Summer’s Splendors

ConeCara/Andrea here . . .Wondering where the summer went!
In the U.S., this Labor Day long weekend traditionally marks the end of the kick-back lazy days of beach reading, country walking and just plain relaxing. As more and more of us are finding life becoming increasingly frenetic, with the demands on our time pressing in from every angle, this interlude where we’re given tacit permission to “turn off” the usual pace is becoming more and more cherished  . . .

With many of us girding the loins to head back to “regular” work after the long holiday weekend, it’s interesting to contemplate that we’re celebrating “Labor Day.” In the past, the traditional workday was well defined. For centuries farmers toiled from dawn to dusk in a natural rhythm with the seasons. Long hours prevailed in other professions, but as workers demanded more of a voice, the standard day became the 9 to 5 routine of our grandparents and parents. What’s happened to us! These days, everyone, from grade school kids to octogenarians are wired to be on the grid 24/7.  We never turn off and let our minds meander and play. Summer becomes just another few months that blur together in a whizzing around . . .to do what? Sometimes I wonder.

I am mindful of trying  to stop and smell the proverbial roses all year ‘round. But summer is a special reminder—perhaps because of childhood and the heady excitement of exploring and playing while school was out—to breath deeply and appreciate the simple pleasures of the moment.

So in an ode to summer, here’s a snapshot of some of the things I’ll miss about the season:

Golf 2Walking the golf course in early evening, plotting and playing in the shimmering light.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Flip flops

Wearing my flip-flops instead of Ugg sheepskin boots.

 

 

 

 

 

 

  Raspberries
The sweet taste of just-picked wild raspberries from along a country road.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Harbor sunsetWatching the colors of twilight play across the water.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
Picnic
Picnics on the beach with friends.

 

 

 

 

 
Rhodo
Savoring the beauty of Nature blooming to life.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saybrook GurlsPlaying hookey on a weekday to hang out with my best friends from college.

 

 

 

 

 So what about you? What do you miss about summer when it's fading into the sunset?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

105 thoughts on “Summer’s Splendors”

  1. For those of us in the Southern Hemisphere, summer is always pretty busy, I think. Christmas and New Year (and then if you’re Ukrainian, another Christmas and New Year!). It seems summer is so packed with parties and events you need another break afterwards!

    Reply
  2. For those of us in the Southern Hemisphere, summer is always pretty busy, I think. Christmas and New Year (and then if you’re Ukrainian, another Christmas and New Year!). It seems summer is so packed with parties and events you need another break afterwards!

    Reply
  3. For those of us in the Southern Hemisphere, summer is always pretty busy, I think. Christmas and New Year (and then if you’re Ukrainian, another Christmas and New Year!). It seems summer is so packed with parties and events you need another break afterwards!

    Reply
  4. For those of us in the Southern Hemisphere, summer is always pretty busy, I think. Christmas and New Year (and then if you’re Ukrainian, another Christmas and New Year!). It seems summer is so packed with parties and events you need another break afterwards!

    Reply
  5. For those of us in the Southern Hemisphere, summer is always pretty busy, I think. Christmas and New Year (and then if you’re Ukrainian, another Christmas and New Year!). It seems summer is so packed with parties and events you need another break afterwards!

    Reply
  6. What will I miss about summer?
    The pool.
    The long days where I can walk in the cool morning or savor the setting of the sun near bedtime.
    The social activities. My friends want to be out and about in summer, less so in winter.
    The outdoor cafes where you can dine, people watch, and smile at puppies out for a stroll.
    Fresh, in season, fruits and vegetables. I dread the return of the imported grapes and the hot house tomatoes.
    Peek-a-boo shoes that show off my pedicure.

    Reply
  7. What will I miss about summer?
    The pool.
    The long days where I can walk in the cool morning or savor the setting of the sun near bedtime.
    The social activities. My friends want to be out and about in summer, less so in winter.
    The outdoor cafes where you can dine, people watch, and smile at puppies out for a stroll.
    Fresh, in season, fruits and vegetables. I dread the return of the imported grapes and the hot house tomatoes.
    Peek-a-boo shoes that show off my pedicure.

    Reply
  8. What will I miss about summer?
    The pool.
    The long days where I can walk in the cool morning or savor the setting of the sun near bedtime.
    The social activities. My friends want to be out and about in summer, less so in winter.
    The outdoor cafes where you can dine, people watch, and smile at puppies out for a stroll.
    Fresh, in season, fruits and vegetables. I dread the return of the imported grapes and the hot house tomatoes.
    Peek-a-boo shoes that show off my pedicure.

    Reply
  9. What will I miss about summer?
    The pool.
    The long days where I can walk in the cool morning or savor the setting of the sun near bedtime.
    The social activities. My friends want to be out and about in summer, less so in winter.
    The outdoor cafes where you can dine, people watch, and smile at puppies out for a stroll.
    Fresh, in season, fruits and vegetables. I dread the return of the imported grapes and the hot house tomatoes.
    Peek-a-boo shoes that show off my pedicure.

    Reply
  10. What will I miss about summer?
    The pool.
    The long days where I can walk in the cool morning or savor the setting of the sun near bedtime.
    The social activities. My friends want to be out and about in summer, less so in winter.
    The outdoor cafes where you can dine, people watch, and smile at puppies out for a stroll.
    Fresh, in season, fruits and vegetables. I dread the return of the imported grapes and the hot house tomatoes.
    Peek-a-boo shoes that show off my pedicure.

    Reply
  11. I love each season, but I miss summer most of all. One thing I always miss is the opportunity to keep the doors and windows open so that I can hear birds and listen to the wind or smell the tomatoes ripening on the deck. And speaking of tomatoes, there’s nothing like squatting down in the veggie garden to eat home-grown, organic veggies off the vine. Nothing–absolutely nothing–tastes better than a fresh carrot pulled right out of the dirt and rinsed off with a garden hose. Same thing with eating sun-warmed tomatoes so pungent and bursting with flavor that most of them end up in my mouth rather than the collander!
    On the financial side of things, I love that I can turn off the furnace in May and not turn it on again until October. That’s a huge savings in furnace oil and utility bills!

    Reply
  12. I love each season, but I miss summer most of all. One thing I always miss is the opportunity to keep the doors and windows open so that I can hear birds and listen to the wind or smell the tomatoes ripening on the deck. And speaking of tomatoes, there’s nothing like squatting down in the veggie garden to eat home-grown, organic veggies off the vine. Nothing–absolutely nothing–tastes better than a fresh carrot pulled right out of the dirt and rinsed off with a garden hose. Same thing with eating sun-warmed tomatoes so pungent and bursting with flavor that most of them end up in my mouth rather than the collander!
    On the financial side of things, I love that I can turn off the furnace in May and not turn it on again until October. That’s a huge savings in furnace oil and utility bills!

    Reply
  13. I love each season, but I miss summer most of all. One thing I always miss is the opportunity to keep the doors and windows open so that I can hear birds and listen to the wind or smell the tomatoes ripening on the deck. And speaking of tomatoes, there’s nothing like squatting down in the veggie garden to eat home-grown, organic veggies off the vine. Nothing–absolutely nothing–tastes better than a fresh carrot pulled right out of the dirt and rinsed off with a garden hose. Same thing with eating sun-warmed tomatoes so pungent and bursting with flavor that most of them end up in my mouth rather than the collander!
    On the financial side of things, I love that I can turn off the furnace in May and not turn it on again until October. That’s a huge savings in furnace oil and utility bills!

    Reply
  14. I love each season, but I miss summer most of all. One thing I always miss is the opportunity to keep the doors and windows open so that I can hear birds and listen to the wind or smell the tomatoes ripening on the deck. And speaking of tomatoes, there’s nothing like squatting down in the veggie garden to eat home-grown, organic veggies off the vine. Nothing–absolutely nothing–tastes better than a fresh carrot pulled right out of the dirt and rinsed off with a garden hose. Same thing with eating sun-warmed tomatoes so pungent and bursting with flavor that most of them end up in my mouth rather than the collander!
    On the financial side of things, I love that I can turn off the furnace in May and not turn it on again until October. That’s a huge savings in furnace oil and utility bills!

    Reply
  15. I love each season, but I miss summer most of all. One thing I always miss is the opportunity to keep the doors and windows open so that I can hear birds and listen to the wind or smell the tomatoes ripening on the deck. And speaking of tomatoes, there’s nothing like squatting down in the veggie garden to eat home-grown, organic veggies off the vine. Nothing–absolutely nothing–tastes better than a fresh carrot pulled right out of the dirt and rinsed off with a garden hose. Same thing with eating sun-warmed tomatoes so pungent and bursting with flavor that most of them end up in my mouth rather than the collander!
    On the financial side of things, I love that I can turn off the furnace in May and not turn it on again until October. That’s a huge savings in furnace oil and utility bills!

    Reply
  16. I enjoyed this post as a reminder of my childhood summers. I live in the desert now, so this is the least fun season. (Walks outside? Unwise. The garden? Could be mistaken for Mars. Eating on the patio? Only if your food needs extra cooking.) The one thing I love about August is the occasional WHOPPING rainstorm. The next day there’s actually water in the river beds. For a few weeks, there is a sprinkling of green over the mountains.

    Reply
  17. I enjoyed this post as a reminder of my childhood summers. I live in the desert now, so this is the least fun season. (Walks outside? Unwise. The garden? Could be mistaken for Mars. Eating on the patio? Only if your food needs extra cooking.) The one thing I love about August is the occasional WHOPPING rainstorm. The next day there’s actually water in the river beds. For a few weeks, there is a sprinkling of green over the mountains.

    Reply
  18. I enjoyed this post as a reminder of my childhood summers. I live in the desert now, so this is the least fun season. (Walks outside? Unwise. The garden? Could be mistaken for Mars. Eating on the patio? Only if your food needs extra cooking.) The one thing I love about August is the occasional WHOPPING rainstorm. The next day there’s actually water in the river beds. For a few weeks, there is a sprinkling of green over the mountains.

    Reply
  19. I enjoyed this post as a reminder of my childhood summers. I live in the desert now, so this is the least fun season. (Walks outside? Unwise. The garden? Could be mistaken for Mars. Eating on the patio? Only if your food needs extra cooking.) The one thing I love about August is the occasional WHOPPING rainstorm. The next day there’s actually water in the river beds. For a few weeks, there is a sprinkling of green over the mountains.

    Reply
  20. I enjoyed this post as a reminder of my childhood summers. I live in the desert now, so this is the least fun season. (Walks outside? Unwise. The garden? Could be mistaken for Mars. Eating on the patio? Only if your food needs extra cooking.) The one thing I love about August is the occasional WHOPPING rainstorm. The next day there’s actually water in the river beds. For a few weeks, there is a sprinkling of green over the mountains.

    Reply
  21. You, you all in the Southern Hemisphere do have a reversed social calendar, as well as reversed season. For us, the Xmas holidays create a well-needed bright spot of activity and revelries as winter heads into its solstice. Funny how those rhythms get ingrained! I would find it very disorienting to have Christmas in the middle of summer!

    Reply
  22. You, you all in the Southern Hemisphere do have a reversed social calendar, as well as reversed season. For us, the Xmas holidays create a well-needed bright spot of activity and revelries as winter heads into its solstice. Funny how those rhythms get ingrained! I would find it very disorienting to have Christmas in the middle of summer!

    Reply
  23. You, you all in the Southern Hemisphere do have a reversed social calendar, as well as reversed season. For us, the Xmas holidays create a well-needed bright spot of activity and revelries as winter heads into its solstice. Funny how those rhythms get ingrained! I would find it very disorienting to have Christmas in the middle of summer!

    Reply
  24. You, you all in the Southern Hemisphere do have a reversed social calendar, as well as reversed season. For us, the Xmas holidays create a well-needed bright spot of activity and revelries as winter heads into its solstice. Funny how those rhythms get ingrained! I would find it very disorienting to have Christmas in the middle of summer!

    Reply
  25. You, you all in the Southern Hemisphere do have a reversed social calendar, as well as reversed season. For us, the Xmas holidays create a well-needed bright spot of activity and revelries as winter heads into its solstice. Funny how those rhythms get ingrained! I would find it very disorienting to have Christmas in the middle of summer!

    Reply
  26. Every region has its rhythms, Katherine. Yours is the reverse of our northern winters, when sometimes is daunting to think of going outside into the frigid cold. The rainstorms actually sound lovely, and seeing the land suddenly spring to life must be amazing. A great reminder on how resilient most of Nature is.

    Reply
  27. Every region has its rhythms, Katherine. Yours is the reverse of our northern winters, when sometimes is daunting to think of going outside into the frigid cold. The rainstorms actually sound lovely, and seeing the land suddenly spring to life must be amazing. A great reminder on how resilient most of Nature is.

    Reply
  28. Every region has its rhythms, Katherine. Yours is the reverse of our northern winters, when sometimes is daunting to think of going outside into the frigid cold. The rainstorms actually sound lovely, and seeing the land suddenly spring to life must be amazing. A great reminder on how resilient most of Nature is.

    Reply
  29. Every region has its rhythms, Katherine. Yours is the reverse of our northern winters, when sometimes is daunting to think of going outside into the frigid cold. The rainstorms actually sound lovely, and seeing the land suddenly spring to life must be amazing. A great reminder on how resilient most of Nature is.

    Reply
  30. Every region has its rhythms, Katherine. Yours is the reverse of our northern winters, when sometimes is daunting to think of going outside into the frigid cold. The rainstorms actually sound lovely, and seeing the land suddenly spring to life must be amazing. A great reminder on how resilient most of Nature is.

    Reply
  31. What do I miss about summer? The easing of the threat of bushfires. I understand what everyone likes about the season – the smells, the food, the long sunny days etc., but here in Australia, I dread the heat, the drying off of the grass and the fear of bushfire. So my favourite season is winter. Sorry everyone.

    Reply
  32. What do I miss about summer? The easing of the threat of bushfires. I understand what everyone likes about the season – the smells, the food, the long sunny days etc., but here in Australia, I dread the heat, the drying off of the grass and the fear of bushfire. So my favourite season is winter. Sorry everyone.

    Reply
  33. What do I miss about summer? The easing of the threat of bushfires. I understand what everyone likes about the season – the smells, the food, the long sunny days etc., but here in Australia, I dread the heat, the drying off of the grass and the fear of bushfire. So my favourite season is winter. Sorry everyone.

    Reply
  34. What do I miss about summer? The easing of the threat of bushfires. I understand what everyone likes about the season – the smells, the food, the long sunny days etc., but here in Australia, I dread the heat, the drying off of the grass and the fear of bushfire. So my favourite season is winter. Sorry everyone.

    Reply
  35. What do I miss about summer? The easing of the threat of bushfires. I understand what everyone likes about the season – the smells, the food, the long sunny days etc., but here in Australia, I dread the heat, the drying off of the grass and the fear of bushfire. So my favourite season is winter. Sorry everyone.

    Reply
  36. Jenny, Nature can be so splendid—and terrifying too. Don’t blame you at all for dreading the hot dry season and the threat of bushfires. Having experienced a natural disaster via a hurricane, I know how devastating such things can be. Hugs and hope your coming summer will be rainy enough to avoid the danger.

    Reply
  37. Jenny, Nature can be so splendid—and terrifying too. Don’t blame you at all for dreading the hot dry season and the threat of bushfires. Having experienced a natural disaster via a hurricane, I know how devastating such things can be. Hugs and hope your coming summer will be rainy enough to avoid the danger.

    Reply
  38. Jenny, Nature can be so splendid—and terrifying too. Don’t blame you at all for dreading the hot dry season and the threat of bushfires. Having experienced a natural disaster via a hurricane, I know how devastating such things can be. Hugs and hope your coming summer will be rainy enough to avoid the danger.

    Reply
  39. Jenny, Nature can be so splendid—and terrifying too. Don’t blame you at all for dreading the hot dry season and the threat of bushfires. Having experienced a natural disaster via a hurricane, I know how devastating such things can be. Hugs and hope your coming summer will be rainy enough to avoid the danger.

    Reply
  40. Jenny, Nature can be so splendid—and terrifying too. Don’t blame you at all for dreading the hot dry season and the threat of bushfires. Having experienced a natural disaster via a hurricane, I know how devastating such things can be. Hugs and hope your coming summer will be rainy enough to avoid the danger.

    Reply
  41. Katherine, your comment made me smile, because for me, there is almost no better end-of-summer smell than the scent of rain on parched earth.
    Anne, who is just moving into Spring dowunder.

    Reply
  42. Katherine, your comment made me smile, because for me, there is almost no better end-of-summer smell than the scent of rain on parched earth.
    Anne, who is just moving into Spring dowunder.

    Reply
  43. Katherine, your comment made me smile, because for me, there is almost no better end-of-summer smell than the scent of rain on parched earth.
    Anne, who is just moving into Spring dowunder.

    Reply
  44. Katherine, your comment made me smile, because for me, there is almost no better end-of-summer smell than the scent of rain on parched earth.
    Anne, who is just moving into Spring dowunder.

    Reply
  45. Katherine, your comment made me smile, because for me, there is almost no better end-of-summer smell than the scent of rain on parched earth.
    Anne, who is just moving into Spring dowunder.

    Reply
  46. Jenny for me, Autumn is the best season of all, with the threat of bushfires past, the worst heat of summer past also, but the days are still clear and warm and sunny and the nights are cool and delicious

    Reply
  47. Jenny for me, Autumn is the best season of all, with the threat of bushfires past, the worst heat of summer past also, but the days are still clear and warm and sunny and the nights are cool and delicious

    Reply
  48. Jenny for me, Autumn is the best season of all, with the threat of bushfires past, the worst heat of summer past also, but the days are still clear and warm and sunny and the nights are cool and delicious

    Reply
  49. Jenny for me, Autumn is the best season of all, with the threat of bushfires past, the worst heat of summer past also, but the days are still clear and warm and sunny and the nights are cool and delicious

    Reply
  50. Jenny for me, Autumn is the best season of all, with the threat of bushfires past, the worst heat of summer past also, but the days are still clear and warm and sunny and the nights are cool and delicious

    Reply
  51. I like the longer daylight of summer.
    As to Christmas in summer– when we were in the Philippines itg was disconcerting to celebrate Christmas wearing shorts and sandals. It made me wonder why so many of us associate Chriostmas with snow. It wouldn’t have been snowing in Bethlehem and half the world is broiling under a summer sun. Our Saint Nicholas and Santa Claus are dressed for icy winds and not tropical or even subtropical breezes.
    Even Christmas trees are native to northern climes. I am not opposed to fake trees and have even put baubles on bamboo.
    I like the fruits and long daylight hours of summer so I can do errands after work( to buy the fruit, quite often) but dislike more than moderate heat. We seem to have more flowers in spring or before the ehat sets in than in mid summer, though I must confess it has been some time since I saw anything resembling a flower garden.

    Reply
  52. I like the longer daylight of summer.
    As to Christmas in summer– when we were in the Philippines itg was disconcerting to celebrate Christmas wearing shorts and sandals. It made me wonder why so many of us associate Chriostmas with snow. It wouldn’t have been snowing in Bethlehem and half the world is broiling under a summer sun. Our Saint Nicholas and Santa Claus are dressed for icy winds and not tropical or even subtropical breezes.
    Even Christmas trees are native to northern climes. I am not opposed to fake trees and have even put baubles on bamboo.
    I like the fruits and long daylight hours of summer so I can do errands after work( to buy the fruit, quite often) but dislike more than moderate heat. We seem to have more flowers in spring or before the ehat sets in than in mid summer, though I must confess it has been some time since I saw anything resembling a flower garden.

    Reply
  53. I like the longer daylight of summer.
    As to Christmas in summer– when we were in the Philippines itg was disconcerting to celebrate Christmas wearing shorts and sandals. It made me wonder why so many of us associate Chriostmas with snow. It wouldn’t have been snowing in Bethlehem and half the world is broiling under a summer sun. Our Saint Nicholas and Santa Claus are dressed for icy winds and not tropical or even subtropical breezes.
    Even Christmas trees are native to northern climes. I am not opposed to fake trees and have even put baubles on bamboo.
    I like the fruits and long daylight hours of summer so I can do errands after work( to buy the fruit, quite often) but dislike more than moderate heat. We seem to have more flowers in spring or before the ehat sets in than in mid summer, though I must confess it has been some time since I saw anything resembling a flower garden.

    Reply
  54. I like the longer daylight of summer.
    As to Christmas in summer– when we were in the Philippines itg was disconcerting to celebrate Christmas wearing shorts and sandals. It made me wonder why so many of us associate Chriostmas with snow. It wouldn’t have been snowing in Bethlehem and half the world is broiling under a summer sun. Our Saint Nicholas and Santa Claus are dressed for icy winds and not tropical or even subtropical breezes.
    Even Christmas trees are native to northern climes. I am not opposed to fake trees and have even put baubles on bamboo.
    I like the fruits and long daylight hours of summer so I can do errands after work( to buy the fruit, quite often) but dislike more than moderate heat. We seem to have more flowers in spring or before the ehat sets in than in mid summer, though I must confess it has been some time since I saw anything resembling a flower garden.

    Reply
  55. I like the longer daylight of summer.
    As to Christmas in summer– when we were in the Philippines itg was disconcerting to celebrate Christmas wearing shorts and sandals. It made me wonder why so many of us associate Chriostmas with snow. It wouldn’t have been snowing in Bethlehem and half the world is broiling under a summer sun. Our Saint Nicholas and Santa Claus are dressed for icy winds and not tropical or even subtropical breezes.
    Even Christmas trees are native to northern climes. I am not opposed to fake trees and have even put baubles on bamboo.
    I like the fruits and long daylight hours of summer so I can do errands after work( to buy the fruit, quite often) but dislike more than moderate heat. We seem to have more flowers in spring or before the ehat sets in than in mid summer, though I must confess it has been some time since I saw anything resembling a flower garden.

    Reply
  56. I’ll miss the garden tomatoes, although hopefully our plants will continue to yield into October. I also love being able to lounge on the back patio reading in the shade, listening to the leaves rustle in the wind, and watching for a visit from a hummingbird.

    Reply
  57. I’ll miss the garden tomatoes, although hopefully our plants will continue to yield into October. I also love being able to lounge on the back patio reading in the shade, listening to the leaves rustle in the wind, and watching for a visit from a hummingbird.

    Reply
  58. I’ll miss the garden tomatoes, although hopefully our plants will continue to yield into October. I also love being able to lounge on the back patio reading in the shade, listening to the leaves rustle in the wind, and watching for a visit from a hummingbird.

    Reply
  59. I’ll miss the garden tomatoes, although hopefully our plants will continue to yield into October. I also love being able to lounge on the back patio reading in the shade, listening to the leaves rustle in the wind, and watching for a visit from a hummingbird.

    Reply
  60. I’ll miss the garden tomatoes, although hopefully our plants will continue to yield into October. I also love being able to lounge on the back patio reading in the shade, listening to the leaves rustle in the wind, and watching for a visit from a hummingbird.

    Reply
  61. What a lovely post Cara/Andrea! I enjoy this part of the year so much when we are on the cusp of autumn and you can feel the change in the air. I do miss taking Angus out for his bedtime walk in the twilight. It’s lovely in the summer because we often see the barn owl dipping over the fields and the deer grazing. But on clear nights in autumn we stop to look at the sky and often see shooting stars, so I’m not complaining!

    Reply
  62. What a lovely post Cara/Andrea! I enjoy this part of the year so much when we are on the cusp of autumn and you can feel the change in the air. I do miss taking Angus out for his bedtime walk in the twilight. It’s lovely in the summer because we often see the barn owl dipping over the fields and the deer grazing. But on clear nights in autumn we stop to look at the sky and often see shooting stars, so I’m not complaining!

    Reply
  63. What a lovely post Cara/Andrea! I enjoy this part of the year so much when we are on the cusp of autumn and you can feel the change in the air. I do miss taking Angus out for his bedtime walk in the twilight. It’s lovely in the summer because we often see the barn owl dipping over the fields and the deer grazing. But on clear nights in autumn we stop to look at the sky and often see shooting stars, so I’m not complaining!

    Reply
  64. What a lovely post Cara/Andrea! I enjoy this part of the year so much when we are on the cusp of autumn and you can feel the change in the air. I do miss taking Angus out for his bedtime walk in the twilight. It’s lovely in the summer because we often see the barn owl dipping over the fields and the deer grazing. But on clear nights in autumn we stop to look at the sky and often see shooting stars, so I’m not complaining!

    Reply
  65. What a lovely post Cara/Andrea! I enjoy this part of the year so much when we are on the cusp of autumn and you can feel the change in the air. I do miss taking Angus out for his bedtime walk in the twilight. It’s lovely in the summer because we often see the barn owl dipping over the fields and the deer grazing. But on clear nights in autumn we stop to look at the sky and often see shooting stars, so I’m not complaining!

    Reply
  66. Nicola, I love walking in late summer twilight, when you can still see the wildlife coming out for the evening, and the colors of the sunset, which seem to linger longer in this season. But I love autumn, too. The crispness in the air, the leaves turning, the scent of ripening apples—all wonderful too. So am looking forward to the coming months!

    Reply
  67. Nicola, I love walking in late summer twilight, when you can still see the wildlife coming out for the evening, and the colors of the sunset, which seem to linger longer in this season. But I love autumn, too. The crispness in the air, the leaves turning, the scent of ripening apples—all wonderful too. So am looking forward to the coming months!

    Reply
  68. Nicola, I love walking in late summer twilight, when you can still see the wildlife coming out for the evening, and the colors of the sunset, which seem to linger longer in this season. But I love autumn, too. The crispness in the air, the leaves turning, the scent of ripening apples—all wonderful too. So am looking forward to the coming months!

    Reply
  69. Nicola, I love walking in late summer twilight, when you can still see the wildlife coming out for the evening, and the colors of the sunset, which seem to linger longer in this season. But I love autumn, too. The crispness in the air, the leaves turning, the scent of ripening apples—all wonderful too. So am looking forward to the coming months!

    Reply
  70. Nicola, I love walking in late summer twilight, when you can still see the wildlife coming out for the evening, and the colors of the sunset, which seem to linger longer in this season. But I love autumn, too. The crispness in the air, the leaves turning, the scent of ripening apples—all wonderful too. So am looking forward to the coming months!

    Reply

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