How Do Readers Find New Books?

Reading 1Cara/Andrea here,
After the mad flurry of activity last week surrounding the release of Scandalously Yours, the first book in my new trilogy, I’m taking a moment to sit back and catch my breath—and untangle my brain synapses. WritingThese days, an author is expected to do a LOT of self-promoting. Facebook, Twitter, Goodreads, Pinterest, blog tours—now, lots of it is interesting stuff but at times I feel like I need  eight arms, four brains—maybe five—six computers, and at least half a ton of Lindt dark chocolate to keep me going. The point is, it eats up a huge chunk of precious writing time.

Scandalously YoursThe Wenches often talk about this among ourselves. The question of how to balance the two demands is a real dilemma. First and foremost, we want to write good books, and for most of us mere mortals, that entails more hours than you want to know about hunched over a keyboard. But of course, we also want readers to find those books when they are done.

Sinfully YoursIt used to be simpler. Publishers printed books and put them in bookstores, where readers would come and peruse the shelves. A finite number of publications did book reviews, so again, serious readers knew where to look to learn about each month’s new releases. Now? Well I don’t have to tell you it’s the Wild West out there.

I used to find so many gems just by wandering around the tables of new history or fictions releases. I’d pick up a book and read the back cover, and I can’t tell you how many times I found something esoteric or fascinating that I never would have thought to look for. I miss those serendipitous moments. Once in a while, I find them on the various lists that Amazon sends to my inbox daily. But it’s harder to know where to find what suits my admittedly quirky tastes.

LibraySo today I thought I’d ask you to tell the Wenches a little about how YOU find books you want to read. And what makes you interested in going learning more about  a book, or reading an excerpt. Do blog appearances work? Do Facebook trumpetings of releases catch your eye? Do you hunt through Goodreads? Please share!

180 thoughts on “How Do Readers Find New Books?”

  1. Cara/Andrea, I’m with you on the “quirky” tastes! I love my oddball little treasures.
    I’m pretty much a hermit and live out in the boonies, so I seldom go to librairies or bookstores anymore. I hear about new books from multiple sources: friends and family, author newsletters, buzz from writers and my book discussion group, and sometimes even the news. (Remember all the hype about The Da Vinci Code and Fifty Shades of Gray?) Also, I’m an audiobook freak and Costco is one of the few local places I can get unabridged audiobooks at a discount.
    But my best source for finding new books is right here. Not only do I get advance notice of Wench releases, but I’ve also learned about great books on a variety of subjects from the Wenches and their guests. And no, I wasn’t paid to say that! *g*

    Reply
  2. Cara/Andrea, I’m with you on the “quirky” tastes! I love my oddball little treasures.
    I’m pretty much a hermit and live out in the boonies, so I seldom go to librairies or bookstores anymore. I hear about new books from multiple sources: friends and family, author newsletters, buzz from writers and my book discussion group, and sometimes even the news. (Remember all the hype about The Da Vinci Code and Fifty Shades of Gray?) Also, I’m an audiobook freak and Costco is one of the few local places I can get unabridged audiobooks at a discount.
    But my best source for finding new books is right here. Not only do I get advance notice of Wench releases, but I’ve also learned about great books on a variety of subjects from the Wenches and their guests. And no, I wasn’t paid to say that! *g*

    Reply
  3. Cara/Andrea, I’m with you on the “quirky” tastes! I love my oddball little treasures.
    I’m pretty much a hermit and live out in the boonies, so I seldom go to librairies or bookstores anymore. I hear about new books from multiple sources: friends and family, author newsletters, buzz from writers and my book discussion group, and sometimes even the news. (Remember all the hype about The Da Vinci Code and Fifty Shades of Gray?) Also, I’m an audiobook freak and Costco is one of the few local places I can get unabridged audiobooks at a discount.
    But my best source for finding new books is right here. Not only do I get advance notice of Wench releases, but I’ve also learned about great books on a variety of subjects from the Wenches and their guests. And no, I wasn’t paid to say that! *g*

    Reply
  4. Cara/Andrea, I’m with you on the “quirky” tastes! I love my oddball little treasures.
    I’m pretty much a hermit and live out in the boonies, so I seldom go to librairies or bookstores anymore. I hear about new books from multiple sources: friends and family, author newsletters, buzz from writers and my book discussion group, and sometimes even the news. (Remember all the hype about The Da Vinci Code and Fifty Shades of Gray?) Also, I’m an audiobook freak and Costco is one of the few local places I can get unabridged audiobooks at a discount.
    But my best source for finding new books is right here. Not only do I get advance notice of Wench releases, but I’ve also learned about great books on a variety of subjects from the Wenches and their guests. And no, I wasn’t paid to say that! *g*

    Reply
  5. Cara/Andrea, I’m with you on the “quirky” tastes! I love my oddball little treasures.
    I’m pretty much a hermit and live out in the boonies, so I seldom go to librairies or bookstores anymore. I hear about new books from multiple sources: friends and family, author newsletters, buzz from writers and my book discussion group, and sometimes even the news. (Remember all the hype about The Da Vinci Code and Fifty Shades of Gray?) Also, I’m an audiobook freak and Costco is one of the few local places I can get unabridged audiobooks at a discount.
    But my best source for finding new books is right here. Not only do I get advance notice of Wench releases, but I’ve also learned about great books on a variety of subjects from the Wenches and their guests. And no, I wasn’t paid to say that! *g*

    Reply
  6. Cara, it depends what the subject matter is. For general fiction I mostly browse at my local Barnes & Noble and pick up what looks interesting (I have to admit, I make a lot of mistakes – that is, pick up books that turn out not to interest me – that way).
    Sometimes I get lucky – right now I’m reading Somewhere in France by Jennifer Robson, which I picked up at the bookstore and sampled briefly in the store; I was intrigued by the style of storytelling so I bought it. So far I am very impressed with it. I found this book checking the New Releases table in the general fiction section – not in romance, though there is a romance in it.
    I don’t read much romance, and that mostly regency, and that mostly the traditional style. I have found *very* few regency historical novels I like – I just don’t like the limited vision of that sex-obsessed format. There was so much more to life then, and now. So I rely on internet word of mouth from people I know have somewhat similar taste. I look at Word Wenches, I check out recommendations from twitter, I scan reviews and new titles at amazon.
    I wish there were a reliable source – I’d particularly like lists of upcoming books – the sort of newsletter thing they used to give out at Waldenbooks. That would be very helpful to me. Oddly enough, I’ve never found one on the internet that is complete. You’d think amazon would offer that, but they don’t seem to.

    Reply
  7. Cara, it depends what the subject matter is. For general fiction I mostly browse at my local Barnes & Noble and pick up what looks interesting (I have to admit, I make a lot of mistakes – that is, pick up books that turn out not to interest me – that way).
    Sometimes I get lucky – right now I’m reading Somewhere in France by Jennifer Robson, which I picked up at the bookstore and sampled briefly in the store; I was intrigued by the style of storytelling so I bought it. So far I am very impressed with it. I found this book checking the New Releases table in the general fiction section – not in romance, though there is a romance in it.
    I don’t read much romance, and that mostly regency, and that mostly the traditional style. I have found *very* few regency historical novels I like – I just don’t like the limited vision of that sex-obsessed format. There was so much more to life then, and now. So I rely on internet word of mouth from people I know have somewhat similar taste. I look at Word Wenches, I check out recommendations from twitter, I scan reviews and new titles at amazon.
    I wish there were a reliable source – I’d particularly like lists of upcoming books – the sort of newsletter thing they used to give out at Waldenbooks. That would be very helpful to me. Oddly enough, I’ve never found one on the internet that is complete. You’d think amazon would offer that, but they don’t seem to.

    Reply
  8. Cara, it depends what the subject matter is. For general fiction I mostly browse at my local Barnes & Noble and pick up what looks interesting (I have to admit, I make a lot of mistakes – that is, pick up books that turn out not to interest me – that way).
    Sometimes I get lucky – right now I’m reading Somewhere in France by Jennifer Robson, which I picked up at the bookstore and sampled briefly in the store; I was intrigued by the style of storytelling so I bought it. So far I am very impressed with it. I found this book checking the New Releases table in the general fiction section – not in romance, though there is a romance in it.
    I don’t read much romance, and that mostly regency, and that mostly the traditional style. I have found *very* few regency historical novels I like – I just don’t like the limited vision of that sex-obsessed format. There was so much more to life then, and now. So I rely on internet word of mouth from people I know have somewhat similar taste. I look at Word Wenches, I check out recommendations from twitter, I scan reviews and new titles at amazon.
    I wish there were a reliable source – I’d particularly like lists of upcoming books – the sort of newsletter thing they used to give out at Waldenbooks. That would be very helpful to me. Oddly enough, I’ve never found one on the internet that is complete. You’d think amazon would offer that, but they don’t seem to.

    Reply
  9. Cara, it depends what the subject matter is. For general fiction I mostly browse at my local Barnes & Noble and pick up what looks interesting (I have to admit, I make a lot of mistakes – that is, pick up books that turn out not to interest me – that way).
    Sometimes I get lucky – right now I’m reading Somewhere in France by Jennifer Robson, which I picked up at the bookstore and sampled briefly in the store; I was intrigued by the style of storytelling so I bought it. So far I am very impressed with it. I found this book checking the New Releases table in the general fiction section – not in romance, though there is a romance in it.
    I don’t read much romance, and that mostly regency, and that mostly the traditional style. I have found *very* few regency historical novels I like – I just don’t like the limited vision of that sex-obsessed format. There was so much more to life then, and now. So I rely on internet word of mouth from people I know have somewhat similar taste. I look at Word Wenches, I check out recommendations from twitter, I scan reviews and new titles at amazon.
    I wish there were a reliable source – I’d particularly like lists of upcoming books – the sort of newsletter thing they used to give out at Waldenbooks. That would be very helpful to me. Oddly enough, I’ve never found one on the internet that is complete. You’d think amazon would offer that, but they don’t seem to.

    Reply
  10. Cara, it depends what the subject matter is. For general fiction I mostly browse at my local Barnes & Noble and pick up what looks interesting (I have to admit, I make a lot of mistakes – that is, pick up books that turn out not to interest me – that way).
    Sometimes I get lucky – right now I’m reading Somewhere in France by Jennifer Robson, which I picked up at the bookstore and sampled briefly in the store; I was intrigued by the style of storytelling so I bought it. So far I am very impressed with it. I found this book checking the New Releases table in the general fiction section – not in romance, though there is a romance in it.
    I don’t read much romance, and that mostly regency, and that mostly the traditional style. I have found *very* few regency historical novels I like – I just don’t like the limited vision of that sex-obsessed format. There was so much more to life then, and now. So I rely on internet word of mouth from people I know have somewhat similar taste. I look at Word Wenches, I check out recommendations from twitter, I scan reviews and new titles at amazon.
    I wish there were a reliable source – I’d particularly like lists of upcoming books – the sort of newsletter thing they used to give out at Waldenbooks. That would be very helpful to me. Oddly enough, I’ve never found one on the internet that is complete. You’d think amazon would offer that, but they don’t seem to.

    Reply
  11. I am blessed because I write reviews for a very busy online site so I peruse the offerings of new titles pretty obsessively. My hope is that other readers wander through the review site and find new books to love that way. I participate in blog tours and wander around entering contests so I read lots of excerpts and find new titles that intrigue me and I tend to skim through the excerpts that are published on various loops that I belong to. I sympathize with the struggle that you authors are faced with because I sometimes feel that I am drowning as I try to keep up with my admittedly large number of favorite series and authors. But, if you ask us readers, I suspect that many of us would rather that you dedicate your efforts to writing us more stories than publicizing if we have to choose one or the other although I realize that is a Catch-22 for you. Newsletters that announce new titles are VERY helpful as long as they aren’t coming too often.

    Reply
  12. I am blessed because I write reviews for a very busy online site so I peruse the offerings of new titles pretty obsessively. My hope is that other readers wander through the review site and find new books to love that way. I participate in blog tours and wander around entering contests so I read lots of excerpts and find new titles that intrigue me and I tend to skim through the excerpts that are published on various loops that I belong to. I sympathize with the struggle that you authors are faced with because I sometimes feel that I am drowning as I try to keep up with my admittedly large number of favorite series and authors. But, if you ask us readers, I suspect that many of us would rather that you dedicate your efforts to writing us more stories than publicizing if we have to choose one or the other although I realize that is a Catch-22 for you. Newsletters that announce new titles are VERY helpful as long as they aren’t coming too often.

    Reply
  13. I am blessed because I write reviews for a very busy online site so I peruse the offerings of new titles pretty obsessively. My hope is that other readers wander through the review site and find new books to love that way. I participate in blog tours and wander around entering contests so I read lots of excerpts and find new titles that intrigue me and I tend to skim through the excerpts that are published on various loops that I belong to. I sympathize with the struggle that you authors are faced with because I sometimes feel that I am drowning as I try to keep up with my admittedly large number of favorite series and authors. But, if you ask us readers, I suspect that many of us would rather that you dedicate your efforts to writing us more stories than publicizing if we have to choose one or the other although I realize that is a Catch-22 for you. Newsletters that announce new titles are VERY helpful as long as they aren’t coming too often.

    Reply
  14. I am blessed because I write reviews for a very busy online site so I peruse the offerings of new titles pretty obsessively. My hope is that other readers wander through the review site and find new books to love that way. I participate in blog tours and wander around entering contests so I read lots of excerpts and find new titles that intrigue me and I tend to skim through the excerpts that are published on various loops that I belong to. I sympathize with the struggle that you authors are faced with because I sometimes feel that I am drowning as I try to keep up with my admittedly large number of favorite series and authors. But, if you ask us readers, I suspect that many of us would rather that you dedicate your efforts to writing us more stories than publicizing if we have to choose one or the other although I realize that is a Catch-22 for you. Newsletters that announce new titles are VERY helpful as long as they aren’t coming too often.

    Reply
  15. I am blessed because I write reviews for a very busy online site so I peruse the offerings of new titles pretty obsessively. My hope is that other readers wander through the review site and find new books to love that way. I participate in blog tours and wander around entering contests so I read lots of excerpts and find new titles that intrigue me and I tend to skim through the excerpts that are published on various loops that I belong to. I sympathize with the struggle that you authors are faced with because I sometimes feel that I am drowning as I try to keep up with my admittedly large number of favorite series and authors. But, if you ask us readers, I suspect that many of us would rather that you dedicate your efforts to writing us more stories than publicizing if we have to choose one or the other although I realize that is a Catch-22 for you. Newsletters that announce new titles are VERY helpful as long as they aren’t coming too often.

    Reply
  16. Living in the sticks book shops -proper book shops that actually want to sell a variety of books -are a rarity . Amazon tend to make suggestions based on what you have previously ordered. So having bought the odd book on motorbikes for the husband or one of his friends they keep me up to date with any new releases about bikes !I have found the wenches brilliant in bringing their own and a lot of other authors work to my attention both fiction and non fiction which I can then chase down on amazon.I don’t alwways find book descriptions on line all that helpful when I am looking for something on a specific subject.It is much better to be able to look at the book itself but they tend not to do sell or return!

    Reply
  17. Living in the sticks book shops -proper book shops that actually want to sell a variety of books -are a rarity . Amazon tend to make suggestions based on what you have previously ordered. So having bought the odd book on motorbikes for the husband or one of his friends they keep me up to date with any new releases about bikes !I have found the wenches brilliant in bringing their own and a lot of other authors work to my attention both fiction and non fiction which I can then chase down on amazon.I don’t alwways find book descriptions on line all that helpful when I am looking for something on a specific subject.It is much better to be able to look at the book itself but they tend not to do sell or return!

    Reply
  18. Living in the sticks book shops -proper book shops that actually want to sell a variety of books -are a rarity . Amazon tend to make suggestions based on what you have previously ordered. So having bought the odd book on motorbikes for the husband or one of his friends they keep me up to date with any new releases about bikes !I have found the wenches brilliant in bringing their own and a lot of other authors work to my attention both fiction and non fiction which I can then chase down on amazon.I don’t alwways find book descriptions on line all that helpful when I am looking for something on a specific subject.It is much better to be able to look at the book itself but they tend not to do sell or return!

    Reply
  19. Living in the sticks book shops -proper book shops that actually want to sell a variety of books -are a rarity . Amazon tend to make suggestions based on what you have previously ordered. So having bought the odd book on motorbikes for the husband or one of his friends they keep me up to date with any new releases about bikes !I have found the wenches brilliant in bringing their own and a lot of other authors work to my attention both fiction and non fiction which I can then chase down on amazon.I don’t alwways find book descriptions on line all that helpful when I am looking for something on a specific subject.It is much better to be able to look at the book itself but they tend not to do sell or return!

    Reply
  20. Living in the sticks book shops -proper book shops that actually want to sell a variety of books -are a rarity . Amazon tend to make suggestions based on what you have previously ordered. So having bought the odd book on motorbikes for the husband or one of his friends they keep me up to date with any new releases about bikes !I have found the wenches brilliant in bringing their own and a lot of other authors work to my attention both fiction and non fiction which I can then chase down on amazon.I don’t alwways find book descriptions on line all that helpful when I am looking for something on a specific subject.It is much better to be able to look at the book itself but they tend not to do sell or return!

    Reply
  21. I depend on about four blog sites these days for what I read plus Amazon recommendations and my autobuy list. I have found that I am generally going to like a book with 4 stars. Five star books, I either love or hate them.
    On blogs, it’s sometimes a known author promoting her work that gets my attention or a reviewer who loves a book. But what I really have gotten my best suggestions is those blogs where bloggers and readers list what they like or love. I’ve been absolutely engrossed in Sharon Shinn’s Twelve Houses series recommended her. And now my Amazon algorithm is suggesting some fantasy romance authors that look good.
    Since I’ve gotten my Kindle, I haven’t done bookstores at all. I was really surprised in Fred Meyer to see a huge display of print books. Because my situation didn’t allow for the luxury of reading, I browsed enjoying the fun of looking at back blurbs but I didn’t buy. Given that I was supposed to be doing a quick errand, I felt very guilty for indulging even that inclination.

    Reply
  22. I depend on about four blog sites these days for what I read plus Amazon recommendations and my autobuy list. I have found that I am generally going to like a book with 4 stars. Five star books, I either love or hate them.
    On blogs, it’s sometimes a known author promoting her work that gets my attention or a reviewer who loves a book. But what I really have gotten my best suggestions is those blogs where bloggers and readers list what they like or love. I’ve been absolutely engrossed in Sharon Shinn’s Twelve Houses series recommended her. And now my Amazon algorithm is suggesting some fantasy romance authors that look good.
    Since I’ve gotten my Kindle, I haven’t done bookstores at all. I was really surprised in Fred Meyer to see a huge display of print books. Because my situation didn’t allow for the luxury of reading, I browsed enjoying the fun of looking at back blurbs but I didn’t buy. Given that I was supposed to be doing a quick errand, I felt very guilty for indulging even that inclination.

    Reply
  23. I depend on about four blog sites these days for what I read plus Amazon recommendations and my autobuy list. I have found that I am generally going to like a book with 4 stars. Five star books, I either love or hate them.
    On blogs, it’s sometimes a known author promoting her work that gets my attention or a reviewer who loves a book. But what I really have gotten my best suggestions is those blogs where bloggers and readers list what they like or love. I’ve been absolutely engrossed in Sharon Shinn’s Twelve Houses series recommended her. And now my Amazon algorithm is suggesting some fantasy romance authors that look good.
    Since I’ve gotten my Kindle, I haven’t done bookstores at all. I was really surprised in Fred Meyer to see a huge display of print books. Because my situation didn’t allow for the luxury of reading, I browsed enjoying the fun of looking at back blurbs but I didn’t buy. Given that I was supposed to be doing a quick errand, I felt very guilty for indulging even that inclination.

    Reply
  24. I depend on about four blog sites these days for what I read plus Amazon recommendations and my autobuy list. I have found that I am generally going to like a book with 4 stars. Five star books, I either love or hate them.
    On blogs, it’s sometimes a known author promoting her work that gets my attention or a reviewer who loves a book. But what I really have gotten my best suggestions is those blogs where bloggers and readers list what they like or love. I’ve been absolutely engrossed in Sharon Shinn’s Twelve Houses series recommended her. And now my Amazon algorithm is suggesting some fantasy romance authors that look good.
    Since I’ve gotten my Kindle, I haven’t done bookstores at all. I was really surprised in Fred Meyer to see a huge display of print books. Because my situation didn’t allow for the luxury of reading, I browsed enjoying the fun of looking at back blurbs but I didn’t buy. Given that I was supposed to be doing a quick errand, I felt very guilty for indulging even that inclination.

    Reply
  25. I depend on about four blog sites these days for what I read plus Amazon recommendations and my autobuy list. I have found that I am generally going to like a book with 4 stars. Five star books, I either love or hate them.
    On blogs, it’s sometimes a known author promoting her work that gets my attention or a reviewer who loves a book. But what I really have gotten my best suggestions is those blogs where bloggers and readers list what they like or love. I’ve been absolutely engrossed in Sharon Shinn’s Twelve Houses series recommended her. And now my Amazon algorithm is suggesting some fantasy romance authors that look good.
    Since I’ve gotten my Kindle, I haven’t done bookstores at all. I was really surprised in Fred Meyer to see a huge display of print books. Because my situation didn’t allow for the luxury of reading, I browsed enjoying the fun of looking at back blurbs but I didn’t buy. Given that I was supposed to be doing a quick errand, I felt very guilty for indulging even that inclination.

    Reply
  26. You’re hired as our spokesperson, Sherrie!
    I discover a lot of great books too through our monthly “What Are We Reading” post, both from the other wenches and from our readers. Word of mouth is one of the primary ways I find new books and authors.

    Reply
  27. You’re hired as our spokesperson, Sherrie!
    I discover a lot of great books too through our monthly “What Are We Reading” post, both from the other wenches and from our readers. Word of mouth is one of the primary ways I find new books and authors.

    Reply
  28. You’re hired as our spokesperson, Sherrie!
    I discover a lot of great books too through our monthly “What Are We Reading” post, both from the other wenches and from our readers. Word of mouth is one of the primary ways I find new books and authors.

    Reply
  29. You’re hired as our spokesperson, Sherrie!
    I discover a lot of great books too through our monthly “What Are We Reading” post, both from the other wenches and from our readers. Word of mouth is one of the primary ways I find new books and authors.

    Reply
  30. You’re hired as our spokesperson, Sherrie!
    I discover a lot of great books too through our monthly “What Are We Reading” post, both from the other wenches and from our readers. Word of mouth is one of the primary ways I find new books and authors.

    Reply
  31. Janice, you’re lucky to have a local B&N that still has a good selection of new releases. Mine now carries mostly children’s toys, games and Nooks. Sigh. So I often browse the new release shelves in the town library (my town has a fabulous library system with three branches, and it orders lots of interesting books.)
    I so agree with you that it would be great to get a general list of monthly releases. The Beau Monde does the Regency titles, but it does feel frustrating to try to hunt through the internet for other sources. If anyone can recommend a general list, I’d love to hear about it.

    Reply
  32. Janice, you’re lucky to have a local B&N that still has a good selection of new releases. Mine now carries mostly children’s toys, games and Nooks. Sigh. So I often browse the new release shelves in the town library (my town has a fabulous library system with three branches, and it orders lots of interesting books.)
    I so agree with you that it would be great to get a general list of monthly releases. The Beau Monde does the Regency titles, but it does feel frustrating to try to hunt through the internet for other sources. If anyone can recommend a general list, I’d love to hear about it.

    Reply
  33. Janice, you’re lucky to have a local B&N that still has a good selection of new releases. Mine now carries mostly children’s toys, games and Nooks. Sigh. So I often browse the new release shelves in the town library (my town has a fabulous library system with three branches, and it orders lots of interesting books.)
    I so agree with you that it would be great to get a general list of monthly releases. The Beau Monde does the Regency titles, but it does feel frustrating to try to hunt through the internet for other sources. If anyone can recommend a general list, I’d love to hear about it.

    Reply
  34. Janice, you’re lucky to have a local B&N that still has a good selection of new releases. Mine now carries mostly children’s toys, games and Nooks. Sigh. So I often browse the new release shelves in the town library (my town has a fabulous library system with three branches, and it orders lots of interesting books.)
    I so agree with you that it would be great to get a general list of monthly releases. The Beau Monde does the Regency titles, but it does feel frustrating to try to hunt through the internet for other sources. If anyone can recommend a general list, I’d love to hear about it.

    Reply
  35. Janice, you’re lucky to have a local B&N that still has a good selection of new releases. Mine now carries mostly children’s toys, games and Nooks. Sigh. So I often browse the new release shelves in the town library (my town has a fabulous library system with three branches, and it orders lots of interesting books.)
    I so agree with you that it would be great to get a general list of monthly releases. The Beau Monde does the Regency titles, but it does feel frustrating to try to hunt through the internet for other sources. If anyone can recommend a general list, I’d love to hear about it.

    Reply
  36. Elf, thank you for sharing that. I do know how time-consuming it is to go visit all the blogs, so it’s good to know our newsletters are helpful. (And I hear you about not doing it too often.) I do worry sometimes when I do a blog tour for a new book that readers will get sick of seeing me on a lot of sites, but we feel we have to do all we can to wave the flag. I wish there were better ways to let you all know about our books, so these answers are very helpful.

    Reply
  37. Elf, thank you for sharing that. I do know how time-consuming it is to go visit all the blogs, so it’s good to know our newsletters are helpful. (And I hear you about not doing it too often.) I do worry sometimes when I do a blog tour for a new book that readers will get sick of seeing me on a lot of sites, but we feel we have to do all we can to wave the flag. I wish there were better ways to let you all know about our books, so these answers are very helpful.

    Reply
  38. Elf, thank you for sharing that. I do know how time-consuming it is to go visit all the blogs, so it’s good to know our newsletters are helpful. (And I hear you about not doing it too often.) I do worry sometimes when I do a blog tour for a new book that readers will get sick of seeing me on a lot of sites, but we feel we have to do all we can to wave the flag. I wish there were better ways to let you all know about our books, so these answers are very helpful.

    Reply
  39. Elf, thank you for sharing that. I do know how time-consuming it is to go visit all the blogs, so it’s good to know our newsletters are helpful. (And I hear you about not doing it too often.) I do worry sometimes when I do a blog tour for a new book that readers will get sick of seeing me on a lot of sites, but we feel we have to do all we can to wave the flag. I wish there were better ways to let you all know about our books, so these answers are very helpful.

    Reply
  40. Elf, thank you for sharing that. I do know how time-consuming it is to go visit all the blogs, so it’s good to know our newsletters are helpful. (And I hear you about not doing it too often.) I do worry sometimes when I do a blog tour for a new book that readers will get sick of seeing me on a lot of sites, but we feel we have to do all we can to wave the flag. I wish there were better ways to let you all know about our books, so these answers are very helpful.

    Reply
  41. Jo, I’m with you in handling a book and perusing the pages to get a feel of whether I will like it. It’s frustrating. And I get the Amazon recommendations too, which sometimes show me a book that intrigues me enough to search out more on it. But I do miss the big tables of new releases to touch and feel. I love it when I go to New Haven and get to wander around the Yale Bookstore. That’s Heaven!

    Reply
  42. Jo, I’m with you in handling a book and perusing the pages to get a feel of whether I will like it. It’s frustrating. And I get the Amazon recommendations too, which sometimes show me a book that intrigues me enough to search out more on it. But I do miss the big tables of new releases to touch and feel. I love it when I go to New Haven and get to wander around the Yale Bookstore. That’s Heaven!

    Reply
  43. Jo, I’m with you in handling a book and perusing the pages to get a feel of whether I will like it. It’s frustrating. And I get the Amazon recommendations too, which sometimes show me a book that intrigues me enough to search out more on it. But I do miss the big tables of new releases to touch and feel. I love it when I go to New Haven and get to wander around the Yale Bookstore. That’s Heaven!

    Reply
  44. Jo, I’m with you in handling a book and perusing the pages to get a feel of whether I will like it. It’s frustrating. And I get the Amazon recommendations too, which sometimes show me a book that intrigues me enough to search out more on it. But I do miss the big tables of new releases to touch and feel. I love it when I go to New Haven and get to wander around the Yale Bookstore. That’s Heaven!

    Reply
  45. Jo, I’m with you in handling a book and perusing the pages to get a feel of whether I will like it. It’s frustrating. And I get the Amazon recommendations too, which sometimes show me a book that intrigues me enough to search out more on it. But I do miss the big tables of new releases to touch and feel. I love it when I go to New Haven and get to wander around the Yale Bookstore. That’s Heaven!

    Reply
  46. Thanks, Shannon! I pay attention too when I see a book raved about by several reviewers.
    And LOL on the browsing when you are supposed to be doing other errands. Show me a book, and I will definitely be distracted from whatever else I am meant to be doing!

    Reply
  47. Thanks, Shannon! I pay attention too when I see a book raved about by several reviewers.
    And LOL on the browsing when you are supposed to be doing other errands. Show me a book, and I will definitely be distracted from whatever else I am meant to be doing!

    Reply
  48. Thanks, Shannon! I pay attention too when I see a book raved about by several reviewers.
    And LOL on the browsing when you are supposed to be doing other errands. Show me a book, and I will definitely be distracted from whatever else I am meant to be doing!

    Reply
  49. Thanks, Shannon! I pay attention too when I see a book raved about by several reviewers.
    And LOL on the browsing when you are supposed to be doing other errands. Show me a book, and I will definitely be distracted from whatever else I am meant to be doing!

    Reply
  50. Thanks, Shannon! I pay attention too when I see a book raved about by several reviewers.
    And LOL on the browsing when you are supposed to be doing other errands. Show me a book, and I will definitely be distracted from whatever else I am meant to be doing!

    Reply
  51. Wenches and wench readers generally have similar tastes to mine, so I take seriously anything mentioned here. That’s my way of saying thank you for the recommendations! (and I second the rec on almost every Sharon Shinn book–the werewolves are the only series I couldn’t get into)
    RT Reviews magazines makes a good effort of listing books coming out in the next month if they’re in print. E-books are a little tougher to find in there.
    I think there are just so many books on the market these days that it’s utterly impossible to come up with lists. But the good side is that if you miss the book’s release, the book will still be there in electronic form for ages. Used to be if you missed the print release, you were out of luck.

    Reply
  52. Wenches and wench readers generally have similar tastes to mine, so I take seriously anything mentioned here. That’s my way of saying thank you for the recommendations! (and I second the rec on almost every Sharon Shinn book–the werewolves are the only series I couldn’t get into)
    RT Reviews magazines makes a good effort of listing books coming out in the next month if they’re in print. E-books are a little tougher to find in there.
    I think there are just so many books on the market these days that it’s utterly impossible to come up with lists. But the good side is that if you miss the book’s release, the book will still be there in electronic form for ages. Used to be if you missed the print release, you were out of luck.

    Reply
  53. Wenches and wench readers generally have similar tastes to mine, so I take seriously anything mentioned here. That’s my way of saying thank you for the recommendations! (and I second the rec on almost every Sharon Shinn book–the werewolves are the only series I couldn’t get into)
    RT Reviews magazines makes a good effort of listing books coming out in the next month if they’re in print. E-books are a little tougher to find in there.
    I think there are just so many books on the market these days that it’s utterly impossible to come up with lists. But the good side is that if you miss the book’s release, the book will still be there in electronic form for ages. Used to be if you missed the print release, you were out of luck.

    Reply
  54. Wenches and wench readers generally have similar tastes to mine, so I take seriously anything mentioned here. That’s my way of saying thank you for the recommendations! (and I second the rec on almost every Sharon Shinn book–the werewolves are the only series I couldn’t get into)
    RT Reviews magazines makes a good effort of listing books coming out in the next month if they’re in print. E-books are a little tougher to find in there.
    I think there are just so many books on the market these days that it’s utterly impossible to come up with lists. But the good side is that if you miss the book’s release, the book will still be there in electronic form for ages. Used to be if you missed the print release, you were out of luck.

    Reply
  55. Wenches and wench readers generally have similar tastes to mine, so I take seriously anything mentioned here. That’s my way of saying thank you for the recommendations! (and I second the rec on almost every Sharon Shinn book–the werewolves are the only series I couldn’t get into)
    RT Reviews magazines makes a good effort of listing books coming out in the next month if they’re in print. E-books are a little tougher to find in there.
    I think there are just so many books on the market these days that it’s utterly impossible to come up with lists. But the good side is that if you miss the book’s release, the book will still be there in electronic form for ages. Used to be if you missed the print release, you were out of luck.

    Reply
  56. Like many people, the way I find books has been revolutionised by the Internet. I used to wander around the library getting increasingly frustrated because I seemed to have read everything I fancied in the genres which were separated out, and couldn’t work out how to find anything similar in the main fiction shelving. I relied quite heavily on jumble sales and anywhere else selling second-hand books. When charity shops became increasingly common they were a godsend because they had second-hand books which were cheap enough to buy to try, but also because they often had books I liked but which were considered too old-fashioed for the library.
    Ane then I discovered author’s blogs, book review sites and more recently Goodreads. So the way I find books now is:
    – I follow as many blogs and websites as I can find run by authors I like, so I know when they’re publishing new books. Sites like this one, with several authors banded together, are ideal.
    – I follow several book review sites, the ones which not only review books I like but also seem to agree with me about them! That way I can give serious consideration to recommendations for authors new to me.
    – I belong to several groups on Goodreads, some for authors I like and some for genres. If someone who likes a book or an author I love recommends another author or book I look into it, again benefitting from the Internet! I’ve found some new favourites that way.
    (I don’t take much notice of the official Goodreads recommendations, or those from Amazon.)
    Taken altogether, I’m generally aware when an author I like is publishing a new book. But I’m also made aware of other authors and books which I might never have heard of before the Internet. Moreover, given the ease with which one can find out-of-print books on the Internet, I can do what I like best and read whole series one after the other when I discover someone new!
    I love the sample system on Kindle, which replaces the way I used t check books by reading the first page or so in the library or bookshop. And I love one-click ebook buying!

    Reply
  57. Like many people, the way I find books has been revolutionised by the Internet. I used to wander around the library getting increasingly frustrated because I seemed to have read everything I fancied in the genres which were separated out, and couldn’t work out how to find anything similar in the main fiction shelving. I relied quite heavily on jumble sales and anywhere else selling second-hand books. When charity shops became increasingly common they were a godsend because they had second-hand books which were cheap enough to buy to try, but also because they often had books I liked but which were considered too old-fashioed for the library.
    Ane then I discovered author’s blogs, book review sites and more recently Goodreads. So the way I find books now is:
    – I follow as many blogs and websites as I can find run by authors I like, so I know when they’re publishing new books. Sites like this one, with several authors banded together, are ideal.
    – I follow several book review sites, the ones which not only review books I like but also seem to agree with me about them! That way I can give serious consideration to recommendations for authors new to me.
    – I belong to several groups on Goodreads, some for authors I like and some for genres. If someone who likes a book or an author I love recommends another author or book I look into it, again benefitting from the Internet! I’ve found some new favourites that way.
    (I don’t take much notice of the official Goodreads recommendations, or those from Amazon.)
    Taken altogether, I’m generally aware when an author I like is publishing a new book. But I’m also made aware of other authors and books which I might never have heard of before the Internet. Moreover, given the ease with which one can find out-of-print books on the Internet, I can do what I like best and read whole series one after the other when I discover someone new!
    I love the sample system on Kindle, which replaces the way I used t check books by reading the first page or so in the library or bookshop. And I love one-click ebook buying!

    Reply
  58. Like many people, the way I find books has been revolutionised by the Internet. I used to wander around the library getting increasingly frustrated because I seemed to have read everything I fancied in the genres which were separated out, and couldn’t work out how to find anything similar in the main fiction shelving. I relied quite heavily on jumble sales and anywhere else selling second-hand books. When charity shops became increasingly common they were a godsend because they had second-hand books which were cheap enough to buy to try, but also because they often had books I liked but which were considered too old-fashioed for the library.
    Ane then I discovered author’s blogs, book review sites and more recently Goodreads. So the way I find books now is:
    – I follow as many blogs and websites as I can find run by authors I like, so I know when they’re publishing new books. Sites like this one, with several authors banded together, are ideal.
    – I follow several book review sites, the ones which not only review books I like but also seem to agree with me about them! That way I can give serious consideration to recommendations for authors new to me.
    – I belong to several groups on Goodreads, some for authors I like and some for genres. If someone who likes a book or an author I love recommends another author or book I look into it, again benefitting from the Internet! I’ve found some new favourites that way.
    (I don’t take much notice of the official Goodreads recommendations, or those from Amazon.)
    Taken altogether, I’m generally aware when an author I like is publishing a new book. But I’m also made aware of other authors and books which I might never have heard of before the Internet. Moreover, given the ease with which one can find out-of-print books on the Internet, I can do what I like best and read whole series one after the other when I discover someone new!
    I love the sample system on Kindle, which replaces the way I used t check books by reading the first page or so in the library or bookshop. And I love one-click ebook buying!

    Reply
  59. Like many people, the way I find books has been revolutionised by the Internet. I used to wander around the library getting increasingly frustrated because I seemed to have read everything I fancied in the genres which were separated out, and couldn’t work out how to find anything similar in the main fiction shelving. I relied quite heavily on jumble sales and anywhere else selling second-hand books. When charity shops became increasingly common they were a godsend because they had second-hand books which were cheap enough to buy to try, but also because they often had books I liked but which were considered too old-fashioed for the library.
    Ane then I discovered author’s blogs, book review sites and more recently Goodreads. So the way I find books now is:
    – I follow as many blogs and websites as I can find run by authors I like, so I know when they’re publishing new books. Sites like this one, with several authors banded together, are ideal.
    – I follow several book review sites, the ones which not only review books I like but also seem to agree with me about them! That way I can give serious consideration to recommendations for authors new to me.
    – I belong to several groups on Goodreads, some for authors I like and some for genres. If someone who likes a book or an author I love recommends another author or book I look into it, again benefitting from the Internet! I’ve found some new favourites that way.
    (I don’t take much notice of the official Goodreads recommendations, or those from Amazon.)
    Taken altogether, I’m generally aware when an author I like is publishing a new book. But I’m also made aware of other authors and books which I might never have heard of before the Internet. Moreover, given the ease with which one can find out-of-print books on the Internet, I can do what I like best and read whole series one after the other when I discover someone new!
    I love the sample system on Kindle, which replaces the way I used t check books by reading the first page or so in the library or bookshop. And I love one-click ebook buying!

    Reply
  60. Like many people, the way I find books has been revolutionised by the Internet. I used to wander around the library getting increasingly frustrated because I seemed to have read everything I fancied in the genres which were separated out, and couldn’t work out how to find anything similar in the main fiction shelving. I relied quite heavily on jumble sales and anywhere else selling second-hand books. When charity shops became increasingly common they were a godsend because they had second-hand books which were cheap enough to buy to try, but also because they often had books I liked but which were considered too old-fashioed for the library.
    Ane then I discovered author’s blogs, book review sites and more recently Goodreads. So the way I find books now is:
    – I follow as many blogs and websites as I can find run by authors I like, so I know when they’re publishing new books. Sites like this one, with several authors banded together, are ideal.
    – I follow several book review sites, the ones which not only review books I like but also seem to agree with me about them! That way I can give serious consideration to recommendations for authors new to me.
    – I belong to several groups on Goodreads, some for authors I like and some for genres. If someone who likes a book or an author I love recommends another author or book I look into it, again benefitting from the Internet! I’ve found some new favourites that way.
    (I don’t take much notice of the official Goodreads recommendations, or those from Amazon.)
    Taken altogether, I’m generally aware when an author I like is publishing a new book. But I’m also made aware of other authors and books which I might never have heard of before the Internet. Moreover, given the ease with which one can find out-of-print books on the Internet, I can do what I like best and read whole series one after the other when I discover someone new!
    I love the sample system on Kindle, which replaces the way I used t check books by reading the first page or so in the library or bookshop. And I love one-click ebook buying!

    Reply
  61. I follow a handful of romance oriented review sites, mostly to read the comment threads. Some of the sites have a “Whatcha Reading?” article pretty regularly. There are commenters whose taste in authors aligns with mine, so I pick up suggestions there.
    I read a lot of traditional regencies and many books published when I was overseas, 1985-1995, are now showing up in ebook form. I canvas Amazon search function using the names of authors and sometimes hit pay dirt. Regency Reads is fabulous, too.
    There’s only so many ways to express love physically, but the universe inside H/h’s heads is limitless. I enjoy witty, adult romances, with protagonists who’ve been around the block!

    Reply
  62. I follow a handful of romance oriented review sites, mostly to read the comment threads. Some of the sites have a “Whatcha Reading?” article pretty regularly. There are commenters whose taste in authors aligns with mine, so I pick up suggestions there.
    I read a lot of traditional regencies and many books published when I was overseas, 1985-1995, are now showing up in ebook form. I canvas Amazon search function using the names of authors and sometimes hit pay dirt. Regency Reads is fabulous, too.
    There’s only so many ways to express love physically, but the universe inside H/h’s heads is limitless. I enjoy witty, adult romances, with protagonists who’ve been around the block!

    Reply
  63. I follow a handful of romance oriented review sites, mostly to read the comment threads. Some of the sites have a “Whatcha Reading?” article pretty regularly. There are commenters whose taste in authors aligns with mine, so I pick up suggestions there.
    I read a lot of traditional regencies and many books published when I was overseas, 1985-1995, are now showing up in ebook form. I canvas Amazon search function using the names of authors and sometimes hit pay dirt. Regency Reads is fabulous, too.
    There’s only so many ways to express love physically, but the universe inside H/h’s heads is limitless. I enjoy witty, adult romances, with protagonists who’ve been around the block!

    Reply
  64. I follow a handful of romance oriented review sites, mostly to read the comment threads. Some of the sites have a “Whatcha Reading?” article pretty regularly. There are commenters whose taste in authors aligns with mine, so I pick up suggestions there.
    I read a lot of traditional regencies and many books published when I was overseas, 1985-1995, are now showing up in ebook form. I canvas Amazon search function using the names of authors and sometimes hit pay dirt. Regency Reads is fabulous, too.
    There’s only so many ways to express love physically, but the universe inside H/h’s heads is limitless. I enjoy witty, adult romances, with protagonists who’ve been around the block!

    Reply
  65. I follow a handful of romance oriented review sites, mostly to read the comment threads. Some of the sites have a “Whatcha Reading?” article pretty regularly. There are commenters whose taste in authors aligns with mine, so I pick up suggestions there.
    I read a lot of traditional regencies and many books published when I was overseas, 1985-1995, are now showing up in ebook form. I canvas Amazon search function using the names of authors and sometimes hit pay dirt. Regency Reads is fabulous, too.
    There’s only so many ways to express love physically, but the universe inside H/h’s heads is limitless. I enjoy witty, adult romances, with protagonists who’ve been around the block!

    Reply
  66. These days, at least 90% of the books I read are review books. I’m sure a lot of books I’d be interested in are slipping through the cracks because I don’t have time to read much else!
    Other places I pick up book recommendations are Goodreads (especially in discussions in the groups there) and a few trusted blogs.
    But for the most part, the books I read come either directly from an author or from NetGalley – the review book site.

    Reply
  67. These days, at least 90% of the books I read are review books. I’m sure a lot of books I’d be interested in are slipping through the cracks because I don’t have time to read much else!
    Other places I pick up book recommendations are Goodreads (especially in discussions in the groups there) and a few trusted blogs.
    But for the most part, the books I read come either directly from an author or from NetGalley – the review book site.

    Reply
  68. These days, at least 90% of the books I read are review books. I’m sure a lot of books I’d be interested in are slipping through the cracks because I don’t have time to read much else!
    Other places I pick up book recommendations are Goodreads (especially in discussions in the groups there) and a few trusted blogs.
    But for the most part, the books I read come either directly from an author or from NetGalley – the review book site.

    Reply
  69. These days, at least 90% of the books I read are review books. I’m sure a lot of books I’d be interested in are slipping through the cracks because I don’t have time to read much else!
    Other places I pick up book recommendations are Goodreads (especially in discussions in the groups there) and a few trusted blogs.
    But for the most part, the books I read come either directly from an author or from NetGalley – the review book site.

    Reply
  70. These days, at least 90% of the books I read are review books. I’m sure a lot of books I’d be interested in are slipping through the cracks because I don’t have time to read much else!
    Other places I pick up book recommendations are Goodreads (especially in discussions in the groups there) and a few trusted blogs.
    But for the most part, the books I read come either directly from an author or from NetGalley – the review book site.

    Reply
  71. Other than auto-buys, all my new book finds come from recs from trusted people whose taste I know matches mine. That means, my recs come for the most part from Twitter. I rarely buy books from author promo on Twitter, but I will buy that same book if another reader recommends it.
    I used to visit B&N a lot in the old days and that is where I bought my books. These days, I buy few books (borrow more) and those are all from Amazon. But I admit, I miss the tactile, sensual experience of walking into a store FULL OF BOOKS and being to touch and smell and see and hear any book my heart desires. What I miss the most due to Amazon buying is that while I’m browsing mystery books, I’ll spot a book in romance or on architecture or what-have-you, get drawn to it, peruse it, and buy it.

    Reply
  72. Other than auto-buys, all my new book finds come from recs from trusted people whose taste I know matches mine. That means, my recs come for the most part from Twitter. I rarely buy books from author promo on Twitter, but I will buy that same book if another reader recommends it.
    I used to visit B&N a lot in the old days and that is where I bought my books. These days, I buy few books (borrow more) and those are all from Amazon. But I admit, I miss the tactile, sensual experience of walking into a store FULL OF BOOKS and being to touch and smell and see and hear any book my heart desires. What I miss the most due to Amazon buying is that while I’m browsing mystery books, I’ll spot a book in romance or on architecture or what-have-you, get drawn to it, peruse it, and buy it.

    Reply
  73. Other than auto-buys, all my new book finds come from recs from trusted people whose taste I know matches mine. That means, my recs come for the most part from Twitter. I rarely buy books from author promo on Twitter, but I will buy that same book if another reader recommends it.
    I used to visit B&N a lot in the old days and that is where I bought my books. These days, I buy few books (borrow more) and those are all from Amazon. But I admit, I miss the tactile, sensual experience of walking into a store FULL OF BOOKS and being to touch and smell and see and hear any book my heart desires. What I miss the most due to Amazon buying is that while I’m browsing mystery books, I’ll spot a book in romance or on architecture or what-have-you, get drawn to it, peruse it, and buy it.

    Reply
  74. Other than auto-buys, all my new book finds come from recs from trusted people whose taste I know matches mine. That means, my recs come for the most part from Twitter. I rarely buy books from author promo on Twitter, but I will buy that same book if another reader recommends it.
    I used to visit B&N a lot in the old days and that is where I bought my books. These days, I buy few books (borrow more) and those are all from Amazon. But I admit, I miss the tactile, sensual experience of walking into a store FULL OF BOOKS and being to touch and smell and see and hear any book my heart desires. What I miss the most due to Amazon buying is that while I’m browsing mystery books, I’ll spot a book in romance or on architecture or what-have-you, get drawn to it, peruse it, and buy it.

    Reply
  75. Other than auto-buys, all my new book finds come from recs from trusted people whose taste I know matches mine. That means, my recs come for the most part from Twitter. I rarely buy books from author promo on Twitter, but I will buy that same book if another reader recommends it.
    I used to visit B&N a lot in the old days and that is where I bought my books. These days, I buy few books (borrow more) and those are all from Amazon. But I admit, I miss the tactile, sensual experience of walking into a store FULL OF BOOKS and being to touch and smell and see and hear any book my heart desires. What I miss the most due to Amazon buying is that while I’m browsing mystery books, I’ll spot a book in romance or on architecture or what-have-you, get drawn to it, peruse it, and buy it.

    Reply
  76. How do I buy books?
    Let me count the ways.
    Since I got a Kindle I haven’t been to a bookstore.
    Mostly buying is by the internet thru blogs and
    favorite writer sites. I also have a former bookstore
    owner friend that will order books as at a discount.
    There is a site called “freebooksy.com” that has
    freebie books that I use frequently. Some are quite
    good but there is sometimes the “hit the wall” kind.
    I’m often lured into buying sequels in a series. I
    also like the “One click” buying.

    Reply
  77. How do I buy books?
    Let me count the ways.
    Since I got a Kindle I haven’t been to a bookstore.
    Mostly buying is by the internet thru blogs and
    favorite writer sites. I also have a former bookstore
    owner friend that will order books as at a discount.
    There is a site called “freebooksy.com” that has
    freebie books that I use frequently. Some are quite
    good but there is sometimes the “hit the wall” kind.
    I’m often lured into buying sequels in a series. I
    also like the “One click” buying.

    Reply
  78. How do I buy books?
    Let me count the ways.
    Since I got a Kindle I haven’t been to a bookstore.
    Mostly buying is by the internet thru blogs and
    favorite writer sites. I also have a former bookstore
    owner friend that will order books as at a discount.
    There is a site called “freebooksy.com” that has
    freebie books that I use frequently. Some are quite
    good but there is sometimes the “hit the wall” kind.
    I’m often lured into buying sequels in a series. I
    also like the “One click” buying.

    Reply
  79. How do I buy books?
    Let me count the ways.
    Since I got a Kindle I haven’t been to a bookstore.
    Mostly buying is by the internet thru blogs and
    favorite writer sites. I also have a former bookstore
    owner friend that will order books as at a discount.
    There is a site called “freebooksy.com” that has
    freebie books that I use frequently. Some are quite
    good but there is sometimes the “hit the wall” kind.
    I’m often lured into buying sequels in a series. I
    also like the “One click” buying.

    Reply
  80. How do I buy books?
    Let me count the ways.
    Since I got a Kindle I haven’t been to a bookstore.
    Mostly buying is by the internet thru blogs and
    favorite writer sites. I also have a former bookstore
    owner friend that will order books as at a discount.
    There is a site called “freebooksy.com” that has
    freebie books that I use frequently. Some are quite
    good but there is sometimes the “hit the wall” kind.
    I’m often lured into buying sequels in a series. I
    also like the “One click” buying.

    Reply
  81. I am also lucky enough to have a number of great independent bookshop near me. I love browsing. But that is not my only source of information. I read reviews in newspapers and especially in bookshop magazines and newsletters (including online newsletters0. They are excellent souces of information on new books. Wide-ranging but genre specific blogs like Word Wenches are fantastic – I have a lot of faith in peer recommendations. Amazon suggestions are always worth browsing. Any website that allows you to read a sample is excellent. Samples and jacket treatments are key in attracting my attention. it might be deporable, but we DO still judge a book by its cover 🙂

    Reply
  82. I am also lucky enough to have a number of great independent bookshop near me. I love browsing. But that is not my only source of information. I read reviews in newspapers and especially in bookshop magazines and newsletters (including online newsletters0. They are excellent souces of information on new books. Wide-ranging but genre specific blogs like Word Wenches are fantastic – I have a lot of faith in peer recommendations. Amazon suggestions are always worth browsing. Any website that allows you to read a sample is excellent. Samples and jacket treatments are key in attracting my attention. it might be deporable, but we DO still judge a book by its cover 🙂

    Reply
  83. I am also lucky enough to have a number of great independent bookshop near me. I love browsing. But that is not my only source of information. I read reviews in newspapers and especially in bookshop magazines and newsletters (including online newsletters0. They are excellent souces of information on new books. Wide-ranging but genre specific blogs like Word Wenches are fantastic – I have a lot of faith in peer recommendations. Amazon suggestions are always worth browsing. Any website that allows you to read a sample is excellent. Samples and jacket treatments are key in attracting my attention. it might be deporable, but we DO still judge a book by its cover 🙂

    Reply
  84. I am also lucky enough to have a number of great independent bookshop near me. I love browsing. But that is not my only source of information. I read reviews in newspapers and especially in bookshop magazines and newsletters (including online newsletters0. They are excellent souces of information on new books. Wide-ranging but genre specific blogs like Word Wenches are fantastic – I have a lot of faith in peer recommendations. Amazon suggestions are always worth browsing. Any website that allows you to read a sample is excellent. Samples and jacket treatments are key in attracting my attention. it might be deporable, but we DO still judge a book by its cover 🙂

    Reply
  85. I am also lucky enough to have a number of great independent bookshop near me. I love browsing. But that is not my only source of information. I read reviews in newspapers and especially in bookshop magazines and newsletters (including online newsletters0. They are excellent souces of information on new books. Wide-ranging but genre specific blogs like Word Wenches are fantastic – I have a lot of faith in peer recommendations. Amazon suggestions are always worth browsing. Any website that allows you to read a sample is excellent. Samples and jacket treatments are key in attracting my attention. it might be deporable, but we DO still judge a book by its cover 🙂

    Reply
  86. Members of the lists I’m on mention their new books. Amazon and BookBub send me notices.
    Also I subscribe to the Regency Reader and the List that Sally Roberts puts out.
    I used to find authors in the library and then went out and bought them.

    Reply
  87. Members of the lists I’m on mention their new books. Amazon and BookBub send me notices.
    Also I subscribe to the Regency Reader and the List that Sally Roberts puts out.
    I used to find authors in the library and then went out and bought them.

    Reply
  88. Members of the lists I’m on mention their new books. Amazon and BookBub send me notices.
    Also I subscribe to the Regency Reader and the List that Sally Roberts puts out.
    I used to find authors in the library and then went out and bought them.

    Reply
  89. Members of the lists I’m on mention their new books. Amazon and BookBub send me notices.
    Also I subscribe to the Regency Reader and the List that Sally Roberts puts out.
    I used to find authors in the library and then went out and bought them.

    Reply
  90. Members of the lists I’m on mention their new books. Amazon and BookBub send me notices.
    Also I subscribe to the Regency Reader and the List that Sally Roberts puts out.
    I used to find authors in the library and then went out and bought them.

    Reply
  91. It’s been so long since I’ve lived where I had a bookstore I could peruse, I can’t rely on them. So my mother-in-law is a great source of recommendations. Also other friends. I now read review blogs as well.

    Reply
  92. It’s been so long since I’ve lived where I had a bookstore I could peruse, I can’t rely on them. So my mother-in-law is a great source of recommendations. Also other friends. I now read review blogs as well.

    Reply
  93. It’s been so long since I’ve lived where I had a bookstore I could peruse, I can’t rely on them. So my mother-in-law is a great source of recommendations. Also other friends. I now read review blogs as well.

    Reply
  94. It’s been so long since I’ve lived where I had a bookstore I could peruse, I can’t rely on them. So my mother-in-law is a great source of recommendations. Also other friends. I now read review blogs as well.

    Reply
  95. It’s been so long since I’ve lived where I had a bookstore I could peruse, I can’t rely on them. So my mother-in-law is a great source of recommendations. Also other friends. I now read review blogs as well.

    Reply
  96. The main way I’ve been discovering new authors lately are: Goodwill and library sales. Suddenly, I am surrounded by 4 or 5 Goodwill stores so that no matter which direction I go in, I will end up going by one.
    My county library system has a HUGE book sale (2 exhibit halls at the fairgrounds) twice a year. I help do set up so as I help unpack the boxes I find many interesting books and authors that way.
    Both of these are very inexpensive ways of sampling before going on and investing in all of a writers books! And I get books from the library as well.
    I also found a site online (www.fictiondb.com) that lets me make a list of my favorite authors. I generate a new copy of what is coming out every few months so I don’t miss anything. I also use that site to generate a list of all the books written by an author so when I find a new one I like, I can look for every single book, short story, ebook they have written. As well, I can generate series lists so I can collect all the books in a series before starting the series.
    About two months ago, I found a book by Joanna Bourne that I really enjoyed. It was while trying to find what else she had written, I stumbled upon this blog. (which by the way I find totally fascinating.) I really love the backstory of events and understanding the historical setting of why, who, what, etc. in stories.
    Finding this blog written by multiple authors encourages me to read all the authors. (I had already read books by 5 of you, now I’ll look for books by the authors I haven’t read.) I do subscribe to a few author newsletters but I haven’t taken to following anyone on FB, twitter, etc.

    Reply
  97. The main way I’ve been discovering new authors lately are: Goodwill and library sales. Suddenly, I am surrounded by 4 or 5 Goodwill stores so that no matter which direction I go in, I will end up going by one.
    My county library system has a HUGE book sale (2 exhibit halls at the fairgrounds) twice a year. I help do set up so as I help unpack the boxes I find many interesting books and authors that way.
    Both of these are very inexpensive ways of sampling before going on and investing in all of a writers books! And I get books from the library as well.
    I also found a site online (www.fictiondb.com) that lets me make a list of my favorite authors. I generate a new copy of what is coming out every few months so I don’t miss anything. I also use that site to generate a list of all the books written by an author so when I find a new one I like, I can look for every single book, short story, ebook they have written. As well, I can generate series lists so I can collect all the books in a series before starting the series.
    About two months ago, I found a book by Joanna Bourne that I really enjoyed. It was while trying to find what else she had written, I stumbled upon this blog. (which by the way I find totally fascinating.) I really love the backstory of events and understanding the historical setting of why, who, what, etc. in stories.
    Finding this blog written by multiple authors encourages me to read all the authors. (I had already read books by 5 of you, now I’ll look for books by the authors I haven’t read.) I do subscribe to a few author newsletters but I haven’t taken to following anyone on FB, twitter, etc.

    Reply
  98. The main way I’ve been discovering new authors lately are: Goodwill and library sales. Suddenly, I am surrounded by 4 or 5 Goodwill stores so that no matter which direction I go in, I will end up going by one.
    My county library system has a HUGE book sale (2 exhibit halls at the fairgrounds) twice a year. I help do set up so as I help unpack the boxes I find many interesting books and authors that way.
    Both of these are very inexpensive ways of sampling before going on and investing in all of a writers books! And I get books from the library as well.
    I also found a site online (www.fictiondb.com) that lets me make a list of my favorite authors. I generate a new copy of what is coming out every few months so I don’t miss anything. I also use that site to generate a list of all the books written by an author so when I find a new one I like, I can look for every single book, short story, ebook they have written. As well, I can generate series lists so I can collect all the books in a series before starting the series.
    About two months ago, I found a book by Joanna Bourne that I really enjoyed. It was while trying to find what else she had written, I stumbled upon this blog. (which by the way I find totally fascinating.) I really love the backstory of events and understanding the historical setting of why, who, what, etc. in stories.
    Finding this blog written by multiple authors encourages me to read all the authors. (I had already read books by 5 of you, now I’ll look for books by the authors I haven’t read.) I do subscribe to a few author newsletters but I haven’t taken to following anyone on FB, twitter, etc.

    Reply
  99. The main way I’ve been discovering new authors lately are: Goodwill and library sales. Suddenly, I am surrounded by 4 or 5 Goodwill stores so that no matter which direction I go in, I will end up going by one.
    My county library system has a HUGE book sale (2 exhibit halls at the fairgrounds) twice a year. I help do set up so as I help unpack the boxes I find many interesting books and authors that way.
    Both of these are very inexpensive ways of sampling before going on and investing in all of a writers books! And I get books from the library as well.
    I also found a site online (www.fictiondb.com) that lets me make a list of my favorite authors. I generate a new copy of what is coming out every few months so I don’t miss anything. I also use that site to generate a list of all the books written by an author so when I find a new one I like, I can look for every single book, short story, ebook they have written. As well, I can generate series lists so I can collect all the books in a series before starting the series.
    About two months ago, I found a book by Joanna Bourne that I really enjoyed. It was while trying to find what else she had written, I stumbled upon this blog. (which by the way I find totally fascinating.) I really love the backstory of events and understanding the historical setting of why, who, what, etc. in stories.
    Finding this blog written by multiple authors encourages me to read all the authors. (I had already read books by 5 of you, now I’ll look for books by the authors I haven’t read.) I do subscribe to a few author newsletters but I haven’t taken to following anyone on FB, twitter, etc.

    Reply
  100. The main way I’ve been discovering new authors lately are: Goodwill and library sales. Suddenly, I am surrounded by 4 or 5 Goodwill stores so that no matter which direction I go in, I will end up going by one.
    My county library system has a HUGE book sale (2 exhibit halls at the fairgrounds) twice a year. I help do set up so as I help unpack the boxes I find many interesting books and authors that way.
    Both of these are very inexpensive ways of sampling before going on and investing in all of a writers books! And I get books from the library as well.
    I also found a site online (www.fictiondb.com) that lets me make a list of my favorite authors. I generate a new copy of what is coming out every few months so I don’t miss anything. I also use that site to generate a list of all the books written by an author so when I find a new one I like, I can look for every single book, short story, ebook they have written. As well, I can generate series lists so I can collect all the books in a series before starting the series.
    About two months ago, I found a book by Joanna Bourne that I really enjoyed. It was while trying to find what else she had written, I stumbled upon this blog. (which by the way I find totally fascinating.) I really love the backstory of events and understanding the historical setting of why, who, what, etc. in stories.
    Finding this blog written by multiple authors encourages me to read all the authors. (I had already read books by 5 of you, now I’ll look for books by the authors I haven’t read.) I do subscribe to a few author newsletters but I haven’t taken to following anyone on FB, twitter, etc.

    Reply
  101. t way it’s really easy to try a new author or book because you feel you have similar tastes. I’ve found so many great reads through our monthly book post with all of you.
    I do look at Goodreads too, though I haven’t gotten into the groups as much as I should.. (I need 48 hr. days!) reader to reader recommendations are really the best way to discover books.

    Reply
  102. t way it’s really easy to try a new author or book because you feel you have similar tastes. I’ve found so many great reads through our monthly book post with all of you.
    I do look at Goodreads too, though I haven’t gotten into the groups as much as I should.. (I need 48 hr. days!) reader to reader recommendations are really the best way to discover books.

    Reply
  103. t way it’s really easy to try a new author or book because you feel you have similar tastes. I’ve found so many great reads through our monthly book post with all of you.
    I do look at Goodreads too, though I haven’t gotten into the groups as much as I should.. (I need 48 hr. days!) reader to reader recommendations are really the best way to discover books.

    Reply
  104. t way it’s really easy to try a new author or book because you feel you have similar tastes. I’ve found so many great reads through our monthly book post with all of you.
    I do look at Goodreads too, though I haven’t gotten into the groups as much as I should.. (I need 48 hr. days!) reader to reader recommendations are really the best way to discover books.

    Reply
  105. t way it’s really easy to try a new author or book because you feel you have similar tastes. I’ve found so many great reads through our monthly book post with all of you.
    I do look at Goodreads too, though I haven’t gotten into the groups as much as I should.. (I need 48 hr. days!) reader to reader recommendations are really the best way to discover books.

    Reply
  106. Thanks so much for sharing the list site, Vicki. I do much the same thing when I find a new author I like, and go try to find all the other books she/he has written.
    And so glad you found us and enjoy our mental meanderings ! Hope to see you here regularly!

    Reply
  107. Thanks so much for sharing the list site, Vicki. I do much the same thing when I find a new author I like, and go try to find all the other books she/he has written.
    And so glad you found us and enjoy our mental meanderings ! Hope to see you here regularly!

    Reply
  108. Thanks so much for sharing the list site, Vicki. I do much the same thing when I find a new author I like, and go try to find all the other books she/he has written.
    And so glad you found us and enjoy our mental meanderings ! Hope to see you here regularly!

    Reply
  109. Thanks so much for sharing the list site, Vicki. I do much the same thing when I find a new author I like, and go try to find all the other books she/he has written.
    And so glad you found us and enjoy our mental meanderings ! Hope to see you here regularly!

    Reply
  110. Thanks so much for sharing the list site, Vicki. I do much the same thing when I find a new author I like, and go try to find all the other books she/he has written.
    And so glad you found us and enjoy our mental meanderings ! Hope to see you here regularly!

    Reply
  111. Love all your articles. I’m enchanted with Edwardian, Regency, Victorian eras and the stories from that time not so interested in the present. I go to the Library for books (they have new releases from all genres) also when the Library has a book sale (I’m on a fixed income and the new releases are expensive for me) I can buy boxes of older books that I haven’t read (looking for a brief story line inside) and I’m set for a long time. I have two sisters that love to read too – we switch books as often as we can so we have good selections. Like to hold a book in my hands to read not a kindle or computer. Thanks for all your info. Diane Eberly

    Reply
  112. Love all your articles. I’m enchanted with Edwardian, Regency, Victorian eras and the stories from that time not so interested in the present. I go to the Library for books (they have new releases from all genres) also when the Library has a book sale (I’m on a fixed income and the new releases are expensive for me) I can buy boxes of older books that I haven’t read (looking for a brief story line inside) and I’m set for a long time. I have two sisters that love to read too – we switch books as often as we can so we have good selections. Like to hold a book in my hands to read not a kindle or computer. Thanks for all your info. Diane Eberly

    Reply
  113. Love all your articles. I’m enchanted with Edwardian, Regency, Victorian eras and the stories from that time not so interested in the present. I go to the Library for books (they have new releases from all genres) also when the Library has a book sale (I’m on a fixed income and the new releases are expensive for me) I can buy boxes of older books that I haven’t read (looking for a brief story line inside) and I’m set for a long time. I have two sisters that love to read too – we switch books as often as we can so we have good selections. Like to hold a book in my hands to read not a kindle or computer. Thanks for all your info. Diane Eberly

    Reply
  114. Love all your articles. I’m enchanted with Edwardian, Regency, Victorian eras and the stories from that time not so interested in the present. I go to the Library for books (they have new releases from all genres) also when the Library has a book sale (I’m on a fixed income and the new releases are expensive for me) I can buy boxes of older books that I haven’t read (looking for a brief story line inside) and I’m set for a long time. I have two sisters that love to read too – we switch books as often as we can so we have good selections. Like to hold a book in my hands to read not a kindle or computer. Thanks for all your info. Diane Eberly

    Reply
  115. Love all your articles. I’m enchanted with Edwardian, Regency, Victorian eras and the stories from that time not so interested in the present. I go to the Library for books (they have new releases from all genres) also when the Library has a book sale (I’m on a fixed income and the new releases are expensive for me) I can buy boxes of older books that I haven’t read (looking for a brief story line inside) and I’m set for a long time. I have two sisters that love to read too – we switch books as often as we can so we have good selections. Like to hold a book in my hands to read not a kindle or computer. Thanks for all your info. Diane Eberly

    Reply
  116. I have certain authors whose new books will automatically get a look from me. I love you ladies because when each of you tell me what you are reading, I always find at least one or two books I know I will like.
    I too go to Goodwill and Salvation Army stores. Am not on Facebook, but go to a few book sites to check on what is coming out.
    And then I am a member of several book groups on Yahoo. My fellow readers on those groups are always letting me know when they have finished a book and what they liked.
    In fact, when I think about it, I spend much too much time finding books. I feel I should say – Hi, my name is Annette and I am a book addict.

    Reply
  117. I have certain authors whose new books will automatically get a look from me. I love you ladies because when each of you tell me what you are reading, I always find at least one or two books I know I will like.
    I too go to Goodwill and Salvation Army stores. Am not on Facebook, but go to a few book sites to check on what is coming out.
    And then I am a member of several book groups on Yahoo. My fellow readers on those groups are always letting me know when they have finished a book and what they liked.
    In fact, when I think about it, I spend much too much time finding books. I feel I should say – Hi, my name is Annette and I am a book addict.

    Reply
  118. I have certain authors whose new books will automatically get a look from me. I love you ladies because when each of you tell me what you are reading, I always find at least one or two books I know I will like.
    I too go to Goodwill and Salvation Army stores. Am not on Facebook, but go to a few book sites to check on what is coming out.
    And then I am a member of several book groups on Yahoo. My fellow readers on those groups are always letting me know when they have finished a book and what they liked.
    In fact, when I think about it, I spend much too much time finding books. I feel I should say – Hi, my name is Annette and I am a book addict.

    Reply
  119. I have certain authors whose new books will automatically get a look from me. I love you ladies because when each of you tell me what you are reading, I always find at least one or two books I know I will like.
    I too go to Goodwill and Salvation Army stores. Am not on Facebook, but go to a few book sites to check on what is coming out.
    And then I am a member of several book groups on Yahoo. My fellow readers on those groups are always letting me know when they have finished a book and what they liked.
    In fact, when I think about it, I spend much too much time finding books. I feel I should say – Hi, my name is Annette and I am a book addict.

    Reply
  120. I have certain authors whose new books will automatically get a look from me. I love you ladies because when each of you tell me what you are reading, I always find at least one or two books I know I will like.
    I too go to Goodwill and Salvation Army stores. Am not on Facebook, but go to a few book sites to check on what is coming out.
    And then I am a member of several book groups on Yahoo. My fellow readers on those groups are always letting me know when they have finished a book and what they liked.
    In fact, when I think about it, I spend much too much time finding books. I feel I should say – Hi, my name is Annette and I am a book addict.

    Reply
  121. Ha, Annette! I’ll join you in introducing myself as a book addict! (Hey, there are far worse vices!)
    So glad you enjoy our recommendations. As I’ve said, I, too, have discovered many wonderful books from our readers and fellow Wenches. I also love browsing library book sales, where intriguing titles can be found for a song.
    Book clubs also sound like a great place, though I haven’t had time to join one.
    Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  122. Ha, Annette! I’ll join you in introducing myself as a book addict! (Hey, there are far worse vices!)
    So glad you enjoy our recommendations. As I’ve said, I, too, have discovered many wonderful books from our readers and fellow Wenches. I also love browsing library book sales, where intriguing titles can be found for a song.
    Book clubs also sound like a great place, though I haven’t had time to join one.
    Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  123. Ha, Annette! I’ll join you in introducing myself as a book addict! (Hey, there are far worse vices!)
    So glad you enjoy our recommendations. As I’ve said, I, too, have discovered many wonderful books from our readers and fellow Wenches. I also love browsing library book sales, where intriguing titles can be found for a song.
    Book clubs also sound like a great place, though I haven’t had time to join one.
    Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  124. Ha, Annette! I’ll join you in introducing myself as a book addict! (Hey, there are far worse vices!)
    So glad you enjoy our recommendations. As I’ve said, I, too, have discovered many wonderful books from our readers and fellow Wenches. I also love browsing library book sales, where intriguing titles can be found for a song.
    Book clubs also sound like a great place, though I haven’t had time to join one.
    Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  125. Ha, Annette! I’ll join you in introducing myself as a book addict! (Hey, there are far worse vices!)
    So glad you enjoy our recommendations. As I’ve said, I, too, have discovered many wonderful books from our readers and fellow Wenches. I also love browsing library book sales, where intriguing titles can be found for a song.
    Book clubs also sound like a great place, though I haven’t had time to join one.
    Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  126. I rely on newsletters from authors I like and from a couple of multiple-author sites (Writerspace and Fresh Fiction). I march to the beat of my own drummer so do not rely on others’ opinions (I, for instance, absolutely hated “Outlander” and only finished it because everybody else loved it so much–thank goodness it was free on Amazon just when I got my first Kindle so I didn’t pay for it). I have a bunch of authors I like and just keeping up with them keeps me reading a lot. I don’t follow anyone on Facebook or Twitter because I’d much rather spend my spare time actually reading the books than reading about them. I do stop at the library at least a couple of times a week and I sometimes look at the new books shelves and check out the backs of those books that look interesting. I have found some new authors that way.

    Reply
  127. I rely on newsletters from authors I like and from a couple of multiple-author sites (Writerspace and Fresh Fiction). I march to the beat of my own drummer so do not rely on others’ opinions (I, for instance, absolutely hated “Outlander” and only finished it because everybody else loved it so much–thank goodness it was free on Amazon just when I got my first Kindle so I didn’t pay for it). I have a bunch of authors I like and just keeping up with them keeps me reading a lot. I don’t follow anyone on Facebook or Twitter because I’d much rather spend my spare time actually reading the books than reading about them. I do stop at the library at least a couple of times a week and I sometimes look at the new books shelves and check out the backs of those books that look interesting. I have found some new authors that way.

    Reply
  128. I rely on newsletters from authors I like and from a couple of multiple-author sites (Writerspace and Fresh Fiction). I march to the beat of my own drummer so do not rely on others’ opinions (I, for instance, absolutely hated “Outlander” and only finished it because everybody else loved it so much–thank goodness it was free on Amazon just when I got my first Kindle so I didn’t pay for it). I have a bunch of authors I like and just keeping up with them keeps me reading a lot. I don’t follow anyone on Facebook or Twitter because I’d much rather spend my spare time actually reading the books than reading about them. I do stop at the library at least a couple of times a week and I sometimes look at the new books shelves and check out the backs of those books that look interesting. I have found some new authors that way.

    Reply
  129. I rely on newsletters from authors I like and from a couple of multiple-author sites (Writerspace and Fresh Fiction). I march to the beat of my own drummer so do not rely on others’ opinions (I, for instance, absolutely hated “Outlander” and only finished it because everybody else loved it so much–thank goodness it was free on Amazon just when I got my first Kindle so I didn’t pay for it). I have a bunch of authors I like and just keeping up with them keeps me reading a lot. I don’t follow anyone on Facebook or Twitter because I’d much rather spend my spare time actually reading the books than reading about them. I do stop at the library at least a couple of times a week and I sometimes look at the new books shelves and check out the backs of those books that look interesting. I have found some new authors that way.

    Reply
  130. I rely on newsletters from authors I like and from a couple of multiple-author sites (Writerspace and Fresh Fiction). I march to the beat of my own drummer so do not rely on others’ opinions (I, for instance, absolutely hated “Outlander” and only finished it because everybody else loved it so much–thank goodness it was free on Amazon just when I got my first Kindle so I didn’t pay for it). I have a bunch of authors I like and just keeping up with them keeps me reading a lot. I don’t follow anyone on Facebook or Twitter because I’d much rather spend my spare time actually reading the books than reading about them. I do stop at the library at least a couple of times a week and I sometimes look at the new books shelves and check out the backs of those books that look interesting. I have found some new authors that way.

    Reply
  131. I do a lot of research on the web before I select the books. I started reading historical fiction about 5 years ago and now have read many of the major authors. I know what I like and always go with the recommendations of other fans. Also have favorite authors!! But I am eager to try new writing but if I dont like their style will not read another book. It requires a lot of reading to find authors and books you really love. Having said that the fun is in the FINDING.

    Reply
  132. I do a lot of research on the web before I select the books. I started reading historical fiction about 5 years ago and now have read many of the major authors. I know what I like and always go with the recommendations of other fans. Also have favorite authors!! But I am eager to try new writing but if I dont like their style will not read another book. It requires a lot of reading to find authors and books you really love. Having said that the fun is in the FINDING.

    Reply
  133. I do a lot of research on the web before I select the books. I started reading historical fiction about 5 years ago and now have read many of the major authors. I know what I like and always go with the recommendations of other fans. Also have favorite authors!! But I am eager to try new writing but if I dont like their style will not read another book. It requires a lot of reading to find authors and books you really love. Having said that the fun is in the FINDING.

    Reply
  134. I do a lot of research on the web before I select the books. I started reading historical fiction about 5 years ago and now have read many of the major authors. I know what I like and always go with the recommendations of other fans. Also have favorite authors!! But I am eager to try new writing but if I dont like their style will not read another book. It requires a lot of reading to find authors and books you really love. Having said that the fun is in the FINDING.

    Reply
  135. I do a lot of research on the web before I select the books. I started reading historical fiction about 5 years ago and now have read many of the major authors. I know what I like and always go with the recommendations of other fans. Also have favorite authors!! But I am eager to try new writing but if I dont like their style will not read another book. It requires a lot of reading to find authors and books you really love. Having said that the fun is in the FINDING.

    Reply
  136. I always loved to browse through bookshops and libraries. I always check the new book display at the library. But the bookstore is not as much fun nowadays because my local one has a so-so historical fiction/romance section. I get recommendations from author and book blogs like this one, reviews on Amazon, reviews at Paperbackswap.com, and reading book reviews in magazines & newspapers. The upside of online is that I’m exposed to a much wider universe of people with my tastes, so I find out about a lot of books that I would never have stumbled on accidentally.
    But my latest author find was most unusual, and due to Joanna Bourne, indirectly. She offered to retweet an article I wrote for a local history blog, about a building preservation effect I am involved in. I only just started using Twitter to publicize this campaign. The piece also got retweeted by a couple of other historical preservationists here in New Jersey, and then I noticed that I was being followed by someone named @DonnaThorland. It turns out that she writes historicals set in in the Revolutionary War era, her series is called “Renegades of the Revolution”. So I am looking forward to reading one of her books soon!

    Reply
  137. I always loved to browse through bookshops and libraries. I always check the new book display at the library. But the bookstore is not as much fun nowadays because my local one has a so-so historical fiction/romance section. I get recommendations from author and book blogs like this one, reviews on Amazon, reviews at Paperbackswap.com, and reading book reviews in magazines & newspapers. The upside of online is that I’m exposed to a much wider universe of people with my tastes, so I find out about a lot of books that I would never have stumbled on accidentally.
    But my latest author find was most unusual, and due to Joanna Bourne, indirectly. She offered to retweet an article I wrote for a local history blog, about a building preservation effect I am involved in. I only just started using Twitter to publicize this campaign. The piece also got retweeted by a couple of other historical preservationists here in New Jersey, and then I noticed that I was being followed by someone named @DonnaThorland. It turns out that she writes historicals set in in the Revolutionary War era, her series is called “Renegades of the Revolution”. So I am looking forward to reading one of her books soon!

    Reply
  138. I always loved to browse through bookshops and libraries. I always check the new book display at the library. But the bookstore is not as much fun nowadays because my local one has a so-so historical fiction/romance section. I get recommendations from author and book blogs like this one, reviews on Amazon, reviews at Paperbackswap.com, and reading book reviews in magazines & newspapers. The upside of online is that I’m exposed to a much wider universe of people with my tastes, so I find out about a lot of books that I would never have stumbled on accidentally.
    But my latest author find was most unusual, and due to Joanna Bourne, indirectly. She offered to retweet an article I wrote for a local history blog, about a building preservation effect I am involved in. I only just started using Twitter to publicize this campaign. The piece also got retweeted by a couple of other historical preservationists here in New Jersey, and then I noticed that I was being followed by someone named @DonnaThorland. It turns out that she writes historicals set in in the Revolutionary War era, her series is called “Renegades of the Revolution”. So I am looking forward to reading one of her books soon!

    Reply
  139. I always loved to browse through bookshops and libraries. I always check the new book display at the library. But the bookstore is not as much fun nowadays because my local one has a so-so historical fiction/romance section. I get recommendations from author and book blogs like this one, reviews on Amazon, reviews at Paperbackswap.com, and reading book reviews in magazines & newspapers. The upside of online is that I’m exposed to a much wider universe of people with my tastes, so I find out about a lot of books that I would never have stumbled on accidentally.
    But my latest author find was most unusual, and due to Joanna Bourne, indirectly. She offered to retweet an article I wrote for a local history blog, about a building preservation effect I am involved in. I only just started using Twitter to publicize this campaign. The piece also got retweeted by a couple of other historical preservationists here in New Jersey, and then I noticed that I was being followed by someone named @DonnaThorland. It turns out that she writes historicals set in in the Revolutionary War era, her series is called “Renegades of the Revolution”. So I am looking forward to reading one of her books soon!

    Reply
  140. I always loved to browse through bookshops and libraries. I always check the new book display at the library. But the bookstore is not as much fun nowadays because my local one has a so-so historical fiction/romance section. I get recommendations from author and book blogs like this one, reviews on Amazon, reviews at Paperbackswap.com, and reading book reviews in magazines & newspapers. The upside of online is that I’m exposed to a much wider universe of people with my tastes, so I find out about a lot of books that I would never have stumbled on accidentally.
    But my latest author find was most unusual, and due to Joanna Bourne, indirectly. She offered to retweet an article I wrote for a local history blog, about a building preservation effect I am involved in. I only just started using Twitter to publicize this campaign. The piece also got retweeted by a couple of other historical preservationists here in New Jersey, and then I noticed that I was being followed by someone named @DonnaThorland. It turns out that she writes historicals set in in the Revolutionary War era, her series is called “Renegades of the Revolution”. So I am looking forward to reading one of her books soon!

    Reply
  141. Hi Cara. I used to wander around the book store or library and find books. As book stores have limited their variety and ebooks have become prevalent, I started reading reviews online at the major retailers.
    My book search has evolved to following multiple blogs with reviewers I trust as well as following author blogs/subscribing to newsletters — like the Word Wenches — to find out about new books or older books being released in eformat. I am a big fan of author websites. I still go to retailers like Amazon and B&N for reviews but I also check out GoodReads and other sites for reviews. I try to leave a few reviews of my own along the way, but often feel like I have enough time to write a comprehensive review that does a book justice.
    I do not use Facebook for books and book reviews. I keep FB for real life friends and am rarely on it anyway.

    Reply
  142. Hi Cara. I used to wander around the book store or library and find books. As book stores have limited their variety and ebooks have become prevalent, I started reading reviews online at the major retailers.
    My book search has evolved to following multiple blogs with reviewers I trust as well as following author blogs/subscribing to newsletters — like the Word Wenches — to find out about new books or older books being released in eformat. I am a big fan of author websites. I still go to retailers like Amazon and B&N for reviews but I also check out GoodReads and other sites for reviews. I try to leave a few reviews of my own along the way, but often feel like I have enough time to write a comprehensive review that does a book justice.
    I do not use Facebook for books and book reviews. I keep FB for real life friends and am rarely on it anyway.

    Reply
  143. Hi Cara. I used to wander around the book store or library and find books. As book stores have limited their variety and ebooks have become prevalent, I started reading reviews online at the major retailers.
    My book search has evolved to following multiple blogs with reviewers I trust as well as following author blogs/subscribing to newsletters — like the Word Wenches — to find out about new books or older books being released in eformat. I am a big fan of author websites. I still go to retailers like Amazon and B&N for reviews but I also check out GoodReads and other sites for reviews. I try to leave a few reviews of my own along the way, but often feel like I have enough time to write a comprehensive review that does a book justice.
    I do not use Facebook for books and book reviews. I keep FB for real life friends and am rarely on it anyway.

    Reply
  144. Hi Cara. I used to wander around the book store or library and find books. As book stores have limited their variety and ebooks have become prevalent, I started reading reviews online at the major retailers.
    My book search has evolved to following multiple blogs with reviewers I trust as well as following author blogs/subscribing to newsletters — like the Word Wenches — to find out about new books or older books being released in eformat. I am a big fan of author websites. I still go to retailers like Amazon and B&N for reviews but I also check out GoodReads and other sites for reviews. I try to leave a few reviews of my own along the way, but often feel like I have enough time to write a comprehensive review that does a book justice.
    I do not use Facebook for books and book reviews. I keep FB for real life friends and am rarely on it anyway.

    Reply
  145. Hi Cara. I used to wander around the book store or library and find books. As book stores have limited their variety and ebooks have become prevalent, I started reading reviews online at the major retailers.
    My book search has evolved to following multiple blogs with reviewers I trust as well as following author blogs/subscribing to newsletters — like the Word Wenches — to find out about new books or older books being released in eformat. I am a big fan of author websites. I still go to retailers like Amazon and B&N for reviews but I also check out GoodReads and other sites for reviews. I try to leave a few reviews of my own along the way, but often feel like I have enough time to write a comprehensive review that does a book justice.
    I do not use Facebook for books and book reviews. I keep FB for real life friends and am rarely on it anyway.

    Reply
  146. Even in the halcyon days of yore, when there was a Waldenbooks or other bookstore in every mall and lots of smaller stores left as well, it was hard to find out about upcoming books. I have never been a fan of Romantic Times’s gushy review style, but I did buy the magazine then just for the lists of upcoming titles. I’d pick up the stores’ monthly new releases leaflets. I’d look in the back of books where publishers would put ads for upcoming titles. In that way I made up my own must-buy list.
    I could do the same now, but for the life of me, I don’t get why publishers and massive book sites like amazon aren’t doing it for me. They have access to the information, but it’s like they’re keeping some big secret.
    Seeing as how romance writing practically supports some of them, it baffles me. Or are we still in the age of non-romance readers running corporations, thinking that “they’re all the same, what difference does it make?”
    And another thing 🙂 — why aren;t bookstores smarter? Don’t they understand that there’s a reason they’re seeing the same faces come back into the store several times a month? Well, duh, they’re looking for new books to read! So why make it so darn difficult to tell the new books from the old? As a constant reader who spends a lot more of her budget on books than she probably ought to, and thus a prime target for bookstores (one would think), I don’t want to know what was new last season or last month, I want to know what came in the door this week. I loved a little paperback store in my neighborhood that had a “New Today” rack! Yet I haven’t been in a store with a “New This Week” display in decades. Seems to me they’re missing an opportunity.

    Reply
  147. Even in the halcyon days of yore, when there was a Waldenbooks or other bookstore in every mall and lots of smaller stores left as well, it was hard to find out about upcoming books. I have never been a fan of Romantic Times’s gushy review style, but I did buy the magazine then just for the lists of upcoming titles. I’d pick up the stores’ monthly new releases leaflets. I’d look in the back of books where publishers would put ads for upcoming titles. In that way I made up my own must-buy list.
    I could do the same now, but for the life of me, I don’t get why publishers and massive book sites like amazon aren’t doing it for me. They have access to the information, but it’s like they’re keeping some big secret.
    Seeing as how romance writing practically supports some of them, it baffles me. Or are we still in the age of non-romance readers running corporations, thinking that “they’re all the same, what difference does it make?”
    And another thing 🙂 — why aren;t bookstores smarter? Don’t they understand that there’s a reason they’re seeing the same faces come back into the store several times a month? Well, duh, they’re looking for new books to read! So why make it so darn difficult to tell the new books from the old? As a constant reader who spends a lot more of her budget on books than she probably ought to, and thus a prime target for bookstores (one would think), I don’t want to know what was new last season or last month, I want to know what came in the door this week. I loved a little paperback store in my neighborhood that had a “New Today” rack! Yet I haven’t been in a store with a “New This Week” display in decades. Seems to me they’re missing an opportunity.

    Reply
  148. Even in the halcyon days of yore, when there was a Waldenbooks or other bookstore in every mall and lots of smaller stores left as well, it was hard to find out about upcoming books. I have never been a fan of Romantic Times’s gushy review style, but I did buy the magazine then just for the lists of upcoming titles. I’d pick up the stores’ monthly new releases leaflets. I’d look in the back of books where publishers would put ads for upcoming titles. In that way I made up my own must-buy list.
    I could do the same now, but for the life of me, I don’t get why publishers and massive book sites like amazon aren’t doing it for me. They have access to the information, but it’s like they’re keeping some big secret.
    Seeing as how romance writing practically supports some of them, it baffles me. Or are we still in the age of non-romance readers running corporations, thinking that “they’re all the same, what difference does it make?”
    And another thing 🙂 — why aren;t bookstores smarter? Don’t they understand that there’s a reason they’re seeing the same faces come back into the store several times a month? Well, duh, they’re looking for new books to read! So why make it so darn difficult to tell the new books from the old? As a constant reader who spends a lot more of her budget on books than she probably ought to, and thus a prime target for bookstores (one would think), I don’t want to know what was new last season or last month, I want to know what came in the door this week. I loved a little paperback store in my neighborhood that had a “New Today” rack! Yet I haven’t been in a store with a “New This Week” display in decades. Seems to me they’re missing an opportunity.

    Reply
  149. Even in the halcyon days of yore, when there was a Waldenbooks or other bookstore in every mall and lots of smaller stores left as well, it was hard to find out about upcoming books. I have never been a fan of Romantic Times’s gushy review style, but I did buy the magazine then just for the lists of upcoming titles. I’d pick up the stores’ monthly new releases leaflets. I’d look in the back of books where publishers would put ads for upcoming titles. In that way I made up my own must-buy list.
    I could do the same now, but for the life of me, I don’t get why publishers and massive book sites like amazon aren’t doing it for me. They have access to the information, but it’s like they’re keeping some big secret.
    Seeing as how romance writing practically supports some of them, it baffles me. Or are we still in the age of non-romance readers running corporations, thinking that “they’re all the same, what difference does it make?”
    And another thing 🙂 — why aren;t bookstores smarter? Don’t they understand that there’s a reason they’re seeing the same faces come back into the store several times a month? Well, duh, they’re looking for new books to read! So why make it so darn difficult to tell the new books from the old? As a constant reader who spends a lot more of her budget on books than she probably ought to, and thus a prime target for bookstores (one would think), I don’t want to know what was new last season or last month, I want to know what came in the door this week. I loved a little paperback store in my neighborhood that had a “New Today” rack! Yet I haven’t been in a store with a “New This Week” display in decades. Seems to me they’re missing an opportunity.

    Reply
  150. Even in the halcyon days of yore, when there was a Waldenbooks or other bookstore in every mall and lots of smaller stores left as well, it was hard to find out about upcoming books. I have never been a fan of Romantic Times’s gushy review style, but I did buy the magazine then just for the lists of upcoming titles. I’d pick up the stores’ monthly new releases leaflets. I’d look in the back of books where publishers would put ads for upcoming titles. In that way I made up my own must-buy list.
    I could do the same now, but for the life of me, I don’t get why publishers and massive book sites like amazon aren’t doing it for me. They have access to the information, but it’s like they’re keeping some big secret.
    Seeing as how romance writing practically supports some of them, it baffles me. Or are we still in the age of non-romance readers running corporations, thinking that “they’re all the same, what difference does it make?”
    And another thing 🙂 — why aren;t bookstores smarter? Don’t they understand that there’s a reason they’re seeing the same faces come back into the store several times a month? Well, duh, they’re looking for new books to read! So why make it so darn difficult to tell the new books from the old? As a constant reader who spends a lot more of her budget on books than she probably ought to, and thus a prime target for bookstores (one would think), I don’t want to know what was new last season or last month, I want to know what came in the door this week. I loved a little paperback store in my neighborhood that had a “New Today” rack! Yet I haven’t been in a store with a “New This Week” display in decades. Seems to me they’re missing an opportunity.

    Reply
  151. When I’m in the library and i’m searching for authors I’ve never read before, I do ye olde bookshelf grab–pulling a book off the shelf if the title intrigues me and the book cover looks interesting. This is actually how I found my first Joanna Bourne book, and subsequently what brought me to this site! So, in that case it really was luck of the draw.
    I am prone to finding authors on the shelf that I like and just playing the ‘lets see what’s on the shelf directly around the authors I like’ game.
    So I guess title and book cover. I know people know that matters and its a cliché, etc, but I really can’t overexpress how vital that is in grabbing my attention. Not just a pretty book cover either: a book cover that looks like it reflects the type of book I’m about to read. I love many of Eloisa James’ novels, but sometimes I find the covers of her novels kind of mortifying and I’m not sure they’re always a fair representation of the type of work her novels represent (ie. if your books is not just a straightup bodice ripper filled with love scenes, if it’s an actual story, I am not the type of person that would want the bare chested hero on the cover. It’s sort of embarrassing to pull that book out in public. But that’s just me).
    For ebooks, seriously a lot of it is word of mouth. Especially author to author recommendations. I like reading author blogs and twitter pages, if you can get your fellow authors to say how awesome your new book is, I will probably at least check out the amazon page. Second: the cover for the ebook is also a big eye catcher if I’m scrolling through a page and just happen to see something neat (easily distracted by shiny, pretty things. you know?). Then I check the preview. Do the first five pages offered to me look good? Lastly: the reviews. I don’t necessarily check how many reviews they have, but I’m usually looking to see the proportion of positive to negative. It’s not always a dealbreaker, I have read and loved many books that only got so-so reviews, and really disliked ones that have at times had a bafflingly large percentage of positive reviews. But I go to the one star review section first and read why the reviewer disliked it. If the answer is: too descriptive, too wordy, or ‘nothing happened’ this will not put me off. If the answer is: the hero almost raped the heroine (or something that I will have a major issue with in terms of the actual content) then I won’t read it.
    So there you go, hope that helps! 🙂

    Reply
  152. When I’m in the library and i’m searching for authors I’ve never read before, I do ye olde bookshelf grab–pulling a book off the shelf if the title intrigues me and the book cover looks interesting. This is actually how I found my first Joanna Bourne book, and subsequently what brought me to this site! So, in that case it really was luck of the draw.
    I am prone to finding authors on the shelf that I like and just playing the ‘lets see what’s on the shelf directly around the authors I like’ game.
    So I guess title and book cover. I know people know that matters and its a cliché, etc, but I really can’t overexpress how vital that is in grabbing my attention. Not just a pretty book cover either: a book cover that looks like it reflects the type of book I’m about to read. I love many of Eloisa James’ novels, but sometimes I find the covers of her novels kind of mortifying and I’m not sure they’re always a fair representation of the type of work her novels represent (ie. if your books is not just a straightup bodice ripper filled with love scenes, if it’s an actual story, I am not the type of person that would want the bare chested hero on the cover. It’s sort of embarrassing to pull that book out in public. But that’s just me).
    For ebooks, seriously a lot of it is word of mouth. Especially author to author recommendations. I like reading author blogs and twitter pages, if you can get your fellow authors to say how awesome your new book is, I will probably at least check out the amazon page. Second: the cover for the ebook is also a big eye catcher if I’m scrolling through a page and just happen to see something neat (easily distracted by shiny, pretty things. you know?). Then I check the preview. Do the first five pages offered to me look good? Lastly: the reviews. I don’t necessarily check how many reviews they have, but I’m usually looking to see the proportion of positive to negative. It’s not always a dealbreaker, I have read and loved many books that only got so-so reviews, and really disliked ones that have at times had a bafflingly large percentage of positive reviews. But I go to the one star review section first and read why the reviewer disliked it. If the answer is: too descriptive, too wordy, or ‘nothing happened’ this will not put me off. If the answer is: the hero almost raped the heroine (or something that I will have a major issue with in terms of the actual content) then I won’t read it.
    So there you go, hope that helps! 🙂

    Reply
  153. When I’m in the library and i’m searching for authors I’ve never read before, I do ye olde bookshelf grab–pulling a book off the shelf if the title intrigues me and the book cover looks interesting. This is actually how I found my first Joanna Bourne book, and subsequently what brought me to this site! So, in that case it really was luck of the draw.
    I am prone to finding authors on the shelf that I like and just playing the ‘lets see what’s on the shelf directly around the authors I like’ game.
    So I guess title and book cover. I know people know that matters and its a cliché, etc, but I really can’t overexpress how vital that is in grabbing my attention. Not just a pretty book cover either: a book cover that looks like it reflects the type of book I’m about to read. I love many of Eloisa James’ novels, but sometimes I find the covers of her novels kind of mortifying and I’m not sure they’re always a fair representation of the type of work her novels represent (ie. if your books is not just a straightup bodice ripper filled with love scenes, if it’s an actual story, I am not the type of person that would want the bare chested hero on the cover. It’s sort of embarrassing to pull that book out in public. But that’s just me).
    For ebooks, seriously a lot of it is word of mouth. Especially author to author recommendations. I like reading author blogs and twitter pages, if you can get your fellow authors to say how awesome your new book is, I will probably at least check out the amazon page. Second: the cover for the ebook is also a big eye catcher if I’m scrolling through a page and just happen to see something neat (easily distracted by shiny, pretty things. you know?). Then I check the preview. Do the first five pages offered to me look good? Lastly: the reviews. I don’t necessarily check how many reviews they have, but I’m usually looking to see the proportion of positive to negative. It’s not always a dealbreaker, I have read and loved many books that only got so-so reviews, and really disliked ones that have at times had a bafflingly large percentage of positive reviews. But I go to the one star review section first and read why the reviewer disliked it. If the answer is: too descriptive, too wordy, or ‘nothing happened’ this will not put me off. If the answer is: the hero almost raped the heroine (or something that I will have a major issue with in terms of the actual content) then I won’t read it.
    So there you go, hope that helps! 🙂

    Reply
  154. When I’m in the library and i’m searching for authors I’ve never read before, I do ye olde bookshelf grab–pulling a book off the shelf if the title intrigues me and the book cover looks interesting. This is actually how I found my first Joanna Bourne book, and subsequently what brought me to this site! So, in that case it really was luck of the draw.
    I am prone to finding authors on the shelf that I like and just playing the ‘lets see what’s on the shelf directly around the authors I like’ game.
    So I guess title and book cover. I know people know that matters and its a cliché, etc, but I really can’t overexpress how vital that is in grabbing my attention. Not just a pretty book cover either: a book cover that looks like it reflects the type of book I’m about to read. I love many of Eloisa James’ novels, but sometimes I find the covers of her novels kind of mortifying and I’m not sure they’re always a fair representation of the type of work her novels represent (ie. if your books is not just a straightup bodice ripper filled with love scenes, if it’s an actual story, I am not the type of person that would want the bare chested hero on the cover. It’s sort of embarrassing to pull that book out in public. But that’s just me).
    For ebooks, seriously a lot of it is word of mouth. Especially author to author recommendations. I like reading author blogs and twitter pages, if you can get your fellow authors to say how awesome your new book is, I will probably at least check out the amazon page. Second: the cover for the ebook is also a big eye catcher if I’m scrolling through a page and just happen to see something neat (easily distracted by shiny, pretty things. you know?). Then I check the preview. Do the first five pages offered to me look good? Lastly: the reviews. I don’t necessarily check how many reviews they have, but I’m usually looking to see the proportion of positive to negative. It’s not always a dealbreaker, I have read and loved many books that only got so-so reviews, and really disliked ones that have at times had a bafflingly large percentage of positive reviews. But I go to the one star review section first and read why the reviewer disliked it. If the answer is: too descriptive, too wordy, or ‘nothing happened’ this will not put me off. If the answer is: the hero almost raped the heroine (or something that I will have a major issue with in terms of the actual content) then I won’t read it.
    So there you go, hope that helps! 🙂

    Reply
  155. When I’m in the library and i’m searching for authors I’ve never read before, I do ye olde bookshelf grab–pulling a book off the shelf if the title intrigues me and the book cover looks interesting. This is actually how I found my first Joanna Bourne book, and subsequently what brought me to this site! So, in that case it really was luck of the draw.
    I am prone to finding authors on the shelf that I like and just playing the ‘lets see what’s on the shelf directly around the authors I like’ game.
    So I guess title and book cover. I know people know that matters and its a cliché, etc, but I really can’t overexpress how vital that is in grabbing my attention. Not just a pretty book cover either: a book cover that looks like it reflects the type of book I’m about to read. I love many of Eloisa James’ novels, but sometimes I find the covers of her novels kind of mortifying and I’m not sure they’re always a fair representation of the type of work her novels represent (ie. if your books is not just a straightup bodice ripper filled with love scenes, if it’s an actual story, I am not the type of person that would want the bare chested hero on the cover. It’s sort of embarrassing to pull that book out in public. But that’s just me).
    For ebooks, seriously a lot of it is word of mouth. Especially author to author recommendations. I like reading author blogs and twitter pages, if you can get your fellow authors to say how awesome your new book is, I will probably at least check out the amazon page. Second: the cover for the ebook is also a big eye catcher if I’m scrolling through a page and just happen to see something neat (easily distracted by shiny, pretty things. you know?). Then I check the preview. Do the first five pages offered to me look good? Lastly: the reviews. I don’t necessarily check how many reviews they have, but I’m usually looking to see the proportion of positive to negative. It’s not always a dealbreaker, I have read and loved many books that only got so-so reviews, and really disliked ones that have at times had a bafflingly large percentage of positive reviews. But I go to the one star review section first and read why the reviewer disliked it. If the answer is: too descriptive, too wordy, or ‘nothing happened’ this will not put me off. If the answer is: the hero almost raped the heroine (or something that I will have a major issue with in terms of the actual content) then I won’t read it.
    So there you go, hope that helps! 🙂

    Reply

Leave a Comment