Serial stories—a what a novel idea!

Drood_serial_coverCara/Andrea here, We’ve recently been talking here about our writing processes, and how time, ambiance, computer vs pen and paper affect how we create our stories. And deadlines—those were mentioned a lot too! In thinking about the subject, it seems to me that some things have been universal angts to writers across the ages. Inspiration. Struggle. How the words flow. And yes, the dreaded deadline! It’s never easy. But on reading a recent article on Charles Dickens and his The Mystery of Edwin Drood, it reminded me that during the 19th century, a phenomena developed—one that proved hugely popular with the public—that put even more pressure on authors.

DickensDickens, who was forced to leave home and find work in a factory after his father was put in debtor’s prison, helped pioneer the “serial” novel, which involved publishing the book in either weekly or monthly installments within the pages of a high-circulation popular magazine of the times. Pickwick Papers, his first book to be serialized, was showcased to the public in 1836, and launched the author on his way to literary fame.

PressSerialization was an interesting confluence of tech and creativity. The Industrial Revolution had spread to the publishing world, and the new high-powered steam presses were making possible the mass production of inexpensive magazines and newspapers. It’s said that Dickens would gauge reader reaction to the story and in response would actually noodle with his original plot to meet. For example, word is he altered Miss Mowcher in David Copperfield, to be shown in a better light.

The_StrandNow, back to "Drood." His works were so popular that The Mystery of Edwin Drood created a huge crisis for his readers. Designed to be released in 12 parts, the book, which had a very complicated plot revolving around opium dens, a romance complete with evil characters, and the sudden disappearance of the hero—had just released part 6 when Dickens inconveniently passed away without having completed the story! There have been many attempts by others to finish the book since then—including one in 1873 by a printer in Vermont who claimed to have the words dictated to him by the spirit of Dickens. Um, talk about giving new meaning to the term “ghostwriter.”



WilkieCollinsAs it is to this day, publishers were on the lookout for “hooks” to attract readers, and in the 19th century, the serialized novel proved a huge draw. People who might not be able to buy books could afford the small cost of the magazine, and thus over time read the whole book. In many ways, it brought a whole new audience to the literary world, and by the late Victorian era, many of the top authors, including Wilkie Collins and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle were releasing their works in this form.

Dartagnan-musketeersEngland was not the only country where serial novels proved wildly popular. In France, Alexandre Dumas enthusiastically embraced the new form. The Three Musketeers and The Count of Monte Cristo (which needed 139 installments) were published as feuilletons, and at times he was working 14 hours a day on several serializations at once. (Okay, shoot me now!) Flaubert followed suit, releasing Madame Bovary as a serial in 1856. In Russia, Tolstoy published Anna Karenina and The Brothers Karamazov within the pages of the Russian Messenger.

Uncle-toms-cabinSerialization proved to be very popular in America as well. In 1851, Uncle Tom’s Cabin, by Harriet Beecher Stowe was published in parts by the Abolitionist magazine, The National Era, and its widespread availability helped influence public opinion on slavery.  Harper’s and Atlantic Monthly developed a reputation as strong literary forums by publishing the likes of Henry James and Herman Melville.

BonfirewolfWith the advent of radio and television, the serialized novel soon lost its allure—though it’s interesting to note that in 1984,  Tom Wolfe’s The Bonfire of the Vanities was published as a 29-part serial in Rolling Stone magazine, partly, it’s said, as an homage to Dickens.

Today, given ever-shrinking attention spans, I’m not sure serials would find a willing audience. But what do you think? Would you enjoy following a serial novel? Or would you be too impatient to wait for the release of each segment. I tend to like to race through a book I love, so not sure how I would like it. However, the notion is intriguing . . . hmmm, maybe the Wenches should start a serial novel on the blog! What do you think? (ducking flying rotten tomatoes from the other Wenches! <G>)

115 thoughts on “Serial stories—a what a novel idea!”

  1. I can’t help but notice that most of these are very long books, to the dismay of students assigned to read them. Maybe they’d be more popular in classrooms today if they were still in serial format.
    Kathy/Kaitlyn

    Reply
  2. I can’t help but notice that most of these are very long books, to the dismay of students assigned to read them. Maybe they’d be more popular in classrooms today if they were still in serial format.
    Kathy/Kaitlyn

    Reply
  3. I can’t help but notice that most of these are very long books, to the dismay of students assigned to read them. Maybe they’d be more popular in classrooms today if they were still in serial format.
    Kathy/Kaitlyn

    Reply
  4. I can’t help but notice that most of these are very long books, to the dismay of students assigned to read them. Maybe they’d be more popular in classrooms today if they were still in serial format.
    Kathy/Kaitlyn

    Reply
  5. I can’t help but notice that most of these are very long books, to the dismay of students assigned to read them. Maybe they’d be more popular in classrooms today if they were still in serial format.
    Kathy/Kaitlyn

    Reply
  6. I’ve always had a sneaking suspicion that the “rule” that you need to end each chapter with a hook goes back to the serialized novels of the 19th century. I can understand needing a hook to get the reader to buy the next installment, but just to turn the page? Why not a hook at the bottom of every page?

    Reply
  7. I’ve always had a sneaking suspicion that the “rule” that you need to end each chapter with a hook goes back to the serialized novels of the 19th century. I can understand needing a hook to get the reader to buy the next installment, but just to turn the page? Why not a hook at the bottom of every page?

    Reply
  8. I’ve always had a sneaking suspicion that the “rule” that you need to end each chapter with a hook goes back to the serialized novels of the 19th century. I can understand needing a hook to get the reader to buy the next installment, but just to turn the page? Why not a hook at the bottom of every page?

    Reply
  9. I’ve always had a sneaking suspicion that the “rule” that you need to end each chapter with a hook goes back to the serialized novels of the 19th century. I can understand needing a hook to get the reader to buy the next installment, but just to turn the page? Why not a hook at the bottom of every page?

    Reply
  10. I’ve always had a sneaking suspicion that the “rule” that you need to end each chapter with a hook goes back to the serialized novels of the 19th century. I can understand needing a hook to get the reader to buy the next installment, but just to turn the page? Why not a hook at the bottom of every page?

    Reply
  11. I think I would enjoy reading a serial! It’s no different than following an ongoing television series. All of those end on a hook, and follow the format of a serial, if I’m not mistaken.

    Reply
  12. I think I would enjoy reading a serial! It’s no different than following an ongoing television series. All of those end on a hook, and follow the format of a serial, if I’m not mistaken.

    Reply
  13. I think I would enjoy reading a serial! It’s no different than following an ongoing television series. All of those end on a hook, and follow the format of a serial, if I’m not mistaken.

    Reply
  14. I think I would enjoy reading a serial! It’s no different than following an ongoing television series. All of those end on a hook, and follow the format of a serial, if I’m not mistaken.

    Reply
  15. I think I would enjoy reading a serial! It’s no different than following an ongoing television series. All of those end on a hook, and follow the format of a serial, if I’m not mistaken.

    Reply
  16. Yes, they absolutely do, Adana. I don’t watch a lot of TV, so am not quite as passionate about a series there as I am about my books. But Idid get hooked on a series that a friend recommended, and was able to whizz through the back seasons like I whizz through a book I love. Now I’m very frustrated that I have to wait for a week between episodes. I just don’t have the patience. I like to go at my own pace.

    Reply
  17. Yes, they absolutely do, Adana. I don’t watch a lot of TV, so am not quite as passionate about a series there as I am about my books. But Idid get hooked on a series that a friend recommended, and was able to whizz through the back seasons like I whizz through a book I love. Now I’m very frustrated that I have to wait for a week between episodes. I just don’t have the patience. I like to go at my own pace.

    Reply
  18. Yes, they absolutely do, Adana. I don’t watch a lot of TV, so am not quite as passionate about a series there as I am about my books. But Idid get hooked on a series that a friend recommended, and was able to whizz through the back seasons like I whizz through a book I love. Now I’m very frustrated that I have to wait for a week between episodes. I just don’t have the patience. I like to go at my own pace.

    Reply
  19. Yes, they absolutely do, Adana. I don’t watch a lot of TV, so am not quite as passionate about a series there as I am about my books. But Idid get hooked on a series that a friend recommended, and was able to whizz through the back seasons like I whizz through a book I love. Now I’m very frustrated that I have to wait for a week between episodes. I just don’t have the patience. I like to go at my own pace.

    Reply
  20. Yes, they absolutely do, Adana. I don’t watch a lot of TV, so am not quite as passionate about a series there as I am about my books. But Idid get hooked on a series that a friend recommended, and was able to whizz through the back seasons like I whizz through a book I love. Now I’m very frustrated that I have to wait for a week between episodes. I just don’t have the patience. I like to go at my own pace.

    Reply
  21. Likely true, Cara/Andrea, but then readers in those days didn’t have the hundreds of distractions we do. They were probably happy to know there was more coming, especially if they liked the story and didn’t want it to end. These days if I read only a chapter or two, by the time I come back a dozen other intervening things have made me forget what went before. It’s great if a story is a page turner, but even if it’s not I almost have to burn right through it to keep the characters straight and the plot lucid!

    Reply
  22. Likely true, Cara/Andrea, but then readers in those days didn’t have the hundreds of distractions we do. They were probably happy to know there was more coming, especially if they liked the story and didn’t want it to end. These days if I read only a chapter or two, by the time I come back a dozen other intervening things have made me forget what went before. It’s great if a story is a page turner, but even if it’s not I almost have to burn right through it to keep the characters straight and the plot lucid!

    Reply
  23. Likely true, Cara/Andrea, but then readers in those days didn’t have the hundreds of distractions we do. They were probably happy to know there was more coming, especially if they liked the story and didn’t want it to end. These days if I read only a chapter or two, by the time I come back a dozen other intervening things have made me forget what went before. It’s great if a story is a page turner, but even if it’s not I almost have to burn right through it to keep the characters straight and the plot lucid!

    Reply
  24. Likely true, Cara/Andrea, but then readers in those days didn’t have the hundreds of distractions we do. They were probably happy to know there was more coming, especially if they liked the story and didn’t want it to end. These days if I read only a chapter or two, by the time I come back a dozen other intervening things have made me forget what went before. It’s great if a story is a page turner, but even if it’s not I almost have to burn right through it to keep the characters straight and the plot lucid!

    Reply
  25. Likely true, Cara/Andrea, but then readers in those days didn’t have the hundreds of distractions we do. They were probably happy to know there was more coming, especially if they liked the story and didn’t want it to end. These days if I read only a chapter or two, by the time I come back a dozen other intervening things have made me forget what went before. It’s great if a story is a page turner, but even if it’s not I almost have to burn right through it to keep the characters straight and the plot lucid!

    Reply
  26. All really good points, Mary. The entertainment factor of a compelling serial—that looking forward to the next episode—was I’m sure a huge factor in its popularity. Not only were distractions far fewer in the serial’s heyday, but most people had hard lives—a small pleasure was something to be savored.
    Today we are so bombarded with information and stimuli to all the senses, that you’re right—it’s hard to remember things, even when they are very enjoyable. I’m usually fine on getting through a book without losing the the plot/character threads. But what I do find is several months later, I tend to forget the details, even when I love a book. Just too much overload!

    Reply
  27. All really good points, Mary. The entertainment factor of a compelling serial—that looking forward to the next episode—was I’m sure a huge factor in its popularity. Not only were distractions far fewer in the serial’s heyday, but most people had hard lives—a small pleasure was something to be savored.
    Today we are so bombarded with information and stimuli to all the senses, that you’re right—it’s hard to remember things, even when they are very enjoyable. I’m usually fine on getting through a book without losing the the plot/character threads. But what I do find is several months later, I tend to forget the details, even when I love a book. Just too much overload!

    Reply
  28. All really good points, Mary. The entertainment factor of a compelling serial—that looking forward to the next episode—was I’m sure a huge factor in its popularity. Not only were distractions far fewer in the serial’s heyday, but most people had hard lives—a small pleasure was something to be savored.
    Today we are so bombarded with information and stimuli to all the senses, that you’re right—it’s hard to remember things, even when they are very enjoyable. I’m usually fine on getting through a book without losing the the plot/character threads. But what I do find is several months later, I tend to forget the details, even when I love a book. Just too much overload!

    Reply
  29. All really good points, Mary. The entertainment factor of a compelling serial—that looking forward to the next episode—was I’m sure a huge factor in its popularity. Not only were distractions far fewer in the serial’s heyday, but most people had hard lives—a small pleasure was something to be savored.
    Today we are so bombarded with information and stimuli to all the senses, that you’re right—it’s hard to remember things, even when they are very enjoyable. I’m usually fine on getting through a book without losing the the plot/character threads. But what I do find is several months later, I tend to forget the details, even when I love a book. Just too much overload!

    Reply
  30. All really good points, Mary. The entertainment factor of a compelling serial—that looking forward to the next episode—was I’m sure a huge factor in its popularity. Not only were distractions far fewer in the serial’s heyday, but most people had hard lives—a small pleasure was something to be savored.
    Today we are so bombarded with information and stimuli to all the senses, that you’re right—it’s hard to remember things, even when they are very enjoyable. I’m usually fine on getting through a book without losing the the plot/character threads. But what I do find is several months later, I tend to forget the details, even when I love a book. Just too much overload!

    Reply
  31. There are a lot of contemporary romance authors writing serials at the moment, but readers aren’t enjoying them as much as was hoped. Publishers thought it would be the Next Big Thing, but I’ve got to admit, as soon as I see something is a serial, I’m not interested.
    It isn’t about my attention span, but that there are few characters I’m invested enough in to keep coming back for! The structure of a romance, with the HEA, makes a serial hard.

    Reply
  32. There are a lot of contemporary romance authors writing serials at the moment, but readers aren’t enjoying them as much as was hoped. Publishers thought it would be the Next Big Thing, but I’ve got to admit, as soon as I see something is a serial, I’m not interested.
    It isn’t about my attention span, but that there are few characters I’m invested enough in to keep coming back for! The structure of a romance, with the HEA, makes a serial hard.

    Reply
  33. There are a lot of contemporary romance authors writing serials at the moment, but readers aren’t enjoying them as much as was hoped. Publishers thought it would be the Next Big Thing, but I’ve got to admit, as soon as I see something is a serial, I’m not interested.
    It isn’t about my attention span, but that there are few characters I’m invested enough in to keep coming back for! The structure of a romance, with the HEA, makes a serial hard.

    Reply
  34. There are a lot of contemporary romance authors writing serials at the moment, but readers aren’t enjoying them as much as was hoped. Publishers thought it would be the Next Big Thing, but I’ve got to admit, as soon as I see something is a serial, I’m not interested.
    It isn’t about my attention span, but that there are few characters I’m invested enough in to keep coming back for! The structure of a romance, with the HEA, makes a serial hard.

    Reply
  35. There are a lot of contemporary romance authors writing serials at the moment, but readers aren’t enjoying them as much as was hoped. Publishers thought it would be the Next Big Thing, but I’ve got to admit, as soon as I see something is a serial, I’m not interested.
    It isn’t about my attention span, but that there are few characters I’m invested enough in to keep coming back for! The structure of a romance, with the HEA, makes a serial hard.

    Reply
  36. I read serial novels all the time on Fan Fiction. The vast majority of the stories on there are serial and for some authors I will read the story in pieces when each chapter is posted but for others, I wait until the entire story had been posted. I also, of course purchase full completed novels. I guess it depends on my mood and the author.

    Reply
  37. I read serial novels all the time on Fan Fiction. The vast majority of the stories on there are serial and for some authors I will read the story in pieces when each chapter is posted but for others, I wait until the entire story had been posted. I also, of course purchase full completed novels. I guess it depends on my mood and the author.

    Reply
  38. I read serial novels all the time on Fan Fiction. The vast majority of the stories on there are serial and for some authors I will read the story in pieces when each chapter is posted but for others, I wait until the entire story had been posted. I also, of course purchase full completed novels. I guess it depends on my mood and the author.

    Reply
  39. I read serial novels all the time on Fan Fiction. The vast majority of the stories on there are serial and for some authors I will read the story in pieces when each chapter is posted but for others, I wait until the entire story had been posted. I also, of course purchase full completed novels. I guess it depends on my mood and the author.

    Reply
  40. I read serial novels all the time on Fan Fiction. The vast majority of the stories on there are serial and for some authors I will read the story in pieces when each chapter is posted but for others, I wait until the entire story had been posted. I also, of course purchase full completed novels. I guess it depends on my mood and the author.

    Reply
  41. Sonya, I remember a few years back there was a big buzz about the idea of serials, but you’re right—it never really took off. I think they could work well for mystery stories. As as others g have said here, all the competing distractions make it hard to keep a reader’s interest in a long-running book series. I know I would probably forget to look every month for a new episode. I’s much rather read a story I like at my own pace—which is usually fast!

    Reply
  42. Sonya, I remember a few years back there was a big buzz about the idea of serials, but you’re right—it never really took off. I think they could work well for mystery stories. As as others g have said here, all the competing distractions make it hard to keep a reader’s interest in a long-running book series. I know I would probably forget to look every month for a new episode. I’s much rather read a story I like at my own pace—which is usually fast!

    Reply
  43. Sonya, I remember a few years back there was a big buzz about the idea of serials, but you’re right—it never really took off. I think they could work well for mystery stories. As as others g have said here, all the competing distractions make it hard to keep a reader’s interest in a long-running book series. I know I would probably forget to look every month for a new episode. I’s much rather read a story I like at my own pace—which is usually fast!

    Reply
  44. Sonya, I remember a few years back there was a big buzz about the idea of serials, but you’re right—it never really took off. I think they could work well for mystery stories. As as others g have said here, all the competing distractions make it hard to keep a reader’s interest in a long-running book series. I know I would probably forget to look every month for a new episode. I’s much rather read a story I like at my own pace—which is usually fast!

    Reply
  45. Sonya, I remember a few years back there was a big buzz about the idea of serials, but you’re right—it never really took off. I think they could work well for mystery stories. As as others g have said here, all the competing distractions make it hard to keep a reader’s interest in a long-running book series. I know I would probably forget to look every month for a new episode. I’s much rather read a story I like at my own pace—which is usually fast!

    Reply
  46. The stories are categorized by genre and movie or TVshow or book. I’m addicted to the twilight stories but there are thousands of stories and topics.

    Reply
  47. The stories are categorized by genre and movie or TVshow or book. I’m addicted to the twilight stories but there are thousands of stories and topics.

    Reply
  48. The stories are categorized by genre and movie or TVshow or book. I’m addicted to the twilight stories but there are thousands of stories and topics.

    Reply
  49. The stories are categorized by genre and movie or TVshow or book. I’m addicted to the twilight stories but there are thousands of stories and topics.

    Reply
  50. The stories are categorized by genre and movie or TVshow or book. I’m addicted to the twilight stories but there are thousands of stories and topics.

    Reply
  51. I read a serialized novel by Alexander McCall Smith a few years ago in The Telegraph. It was not really memorable, and I don’t recall much about it except that it followed many characters, including a man who was obsessed with Belgian loafers. The exercise seemed like a stunt or, perhaps, an homage to Dickens. Does anyone else remember it?

    Reply
  52. I read a serialized novel by Alexander McCall Smith a few years ago in The Telegraph. It was not really memorable, and I don’t recall much about it except that it followed many characters, including a man who was obsessed with Belgian loafers. The exercise seemed like a stunt or, perhaps, an homage to Dickens. Does anyone else remember it?

    Reply
  53. I read a serialized novel by Alexander McCall Smith a few years ago in The Telegraph. It was not really memorable, and I don’t recall much about it except that it followed many characters, including a man who was obsessed with Belgian loafers. The exercise seemed like a stunt or, perhaps, an homage to Dickens. Does anyone else remember it?

    Reply
  54. I read a serialized novel by Alexander McCall Smith a few years ago in The Telegraph. It was not really memorable, and I don’t recall much about it except that it followed many characters, including a man who was obsessed with Belgian loafers. The exercise seemed like a stunt or, perhaps, an homage to Dickens. Does anyone else remember it?

    Reply
  55. I read a serialized novel by Alexander McCall Smith a few years ago in The Telegraph. It was not really memorable, and I don’t recall much about it except that it followed many characters, including a man who was obsessed with Belgian loafers. The exercise seemed like a stunt or, perhaps, an homage to Dickens. Does anyone else remember it?

    Reply
  56. Linda, I don’t remember hearing about it—and McCall Smith certainly should have attracted my attention. I just think it’s a very hard format for this day and age. People want instant gratification. I guess it works for weekly television. But I know a lot of people who wait until a season is finished, then to “binge” streaming, or get the season on DVD from the library.

    Reply
  57. Linda, I don’t remember hearing about it—and McCall Smith certainly should have attracted my attention. I just think it’s a very hard format for this day and age. People want instant gratification. I guess it works for weekly television. But I know a lot of people who wait until a season is finished, then to “binge” streaming, or get the season on DVD from the library.

    Reply
  58. Linda, I don’t remember hearing about it—and McCall Smith certainly should have attracted my attention. I just think it’s a very hard format for this day and age. People want instant gratification. I guess it works for weekly television. But I know a lot of people who wait until a season is finished, then to “binge” streaming, or get the season on DVD from the library.

    Reply
  59. Linda, I don’t remember hearing about it—and McCall Smith certainly should have attracted my attention. I just think it’s a very hard format for this day and age. People want instant gratification. I guess it works for weekly television. But I know a lot of people who wait until a season is finished, then to “binge” streaming, or get the season on DVD from the library.

    Reply
  60. Linda, I don’t remember hearing about it—and McCall Smith certainly should have attracted my attention. I just think it’s a very hard format for this day and age. People want instant gratification. I guess it works for weekly television. But I know a lot of people who wait until a season is finished, then to “binge” streaming, or get the season on DVD from the library.

    Reply
  61. I do not like serials. They were still in existence in my early reading; both in children’s magazines and in Science Fictions magazines. I lived with it but I never liked not being able to read at my own pace.
    James Femimore Cooper’s “The Last of the Mohicans” was possibly the world’s most frustrating serial. It frustrated me when I first read the entire novel. Each chapter ended with a cliff-hanger. Each follow-up chapter began “in another part of the forest” leaving the reader still hanging on the cliff. In the novel, I could (and DID) page ahead and resolve the prior issue, before I went back to the beginning of the next chapter. Imagine needing to wait a month (or even a week) and then not getting a resolution of the problem!

    Reply
  62. I do not like serials. They were still in existence in my early reading; both in children’s magazines and in Science Fictions magazines. I lived with it but I never liked not being able to read at my own pace.
    James Femimore Cooper’s “The Last of the Mohicans” was possibly the world’s most frustrating serial. It frustrated me when I first read the entire novel. Each chapter ended with a cliff-hanger. Each follow-up chapter began “in another part of the forest” leaving the reader still hanging on the cliff. In the novel, I could (and DID) page ahead and resolve the prior issue, before I went back to the beginning of the next chapter. Imagine needing to wait a month (or even a week) and then not getting a resolution of the problem!

    Reply
  63. I do not like serials. They were still in existence in my early reading; both in children’s magazines and in Science Fictions magazines. I lived with it but I never liked not being able to read at my own pace.
    James Femimore Cooper’s “The Last of the Mohicans” was possibly the world’s most frustrating serial. It frustrated me when I first read the entire novel. Each chapter ended with a cliff-hanger. Each follow-up chapter began “in another part of the forest” leaving the reader still hanging on the cliff. In the novel, I could (and DID) page ahead and resolve the prior issue, before I went back to the beginning of the next chapter. Imagine needing to wait a month (or even a week) and then not getting a resolution of the problem!

    Reply
  64. I do not like serials. They were still in existence in my early reading; both in children’s magazines and in Science Fictions magazines. I lived with it but I never liked not being able to read at my own pace.
    James Femimore Cooper’s “The Last of the Mohicans” was possibly the world’s most frustrating serial. It frustrated me when I first read the entire novel. Each chapter ended with a cliff-hanger. Each follow-up chapter began “in another part of the forest” leaving the reader still hanging on the cliff. In the novel, I could (and DID) page ahead and resolve the prior issue, before I went back to the beginning of the next chapter. Imagine needing to wait a month (or even a week) and then not getting a resolution of the problem!

    Reply
  65. I do not like serials. They were still in existence in my early reading; both in children’s magazines and in Science Fictions magazines. I lived with it but I never liked not being able to read at my own pace.
    James Femimore Cooper’s “The Last of the Mohicans” was possibly the world’s most frustrating serial. It frustrated me when I first read the entire novel. Each chapter ended with a cliff-hanger. Each follow-up chapter began “in another part of the forest” leaving the reader still hanging on the cliff. In the novel, I could (and DID) page ahead and resolve the prior issue, before I went back to the beginning of the next chapter. Imagine needing to wait a month (or even a week) and then not getting a resolution of the problem!

    Reply
  66. I don’t have the patience anymore, to follow a series on TV, so a book serial would probably frustrate me too. I DVR’d all of Poldark so I could watch it at my leisure. We are used to instant gratification. I suppose in the 19th century people read them aloud to each other and it was a lot more fun.

    Reply
  67. I don’t have the patience anymore, to follow a series on TV, so a book serial would probably frustrate me too. I DVR’d all of Poldark so I could watch it at my leisure. We are used to instant gratification. I suppose in the 19th century people read them aloud to each other and it was a lot more fun.

    Reply
  68. I don’t have the patience anymore, to follow a series on TV, so a book serial would probably frustrate me too. I DVR’d all of Poldark so I could watch it at my leisure. We are used to instant gratification. I suppose in the 19th century people read them aloud to each other and it was a lot more fun.

    Reply
  69. I don’t have the patience anymore, to follow a series on TV, so a book serial would probably frustrate me too. I DVR’d all of Poldark so I could watch it at my leisure. We are used to instant gratification. I suppose in the 19th century people read them aloud to each other and it was a lot more fun.

    Reply
  70. I don’t have the patience anymore, to follow a series on TV, so a book serial would probably frustrate me too. I DVR’d all of Poldark so I could watch it at my leisure. We are used to instant gratification. I suppose in the 19th century people read them aloud to each other and it was a lot more fun.

    Reply
  71. I have a vague recollection of some serial stories in magazines from when I was very young. As a child I thought it was fun to look forward to next month’s copy. Now it reminds me of the anticipation I feel when I begin the next in an historical romance novel’s series and of the inclusion of old friends from previous books.

    Reply
  72. I have a vague recollection of some serial stories in magazines from when I was very young. As a child I thought it was fun to look forward to next month’s copy. Now it reminds me of the anticipation I feel when I begin the next in an historical romance novel’s series and of the inclusion of old friends from previous books.

    Reply
  73. I have a vague recollection of some serial stories in magazines from when I was very young. As a child I thought it was fun to look forward to next month’s copy. Now it reminds me of the anticipation I feel when I begin the next in an historical romance novel’s series and of the inclusion of old friends from previous books.

    Reply
  74. I have a vague recollection of some serial stories in magazines from when I was very young. As a child I thought it was fun to look forward to next month’s copy. Now it reminds me of the anticipation I feel when I begin the next in an historical romance novel’s series and of the inclusion of old friends from previous books.

    Reply
  75. I have a vague recollection of some serial stories in magazines from when I was very young. As a child I thought it was fun to look forward to next month’s copy. Now it reminds me of the anticipation I feel when I begin the next in an historical romance novel’s series and of the inclusion of old friends from previous books.

    Reply

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