Reading the Fine Print . . .

AM 1Cara/Andrea here, I’ve recently picked up some interesting e-books—thanks to our monthly “What Are We Reading” post—so I’ve been reading on my Kindle more than usual. The fact that it slips so easily into a purse is convenient, and as I’ve been running hither and yon lately, that’s a big plus. But I confess, no matter how hard I try, I just can’t warm up to a sliver of light-emitting plastic. Okay it’s a utilitarian tool.

300px-Aldus_Manutius_LOC_photo_meetup_2012 Aldus_ManutiusBut it’s not art. And the exhibition that just opened at the Grolier Club in New York City on the Italian Humanist printer Aldus Manutius shows that good book design brings as much pleasure to the eye as to the intellect.

Manutius, a scholar turned printer, founded the Aldine Press in in Venice in 1492. (His famous printer’s mark, a dolphin entwined around an anchor, is used today by Doubleday.) The New York Times review of the show says that Gutenberg’s invention of movable type was the same disruptive force on society as our own digital information age—and that Venice was the Silicon Valley of its day, as it became the center of printing.

Tumblr_lo6ikhsCMy1qbo11ro1_500But it wasn’t just that Manutius published books that have made him an iconic name for all bibliophiles. He published beautiful books, and pioneered innovations in typography and design that have had a profound influence on how we read today—it really to him that we owe the mass market paperback! (Though he is likely rolling in his grave over the lack of quality in both materials and page layout.)

AM 4The list of his achievements would fill many sheets of deckle-edged paper. They include the invention of italic letters—wanting something that reflected the elegant handwriting of the Humanist scholars, he worked with his brilliant typemaker Francesco Griffo to create the style. (Shown just below is the first book ever to be printed with italics—look closely at the book and the heart in St. Catherine’s hands)

AM 6

Title_page_of_Herodotus'_history_of_the_Greek_and_Persian_Wars_1502He also designed beautiful Roman typefaces for his books, renowned for their graceful proportions and readability. Bembo, one of his most famous creations, is still very popular. Another of his innovations was the semicolon—he was the first to use it in the grammatical way we do today. Golden CanonDetermined to make the work of the ancient Greeks readily available to Renaissance readers, he was the first print the works of Aristotle. Sophocles and Herodotus. He’s also known for pioneering the “Golden Ratio” proportion of page design, which is still a guiding principle today.

AM 5One of his most influential innovations was the creation of libelli portatiles, or “portable little books.” The New York Times article quotes G. Scott Clemons, the president of the Grolier Club as saying, “It’s become a cliché to call them the forerunners of the Penguin Classics. But the concept of personal reading is in some ways directly traceable to the innovations of Aldus’s portable library.” The small volumes, which are similar in size to our modern mass Bembomarket paperbacks, helped encourage the dissemination of the classics, and make reading more accessible. The new idea spawned lots of knock-offs and counterfeit editions (just like today!) purporting to be Aldine books. Manutius was very unhappy about it, not just for the monetary loss but also because he felt the books were of such inferior quality and design.

ManutiusIn bibliographic and typographic history, Manutius is best known for his edition of Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, produced in 1499, which is considered the most beautiful (and strangest) book ever printed. (The Gutenberg Bible and HP are the most famous incunabula, which is the term for books printed before 1500.) Written by Francesco Colonna, it’s a weirdly allegorical erotic journey of love, mixing a number of different languages—some of them apparently made up by the author. Scholar still puzzle over its meaning, but visually, it’s an exquisite combination of graceful woodcuts and elegant typography. (As a grad student in Graphic Design, I was lucky enough to be handle to handle an original copy of HP, and actually feel the paper and smell the ink!)

Hp_4_lg
So what about you? Do you care about the look of a book’s page? Or are you happy simply seeing words on a page? Does the practical features of an e-reader, like altering size of type, trump the feel of a page and the proportions of the margins. Lastly, do you have a favorite “beautiful” book? Mine is the Kelmscott Chaucer, printed by William Morris.

100 thoughts on “Reading the Fine Print . . .”

  1. I’m a huge fan of my Kindle because of the ability to change the font size. When I’m feeling tired, I can increase the size of the font, and reading becomes easier. And I do play with the line spacing and margins.
    But I do love my print books. I pulled out a couple to see if there were any that were something special. I was drawn to Sand, Sea, Sky by Rachel Carson. This was in the days when color plates were inserted every 50 pages or so. But the pages are elegantly laid out with large margins on the left side of the left page and on the right side of the right page. It’s a lovely essay on beautiful places.

    Reply
  2. I’m a huge fan of my Kindle because of the ability to change the font size. When I’m feeling tired, I can increase the size of the font, and reading becomes easier. And I do play with the line spacing and margins.
    But I do love my print books. I pulled out a couple to see if there were any that were something special. I was drawn to Sand, Sea, Sky by Rachel Carson. This was in the days when color plates were inserted every 50 pages or so. But the pages are elegantly laid out with large margins on the left side of the left page and on the right side of the right page. It’s a lovely essay on beautiful places.

    Reply
  3. I’m a huge fan of my Kindle because of the ability to change the font size. When I’m feeling tired, I can increase the size of the font, and reading becomes easier. And I do play with the line spacing and margins.
    But I do love my print books. I pulled out a couple to see if there were any that were something special. I was drawn to Sand, Sea, Sky by Rachel Carson. This was in the days when color plates were inserted every 50 pages or so. But the pages are elegantly laid out with large margins on the left side of the left page and on the right side of the right page. It’s a lovely essay on beautiful places.

    Reply
  4. I’m a huge fan of my Kindle because of the ability to change the font size. When I’m feeling tired, I can increase the size of the font, and reading becomes easier. And I do play with the line spacing and margins.
    But I do love my print books. I pulled out a couple to see if there were any that were something special. I was drawn to Sand, Sea, Sky by Rachel Carson. This was in the days when color plates were inserted every 50 pages or so. But the pages are elegantly laid out with large margins on the left side of the left page and on the right side of the right page. It’s a lovely essay on beautiful places.

    Reply
  5. I’m a huge fan of my Kindle because of the ability to change the font size. When I’m feeling tired, I can increase the size of the font, and reading becomes easier. And I do play with the line spacing and margins.
    But I do love my print books. I pulled out a couple to see if there were any that were something special. I was drawn to Sand, Sea, Sky by Rachel Carson. This was in the days when color plates were inserted every 50 pages or so. But the pages are elegantly laid out with large margins on the left side of the left page and on the right side of the right page. It’s a lovely essay on beautiful places.

    Reply
  6. Shannon, I know how useful a Kindle is, and I do use mine for when I’m running around, or taking the train to NYC, because it fits in my purse so easily. But the aesthetics of a well-designed printed page, and the feel of paper is something I love.
    The Carson book sounds lovely. A beautiful essay deserves a beautiful presentation!

    Reply
  7. Shannon, I know how useful a Kindle is, and I do use mine for when I’m running around, or taking the train to NYC, because it fits in my purse so easily. But the aesthetics of a well-designed printed page, and the feel of paper is something I love.
    The Carson book sounds lovely. A beautiful essay deserves a beautiful presentation!

    Reply
  8. Shannon, I know how useful a Kindle is, and I do use mine for when I’m running around, or taking the train to NYC, because it fits in my purse so easily. But the aesthetics of a well-designed printed page, and the feel of paper is something I love.
    The Carson book sounds lovely. A beautiful essay deserves a beautiful presentation!

    Reply
  9. Shannon, I know how useful a Kindle is, and I do use mine for when I’m running around, or taking the train to NYC, because it fits in my purse so easily. But the aesthetics of a well-designed printed page, and the feel of paper is something I love.
    The Carson book sounds lovely. A beautiful essay deserves a beautiful presentation!

    Reply
  10. Shannon, I know how useful a Kindle is, and I do use mine for when I’m running around, or taking the train to NYC, because it fits in my purse so easily. But the aesthetics of a well-designed printed page, and the feel of paper is something I love.
    The Carson book sounds lovely. A beautiful essay deserves a beautiful presentation!

    Reply
  11. I have had a Kindle for several years, and I do like my new paperwhite, but, that said, I’d rather read a book. I think information books are better read in print; I seem to absorb and retain more. Since I’m trying not to waste time n forgettable junk anymore (which is what kindle is good for), I’m not using it as much.
    The one advantage kindle has over print is that it’s searchable. I do use that function, but I wouldn’t buy a kindle just for that.
    The other thing is that print books go through a process of editing, checking and such, which generally yields a higher quality work, but a great deal of what is epublished does not = and it’s awful. Just awful. People just barf on and on without skill, training or purpose. Maybe their best friends and critique groupies like it, or are afraid to say they don’t – but that’s not helpful to a reader looking for the best use of her reading budget.
    I don’t carry my kindle with me. I don’t want to break or mislay it. One lost paperback is a lot less expensive to replace than a lost or nicked kindle. I do have the kindle app on my phone, but I don’t use it much because it runs the battery down fast.
    Just because we have a new engineering solution for something doesn’t mean we have to abandon the old one that worked too. If it’s a choice between print and ebook, I’ll buy the print version.
    Besides, books are lovely to hold and smell and turn pages in.

    Reply
  12. I have had a Kindle for several years, and I do like my new paperwhite, but, that said, I’d rather read a book. I think information books are better read in print; I seem to absorb and retain more. Since I’m trying not to waste time n forgettable junk anymore (which is what kindle is good for), I’m not using it as much.
    The one advantage kindle has over print is that it’s searchable. I do use that function, but I wouldn’t buy a kindle just for that.
    The other thing is that print books go through a process of editing, checking and such, which generally yields a higher quality work, but a great deal of what is epublished does not = and it’s awful. Just awful. People just barf on and on without skill, training or purpose. Maybe their best friends and critique groupies like it, or are afraid to say they don’t – but that’s not helpful to a reader looking for the best use of her reading budget.
    I don’t carry my kindle with me. I don’t want to break or mislay it. One lost paperback is a lot less expensive to replace than a lost or nicked kindle. I do have the kindle app on my phone, but I don’t use it much because it runs the battery down fast.
    Just because we have a new engineering solution for something doesn’t mean we have to abandon the old one that worked too. If it’s a choice between print and ebook, I’ll buy the print version.
    Besides, books are lovely to hold and smell and turn pages in.

    Reply
  13. I have had a Kindle for several years, and I do like my new paperwhite, but, that said, I’d rather read a book. I think information books are better read in print; I seem to absorb and retain more. Since I’m trying not to waste time n forgettable junk anymore (which is what kindle is good for), I’m not using it as much.
    The one advantage kindle has over print is that it’s searchable. I do use that function, but I wouldn’t buy a kindle just for that.
    The other thing is that print books go through a process of editing, checking and such, which generally yields a higher quality work, but a great deal of what is epublished does not = and it’s awful. Just awful. People just barf on and on without skill, training or purpose. Maybe their best friends and critique groupies like it, or are afraid to say they don’t – but that’s not helpful to a reader looking for the best use of her reading budget.
    I don’t carry my kindle with me. I don’t want to break or mislay it. One lost paperback is a lot less expensive to replace than a lost or nicked kindle. I do have the kindle app on my phone, but I don’t use it much because it runs the battery down fast.
    Just because we have a new engineering solution for something doesn’t mean we have to abandon the old one that worked too. If it’s a choice between print and ebook, I’ll buy the print version.
    Besides, books are lovely to hold and smell and turn pages in.

    Reply
  14. I have had a Kindle for several years, and I do like my new paperwhite, but, that said, I’d rather read a book. I think information books are better read in print; I seem to absorb and retain more. Since I’m trying not to waste time n forgettable junk anymore (which is what kindle is good for), I’m not using it as much.
    The one advantage kindle has over print is that it’s searchable. I do use that function, but I wouldn’t buy a kindle just for that.
    The other thing is that print books go through a process of editing, checking and such, which generally yields a higher quality work, but a great deal of what is epublished does not = and it’s awful. Just awful. People just barf on and on without skill, training or purpose. Maybe their best friends and critique groupies like it, or are afraid to say they don’t – but that’s not helpful to a reader looking for the best use of her reading budget.
    I don’t carry my kindle with me. I don’t want to break or mislay it. One lost paperback is a lot less expensive to replace than a lost or nicked kindle. I do have the kindle app on my phone, but I don’t use it much because it runs the battery down fast.
    Just because we have a new engineering solution for something doesn’t mean we have to abandon the old one that worked too. If it’s a choice between print and ebook, I’ll buy the print version.
    Besides, books are lovely to hold and smell and turn pages in.

    Reply
  15. I have had a Kindle for several years, and I do like my new paperwhite, but, that said, I’d rather read a book. I think information books are better read in print; I seem to absorb and retain more. Since I’m trying not to waste time n forgettable junk anymore (which is what kindle is good for), I’m not using it as much.
    The one advantage kindle has over print is that it’s searchable. I do use that function, but I wouldn’t buy a kindle just for that.
    The other thing is that print books go through a process of editing, checking and such, which generally yields a higher quality work, but a great deal of what is epublished does not = and it’s awful. Just awful. People just barf on and on without skill, training or purpose. Maybe their best friends and critique groupies like it, or are afraid to say they don’t – but that’s not helpful to a reader looking for the best use of her reading budget.
    I don’t carry my kindle with me. I don’t want to break or mislay it. One lost paperback is a lot less expensive to replace than a lost or nicked kindle. I do have the kindle app on my phone, but I don’t use it much because it runs the battery down fast.
    Just because we have a new engineering solution for something doesn’t mean we have to abandon the old one that worked too. If it’s a choice between print and ebook, I’ll buy the print version.
    Besides, books are lovely to hold and smell and turn pages in.

    Reply
  16. I much prefer the print and paper book over the e-reader. We have two Nooks, a Kindle, and Nook and Kindle apps on two iPads and an iPhone; it’s clear that we’re not technophobes. Still i would rather turn the page than slide it and have well-edited copies and well designed pages to read.
    I worked for thirty years as a copy-editor and proof-reader for a text book firm so some of that may be professional pride, but I believe it is a true love of “real books.” The e-reader is useful for long waits and for its ability to hold a large library in a small space, but for me it will always be a substitute for a “real book.”
    For almost the first time in 25-years, I wish I were still living and working in the New York area, instead of happily back home in the Midwest. this exhibition would be lovely to see. I do love to play with different type-styles when I’m creating on my computer. And I know that that love is a gift of that 30-year old career.

    Reply
  17. I much prefer the print and paper book over the e-reader. We have two Nooks, a Kindle, and Nook and Kindle apps on two iPads and an iPhone; it’s clear that we’re not technophobes. Still i would rather turn the page than slide it and have well-edited copies and well designed pages to read.
    I worked for thirty years as a copy-editor and proof-reader for a text book firm so some of that may be professional pride, but I believe it is a true love of “real books.” The e-reader is useful for long waits and for its ability to hold a large library in a small space, but for me it will always be a substitute for a “real book.”
    For almost the first time in 25-years, I wish I were still living and working in the New York area, instead of happily back home in the Midwest. this exhibition would be lovely to see. I do love to play with different type-styles when I’m creating on my computer. And I know that that love is a gift of that 30-year old career.

    Reply
  18. I much prefer the print and paper book over the e-reader. We have two Nooks, a Kindle, and Nook and Kindle apps on two iPads and an iPhone; it’s clear that we’re not technophobes. Still i would rather turn the page than slide it and have well-edited copies and well designed pages to read.
    I worked for thirty years as a copy-editor and proof-reader for a text book firm so some of that may be professional pride, but I believe it is a true love of “real books.” The e-reader is useful for long waits and for its ability to hold a large library in a small space, but for me it will always be a substitute for a “real book.”
    For almost the first time in 25-years, I wish I were still living and working in the New York area, instead of happily back home in the Midwest. this exhibition would be lovely to see. I do love to play with different type-styles when I’m creating on my computer. And I know that that love is a gift of that 30-year old career.

    Reply
  19. I much prefer the print and paper book over the e-reader. We have two Nooks, a Kindle, and Nook and Kindle apps on two iPads and an iPhone; it’s clear that we’re not technophobes. Still i would rather turn the page than slide it and have well-edited copies and well designed pages to read.
    I worked for thirty years as a copy-editor and proof-reader for a text book firm so some of that may be professional pride, but I believe it is a true love of “real books.” The e-reader is useful for long waits and for its ability to hold a large library in a small space, but for me it will always be a substitute for a “real book.”
    For almost the first time in 25-years, I wish I were still living and working in the New York area, instead of happily back home in the Midwest. this exhibition would be lovely to see. I do love to play with different type-styles when I’m creating on my computer. And I know that that love is a gift of that 30-year old career.

    Reply
  20. I much prefer the print and paper book over the e-reader. We have two Nooks, a Kindle, and Nook and Kindle apps on two iPads and an iPhone; it’s clear that we’re not technophobes. Still i would rather turn the page than slide it and have well-edited copies and well designed pages to read.
    I worked for thirty years as a copy-editor and proof-reader for a text book firm so some of that may be professional pride, but I believe it is a true love of “real books.” The e-reader is useful for long waits and for its ability to hold a large library in a small space, but for me it will always be a substitute for a “real book.”
    For almost the first time in 25-years, I wish I were still living and working in the New York area, instead of happily back home in the Midwest. this exhibition would be lovely to see. I do love to play with different type-styles when I’m creating on my computer. And I know that that love is a gift of that 30-year old career.

    Reply
  21. My favorite “beautiful” book, which I was assigned to read for Eng Lit, my second year in college, was the Riverside Shakespeare. I loved it, so much that despite getting more than a third of its value if I were to resell it back to the college bookstore, I ended up keeping it at the end of the semester. Its current home is my bookshelf in my room. Have a look at the cover here: http://www.antiqbook.com/boox/rarebo/31422.shtml

    Reply
  22. My favorite “beautiful” book, which I was assigned to read for Eng Lit, my second year in college, was the Riverside Shakespeare. I loved it, so much that despite getting more than a third of its value if I were to resell it back to the college bookstore, I ended up keeping it at the end of the semester. Its current home is my bookshelf in my room. Have a look at the cover here: http://www.antiqbook.com/boox/rarebo/31422.shtml

    Reply
  23. My favorite “beautiful” book, which I was assigned to read for Eng Lit, my second year in college, was the Riverside Shakespeare. I loved it, so much that despite getting more than a third of its value if I were to resell it back to the college bookstore, I ended up keeping it at the end of the semester. Its current home is my bookshelf in my room. Have a look at the cover here: http://www.antiqbook.com/boox/rarebo/31422.shtml

    Reply
  24. My favorite “beautiful” book, which I was assigned to read for Eng Lit, my second year in college, was the Riverside Shakespeare. I loved it, so much that despite getting more than a third of its value if I were to resell it back to the college bookstore, I ended up keeping it at the end of the semester. Its current home is my bookshelf in my room. Have a look at the cover here: http://www.antiqbook.com/boox/rarebo/31422.shtml

    Reply
  25. My favorite “beautiful” book, which I was assigned to read for Eng Lit, my second year in college, was the Riverside Shakespeare. I loved it, so much that despite getting more than a third of its value if I were to resell it back to the college bookstore, I ended up keeping it at the end of the semester. Its current home is my bookshelf in my room. Have a look at the cover here: http://www.antiqbook.com/boox/rarebo/31422.shtml

    Reply
  26. Janice, those are all such thoughtful points. I e never think of using the search tool on a kindle, though I suppose it’s useful, especially in non-fiction. However, the feel and tactile enjoyment of turning a page is somehow ingrained in my reading experience. I much prefer real books.
    And like you, I tend to buy quick, “forgettable” reads for my kindle, stuff I enjoy while running around. For reads I truly care about and will go back to time and again, I buy print.
    Also agree with the low level of editing on many e-books. Very annoying the errors in formatting and spelling. Plus, as you say, the quality of the writing varies wildly, and readers have little way of vetting it. There are too many people out there who shouldn’t be trying to write books! I hope that will soon shake out.

    Reply
  27. Janice, those are all such thoughtful points. I e never think of using the search tool on a kindle, though I suppose it’s useful, especially in non-fiction. However, the feel and tactile enjoyment of turning a page is somehow ingrained in my reading experience. I much prefer real books.
    And like you, I tend to buy quick, “forgettable” reads for my kindle, stuff I enjoy while running around. For reads I truly care about and will go back to time and again, I buy print.
    Also agree with the low level of editing on many e-books. Very annoying the errors in formatting and spelling. Plus, as you say, the quality of the writing varies wildly, and readers have little way of vetting it. There are too many people out there who shouldn’t be trying to write books! I hope that will soon shake out.

    Reply
  28. Janice, those are all such thoughtful points. I e never think of using the search tool on a kindle, though I suppose it’s useful, especially in non-fiction. However, the feel and tactile enjoyment of turning a page is somehow ingrained in my reading experience. I much prefer real books.
    And like you, I tend to buy quick, “forgettable” reads for my kindle, stuff I enjoy while running around. For reads I truly care about and will go back to time and again, I buy print.
    Also agree with the low level of editing on many e-books. Very annoying the errors in formatting and spelling. Plus, as you say, the quality of the writing varies wildly, and readers have little way of vetting it. There are too many people out there who shouldn’t be trying to write books! I hope that will soon shake out.

    Reply
  29. Janice, those are all such thoughtful points. I e never think of using the search tool on a kindle, though I suppose it’s useful, especially in non-fiction. However, the feel and tactile enjoyment of turning a page is somehow ingrained in my reading experience. I much prefer real books.
    And like you, I tend to buy quick, “forgettable” reads for my kindle, stuff I enjoy while running around. For reads I truly care about and will go back to time and again, I buy print.
    Also agree with the low level of editing on many e-books. Very annoying the errors in formatting and spelling. Plus, as you say, the quality of the writing varies wildly, and readers have little way of vetting it. There are too many people out there who shouldn’t be trying to write books! I hope that will soon shake out.

    Reply
  30. Janice, those are all such thoughtful points. I e never think of using the search tool on a kindle, though I suppose it’s useful, especially in non-fiction. However, the feel and tactile enjoyment of turning a page is somehow ingrained in my reading experience. I much prefer real books.
    And like you, I tend to buy quick, “forgettable” reads for my kindle, stuff I enjoy while running around. For reads I truly care about and will go back to time and again, I buy print.
    Also agree with the low level of editing on many e-books. Very annoying the errors in formatting and spelling. Plus, as you say, the quality of the writing varies wildly, and readers have little way of vetting it. There are too many people out there who shouldn’t be trying to write books! I hope that will soon shake out.

    Reply
  31. Sue, as my background is book design, I’m completely with you on an appreciation of the printed page—and the dedication and attention to detail that it takes to put a book into print. That art is, to me, important, and most e-books seem oblivious to the fact that quality matters!

    Reply
  32. Sue, as my background is book design, I’m completely with you on an appreciation of the printed page—and the dedication and attention to detail that it takes to put a book into print. That art is, to me, important, and most e-books seem oblivious to the fact that quality matters!

    Reply
  33. Sue, as my background is book design, I’m completely with you on an appreciation of the printed page—and the dedication and attention to detail that it takes to put a book into print. That art is, to me, important, and most e-books seem oblivious to the fact that quality matters!

    Reply
  34. Sue, as my background is book design, I’m completely with you on an appreciation of the printed page—and the dedication and attention to detail that it takes to put a book into print. That art is, to me, important, and most e-books seem oblivious to the fact that quality matters!

    Reply
  35. Sue, as my background is book design, I’m completely with you on an appreciation of the printed page—and the dedication and attention to detail that it takes to put a book into print. That art is, to me, important, and most e-books seem oblivious to the fact that quality matters!

    Reply
  36. Kanch, thanks for sharing! It’s lovely. And good for you for keeping it. Some things can’t be measured in money. You’ll get far more enjoyment from the book over time that in the dollars you would have gotten on selling it back.

    Reply
  37. Kanch, thanks for sharing! It’s lovely. And good for you for keeping it. Some things can’t be measured in money. You’ll get far more enjoyment from the book over time that in the dollars you would have gotten on selling it back.

    Reply
  38. Kanch, thanks for sharing! It’s lovely. And good for you for keeping it. Some things can’t be measured in money. You’ll get far more enjoyment from the book over time that in the dollars you would have gotten on selling it back.

    Reply
  39. Kanch, thanks for sharing! It’s lovely. And good for you for keeping it. Some things can’t be measured in money. You’ll get far more enjoyment from the book over time that in the dollars you would have gotten on selling it back.

    Reply
  40. Kanch, thanks for sharing! It’s lovely. And good for you for keeping it. Some things can’t be measured in money. You’ll get far more enjoyment from the book over time that in the dollars you would have gotten on selling it back.

    Reply
  41. I recently got an e-reader, to use when traveling, but like previous comments, it will not replace my love of books. The cold hardness of the e-reader cannot compare to the warmer, softer book, especially one well read. I can curl up in so many ways with a book, that I cannot do with an e-reader. I, also, LOVE the smell of books. Anytime I am in a bookstore I will definitely pick up at least one book and bring it up to my nose and inhale. I should have lived in the time of vellum and leather.

    Reply
  42. I recently got an e-reader, to use when traveling, but like previous comments, it will not replace my love of books. The cold hardness of the e-reader cannot compare to the warmer, softer book, especially one well read. I can curl up in so many ways with a book, that I cannot do with an e-reader. I, also, LOVE the smell of books. Anytime I am in a bookstore I will definitely pick up at least one book and bring it up to my nose and inhale. I should have lived in the time of vellum and leather.

    Reply
  43. I recently got an e-reader, to use when traveling, but like previous comments, it will not replace my love of books. The cold hardness of the e-reader cannot compare to the warmer, softer book, especially one well read. I can curl up in so many ways with a book, that I cannot do with an e-reader. I, also, LOVE the smell of books. Anytime I am in a bookstore I will definitely pick up at least one book and bring it up to my nose and inhale. I should have lived in the time of vellum and leather.

    Reply
  44. I recently got an e-reader, to use when traveling, but like previous comments, it will not replace my love of books. The cold hardness of the e-reader cannot compare to the warmer, softer book, especially one well read. I can curl up in so many ways with a book, that I cannot do with an e-reader. I, also, LOVE the smell of books. Anytime I am in a bookstore I will definitely pick up at least one book and bring it up to my nose and inhale. I should have lived in the time of vellum and leather.

    Reply
  45. I recently got an e-reader, to use when traveling, but like previous comments, it will not replace my love of books. The cold hardness of the e-reader cannot compare to the warmer, softer book, especially one well read. I can curl up in so many ways with a book, that I cannot do with an e-reader. I, also, LOVE the smell of books. Anytime I am in a bookstore I will definitely pick up at least one book and bring it up to my nose and inhale. I should have lived in the time of vellum and leather.

    Reply
  46. Or as we lovingly dubbed it in college; ‘The Weightlifting Edition.’ I also kept mine and won’t part with it, and that has been….oh dear…forty years now.

    Reply
  47. Or as we lovingly dubbed it in college; ‘The Weightlifting Edition.’ I also kept mine and won’t part with it, and that has been….oh dear…forty years now.

    Reply
  48. Or as we lovingly dubbed it in college; ‘The Weightlifting Edition.’ I also kept mine and won’t part with it, and that has been….oh dear…forty years now.

    Reply
  49. Or as we lovingly dubbed it in college; ‘The Weightlifting Edition.’ I also kept mine and won’t part with it, and that has been….oh dear…forty years now.

    Reply
  50. Or as we lovingly dubbed it in college; ‘The Weightlifting Edition.’ I also kept mine and won’t part with it, and that has been….oh dear…forty years now.

    Reply
  51. Thank you so much Cara, for this lovely and fascinating article. I wish I could transport myself to NYC just to see this exhibit. As a book lover I have my own little library of books I cannot part with knowing I’ll want to read them again and again. Nothing unusual there for most of us following this website.
    I find the discussion of print vs. ebook fandom entertaining and informative, oh….also embarrassing too. I feel convicted by Janice’s comment regarding ‘forgettable junk reads.’ I do feel everyone’s preference is very valid. I love the printed versions, and I LOVE my Kindle, which they will have to pry out of my cold dead hands someday. I own both copies of some favorites. And my hands are suffering these days, so it is easier to hold the Kindle than the 800 page read many many times fave. But that applies to smaller books for me also. I also need to change the font size for ease of reading too. Can’t do that with a paperback, and believe me I’ve tried magnifier appliances galore. Boo.
    Editing is a huge issue. This article has brought up so many good ideas worthy of discussion. I could go on and on about editing, but I’m getting more tolerant as I’ve read some excellent works that I hope with the success of a first attempt with enable a new author to employ an editor for the next venture out.
    Great article Cara. You opened up an intriguing ‘can of worms.’

    Reply
  52. Thank you so much Cara, for this lovely and fascinating article. I wish I could transport myself to NYC just to see this exhibit. As a book lover I have my own little library of books I cannot part with knowing I’ll want to read them again and again. Nothing unusual there for most of us following this website.
    I find the discussion of print vs. ebook fandom entertaining and informative, oh….also embarrassing too. I feel convicted by Janice’s comment regarding ‘forgettable junk reads.’ I do feel everyone’s preference is very valid. I love the printed versions, and I LOVE my Kindle, which they will have to pry out of my cold dead hands someday. I own both copies of some favorites. And my hands are suffering these days, so it is easier to hold the Kindle than the 800 page read many many times fave. But that applies to smaller books for me also. I also need to change the font size for ease of reading too. Can’t do that with a paperback, and believe me I’ve tried magnifier appliances galore. Boo.
    Editing is a huge issue. This article has brought up so many good ideas worthy of discussion. I could go on and on about editing, but I’m getting more tolerant as I’ve read some excellent works that I hope with the success of a first attempt with enable a new author to employ an editor for the next venture out.
    Great article Cara. You opened up an intriguing ‘can of worms.’

    Reply
  53. Thank you so much Cara, for this lovely and fascinating article. I wish I could transport myself to NYC just to see this exhibit. As a book lover I have my own little library of books I cannot part with knowing I’ll want to read them again and again. Nothing unusual there for most of us following this website.
    I find the discussion of print vs. ebook fandom entertaining and informative, oh….also embarrassing too. I feel convicted by Janice’s comment regarding ‘forgettable junk reads.’ I do feel everyone’s preference is very valid. I love the printed versions, and I LOVE my Kindle, which they will have to pry out of my cold dead hands someday. I own both copies of some favorites. And my hands are suffering these days, so it is easier to hold the Kindle than the 800 page read many many times fave. But that applies to smaller books for me also. I also need to change the font size for ease of reading too. Can’t do that with a paperback, and believe me I’ve tried magnifier appliances galore. Boo.
    Editing is a huge issue. This article has brought up so many good ideas worthy of discussion. I could go on and on about editing, but I’m getting more tolerant as I’ve read some excellent works that I hope with the success of a first attempt with enable a new author to employ an editor for the next venture out.
    Great article Cara. You opened up an intriguing ‘can of worms.’

    Reply
  54. Thank you so much Cara, for this lovely and fascinating article. I wish I could transport myself to NYC just to see this exhibit. As a book lover I have my own little library of books I cannot part with knowing I’ll want to read them again and again. Nothing unusual there for most of us following this website.
    I find the discussion of print vs. ebook fandom entertaining and informative, oh….also embarrassing too. I feel convicted by Janice’s comment regarding ‘forgettable junk reads.’ I do feel everyone’s preference is very valid. I love the printed versions, and I LOVE my Kindle, which they will have to pry out of my cold dead hands someday. I own both copies of some favorites. And my hands are suffering these days, so it is easier to hold the Kindle than the 800 page read many many times fave. But that applies to smaller books for me also. I also need to change the font size for ease of reading too. Can’t do that with a paperback, and believe me I’ve tried magnifier appliances galore. Boo.
    Editing is a huge issue. This article has brought up so many good ideas worthy of discussion. I could go on and on about editing, but I’m getting more tolerant as I’ve read some excellent works that I hope with the success of a first attempt with enable a new author to employ an editor for the next venture out.
    Great article Cara. You opened up an intriguing ‘can of worms.’

    Reply
  55. Thank you so much Cara, for this lovely and fascinating article. I wish I could transport myself to NYC just to see this exhibit. As a book lover I have my own little library of books I cannot part with knowing I’ll want to read them again and again. Nothing unusual there for most of us following this website.
    I find the discussion of print vs. ebook fandom entertaining and informative, oh….also embarrassing too. I feel convicted by Janice’s comment regarding ‘forgettable junk reads.’ I do feel everyone’s preference is very valid. I love the printed versions, and I LOVE my Kindle, which they will have to pry out of my cold dead hands someday. I own both copies of some favorites. And my hands are suffering these days, so it is easier to hold the Kindle than the 800 page read many many times fave. But that applies to smaller books for me also. I also need to change the font size for ease of reading too. Can’t do that with a paperback, and believe me I’ve tried magnifier appliances galore. Boo.
    Editing is a huge issue. This article has brought up so many good ideas worthy of discussion. I could go on and on about editing, but I’m getting more tolerant as I’ve read some excellent works that I hope with the success of a first attempt with enable a new author to employ an editor for the next venture out.
    Great article Cara. You opened up an intriguing ‘can of worms.’

    Reply
  56. Oh, LOL on the leather and vellum. A really old, classic bookstore, like the ones you find in London, have that incredible smell—maybe there’s something addictive in old ink But I can’t get enough of it either!
    Paper does feel so nice compared to hard plastic—the price for modern convenience.

    Reply
  57. Oh, LOL on the leather and vellum. A really old, classic bookstore, like the ones you find in London, have that incredible smell—maybe there’s something addictive in old ink But I can’t get enough of it either!
    Paper does feel so nice compared to hard plastic—the price for modern convenience.

    Reply
  58. Oh, LOL on the leather and vellum. A really old, classic bookstore, like the ones you find in London, have that incredible smell—maybe there’s something addictive in old ink But I can’t get enough of it either!
    Paper does feel so nice compared to hard plastic—the price for modern convenience.

    Reply
  59. Oh, LOL on the leather and vellum. A really old, classic bookstore, like the ones you find in London, have that incredible smell—maybe there’s something addictive in old ink But I can’t get enough of it either!
    Paper does feel so nice compared to hard plastic—the price for modern convenience.

    Reply
  60. Oh, LOL on the leather and vellum. A really old, classic bookstore, like the ones you find in London, have that incredible smell—maybe there’s something addictive in old ink But I can’t get enough of it either!
    Paper does feel so nice compared to hard plastic—the price for modern convenience.

    Reply
  61. So glad you enjoyed the article. Michelle. I much prefer my paper books to my kindle, but I’m glad to have both. And I totally understand how invaluable the magnification and light weight are, so appreciate that readers have a tool that helps them read. As far as I’m concerned, anything that gets people reading is wonderful, and these days having practical choices is great. I simply prefer the aesthetics, both tactile and visual of a traditionally printed page, especially when it’s done with an eye to the art and craft of book design.
    There’s room for both, and each have merits . . .I just feel the tard book has a lot more of them

    Reply
  62. So glad you enjoyed the article. Michelle. I much prefer my paper books to my kindle, but I’m glad to have both. And I totally understand how invaluable the magnification and light weight are, so appreciate that readers have a tool that helps them read. As far as I’m concerned, anything that gets people reading is wonderful, and these days having practical choices is great. I simply prefer the aesthetics, both tactile and visual of a traditionally printed page, especially when it’s done with an eye to the art and craft of book design.
    There’s room for both, and each have merits . . .I just feel the tard book has a lot more of them

    Reply
  63. So glad you enjoyed the article. Michelle. I much prefer my paper books to my kindle, but I’m glad to have both. And I totally understand how invaluable the magnification and light weight are, so appreciate that readers have a tool that helps them read. As far as I’m concerned, anything that gets people reading is wonderful, and these days having practical choices is great. I simply prefer the aesthetics, both tactile and visual of a traditionally printed page, especially when it’s done with an eye to the art and craft of book design.
    There’s room for both, and each have merits . . .I just feel the tard book has a lot more of them

    Reply
  64. So glad you enjoyed the article. Michelle. I much prefer my paper books to my kindle, but I’m glad to have both. And I totally understand how invaluable the magnification and light weight are, so appreciate that readers have a tool that helps them read. As far as I’m concerned, anything that gets people reading is wonderful, and these days having practical choices is great. I simply prefer the aesthetics, both tactile and visual of a traditionally printed page, especially when it’s done with an eye to the art and craft of book design.
    There’s room for both, and each have merits . . .I just feel the tard book has a lot more of them

    Reply
  65. So glad you enjoyed the article. Michelle. I much prefer my paper books to my kindle, but I’m glad to have both. And I totally understand how invaluable the magnification and light weight are, so appreciate that readers have a tool that helps them read. As far as I’m concerned, anything that gets people reading is wonderful, and these days having practical choices is great. I simply prefer the aesthetics, both tactile and visual of a traditionally printed page, especially when it’s done with an eye to the art and craft of book design.
    There’s room for both, and each have merits . . .I just feel the tard book has a lot more of them

    Reply
  66. I’m sorry if I hit a sore toe, Michelle 🙂 — but to me reading on kindle is much more like an hour of forgettable TV than it is “real” reading. It just doesn’t feel the same.
    And I think we all recognize that many ebooks are self-published; maybe for some folks that’s the only way to get published, but it does bypass the informed comment of a good editor.
    The great thing about amazon is that they will send sample chapters before you buy an ebook. In the five years that I’ve had an ereader, only once have I found a self published ebook that I thought was worthwhile enough to buy it. Sturgeon’s law definitely applies. Or maybe I’m just a high stickler. However much of what I sample on ebook is so poorly written that it’s painful to look at. Delete, delete, delete 🙁
    Like others here, for convenience I do have some of my favorites on my kindle (having paid for both print and ebook versions), but they are there for moments when I can’t get to the print version.
    Another thing that offends me is a legal point – I don’t own my kindle ebooks in the same sense that I own a print copy of a book. What I own is a license to read that book on my devices — a license which amazon can withdraw whenever it wants — and there’s a famous case where they did exactly that and didn’t even give the customer her money back. She had to fight them in court.
    Whereas with a print book, that copy is mine. I can sell it, trade it, pass it on, donate it, toss it in the recycling if that’s what I want. That copy is my property. Not so with ebooks. I think many people don’t realize that from time to time books will disappear from their ereaders through no action of their own and there won’t be anything they can do about it.

    Reply
  67. I’m sorry if I hit a sore toe, Michelle 🙂 — but to me reading on kindle is much more like an hour of forgettable TV than it is “real” reading. It just doesn’t feel the same.
    And I think we all recognize that many ebooks are self-published; maybe for some folks that’s the only way to get published, but it does bypass the informed comment of a good editor.
    The great thing about amazon is that they will send sample chapters before you buy an ebook. In the five years that I’ve had an ereader, only once have I found a self published ebook that I thought was worthwhile enough to buy it. Sturgeon’s law definitely applies. Or maybe I’m just a high stickler. However much of what I sample on ebook is so poorly written that it’s painful to look at. Delete, delete, delete 🙁
    Like others here, for convenience I do have some of my favorites on my kindle (having paid for both print and ebook versions), but they are there for moments when I can’t get to the print version.
    Another thing that offends me is a legal point – I don’t own my kindle ebooks in the same sense that I own a print copy of a book. What I own is a license to read that book on my devices — a license which amazon can withdraw whenever it wants — and there’s a famous case where they did exactly that and didn’t even give the customer her money back. She had to fight them in court.
    Whereas with a print book, that copy is mine. I can sell it, trade it, pass it on, donate it, toss it in the recycling if that’s what I want. That copy is my property. Not so with ebooks. I think many people don’t realize that from time to time books will disappear from their ereaders through no action of their own and there won’t be anything they can do about it.

    Reply
  68. I’m sorry if I hit a sore toe, Michelle 🙂 — but to me reading on kindle is much more like an hour of forgettable TV than it is “real” reading. It just doesn’t feel the same.
    And I think we all recognize that many ebooks are self-published; maybe for some folks that’s the only way to get published, but it does bypass the informed comment of a good editor.
    The great thing about amazon is that they will send sample chapters before you buy an ebook. In the five years that I’ve had an ereader, only once have I found a self published ebook that I thought was worthwhile enough to buy it. Sturgeon’s law definitely applies. Or maybe I’m just a high stickler. However much of what I sample on ebook is so poorly written that it’s painful to look at. Delete, delete, delete 🙁
    Like others here, for convenience I do have some of my favorites on my kindle (having paid for both print and ebook versions), but they are there for moments when I can’t get to the print version.
    Another thing that offends me is a legal point – I don’t own my kindle ebooks in the same sense that I own a print copy of a book. What I own is a license to read that book on my devices — a license which amazon can withdraw whenever it wants — and there’s a famous case where they did exactly that and didn’t even give the customer her money back. She had to fight them in court.
    Whereas with a print book, that copy is mine. I can sell it, trade it, pass it on, donate it, toss it in the recycling if that’s what I want. That copy is my property. Not so with ebooks. I think many people don’t realize that from time to time books will disappear from their ereaders through no action of their own and there won’t be anything they can do about it.

    Reply
  69. I’m sorry if I hit a sore toe, Michelle 🙂 — but to me reading on kindle is much more like an hour of forgettable TV than it is “real” reading. It just doesn’t feel the same.
    And I think we all recognize that many ebooks are self-published; maybe for some folks that’s the only way to get published, but it does bypass the informed comment of a good editor.
    The great thing about amazon is that they will send sample chapters before you buy an ebook. In the five years that I’ve had an ereader, only once have I found a self published ebook that I thought was worthwhile enough to buy it. Sturgeon’s law definitely applies. Or maybe I’m just a high stickler. However much of what I sample on ebook is so poorly written that it’s painful to look at. Delete, delete, delete 🙁
    Like others here, for convenience I do have some of my favorites on my kindle (having paid for both print and ebook versions), but they are there for moments when I can’t get to the print version.
    Another thing that offends me is a legal point – I don’t own my kindle ebooks in the same sense that I own a print copy of a book. What I own is a license to read that book on my devices — a license which amazon can withdraw whenever it wants — and there’s a famous case where they did exactly that and didn’t even give the customer her money back. She had to fight them in court.
    Whereas with a print book, that copy is mine. I can sell it, trade it, pass it on, donate it, toss it in the recycling if that’s what I want. That copy is my property. Not so with ebooks. I think many people don’t realize that from time to time books will disappear from their ereaders through no action of their own and there won’t be anything they can do about it.

    Reply
  70. I’m sorry if I hit a sore toe, Michelle 🙂 — but to me reading on kindle is much more like an hour of forgettable TV than it is “real” reading. It just doesn’t feel the same.
    And I think we all recognize that many ebooks are self-published; maybe for some folks that’s the only way to get published, but it does bypass the informed comment of a good editor.
    The great thing about amazon is that they will send sample chapters before you buy an ebook. In the five years that I’ve had an ereader, only once have I found a self published ebook that I thought was worthwhile enough to buy it. Sturgeon’s law definitely applies. Or maybe I’m just a high stickler. However much of what I sample on ebook is so poorly written that it’s painful to look at. Delete, delete, delete 🙁
    Like others here, for convenience I do have some of my favorites on my kindle (having paid for both print and ebook versions), but they are there for moments when I can’t get to the print version.
    Another thing that offends me is a legal point – I don’t own my kindle ebooks in the same sense that I own a print copy of a book. What I own is a license to read that book on my devices — a license which amazon can withdraw whenever it wants — and there’s a famous case where they did exactly that and didn’t even give the customer her money back. She had to fight them in court.
    Whereas with a print book, that copy is mine. I can sell it, trade it, pass it on, donate it, toss it in the recycling if that’s what I want. That copy is my property. Not so with ebooks. I think many people don’t realize that from time to time books will disappear from their ereaders through no action of their own and there won’t be anything they can do about it.

    Reply
  71. Wow, I’ve never heard of the Grolier Club, but now it’s definitely on my list of places to visit, since I’m within easy reach of New York. Thanks so much for letting us know about this exhibition.
    I do have a lot of printed books, and when it comes to books with illustrations, I’ve got to have it in print. I also need my cookbooks to be in print. Then there’s my old out-of-print books which I could never give up. But when it comes to everyday reading, I’ve gone over more and more to Kindle. I use the app on my iPad mini. It’s wonderful not to have to load down my luggage with books when I travel(although I always take a couple of paperbacks anyway, because I don’t want to risk the iPad by the beach or the pool). I’m not terribly fussy over the layout, as long as the margins are a decent size, and the print is not terribly tiny.
    My favorite book? I’m rather fond of an old Atlas I have, which shows the boundaries of countries in Europe and the Near East through the ages, starting with ancient times, to the early 20th Century.

    Reply
  72. Wow, I’ve never heard of the Grolier Club, but now it’s definitely on my list of places to visit, since I’m within easy reach of New York. Thanks so much for letting us know about this exhibition.
    I do have a lot of printed books, and when it comes to books with illustrations, I’ve got to have it in print. I also need my cookbooks to be in print. Then there’s my old out-of-print books which I could never give up. But when it comes to everyday reading, I’ve gone over more and more to Kindle. I use the app on my iPad mini. It’s wonderful not to have to load down my luggage with books when I travel(although I always take a couple of paperbacks anyway, because I don’t want to risk the iPad by the beach or the pool). I’m not terribly fussy over the layout, as long as the margins are a decent size, and the print is not terribly tiny.
    My favorite book? I’m rather fond of an old Atlas I have, which shows the boundaries of countries in Europe and the Near East through the ages, starting with ancient times, to the early 20th Century.

    Reply
  73. Wow, I’ve never heard of the Grolier Club, but now it’s definitely on my list of places to visit, since I’m within easy reach of New York. Thanks so much for letting us know about this exhibition.
    I do have a lot of printed books, and when it comes to books with illustrations, I’ve got to have it in print. I also need my cookbooks to be in print. Then there’s my old out-of-print books which I could never give up. But when it comes to everyday reading, I’ve gone over more and more to Kindle. I use the app on my iPad mini. It’s wonderful not to have to load down my luggage with books when I travel(although I always take a couple of paperbacks anyway, because I don’t want to risk the iPad by the beach or the pool). I’m not terribly fussy over the layout, as long as the margins are a decent size, and the print is not terribly tiny.
    My favorite book? I’m rather fond of an old Atlas I have, which shows the boundaries of countries in Europe and the Near East through the ages, starting with ancient times, to the early 20th Century.

    Reply
  74. Wow, I’ve never heard of the Grolier Club, but now it’s definitely on my list of places to visit, since I’m within easy reach of New York. Thanks so much for letting us know about this exhibition.
    I do have a lot of printed books, and when it comes to books with illustrations, I’ve got to have it in print. I also need my cookbooks to be in print. Then there’s my old out-of-print books which I could never give up. But when it comes to everyday reading, I’ve gone over more and more to Kindle. I use the app on my iPad mini. It’s wonderful not to have to load down my luggage with books when I travel(although I always take a couple of paperbacks anyway, because I don’t want to risk the iPad by the beach or the pool). I’m not terribly fussy over the layout, as long as the margins are a decent size, and the print is not terribly tiny.
    My favorite book? I’m rather fond of an old Atlas I have, which shows the boundaries of countries in Europe and the Near East through the ages, starting with ancient times, to the early 20th Century.

    Reply
  75. Wow, I’ve never heard of the Grolier Club, but now it’s definitely on my list of places to visit, since I’m within easy reach of New York. Thanks so much for letting us know about this exhibition.
    I do have a lot of printed books, and when it comes to books with illustrations, I’ve got to have it in print. I also need my cookbooks to be in print. Then there’s my old out-of-print books which I could never give up. But when it comes to everyday reading, I’ve gone over more and more to Kindle. I use the app on my iPad mini. It’s wonderful not to have to load down my luggage with books when I travel(although I always take a couple of paperbacks anyway, because I don’t want to risk the iPad by the beach or the pool). I’m not terribly fussy over the layout, as long as the margins are a decent size, and the print is not terribly tiny.
    My favorite book? I’m rather fond of an old Atlas I have, which shows the boundaries of countries in Europe and the Near East through the ages, starting with ancient times, to the early 20th Century.

    Reply
  76. Karin, illustrated books really don’t come across well on a Kindle yet (I don’t have an i-Pad, so maybe with that resolution they look better.) And I do agree with the traveling—I do appreciate not having to lug reading material. But at hone, I prefer paper. And we haven’t yet touched on the whole area of bookshelves! I love coming into my writing room and seeing the shelves full of books. I find a room bare of books very empty!

    Reply
  77. Karin, illustrated books really don’t come across well on a Kindle yet (I don’t have an i-Pad, so maybe with that resolution they look better.) And I do agree with the traveling—I do appreciate not having to lug reading material. But at hone, I prefer paper. And we haven’t yet touched on the whole area of bookshelves! I love coming into my writing room and seeing the shelves full of books. I find a room bare of books very empty!

    Reply
  78. Karin, illustrated books really don’t come across well on a Kindle yet (I don’t have an i-Pad, so maybe with that resolution they look better.) And I do agree with the traveling—I do appreciate not having to lug reading material. But at hone, I prefer paper. And we haven’t yet touched on the whole area of bookshelves! I love coming into my writing room and seeing the shelves full of books. I find a room bare of books very empty!

    Reply
  79. Karin, illustrated books really don’t come across well on a Kindle yet (I don’t have an i-Pad, so maybe with that resolution they look better.) And I do agree with the traveling—I do appreciate not having to lug reading material. But at hone, I prefer paper. And we haven’t yet touched on the whole area of bookshelves! I love coming into my writing room and seeing the shelves full of books. I find a room bare of books very empty!

    Reply
  80. Karin, illustrated books really don’t come across well on a Kindle yet (I don’t have an i-Pad, so maybe with that resolution they look better.) And I do agree with the traveling—I do appreciate not having to lug reading material. But at hone, I prefer paper. And we haven’t yet touched on the whole area of bookshelves! I love coming into my writing room and seeing the shelves full of books. I find a room bare of books very empty!

    Reply
  81. Cara, I too love bookshelves – and what is more, when I visit a house and I don’t see any books or bookshelves, I want to leave – there must be something seriously wrong with those people!

    Reply
  82. Cara, I too love bookshelves – and what is more, when I visit a house and I don’t see any books or bookshelves, I want to leave – there must be something seriously wrong with those people!

    Reply
  83. Cara, I too love bookshelves – and what is more, when I visit a house and I don’t see any books or bookshelves, I want to leave – there must be something seriously wrong with those people!

    Reply
  84. Cara, I too love bookshelves – and what is more, when I visit a house and I don’t see any books or bookshelves, I want to leave – there must be something seriously wrong with those people!

    Reply
  85. Cara, I too love bookshelves – and what is more, when I visit a house and I don’t see any books or bookshelves, I want to leave – there must be something seriously wrong with those people!

    Reply

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