both times as a kitchen cat in Kirkland House called Badger because he was black and white.  He's on the right.)

IMG_4371 (1)Last but hardly least is my one girl cat, the Princess Flufferbella, who has an important role in this year's Christmas anthology, A Yuletide Kiss.  Her appearance in my story, When Strangers Meet echoes her own story, what I know of it. (Flufferbella on the left; you can see where she got her name!)

Like most animal lovers, I can happily burble on about my wonderful pets indefinitely, but I'll spare you the complete listing of all the cats in almost all of my stories and ask you if there are books that have animals you particularly loved?  Personally I think critters add to a story, so tell me what you think!

Also, since I just got several advance reading copies of the Christmas Anthology Yuletide kissmentioned above, A Yuletide Kiss, which will be out in 9/28/21.  Here's the preorder link.  I'll give a copy to one person who comments between now and Saturday midnight. (US only, sorry.) 

So tell me about your favorite animals in books!

Mary Jo, who currently has all five cats sitting around me in my office and staring at me with gazes suggesting it's time for their midnight snack.

245 thoughts on “Cat Tales”

  1. I have two rescued cats, but Misty outshines the two. She is the most talkative cat you’ll ever meet. She is sassy and talks right back at you. You can have a “conversation” with her. She does not obey to the word “NO” and does anything she wants if you don’t catch her doing the naughty. She would make a perfect secondary character in a book! She is quite a character.

    Reply
  2. I have two rescued cats, but Misty outshines the two. She is the most talkative cat you’ll ever meet. She is sassy and talks right back at you. You can have a “conversation” with her. She does not obey to the word “NO” and does anything she wants if you don’t catch her doing the naughty. She would make a perfect secondary character in a book! She is quite a character.

    Reply
  3. I have two rescued cats, but Misty outshines the two. She is the most talkative cat you’ll ever meet. She is sassy and talks right back at you. You can have a “conversation” with her. She does not obey to the word “NO” and does anything she wants if you don’t catch her doing the naughty. She would make a perfect secondary character in a book! She is quite a character.

    Reply
  4. I have two rescued cats, but Misty outshines the two. She is the most talkative cat you’ll ever meet. She is sassy and talks right back at you. You can have a “conversation” with her. She does not obey to the word “NO” and does anything she wants if you don’t catch her doing the naughty. She would make a perfect secondary character in a book! She is quite a character.

    Reply
  5. I have two rescued cats, but Misty outshines the two. She is the most talkative cat you’ll ever meet. She is sassy and talks right back at you. You can have a “conversation” with her. She does not obey to the word “NO” and does anything she wants if you don’t catch her doing the naughty. She would make a perfect secondary character in a book! She is quite a character.

    Reply
  6. Lovely cat stories, Mary Jo. Like you, I’ve used my own cats as characters in my novels but I found one drawback. It’s really hard to keep writing about the fictional cat after the real cat who inspired him has died (at 19, so his death was wrenching but not tragic). In the last book in the series I had my characters deal with the loss of a beloved pet, but I had mixed feelings about it. In other people’s novels, I love your cats and also Bastet in Elizabeth Peters’s Amelia Peabody mysteries.

    Reply
  7. Lovely cat stories, Mary Jo. Like you, I’ve used my own cats as characters in my novels but I found one drawback. It’s really hard to keep writing about the fictional cat after the real cat who inspired him has died (at 19, so his death was wrenching but not tragic). In the last book in the series I had my characters deal with the loss of a beloved pet, but I had mixed feelings about it. In other people’s novels, I love your cats and also Bastet in Elizabeth Peters’s Amelia Peabody mysteries.

    Reply
  8. Lovely cat stories, Mary Jo. Like you, I’ve used my own cats as characters in my novels but I found one drawback. It’s really hard to keep writing about the fictional cat after the real cat who inspired him has died (at 19, so his death was wrenching but not tragic). In the last book in the series I had my characters deal with the loss of a beloved pet, but I had mixed feelings about it. In other people’s novels, I love your cats and also Bastet in Elizabeth Peters’s Amelia Peabody mysteries.

    Reply
  9. Lovely cat stories, Mary Jo. Like you, I’ve used my own cats as characters in my novels but I found one drawback. It’s really hard to keep writing about the fictional cat after the real cat who inspired him has died (at 19, so his death was wrenching but not tragic). In the last book in the series I had my characters deal with the loss of a beloved pet, but I had mixed feelings about it. In other people’s novels, I love your cats and also Bastet in Elizabeth Peters’s Amelia Peabody mysteries.

    Reply
  10. Lovely cat stories, Mary Jo. Like you, I’ve used my own cats as characters in my novels but I found one drawback. It’s really hard to keep writing about the fictional cat after the real cat who inspired him has died (at 19, so his death was wrenching but not tragic). In the last book in the series I had my characters deal with the loss of a beloved pet, but I had mixed feelings about it. In other people’s novels, I love your cats and also Bastet in Elizabeth Peters’s Amelia Peabody mysteries.

    Reply
  11. A cat book and an Xmas anthology! Off to find the credit card.
    My most recent favorite animal in books would be Eddie in the Bookmobile Cat mystery series.

    Reply
  12. A cat book and an Xmas anthology! Off to find the credit card.
    My most recent favorite animal in books would be Eddie in the Bookmobile Cat mystery series.

    Reply
  13. A cat book and an Xmas anthology! Off to find the credit card.
    My most recent favorite animal in books would be Eddie in the Bookmobile Cat mystery series.

    Reply
  14. A cat book and an Xmas anthology! Off to find the credit card.
    My most recent favorite animal in books would be Eddie in the Bookmobile Cat mystery series.

    Reply
  15. A cat book and an Xmas anthology! Off to find the credit card.
    My most recent favorite animal in books would be Eddie in the Bookmobile Cat mystery series.

    Reply
  16. My husband and I were cat lovers as individuals, and doubly so after we met and married. I like dogs BUT reversing the way of the world, I am sensitive to dog dander, rather that cat dander, Never the less, we house sat a family dog during a divorce. NOT the only dog I’ve owned.
    My FIRST rescue cat was a kitten who wandered into my highschool, and was adopted by me on the spot. All my teachers were very forgiving of the cat at classes for that one day. I dob’t think the steet car and bus drivers even noticed it. He lived for almost nine years, staying with my family after my first husband and I were married.

    Reply
  17. My husband and I were cat lovers as individuals, and doubly so after we met and married. I like dogs BUT reversing the way of the world, I am sensitive to dog dander, rather that cat dander, Never the less, we house sat a family dog during a divorce. NOT the only dog I’ve owned.
    My FIRST rescue cat was a kitten who wandered into my highschool, and was adopted by me on the spot. All my teachers were very forgiving of the cat at classes for that one day. I dob’t think the steet car and bus drivers even noticed it. He lived for almost nine years, staying with my family after my first husband and I were married.

    Reply
  18. My husband and I were cat lovers as individuals, and doubly so after we met and married. I like dogs BUT reversing the way of the world, I am sensitive to dog dander, rather that cat dander, Never the less, we house sat a family dog during a divorce. NOT the only dog I’ve owned.
    My FIRST rescue cat was a kitten who wandered into my highschool, and was adopted by me on the spot. All my teachers were very forgiving of the cat at classes for that one day. I dob’t think the steet car and bus drivers even noticed it. He lived for almost nine years, staying with my family after my first husband and I were married.

    Reply
  19. My husband and I were cat lovers as individuals, and doubly so after we met and married. I like dogs BUT reversing the way of the world, I am sensitive to dog dander, rather that cat dander, Never the less, we house sat a family dog during a divorce. NOT the only dog I’ve owned.
    My FIRST rescue cat was a kitten who wandered into my highschool, and was adopted by me on the spot. All my teachers were very forgiving of the cat at classes for that one day. I dob’t think the steet car and bus drivers even noticed it. He lived for almost nine years, staying with my family after my first husband and I were married.

    Reply
  20. My husband and I were cat lovers as individuals, and doubly so after we met and married. I like dogs BUT reversing the way of the world, I am sensitive to dog dander, rather that cat dander, Never the less, we house sat a family dog during a divorce. NOT the only dog I’ve owned.
    My FIRST rescue cat was a kitten who wandered into my highschool, and was adopted by me on the spot. All my teachers were very forgiving of the cat at classes for that one day. I dob’t think the steet car and bus drivers even noticed it. He lived for almost nine years, staying with my family after my first husband and I were married.

    Reply
  21. Wonderful blog. I too am a cat lover. Both your book (Christmas Anthology) and Mr. Nicholson’s book are going on my TBR list.
    I have always had cats and dogs, but when my last dog died I decided I should not get another one given my age and condition. Cats are another story though. As long as I can clean the litter box and feed them – they are just fine.
    When my last cat died several years ago, I swore he was the last one. But My sister talked me into going to the local animal shelter – just to look. Well, I walked out of that place with the sweetest little girl you would ever want to meet. Every morning she crawls up into my arms and lets me hold her like a baby and rub her tummy. She is also the official greeter. When anyone comes into my house, she runs into greet them and say hello.
    Favorite animals in books is almost anything by Barbara Metzger. My favorite is A LOYAL COMPANION where Fitz (the dog) gives some narration at the beginning of each chapter.
    From a fellow cat lover – thanks for this blog.

    Reply
  22. Wonderful blog. I too am a cat lover. Both your book (Christmas Anthology) and Mr. Nicholson’s book are going on my TBR list.
    I have always had cats and dogs, but when my last dog died I decided I should not get another one given my age and condition. Cats are another story though. As long as I can clean the litter box and feed them – they are just fine.
    When my last cat died several years ago, I swore he was the last one. But My sister talked me into going to the local animal shelter – just to look. Well, I walked out of that place with the sweetest little girl you would ever want to meet. Every morning she crawls up into my arms and lets me hold her like a baby and rub her tummy. She is also the official greeter. When anyone comes into my house, she runs into greet them and say hello.
    Favorite animals in books is almost anything by Barbara Metzger. My favorite is A LOYAL COMPANION where Fitz (the dog) gives some narration at the beginning of each chapter.
    From a fellow cat lover – thanks for this blog.

    Reply
  23. Wonderful blog. I too am a cat lover. Both your book (Christmas Anthology) and Mr. Nicholson’s book are going on my TBR list.
    I have always had cats and dogs, but when my last dog died I decided I should not get another one given my age and condition. Cats are another story though. As long as I can clean the litter box and feed them – they are just fine.
    When my last cat died several years ago, I swore he was the last one. But My sister talked me into going to the local animal shelter – just to look. Well, I walked out of that place with the sweetest little girl you would ever want to meet. Every morning she crawls up into my arms and lets me hold her like a baby and rub her tummy. She is also the official greeter. When anyone comes into my house, she runs into greet them and say hello.
    Favorite animals in books is almost anything by Barbara Metzger. My favorite is A LOYAL COMPANION where Fitz (the dog) gives some narration at the beginning of each chapter.
    From a fellow cat lover – thanks for this blog.

    Reply
  24. Wonderful blog. I too am a cat lover. Both your book (Christmas Anthology) and Mr. Nicholson’s book are going on my TBR list.
    I have always had cats and dogs, but when my last dog died I decided I should not get another one given my age and condition. Cats are another story though. As long as I can clean the litter box and feed them – they are just fine.
    When my last cat died several years ago, I swore he was the last one. But My sister talked me into going to the local animal shelter – just to look. Well, I walked out of that place with the sweetest little girl you would ever want to meet. Every morning she crawls up into my arms and lets me hold her like a baby and rub her tummy. She is also the official greeter. When anyone comes into my house, she runs into greet them and say hello.
    Favorite animals in books is almost anything by Barbara Metzger. My favorite is A LOYAL COMPANION where Fitz (the dog) gives some narration at the beginning of each chapter.
    From a fellow cat lover – thanks for this blog.

    Reply
  25. Wonderful blog. I too am a cat lover. Both your book (Christmas Anthology) and Mr. Nicholson’s book are going on my TBR list.
    I have always had cats and dogs, but when my last dog died I decided I should not get another one given my age and condition. Cats are another story though. As long as I can clean the litter box and feed them – they are just fine.
    When my last cat died several years ago, I swore he was the last one. But My sister talked me into going to the local animal shelter – just to look. Well, I walked out of that place with the sweetest little girl you would ever want to meet. Every morning she crawls up into my arms and lets me hold her like a baby and rub her tummy. She is also the official greeter. When anyone comes into my house, she runs into greet them and say hello.
    Favorite animals in books is almost anything by Barbara Metzger. My favorite is A LOYAL COMPANION where Fitz (the dog) gives some narration at the beginning of each chapter.
    From a fellow cat lover – thanks for this blog.

    Reply
  26. How a Hero/Heroine treat animals is good foreshadowing for how s/he will treat the people around them. Ella Quinn’s Worthington series is loaded with Great Danes and Chartreux cats. I think my favorite story in that series is how a heroine induces a stuffy hero to rescue a bag of kittens from being drown. He winds up adopting one and the kitten follows him everywhere including sitting next to him on his phaeton. I just finished “A Duke in Time” by Janna MacGregor. Early in the book is a scene where the hero’s late half brother sends a bequest, a pregnant race horse who decides she wants to stay in the house. Being a cavalry officer he calms and sweet talks to horse out of the house using a voice the heroine deems should be illegal for what it can to a woman’s insides. I think MJP’s cats add something special to her stories. The Spook and Panda are my favorites, so far.

    Reply
  27. How a Hero/Heroine treat animals is good foreshadowing for how s/he will treat the people around them. Ella Quinn’s Worthington series is loaded with Great Danes and Chartreux cats. I think my favorite story in that series is how a heroine induces a stuffy hero to rescue a bag of kittens from being drown. He winds up adopting one and the kitten follows him everywhere including sitting next to him on his phaeton. I just finished “A Duke in Time” by Janna MacGregor. Early in the book is a scene where the hero’s late half brother sends a bequest, a pregnant race horse who decides she wants to stay in the house. Being a cavalry officer he calms and sweet talks to horse out of the house using a voice the heroine deems should be illegal for what it can to a woman’s insides. I think MJP’s cats add something special to her stories. The Spook and Panda are my favorites, so far.

    Reply
  28. How a Hero/Heroine treat animals is good foreshadowing for how s/he will treat the people around them. Ella Quinn’s Worthington series is loaded with Great Danes and Chartreux cats. I think my favorite story in that series is how a heroine induces a stuffy hero to rescue a bag of kittens from being drown. He winds up adopting one and the kitten follows him everywhere including sitting next to him on his phaeton. I just finished “A Duke in Time” by Janna MacGregor. Early in the book is a scene where the hero’s late half brother sends a bequest, a pregnant race horse who decides she wants to stay in the house. Being a cavalry officer he calms and sweet talks to horse out of the house using a voice the heroine deems should be illegal for what it can to a woman’s insides. I think MJP’s cats add something special to her stories. The Spook and Panda are my favorites, so far.

    Reply
  29. How a Hero/Heroine treat animals is good foreshadowing for how s/he will treat the people around them. Ella Quinn’s Worthington series is loaded with Great Danes and Chartreux cats. I think my favorite story in that series is how a heroine induces a stuffy hero to rescue a bag of kittens from being drown. He winds up adopting one and the kitten follows him everywhere including sitting next to him on his phaeton. I just finished “A Duke in Time” by Janna MacGregor. Early in the book is a scene where the hero’s late half brother sends a bequest, a pregnant race horse who decides she wants to stay in the house. Being a cavalry officer he calms and sweet talks to horse out of the house using a voice the heroine deems should be illegal for what it can to a woman’s insides. I think MJP’s cats add something special to her stories. The Spook and Panda are my favorites, so far.

    Reply
  30. How a Hero/Heroine treat animals is good foreshadowing for how s/he will treat the people around them. Ella Quinn’s Worthington series is loaded with Great Danes and Chartreux cats. I think my favorite story in that series is how a heroine induces a stuffy hero to rescue a bag of kittens from being drown. He winds up adopting one and the kitten follows him everywhere including sitting next to him on his phaeton. I just finished “A Duke in Time” by Janna MacGregor. Early in the book is a scene where the hero’s late half brother sends a bequest, a pregnant race horse who decides she wants to stay in the house. Being a cavalry officer he calms and sweet talks to horse out of the house using a voice the heroine deems should be illegal for what it can to a woman’s insides. I think MJP’s cats add something special to her stories. The Spook and Panda are my favorites, so far.

    Reply
  31. My husband is less than happy with cats. He can’t understand why ‘their expression never changes’ though we know it does 😉 and how they seem so ‘sneaky.’ However, when Thing 2’s female kitty had surgery, I convinced him that she needed to come here because the two boys she lived with picked on her constantly and Thing 2 and I just thought it would be better for her if her stitches weren’t ripped out. So, Loaner Cat as I affectionately call her, since she was on loan to me, decided my husband is her person and spent any amount of time she could and can, flopping all over his feet and rubbing his legs. Welp, Loaner Cat, whose real name is Shorty due to half a tail missing) has been here two years and she’s not leaving any time soon. Hubs has decided that at 16+, moving her around would be much too stressful for her and he doesn’t want to put her through that.
    Go figure.
    A book with an animal? I’ve just finished the David J Gatward series that started with Grimm Up North which I mentioned last week. About the third book in, Fly is introduced. A fuzzy, furry ball of fluff that lives for tummy rubs and maybe someday, will turn into a boarder collie. But I’m not counting on it 😉

    Reply
  32. My husband is less than happy with cats. He can’t understand why ‘their expression never changes’ though we know it does 😉 and how they seem so ‘sneaky.’ However, when Thing 2’s female kitty had surgery, I convinced him that she needed to come here because the two boys she lived with picked on her constantly and Thing 2 and I just thought it would be better for her if her stitches weren’t ripped out. So, Loaner Cat as I affectionately call her, since she was on loan to me, decided my husband is her person and spent any amount of time she could and can, flopping all over his feet and rubbing his legs. Welp, Loaner Cat, whose real name is Shorty due to half a tail missing) has been here two years and she’s not leaving any time soon. Hubs has decided that at 16+, moving her around would be much too stressful for her and he doesn’t want to put her through that.
    Go figure.
    A book with an animal? I’ve just finished the David J Gatward series that started with Grimm Up North which I mentioned last week. About the third book in, Fly is introduced. A fuzzy, furry ball of fluff that lives for tummy rubs and maybe someday, will turn into a boarder collie. But I’m not counting on it 😉

    Reply
  33. My husband is less than happy with cats. He can’t understand why ‘their expression never changes’ though we know it does 😉 and how they seem so ‘sneaky.’ However, when Thing 2’s female kitty had surgery, I convinced him that she needed to come here because the two boys she lived with picked on her constantly and Thing 2 and I just thought it would be better for her if her stitches weren’t ripped out. So, Loaner Cat as I affectionately call her, since she was on loan to me, decided my husband is her person and spent any amount of time she could and can, flopping all over his feet and rubbing his legs. Welp, Loaner Cat, whose real name is Shorty due to half a tail missing) has been here two years and she’s not leaving any time soon. Hubs has decided that at 16+, moving her around would be much too stressful for her and he doesn’t want to put her through that.
    Go figure.
    A book with an animal? I’ve just finished the David J Gatward series that started with Grimm Up North which I mentioned last week. About the third book in, Fly is introduced. A fuzzy, furry ball of fluff that lives for tummy rubs and maybe someday, will turn into a boarder collie. But I’m not counting on it 😉

    Reply
  34. My husband is less than happy with cats. He can’t understand why ‘their expression never changes’ though we know it does 😉 and how they seem so ‘sneaky.’ However, when Thing 2’s female kitty had surgery, I convinced him that she needed to come here because the two boys she lived with picked on her constantly and Thing 2 and I just thought it would be better for her if her stitches weren’t ripped out. So, Loaner Cat as I affectionately call her, since she was on loan to me, decided my husband is her person and spent any amount of time she could and can, flopping all over his feet and rubbing his legs. Welp, Loaner Cat, whose real name is Shorty due to half a tail missing) has been here two years and she’s not leaving any time soon. Hubs has decided that at 16+, moving her around would be much too stressful for her and he doesn’t want to put her through that.
    Go figure.
    A book with an animal? I’ve just finished the David J Gatward series that started with Grimm Up North which I mentioned last week. About the third book in, Fly is introduced. A fuzzy, furry ball of fluff that lives for tummy rubs and maybe someday, will turn into a boarder collie. But I’m not counting on it 😉

    Reply
  35. My husband is less than happy with cats. He can’t understand why ‘their expression never changes’ though we know it does 😉 and how they seem so ‘sneaky.’ However, when Thing 2’s female kitty had surgery, I convinced him that she needed to come here because the two boys she lived with picked on her constantly and Thing 2 and I just thought it would be better for her if her stitches weren’t ripped out. So, Loaner Cat as I affectionately call her, since she was on loan to me, decided my husband is her person and spent any amount of time she could and can, flopping all over his feet and rubbing his legs. Welp, Loaner Cat, whose real name is Shorty due to half a tail missing) has been here two years and she’s not leaving any time soon. Hubs has decided that at 16+, moving her around would be much too stressful for her and he doesn’t want to put her through that.
    Go figure.
    A book with an animal? I’ve just finished the David J Gatward series that started with Grimm Up North which I mentioned last week. About the third book in, Fly is introduced. A fuzzy, furry ball of fluff that lives for tummy rubs and maybe someday, will turn into a boarder collie. But I’m not counting on it 😉

    Reply
  36. What an enjoyable post, Mary Jo! I agree that pets/other animals can add a wonderful element to books.
    My favorite books containing animals is a series written for children which is also entertaining for adults. It’s the Hank the Cowdog series by John R. Erickson. My husband read these aloud to our daughter when she was between five and ten years old. At that time, there were 35 chapter books in the series (and he read them all); I just checked and there are now 77! The books are mysteries written in the first person … first dog?! … and are very amusing. A number of expressions from the book are part of our family lexicon twenty years later.

    Reply
  37. What an enjoyable post, Mary Jo! I agree that pets/other animals can add a wonderful element to books.
    My favorite books containing animals is a series written for children which is also entertaining for adults. It’s the Hank the Cowdog series by John R. Erickson. My husband read these aloud to our daughter when she was between five and ten years old. At that time, there were 35 chapter books in the series (and he read them all); I just checked and there are now 77! The books are mysteries written in the first person … first dog?! … and are very amusing. A number of expressions from the book are part of our family lexicon twenty years later.

    Reply
  38. What an enjoyable post, Mary Jo! I agree that pets/other animals can add a wonderful element to books.
    My favorite books containing animals is a series written for children which is also entertaining for adults. It’s the Hank the Cowdog series by John R. Erickson. My husband read these aloud to our daughter when she was between five and ten years old. At that time, there were 35 chapter books in the series (and he read them all); I just checked and there are now 77! The books are mysteries written in the first person … first dog?! … and are very amusing. A number of expressions from the book are part of our family lexicon twenty years later.

    Reply
  39. What an enjoyable post, Mary Jo! I agree that pets/other animals can add a wonderful element to books.
    My favorite books containing animals is a series written for children which is also entertaining for adults. It’s the Hank the Cowdog series by John R. Erickson. My husband read these aloud to our daughter when she was between five and ten years old. At that time, there were 35 chapter books in the series (and he read them all); I just checked and there are now 77! The books are mysteries written in the first person … first dog?! … and are very amusing. A number of expressions from the book are part of our family lexicon twenty years later.

    Reply
  40. What an enjoyable post, Mary Jo! I agree that pets/other animals can add a wonderful element to books.
    My favorite books containing animals is a series written for children which is also entertaining for adults. It’s the Hank the Cowdog series by John R. Erickson. My husband read these aloud to our daughter when she was between five and ten years old. At that time, there were 35 chapter books in the series (and he read them all); I just checked and there are now 77! The books are mysteries written in the first person … first dog?! … and are very amusing. A number of expressions from the book are part of our family lexicon twenty years later.

    Reply
  41. Kathy, putting our pets into romance is easier since the books are fairly standalone. Much harder in continuing mystery series like yours with ongoing characters. 19 is a good age, but still too soon. And yes, Bastet is a character! In fact in the picture above, my Flufferbella is posing beside a statue of Bast. *G*

    Reply
  42. Kathy, putting our pets into romance is easier since the books are fairly standalone. Much harder in continuing mystery series like yours with ongoing characters. 19 is a good age, but still too soon. And yes, Bastet is a character! In fact in the picture above, my Flufferbella is posing beside a statue of Bast. *G*

    Reply
  43. Kathy, putting our pets into romance is easier since the books are fairly standalone. Much harder in continuing mystery series like yours with ongoing characters. 19 is a good age, but still too soon. And yes, Bastet is a character! In fact in the picture above, my Flufferbella is posing beside a statue of Bast. *G*

    Reply
  44. Kathy, putting our pets into romance is easier since the books are fairly standalone. Much harder in continuing mystery series like yours with ongoing characters. 19 is a good age, but still too soon. And yes, Bastet is a character! In fact in the picture above, my Flufferbella is posing beside a statue of Bast. *G*

    Reply
  45. Kathy, putting our pets into romance is easier since the books are fairly standalone. Much harder in continuing mystery series like yours with ongoing characters. 19 is a good age, but still too soon. And yes, Bastet is a character! In fact in the picture above, my Flufferbella is posing beside a statue of Bast. *G*

    Reply
  46. I would say my favourite animal is Oberon in Kevin Hearne’s Iron Druid Chronicles. He’s a dog, not a cat, plus he’s joined mentally with the hero so perhaps not technically filling the brief, but I can’t enter the draw so that’s my choice!

    Reply
  47. I would say my favourite animal is Oberon in Kevin Hearne’s Iron Druid Chronicles. He’s a dog, not a cat, plus he’s joined mentally with the hero so perhaps not technically filling the brief, but I can’t enter the draw so that’s my choice!

    Reply
  48. I would say my favourite animal is Oberon in Kevin Hearne’s Iron Druid Chronicles. He’s a dog, not a cat, plus he’s joined mentally with the hero so perhaps not technically filling the brief, but I can’t enter the draw so that’s my choice!

    Reply
  49. I would say my favourite animal is Oberon in Kevin Hearne’s Iron Druid Chronicles. He’s a dog, not a cat, plus he’s joined mentally with the hero so perhaps not technically filling the brief, but I can’t enter the draw so that’s my choice!

    Reply
  50. I would say my favourite animal is Oberon in Kevin Hearne’s Iron Druid Chronicles. He’s a dog, not a cat, plus he’s joined mentally with the hero so perhaps not technically filling the brief, but I can’t enter the draw so that’s my choice!

    Reply
  51. I too was thinking of Barbara Metzger’s Fitz, mentioned above.
    I read a vintage reagency a long time ago, the title and author of which I have totally forgotten, as well as the plot – but I do recall that the hero, a gentleman of the ton and a younger son, had been in the army and had kept his trooper, an unprepossessing gray with Roman nose, rough coat and knobby knees. That horse had saved his life several times, and somehow he got him back to England with him. His civilian friends mocked his taste in horses, but that trooper had loyalty, heart and stamina and could run all day while his friends’ fancy highbred ‘uns were left puffing in the dust. I wish I could remember his name!

    Reply
  52. I too was thinking of Barbara Metzger’s Fitz, mentioned above.
    I read a vintage reagency a long time ago, the title and author of which I have totally forgotten, as well as the plot – but I do recall that the hero, a gentleman of the ton and a younger son, had been in the army and had kept his trooper, an unprepossessing gray with Roman nose, rough coat and knobby knees. That horse had saved his life several times, and somehow he got him back to England with him. His civilian friends mocked his taste in horses, but that trooper had loyalty, heart and stamina and could run all day while his friends’ fancy highbred ‘uns were left puffing in the dust. I wish I could remember his name!

    Reply
  53. I too was thinking of Barbara Metzger’s Fitz, mentioned above.
    I read a vintage reagency a long time ago, the title and author of which I have totally forgotten, as well as the plot – but I do recall that the hero, a gentleman of the ton and a younger son, had been in the army and had kept his trooper, an unprepossessing gray with Roman nose, rough coat and knobby knees. That horse had saved his life several times, and somehow he got him back to England with him. His civilian friends mocked his taste in horses, but that trooper had loyalty, heart and stamina and could run all day while his friends’ fancy highbred ‘uns were left puffing in the dust. I wish I could remember his name!

    Reply
  54. I too was thinking of Barbara Metzger’s Fitz, mentioned above.
    I read a vintage reagency a long time ago, the title and author of which I have totally forgotten, as well as the plot – but I do recall that the hero, a gentleman of the ton and a younger son, had been in the army and had kept his trooper, an unprepossessing gray with Roman nose, rough coat and knobby knees. That horse had saved his life several times, and somehow he got him back to England with him. His civilian friends mocked his taste in horses, but that trooper had loyalty, heart and stamina and could run all day while his friends’ fancy highbred ‘uns were left puffing in the dust. I wish I could remember his name!

    Reply
  55. I too was thinking of Barbara Metzger’s Fitz, mentioned above.
    I read a vintage reagency a long time ago, the title and author of which I have totally forgotten, as well as the plot – but I do recall that the hero, a gentleman of the ton and a younger son, had been in the army and had kept his trooper, an unprepossessing gray with Roman nose, rough coat and knobby knees. That horse had saved his life several times, and somehow he got him back to England with him. His civilian friends mocked his taste in horses, but that trooper had loyalty, heart and stamina and could run all day while his friends’ fancy highbred ‘uns were left puffing in the dust. I wish I could remember his name!

    Reply
  56. Surely you knew you were a goner once your sister talked you into visiting the animal shelter! Dogs are great but cats are lower maintenance. You obviously found a real winner!
    I’ve heard of Fitz before and I really ought to fine a copy of that book!

    Reply
  57. Surely you knew you were a goner once your sister talked you into visiting the animal shelter! Dogs are great but cats are lower maintenance. You obviously found a real winner!
    I’ve heard of Fitz before and I really ought to fine a copy of that book!

    Reply
  58. Surely you knew you were a goner once your sister talked you into visiting the animal shelter! Dogs are great but cats are lower maintenance. You obviously found a real winner!
    I’ve heard of Fitz before and I really ought to fine a copy of that book!

    Reply
  59. Surely you knew you were a goner once your sister talked you into visiting the animal shelter! Dogs are great but cats are lower maintenance. You obviously found a real winner!
    I’ve heard of Fitz before and I really ought to fine a copy of that book!

    Reply
  60. Surely you knew you were a goner once your sister talked you into visiting the animal shelter! Dogs are great but cats are lower maintenance. You obviously found a real winner!
    I’ve heard of Fitz before and I really ought to fine a copy of that book!

    Reply
  61. Pamela, these are great examples of how animals add to stories and show aspects of character. I love the story of the pregnant mare!
    I think you’ll like Princess Flufferbella.

    Reply
  62. Pamela, these are great examples of how animals add to stories and show aspects of character. I love the story of the pregnant mare!
    I think you’ll like Princess Flufferbella.

    Reply
  63. Pamela, these are great examples of how animals add to stories and show aspects of character. I love the story of the pregnant mare!
    I think you’ll like Princess Flufferbella.

    Reply
  64. Pamela, these are great examples of how animals add to stories and show aspects of character. I love the story of the pregnant mare!
    I think you’ll like Princess Flufferbella.

    Reply
  65. Pamela, these are great examples of how animals add to stories and show aspects of character. I love the story of the pregnant mare!
    I think you’ll like Princess Flufferbella.

    Reply
  66. Mary Jo-great post! I loved reading about Dean and his travels with the intrepid Nala. Gotta read the book. Of course, I love your cats as they wander through the pages of your books and novellas. Can’t wait to see what kind of adventures Princess Flufferbella has in your Christmas novella. But for all that, I’m really a dog person. I love the way (hero) Zack helps Jane rescue the ugly dog in Anne Gracie’s The Spring Bride. And I’ve always been in love with Finn, the Irish wolfhound who is George’s dog throughout Anne’s Convenient Marriage series. My other favorite dog is the golden retriever in Linda Howard’s Troublemaker. Who knew a dog could tell time on the microwave? Or give you the cold shoulder when you transgress? Anyway, this post was a delight, as well as all the comments about favorite critters characters. Miaow. And woof.

    Reply
  67. Mary Jo-great post! I loved reading about Dean and his travels with the intrepid Nala. Gotta read the book. Of course, I love your cats as they wander through the pages of your books and novellas. Can’t wait to see what kind of adventures Princess Flufferbella has in your Christmas novella. But for all that, I’m really a dog person. I love the way (hero) Zack helps Jane rescue the ugly dog in Anne Gracie’s The Spring Bride. And I’ve always been in love with Finn, the Irish wolfhound who is George’s dog throughout Anne’s Convenient Marriage series. My other favorite dog is the golden retriever in Linda Howard’s Troublemaker. Who knew a dog could tell time on the microwave? Or give you the cold shoulder when you transgress? Anyway, this post was a delight, as well as all the comments about favorite critters characters. Miaow. And woof.

    Reply
  68. Mary Jo-great post! I loved reading about Dean and his travels with the intrepid Nala. Gotta read the book. Of course, I love your cats as they wander through the pages of your books and novellas. Can’t wait to see what kind of adventures Princess Flufferbella has in your Christmas novella. But for all that, I’m really a dog person. I love the way (hero) Zack helps Jane rescue the ugly dog in Anne Gracie’s The Spring Bride. And I’ve always been in love with Finn, the Irish wolfhound who is George’s dog throughout Anne’s Convenient Marriage series. My other favorite dog is the golden retriever in Linda Howard’s Troublemaker. Who knew a dog could tell time on the microwave? Or give you the cold shoulder when you transgress? Anyway, this post was a delight, as well as all the comments about favorite critters characters. Miaow. And woof.

    Reply
  69. Mary Jo-great post! I loved reading about Dean and his travels with the intrepid Nala. Gotta read the book. Of course, I love your cats as they wander through the pages of your books and novellas. Can’t wait to see what kind of adventures Princess Flufferbella has in your Christmas novella. But for all that, I’m really a dog person. I love the way (hero) Zack helps Jane rescue the ugly dog in Anne Gracie’s The Spring Bride. And I’ve always been in love with Finn, the Irish wolfhound who is George’s dog throughout Anne’s Convenient Marriage series. My other favorite dog is the golden retriever in Linda Howard’s Troublemaker. Who knew a dog could tell time on the microwave? Or give you the cold shoulder when you transgress? Anyway, this post was a delight, as well as all the comments about favorite critters characters. Miaow. And woof.

    Reply
  70. Mary Jo-great post! I loved reading about Dean and his travels with the intrepid Nala. Gotta read the book. Of course, I love your cats as they wander through the pages of your books and novellas. Can’t wait to see what kind of adventures Princess Flufferbella has in your Christmas novella. But for all that, I’m really a dog person. I love the way (hero) Zack helps Jane rescue the ugly dog in Anne Gracie’s The Spring Bride. And I’ve always been in love with Finn, the Irish wolfhound who is George’s dog throughout Anne’s Convenient Marriage series. My other favorite dog is the golden retriever in Linda Howard’s Troublemaker. Who knew a dog could tell time on the microwave? Or give you the cold shoulder when you transgress? Anyway, this post was a delight, as well as all the comments about favorite critters characters. Miaow. And woof.

    Reply
  71. Well, seems I’m a little late to the party! Evidently none of us guessed how much kitty love our fellow wenchlets were harboring. Great write-up on Dean and Nala, Mary Jo. And maybe the best part, it’s a real and ongoing story.
    I had to rehome my daughter’s two cats, Mochi and Mo, this week. Sad, but a terrific rescue lady popped up as well as an adopter who, sight unseen, wanted them. I put the two together and “the boys” have a new and happy home together. Yay!
    The book cat I remember most vividly was in one of Marion Babson’s theatre books. I’ve forgotten the name and can’t locate the book, unfortunately. The story was built around an actor/director who somehow swaps existence with the theatre cat for several months. At the end, they’re zapped back into themselves. In the final scene, the actor’s actress wife tells him she’s pregnant, and the once-again cat sits there with a smug smile and a twinkle in his eye.
    Mary Jo, I would love a copy of A Yuletide Kiss for the book you promised above. I think I’ve read almost all of your other books. Thank you!

    Reply
  72. Well, seems I’m a little late to the party! Evidently none of us guessed how much kitty love our fellow wenchlets were harboring. Great write-up on Dean and Nala, Mary Jo. And maybe the best part, it’s a real and ongoing story.
    I had to rehome my daughter’s two cats, Mochi and Mo, this week. Sad, but a terrific rescue lady popped up as well as an adopter who, sight unseen, wanted them. I put the two together and “the boys” have a new and happy home together. Yay!
    The book cat I remember most vividly was in one of Marion Babson’s theatre books. I’ve forgotten the name and can’t locate the book, unfortunately. The story was built around an actor/director who somehow swaps existence with the theatre cat for several months. At the end, they’re zapped back into themselves. In the final scene, the actor’s actress wife tells him she’s pregnant, and the once-again cat sits there with a smug smile and a twinkle in his eye.
    Mary Jo, I would love a copy of A Yuletide Kiss for the book you promised above. I think I’ve read almost all of your other books. Thank you!

    Reply
  73. Well, seems I’m a little late to the party! Evidently none of us guessed how much kitty love our fellow wenchlets were harboring. Great write-up on Dean and Nala, Mary Jo. And maybe the best part, it’s a real and ongoing story.
    I had to rehome my daughter’s two cats, Mochi and Mo, this week. Sad, but a terrific rescue lady popped up as well as an adopter who, sight unseen, wanted them. I put the two together and “the boys” have a new and happy home together. Yay!
    The book cat I remember most vividly was in one of Marion Babson’s theatre books. I’ve forgotten the name and can’t locate the book, unfortunately. The story was built around an actor/director who somehow swaps existence with the theatre cat for several months. At the end, they’re zapped back into themselves. In the final scene, the actor’s actress wife tells him she’s pregnant, and the once-again cat sits there with a smug smile and a twinkle in his eye.
    Mary Jo, I would love a copy of A Yuletide Kiss for the book you promised above. I think I’ve read almost all of your other books. Thank you!

    Reply
  74. Well, seems I’m a little late to the party! Evidently none of us guessed how much kitty love our fellow wenchlets were harboring. Great write-up on Dean and Nala, Mary Jo. And maybe the best part, it’s a real and ongoing story.
    I had to rehome my daughter’s two cats, Mochi and Mo, this week. Sad, but a terrific rescue lady popped up as well as an adopter who, sight unseen, wanted them. I put the two together and “the boys” have a new and happy home together. Yay!
    The book cat I remember most vividly was in one of Marion Babson’s theatre books. I’ve forgotten the name and can’t locate the book, unfortunately. The story was built around an actor/director who somehow swaps existence with the theatre cat for several months. At the end, they’re zapped back into themselves. In the final scene, the actor’s actress wife tells him she’s pregnant, and the once-again cat sits there with a smug smile and a twinkle in his eye.
    Mary Jo, I would love a copy of A Yuletide Kiss for the book you promised above. I think I’ve read almost all of your other books. Thank you!

    Reply
  75. Well, seems I’m a little late to the party! Evidently none of us guessed how much kitty love our fellow wenchlets were harboring. Great write-up on Dean and Nala, Mary Jo. And maybe the best part, it’s a real and ongoing story.
    I had to rehome my daughter’s two cats, Mochi and Mo, this week. Sad, but a terrific rescue lady popped up as well as an adopter who, sight unseen, wanted them. I put the two together and “the boys” have a new and happy home together. Yay!
    The book cat I remember most vividly was in one of Marion Babson’s theatre books. I’ve forgotten the name and can’t locate the book, unfortunately. The story was built around an actor/director who somehow swaps existence with the theatre cat for several months. At the end, they’re zapped back into themselves. In the final scene, the actor’s actress wife tells him she’s pregnant, and the once-again cat sits there with a smug smile and a twinkle in his eye.
    Mary Jo, I would love a copy of A Yuletide Kiss for the book you promised above. I think I’ve read almost all of your other books. Thank you!

    Reply
  76. I really enjoy when animals, be it cats, dogs or horses, are written into books. They usually lend an air of mystery or great humour to the story. My sentimental favourite would go to Jo Beverley’s Rogue series, which introduced me to my love of Regency romances. Loved the intuitive cat in Hawk’s story, that is then continued in Dare’s story with the feline staying with the two French orphans. I reread the series every 4 or 5 years as the books/characters have special place on my book shelf.

    Reply
  77. I really enjoy when animals, be it cats, dogs or horses, are written into books. They usually lend an air of mystery or great humour to the story. My sentimental favourite would go to Jo Beverley’s Rogue series, which introduced me to my love of Regency romances. Loved the intuitive cat in Hawk’s story, that is then continued in Dare’s story with the feline staying with the two French orphans. I reread the series every 4 or 5 years as the books/characters have special place on my book shelf.

    Reply
  78. I really enjoy when animals, be it cats, dogs or horses, are written into books. They usually lend an air of mystery or great humour to the story. My sentimental favourite would go to Jo Beverley’s Rogue series, which introduced me to my love of Regency romances. Loved the intuitive cat in Hawk’s story, that is then continued in Dare’s story with the feline staying with the two French orphans. I reread the series every 4 or 5 years as the books/characters have special place on my book shelf.

    Reply
  79. I really enjoy when animals, be it cats, dogs or horses, are written into books. They usually lend an air of mystery or great humour to the story. My sentimental favourite would go to Jo Beverley’s Rogue series, which introduced me to my love of Regency romances. Loved the intuitive cat in Hawk’s story, that is then continued in Dare’s story with the feline staying with the two French orphans. I reread the series every 4 or 5 years as the books/characters have special place on my book shelf.

    Reply
  80. I really enjoy when animals, be it cats, dogs or horses, are written into books. They usually lend an air of mystery or great humour to the story. My sentimental favourite would go to Jo Beverley’s Rogue series, which introduced me to my love of Regency romances. Loved the intuitive cat in Hawk’s story, that is then continued in Dare’s story with the feline staying with the two French orphans. I reread the series every 4 or 5 years as the books/characters have special place on my book shelf.

    Reply
  81. My favorite fictional cat is Manegold. He is the hero’s cat in “Once Upon a Christmas”, an absolutely lovely Signet Regency by Diane Farr. All the characters are great, but Manegold has such a personality, steals every scene he appears in.

    Reply
  82. My favorite fictional cat is Manegold. He is the hero’s cat in “Once Upon a Christmas”, an absolutely lovely Signet Regency by Diane Farr. All the characters are great, but Manegold has such a personality, steals every scene he appears in.

    Reply
  83. My favorite fictional cat is Manegold. He is the hero’s cat in “Once Upon a Christmas”, an absolutely lovely Signet Regency by Diane Farr. All the characters are great, but Manegold has such a personality, steals every scene he appears in.

    Reply
  84. My favorite fictional cat is Manegold. He is the hero’s cat in “Once Upon a Christmas”, an absolutely lovely Signet Regency by Diane Farr. All the characters are great, but Manegold has such a personality, steals every scene he appears in.

    Reply
  85. My favorite fictional cat is Manegold. He is the hero’s cat in “Once Upon a Christmas”, an absolutely lovely Signet Regency by Diane Farr. All the characters are great, but Manegold has such a personality, steals every scene he appears in.

    Reply
  86. I have always loved cats–at one point in time I had six! One of my favorite books about cats is the one about Dewey, the library cat, who was abandoned/deposited in a library via the return books slot. He became a favorite of all the staff and patrons and people would visit the library just to see him even if they didn’t want books. I read the book a while ago and can’t remember all the details, but remember how sweet it was. I also want to post my favorite saying about cats (and how true it is): “Cats know how to obtain food without labor, shelter without confinement, and love without penalties”, by Walter Lionel George. How true that is!

    Reply
  87. I have always loved cats–at one point in time I had six! One of my favorite books about cats is the one about Dewey, the library cat, who was abandoned/deposited in a library via the return books slot. He became a favorite of all the staff and patrons and people would visit the library just to see him even if they didn’t want books. I read the book a while ago and can’t remember all the details, but remember how sweet it was. I also want to post my favorite saying about cats (and how true it is): “Cats know how to obtain food without labor, shelter without confinement, and love without penalties”, by Walter Lionel George. How true that is!

    Reply
  88. I have always loved cats–at one point in time I had six! One of my favorite books about cats is the one about Dewey, the library cat, who was abandoned/deposited in a library via the return books slot. He became a favorite of all the staff and patrons and people would visit the library just to see him even if they didn’t want books. I read the book a while ago and can’t remember all the details, but remember how sweet it was. I also want to post my favorite saying about cats (and how true it is): “Cats know how to obtain food without labor, shelter without confinement, and love without penalties”, by Walter Lionel George. How true that is!

    Reply
  89. I have always loved cats–at one point in time I had six! One of my favorite books about cats is the one about Dewey, the library cat, who was abandoned/deposited in a library via the return books slot. He became a favorite of all the staff and patrons and people would visit the library just to see him even if they didn’t want books. I read the book a while ago and can’t remember all the details, but remember how sweet it was. I also want to post my favorite saying about cats (and how true it is): “Cats know how to obtain food without labor, shelter without confinement, and love without penalties”, by Walter Lionel George. How true that is!

    Reply
  90. I have always loved cats–at one point in time I had six! One of my favorite books about cats is the one about Dewey, the library cat, who was abandoned/deposited in a library via the return books slot. He became a favorite of all the staff and patrons and people would visit the library just to see him even if they didn’t want books. I read the book a while ago and can’t remember all the details, but remember how sweet it was. I also want to post my favorite saying about cats (and how true it is): “Cats know how to obtain food without labor, shelter without confinement, and love without penalties”, by Walter Lionel George. How true that is!

    Reply
  91. Eloisa James’s Wilde family have all sorts of interesting pets. First there is Fitz the peacock. Life was good until a well meaning person added another peacock so Fitz wouldn’t be lonely. Except it was another male. One of the ladies has a pet skunk which puzzled most people. My mom had a pet skunk for a while and it introduced terror into every room it entered with unsuspecting guests.

    Reply
  92. Eloisa James’s Wilde family have all sorts of interesting pets. First there is Fitz the peacock. Life was good until a well meaning person added another peacock so Fitz wouldn’t be lonely. Except it was another male. One of the ladies has a pet skunk which puzzled most people. My mom had a pet skunk for a while and it introduced terror into every room it entered with unsuspecting guests.

    Reply
  93. Eloisa James’s Wilde family have all sorts of interesting pets. First there is Fitz the peacock. Life was good until a well meaning person added another peacock so Fitz wouldn’t be lonely. Except it was another male. One of the ladies has a pet skunk which puzzled most people. My mom had a pet skunk for a while and it introduced terror into every room it entered with unsuspecting guests.

    Reply
  94. Eloisa James’s Wilde family have all sorts of interesting pets. First there is Fitz the peacock. Life was good until a well meaning person added another peacock so Fitz wouldn’t be lonely. Except it was another male. One of the ladies has a pet skunk which puzzled most people. My mom had a pet skunk for a while and it introduced terror into every room it entered with unsuspecting guests.

    Reply
  95. Eloisa James’s Wilde family have all sorts of interesting pets. First there is Fitz the peacock. Life was good until a well meaning person added another peacock so Fitz wouldn’t be lonely. Except it was another male. One of the ladies has a pet skunk which puzzled most people. My mom had a pet skunk for a while and it introduced terror into every room it entered with unsuspecting guests.

    Reply
  96. I noticedthe cats in your books, Mary Jo but have ti say that the 1st prize for animals in stories goes to the Dust Bunnies of Jayne Castle’s stories on another planet.
    I think they take first prize.

    Reply
  97. I noticedthe cats in your books, Mary Jo but have ti say that the 1st prize for animals in stories goes to the Dust Bunnies of Jayne Castle’s stories on another planet.
    I think they take first prize.

    Reply
  98. I noticedthe cats in your books, Mary Jo but have ti say that the 1st prize for animals in stories goes to the Dust Bunnies of Jayne Castle’s stories on another planet.
    I think they take first prize.

    Reply
  99. I noticedthe cats in your books, Mary Jo but have ti say that the 1st prize for animals in stories goes to the Dust Bunnies of Jayne Castle’s stories on another planet.
    I think they take first prize.

    Reply
  100. I noticedthe cats in your books, Mary Jo but have ti say that the 1st prize for animals in stories goes to the Dust Bunnies of Jayne Castle’s stories on another planet.
    I think they take first prize.

    Reply
  101. We have had cats and dogs for as long as I remember. At present we just have very pampered cats. We also once had a Parakeet and fish. neither survived in a housefull of cats.

    Reply
  102. We have had cats and dogs for as long as I remember. At present we just have very pampered cats. We also once had a Parakeet and fish. neither survived in a housefull of cats.

    Reply
  103. We have had cats and dogs for as long as I remember. At present we just have very pampered cats. We also once had a Parakeet and fish. neither survived in a housefull of cats.

    Reply
  104. We have had cats and dogs for as long as I remember. At present we just have very pampered cats. We also once had a Parakeet and fish. neither survived in a housefull of cats.

    Reply
  105. We have had cats and dogs for as long as I remember. At present we just have very pampered cats. We also once had a Parakeet and fish. neither survived in a housefull of cats.

    Reply
  106. I’m going to have to read this book! I love animals in books — as long as nothing bad happens to them, particularly cats. But I also love the firelizards in Anne McCaffrey’s Pern series. I’m in the midst of reading Patricia Rice’s School of Magic series, and there are some very interesting (and imaginative) animals in that world.

    Reply
  107. I’m going to have to read this book! I love animals in books — as long as nothing bad happens to them, particularly cats. But I also love the firelizards in Anne McCaffrey’s Pern series. I’m in the midst of reading Patricia Rice’s School of Magic series, and there are some very interesting (and imaginative) animals in that world.

    Reply
  108. I’m going to have to read this book! I love animals in books — as long as nothing bad happens to them, particularly cats. But I also love the firelizards in Anne McCaffrey’s Pern series. I’m in the midst of reading Patricia Rice’s School of Magic series, and there are some very interesting (and imaginative) animals in that world.

    Reply
  109. I’m going to have to read this book! I love animals in books — as long as nothing bad happens to them, particularly cats. But I also love the firelizards in Anne McCaffrey’s Pern series. I’m in the midst of reading Patricia Rice’s School of Magic series, and there are some very interesting (and imaginative) animals in that world.

    Reply
  110. I’m going to have to read this book! I love animals in books — as long as nothing bad happens to them, particularly cats. But I also love the firelizards in Anne McCaffrey’s Pern series. I’m in the midst of reading Patricia Rice’s School of Magic series, and there are some very interesting (and imaginative) animals in that world.

    Reply
  111. I just love all the cats in MJP books!!
    My last boy crossed the Rainbow Bridge 11 years ago at age 8 due to being FELK+ he was a former street cat who hit the lottery when we met

    Reply
  112. I just love all the cats in MJP books!!
    My last boy crossed the Rainbow Bridge 11 years ago at age 8 due to being FELK+ he was a former street cat who hit the lottery when we met

    Reply
  113. I just love all the cats in MJP books!!
    My last boy crossed the Rainbow Bridge 11 years ago at age 8 due to being FELK+ he was a former street cat who hit the lottery when we met

    Reply
  114. I just love all the cats in MJP books!!
    My last boy crossed the Rainbow Bridge 11 years ago at age 8 due to being FELK+ he was a former street cat who hit the lottery when we met

    Reply
  115. I just love all the cats in MJP books!!
    My last boy crossed the Rainbow Bridge 11 years ago at age 8 due to being FELK+ he was a former street cat who hit the lottery when we met

    Reply
  116. Mary M, very good news that your daughter’s cats were rehomed so quickly and smoothly.
    I’ve recently reread that Marian Babson book, and yes, it’s great fun! And at the end, the actor is less of a tomcat in his personal life. *G*

    Reply
  117. Mary M, very good news that your daughter’s cats were rehomed so quickly and smoothly.
    I’ve recently reread that Marian Babson book, and yes, it’s great fun! And at the end, the actor is less of a tomcat in his personal life. *G*

    Reply
  118. Mary M, very good news that your daughter’s cats were rehomed so quickly and smoothly.
    I’ve recently reread that Marian Babson book, and yes, it’s great fun! And at the end, the actor is less of a tomcat in his personal life. *G*

    Reply
  119. Mary M, very good news that your daughter’s cats were rehomed so quickly and smoothly.
    I’ve recently reread that Marian Babson book, and yes, it’s great fun! And at the end, the actor is less of a tomcat in his personal life. *G*

    Reply
  120. Mary M, very good news that your daughter’s cats were rehomed so quickly and smoothly.
    I’ve recently reread that Marian Babson book, and yes, it’s great fun! And at the end, the actor is less of a tomcat in his personal life. *G*

    Reply
  121. Suzanne, I adored the Dewey book also. What kind of monster would dump a kitten in a library book return box on a bitterly cold night??? He was one lucky guy to be found and turned into the library’s beloved mascot.
    I love that quote!

    Reply
  122. Suzanne, I adored the Dewey book also. What kind of monster would dump a kitten in a library book return box on a bitterly cold night??? He was one lucky guy to be found and turned into the library’s beloved mascot.
    I love that quote!

    Reply
  123. Suzanne, I adored the Dewey book also. What kind of monster would dump a kitten in a library book return box on a bitterly cold night??? He was one lucky guy to be found and turned into the library’s beloved mascot.
    I love that quote!

    Reply
  124. Suzanne, I adored the Dewey book also. What kind of monster would dump a kitten in a library book return box on a bitterly cold night??? He was one lucky guy to be found and turned into the library’s beloved mascot.
    I love that quote!

    Reply
  125. Suzanne, I adored the Dewey book also. What kind of monster would dump a kitten in a library book return box on a bitterly cold night??? He was one lucky guy to be found and turned into the library’s beloved mascot.
    I love that quote!

    Reply
  126. thanks, Jane, glad you find my creatures entertaining! Animals and pets are too much a part of our world to be ignored, and how a character interacts with them says a lot about their personalities. But I shall resist having all of them in one place.

    Reply
  127. thanks, Jane, glad you find my creatures entertaining! Animals and pets are too much a part of our world to be ignored, and how a character interacts with them says a lot about their personalities. But I shall resist having all of them in one place.

    Reply
  128. thanks, Jane, glad you find my creatures entertaining! Animals and pets are too much a part of our world to be ignored, and how a character interacts with them says a lot about their personalities. But I shall resist having all of them in one place.

    Reply
  129. thanks, Jane, glad you find my creatures entertaining! Animals and pets are too much a part of our world to be ignored, and how a character interacts with them says a lot about their personalities. But I shall resist having all of them in one place.

    Reply
  130. thanks, Jane, glad you find my creatures entertaining! Animals and pets are too much a part of our world to be ignored, and how a character interacts with them says a lot about their personalities. But I shall resist having all of them in one place.

    Reply
  131. I’m not a cat person – or rather, I like them but they never seem to like me! Maybe they can tell I prefer dogs? Love animals in stories though and try to have dogs in mine as often as I can. They do add a certain something and always make me smile!

    Reply
  132. I’m not a cat person – or rather, I like them but they never seem to like me! Maybe they can tell I prefer dogs? Love animals in stories though and try to have dogs in mine as often as I can. They do add a certain something and always make me smile!

    Reply
  133. I’m not a cat person – or rather, I like them but they never seem to like me! Maybe they can tell I prefer dogs? Love animals in stories though and try to have dogs in mine as often as I can. They do add a certain something and always make me smile!

    Reply
  134. I’m not a cat person – or rather, I like them but they never seem to like me! Maybe they can tell I prefer dogs? Love animals in stories though and try to have dogs in mine as often as I can. They do add a certain something and always make me smile!

    Reply
  135. I’m not a cat person – or rather, I like them but they never seem to like me! Maybe they can tell I prefer dogs? Love animals in stories though and try to have dogs in mine as often as I can. They do add a certain something and always make me smile!

    Reply
  136. I have a wonderful calico who adopted me a year ago at Christmas when it was bitterly cold. Her name is Callie and she is spoiled rotten! I always loved the two Siamese cats in all the books by Lillian Jackson Braun and Deborah Crombie who is one of my favourite mystery writers has her two principal detectives end up adopting two very sweet dogs – Geordie and Tess – from the bad guys and also Sid the cat, who was owned by a victim and was rendered homeless by the crime. She does the animals so well and you end up caring about them very much by the end of the books.

    Reply
  137. I have a wonderful calico who adopted me a year ago at Christmas when it was bitterly cold. Her name is Callie and she is spoiled rotten! I always loved the two Siamese cats in all the books by Lillian Jackson Braun and Deborah Crombie who is one of my favourite mystery writers has her two principal detectives end up adopting two very sweet dogs – Geordie and Tess – from the bad guys and also Sid the cat, who was owned by a victim and was rendered homeless by the crime. She does the animals so well and you end up caring about them very much by the end of the books.

    Reply
  138. I have a wonderful calico who adopted me a year ago at Christmas when it was bitterly cold. Her name is Callie and she is spoiled rotten! I always loved the two Siamese cats in all the books by Lillian Jackson Braun and Deborah Crombie who is one of my favourite mystery writers has her two principal detectives end up adopting two very sweet dogs – Geordie and Tess – from the bad guys and also Sid the cat, who was owned by a victim and was rendered homeless by the crime. She does the animals so well and you end up caring about them very much by the end of the books.

    Reply
  139. I have a wonderful calico who adopted me a year ago at Christmas when it was bitterly cold. Her name is Callie and she is spoiled rotten! I always loved the two Siamese cats in all the books by Lillian Jackson Braun and Deborah Crombie who is one of my favourite mystery writers has her two principal detectives end up adopting two very sweet dogs – Geordie and Tess – from the bad guys and also Sid the cat, who was owned by a victim and was rendered homeless by the crime. She does the animals so well and you end up caring about them very much by the end of the books.

    Reply
  140. I have a wonderful calico who adopted me a year ago at Christmas when it was bitterly cold. Her name is Callie and she is spoiled rotten! I always loved the two Siamese cats in all the books by Lillian Jackson Braun and Deborah Crombie who is one of my favourite mystery writers has her two principal detectives end up adopting two very sweet dogs – Geordie and Tess – from the bad guys and also Sid the cat, who was owned by a victim and was rendered homeless by the crime. She does the animals so well and you end up caring about them very much by the end of the books.

    Reply
  141. Donna H, you and Callie both lucked out! Any character who adopts lost animals as Crombie does is clearly a good human being!
    My favorite book cats might be the ones in Kerry Greenwood’s Corinna Chapman series. Corinna is a baker who lives in a charming Roman style Melbourne apartment house, and delightful kittens are distributed to all the other residents. All the cats have very distinct personalities, including Corinna’s three personal cats!

    Reply
  142. Donna H, you and Callie both lucked out! Any character who adopts lost animals as Crombie does is clearly a good human being!
    My favorite book cats might be the ones in Kerry Greenwood’s Corinna Chapman series. Corinna is a baker who lives in a charming Roman style Melbourne apartment house, and delightful kittens are distributed to all the other residents. All the cats have very distinct personalities, including Corinna’s three personal cats!

    Reply
  143. Donna H, you and Callie both lucked out! Any character who adopts lost animals as Crombie does is clearly a good human being!
    My favorite book cats might be the ones in Kerry Greenwood’s Corinna Chapman series. Corinna is a baker who lives in a charming Roman style Melbourne apartment house, and delightful kittens are distributed to all the other residents. All the cats have very distinct personalities, including Corinna’s three personal cats!

    Reply
  144. Donna H, you and Callie both lucked out! Any character who adopts lost animals as Crombie does is clearly a good human being!
    My favorite book cats might be the ones in Kerry Greenwood’s Corinna Chapman series. Corinna is a baker who lives in a charming Roman style Melbourne apartment house, and delightful kittens are distributed to all the other residents. All the cats have very distinct personalities, including Corinna’s three personal cats!

    Reply
  145. Donna H, you and Callie both lucked out! Any character who adopts lost animals as Crombie does is clearly a good human being!
    My favorite book cats might be the ones in Kerry Greenwood’s Corinna Chapman series. Corinna is a baker who lives in a charming Roman style Melbourne apartment house, and delightful kittens are distributed to all the other residents. All the cats have very distinct personalities, including Corinna’s three personal cats!

    Reply
  146. Lovely! A friend had loaned me the first 5 a while ago, and I hadn’t realized that more had come out – so now I’m on the library wait list for the most recent couple.

    Reply
  147. Lovely! A friend had loaned me the first 5 a while ago, and I hadn’t realized that more had come out – so now I’m on the library wait list for the most recent couple.

    Reply
  148. Lovely! A friend had loaned me the first 5 a while ago, and I hadn’t realized that more had come out – so now I’m on the library wait list for the most recent couple.

    Reply
  149. Lovely! A friend had loaned me the first 5 a while ago, and I hadn’t realized that more had come out – so now I’m on the library wait list for the most recent couple.

    Reply
  150. Lovely! A friend had loaned me the first 5 a while ago, and I hadn’t realized that more had come out – so now I’m on the library wait list for the most recent couple.

    Reply
  151. Very fun post. I always think animals are good for fictional characters. My favorite is the very lazy Galahad in the Eve Dallas books by JD Robb. He doesn’t do much, but he still helps Eve out of a couple of tight spots!

    Reply
  152. Very fun post. I always think animals are good for fictional characters. My favorite is the very lazy Galahad in the Eve Dallas books by JD Robb. He doesn’t do much, but he still helps Eve out of a couple of tight spots!

    Reply
  153. Very fun post. I always think animals are good for fictional characters. My favorite is the very lazy Galahad in the Eve Dallas books by JD Robb. He doesn’t do much, but he still helps Eve out of a couple of tight spots!

    Reply
  154. Very fun post. I always think animals are good for fictional characters. My favorite is the very lazy Galahad in the Eve Dallas books by JD Robb. He doesn’t do much, but he still helps Eve out of a couple of tight spots!

    Reply
  155. Very fun post. I always think animals are good for fictional characters. My favorite is the very lazy Galahad in the Eve Dallas books by JD Robb. He doesn’t do much, but he still helps Eve out of a couple of tight spots!

    Reply

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