The Art of Creating a Deliciously Desirable Hero

603px-Poussin,_Nicolas_-_The_Nurture_of_Jupiter_-_Google_Art_ProjectCara/Andrea here, I'm delighted to kick off our regular blog schedule for the new year by welcoming back my good friend and Honorary Word Wench Miranda Neville. Nt only does Miranda craft delightfully smart and sophisticated Regency romances, but as those who have read her books know she also draws on her expertise in period history and art to create a wonderful ambiance of the era. In her latest book, which released just last week, she found inspiration in an unexpected place . . . so without further ado, I shall hand over the pen and let her tell us all about it!

NevilleColorSmallerMiranda here,
For The Duke of Dark Desires, I used a remarkable creation of the Regency period. One of London’s best art collections is also relatively unknown, probably because it’s inconvenient to reach by public transport. Dulwich Picture Gallery opened in 1817 and is the oldest public art gallery in England. It houses an extraordinary collection of Dutch, French, Italian and Flemish Old Masters including Rembrandt, Rubens, Raphael, Poussin, and Fragonard, as well as English masters like Gainsborough and Lawrence.

Dulwich-picture-gallery-interiorThe existence of this great museum in a fairly obscure part of south London arose from the career of a pair of eighteenth-century art dealers, Noël Desenfans and Sir Francis Bourgeois. Commissioned by the King of Poland to assemble a ready-made collection of masterworks, the paintings were left on their hands when Poland (not for the first time) succumbed to more powerful neighbors. Failing to find a buyer elsewhere (both the Tsar of Russia and the British government turned it down), the collection was bequeathed by Bourgeois to his old school, Dulwich College, with the stipulation that it be displayed to the public.

640px-Dulwich_picture_gallery_at_sunsetNot only was it the first public gallery in England, it was also the first purpose-built gallery in the world. Sir John Soane, one of the most interesting architects of the day, designed the building, including revolutionary roof-lanterns that provided natural top light ideal for viewing art. Adjacent to the gallery space, slightly macabrely, is a mausoleum for Bourgeois, Desenfans, and the latter’s wife.

Before he inherited the title, Julian Fortescue, the hero of my latest book, had to work for his living so he followed his passion and became an art dealer. Though still considered trade, it wasn’t unusual for gentleman to do a little genteel wheeling and dealing, tracking down European treasures to meet the voracious appetite of wealthy Englishmen for works of art. (Sir William Hamilton, Emma’s husband, is a famous example.) Revolutionary Paris offered rich pickings as aristocrats fled the country.  Such a story is at the crux of the plot of The Duke of Dark Desires. I also incorporated elements of the Dulwich history into the book, as well as the long, fruitless effort to establish a national collection, which succeeded only with the foundation of the National Gallery in 1824. Best of all, I was able to raid the art galleries of the world to assemble Julian’s collection.

DDDI don’t want to give the impression that The Duke of Dark Desires is a treatise on art history. This is the short blurb:

Julian Fortescue never expected to inherit a dukedom, nor to find himself guardian to three young half-sisters. Now in the market for a governess, he lays eyes on Jane Grey and knows immediately she is qualified–to become his mistress. To find the man responsible for the deaths of her family, Jeanne de Falleron enters the Duke of Denford's house as governess Jane Gray. As she discovers more clues about the villain she seeks, she's faced with a possibility more disturbing than her growing feelings for the duke: What will she do if the man she loves is also the man she has sworn to kill?

I’m always pleased when I can tailor real historical events to fit my novels and I especially enjoyed the inspiration of the Dulwich Picture Gallery. I will be thrilled if I encourage a few people to visit this gem. Incidentally, there’s an excellent café!

I am a keen museum goer and I love discovering new ones. Do you have a favorite “lesser known” museum or historic site? Perhaps there’s a hidden gem in your area. If so, I would like to know. One commenter will be chosen at random to win a copy of The Duke of Dark Desires.

280 thoughts on “The Art of Creating a Deliciously Desirable Hero”

  1. This was very interesting, and very timely in my view. I am intending travelling from Australia to the UK in June this year, and as little gems like this appear in the blog I am jotting down the details. It will be 30 years since I last visited the UK, and there are lots and lots of new places to visit and things to see. Whether I will have enough time to visit the lengthy list in the three or so weeks I will have remains to be seen. This gallery will definitely be on the list. Thank you so much.

    Reply
  2. This was very interesting, and very timely in my view. I am intending travelling from Australia to the UK in June this year, and as little gems like this appear in the blog I am jotting down the details. It will be 30 years since I last visited the UK, and there are lots and lots of new places to visit and things to see. Whether I will have enough time to visit the lengthy list in the three or so weeks I will have remains to be seen. This gallery will definitely be on the list. Thank you so much.

    Reply
  3. This was very interesting, and very timely in my view. I am intending travelling from Australia to the UK in June this year, and as little gems like this appear in the blog I am jotting down the details. It will be 30 years since I last visited the UK, and there are lots and lots of new places to visit and things to see. Whether I will have enough time to visit the lengthy list in the three or so weeks I will have remains to be seen. This gallery will definitely be on the list. Thank you so much.

    Reply
  4. This was very interesting, and very timely in my view. I am intending travelling from Australia to the UK in June this year, and as little gems like this appear in the blog I am jotting down the details. It will be 30 years since I last visited the UK, and there are lots and lots of new places to visit and things to see. Whether I will have enough time to visit the lengthy list in the three or so weeks I will have remains to be seen. This gallery will definitely be on the list. Thank you so much.

    Reply
  5. This was very interesting, and very timely in my view. I am intending travelling from Australia to the UK in June this year, and as little gems like this appear in the blog I am jotting down the details. It will be 30 years since I last visited the UK, and there are lots and lots of new places to visit and things to see. Whether I will have enough time to visit the lengthy list in the three or so weeks I will have remains to be seen. This gallery will definitely be on the list. Thank you so much.

    Reply
  6. My favorite hidden museum in the UK is one on time and nautical history in Greenwich. I took a ferry from somewhere around Canary Wharf over to Greenwich, slow but an interesting view of the Thames.
    Here in DC, it’s big and far away, but the Air and Space Museum near Dulles Airport is well worth the drive. It has several spy planes that flew high and fast to evade the Soviets, there’s the space shuttle, and war planes from WWI to the present day. My trip was enhance by having a docent. It also explains the history of missiles.

    Reply
  7. My favorite hidden museum in the UK is one on time and nautical history in Greenwich. I took a ferry from somewhere around Canary Wharf over to Greenwich, slow but an interesting view of the Thames.
    Here in DC, it’s big and far away, but the Air and Space Museum near Dulles Airport is well worth the drive. It has several spy planes that flew high and fast to evade the Soviets, there’s the space shuttle, and war planes from WWI to the present day. My trip was enhance by having a docent. It also explains the history of missiles.

    Reply
  8. My favorite hidden museum in the UK is one on time and nautical history in Greenwich. I took a ferry from somewhere around Canary Wharf over to Greenwich, slow but an interesting view of the Thames.
    Here in DC, it’s big and far away, but the Air and Space Museum near Dulles Airport is well worth the drive. It has several spy planes that flew high and fast to evade the Soviets, there’s the space shuttle, and war planes from WWI to the present day. My trip was enhance by having a docent. It also explains the history of missiles.

    Reply
  9. My favorite hidden museum in the UK is one on time and nautical history in Greenwich. I took a ferry from somewhere around Canary Wharf over to Greenwich, slow but an interesting view of the Thames.
    Here in DC, it’s big and far away, but the Air and Space Museum near Dulles Airport is well worth the drive. It has several spy planes that flew high and fast to evade the Soviets, there’s the space shuttle, and war planes from WWI to the present day. My trip was enhance by having a docent. It also explains the history of missiles.

    Reply
  10. My favorite hidden museum in the UK is one on time and nautical history in Greenwich. I took a ferry from somewhere around Canary Wharf over to Greenwich, slow but an interesting view of the Thames.
    Here in DC, it’s big and far away, but the Air and Space Museum near Dulles Airport is well worth the drive. It has several spy planes that flew high and fast to evade the Soviets, there’s the space shuttle, and war planes from WWI to the present day. My trip was enhance by having a docent. It also explains the history of missiles.

    Reply
  11. I am glad I read this book. Julian was different from many of the standard duke heroes and that was enjoyable. I think he never really did reform to the duty and honor prototype but I do think Julian cleaned up this act considerably. Enjoyed this hero.

    Reply
  12. I am glad I read this book. Julian was different from many of the standard duke heroes and that was enjoyable. I think he never really did reform to the duty and honor prototype but I do think Julian cleaned up this act considerably. Enjoyed this hero.

    Reply
  13. I am glad I read this book. Julian was different from many of the standard duke heroes and that was enjoyable. I think he never really did reform to the duty and honor prototype but I do think Julian cleaned up this act considerably. Enjoyed this hero.

    Reply
  14. I am glad I read this book. Julian was different from many of the standard duke heroes and that was enjoyable. I think he never really did reform to the duty and honor prototype but I do think Julian cleaned up this act considerably. Enjoyed this hero.

    Reply
  15. I am glad I read this book. Julian was different from many of the standard duke heroes and that was enjoyable. I think he never really did reform to the duty and honor prototype but I do think Julian cleaned up this act considerably. Enjoyed this hero.

    Reply
  16. The Museum of the Rockies, in Bozeman, Montana is usually associated with dinosaurs. It also generally has an art exhibit going on in its second floor gallery and has a small collection, mostly of work by Montana artists.
    The Buffalo Bill Museum in Cody, Wyoming has one of the largest western art exhibits, as well as a very large collection of firearms, and Plains Indians Artifacts.
    And the charles M. Russell Museum in Great Falls, Montana has work by that artist. They have an art sale every year – It’s how, in part, the place is supported.

    Reply
  17. The Museum of the Rockies, in Bozeman, Montana is usually associated with dinosaurs. It also generally has an art exhibit going on in its second floor gallery and has a small collection, mostly of work by Montana artists.
    The Buffalo Bill Museum in Cody, Wyoming has one of the largest western art exhibits, as well as a very large collection of firearms, and Plains Indians Artifacts.
    And the charles M. Russell Museum in Great Falls, Montana has work by that artist. They have an art sale every year – It’s how, in part, the place is supported.

    Reply
  18. The Museum of the Rockies, in Bozeman, Montana is usually associated with dinosaurs. It also generally has an art exhibit going on in its second floor gallery and has a small collection, mostly of work by Montana artists.
    The Buffalo Bill Museum in Cody, Wyoming has one of the largest western art exhibits, as well as a very large collection of firearms, and Plains Indians Artifacts.
    And the charles M. Russell Museum in Great Falls, Montana has work by that artist. They have an art sale every year – It’s how, in part, the place is supported.

    Reply
  19. The Museum of the Rockies, in Bozeman, Montana is usually associated with dinosaurs. It also generally has an art exhibit going on in its second floor gallery and has a small collection, mostly of work by Montana artists.
    The Buffalo Bill Museum in Cody, Wyoming has one of the largest western art exhibits, as well as a very large collection of firearms, and Plains Indians Artifacts.
    And the charles M. Russell Museum in Great Falls, Montana has work by that artist. They have an art sale every year – It’s how, in part, the place is supported.

    Reply
  20. The Museum of the Rockies, in Bozeman, Montana is usually associated with dinosaurs. It also generally has an art exhibit going on in its second floor gallery and has a small collection, mostly of work by Montana artists.
    The Buffalo Bill Museum in Cody, Wyoming has one of the largest western art exhibits, as well as a very large collection of firearms, and Plains Indians Artifacts.
    And the charles M. Russell Museum in Great Falls, Montana has work by that artist. They have an art sale every year – It’s how, in part, the place is supported.

    Reply
  21. We spent a week in Canberra, and were very impressed with the museums, zoo, botanical gardens, campus of National University…..everywhere we went. A truly remarkable city.

    Reply
  22. We spent a week in Canberra, and were very impressed with the museums, zoo, botanical gardens, campus of National University…..everywhere we went. A truly remarkable city.

    Reply
  23. We spent a week in Canberra, and were very impressed with the museums, zoo, botanical gardens, campus of National University…..everywhere we went. A truly remarkable city.

    Reply
  24. We spent a week in Canberra, and were very impressed with the museums, zoo, botanical gardens, campus of National University…..everywhere we went. A truly remarkable city.

    Reply
  25. We spent a week in Canberra, and were very impressed with the museums, zoo, botanical gardens, campus of National University…..everywhere we went. A truly remarkable city.

    Reply
  26. I love Greenwich, Shannon. A couple of years ago I took the boat trip and it struck me how empty the Thames is now, when for centuries it was one of the busiest waterways in the world.
    I visited the Air & Space Museum years ago on the Mall. I guess it moved or is that a bigger branch? I went with my dad who is far more interested in art than science. But he was in WWII after all so he got into the planes.

    Reply
  27. I love Greenwich, Shannon. A couple of years ago I took the boat trip and it struck me how empty the Thames is now, when for centuries it was one of the busiest waterways in the world.
    I visited the Air & Space Museum years ago on the Mall. I guess it moved or is that a bigger branch? I went with my dad who is far more interested in art than science. But he was in WWII after all so he got into the planes.

    Reply
  28. I love Greenwich, Shannon. A couple of years ago I took the boat trip and it struck me how empty the Thames is now, when for centuries it was one of the busiest waterways in the world.
    I visited the Air & Space Museum years ago on the Mall. I guess it moved or is that a bigger branch? I went with my dad who is far more interested in art than science. But he was in WWII after all so he got into the planes.

    Reply
  29. I love Greenwich, Shannon. A couple of years ago I took the boat trip and it struck me how empty the Thames is now, when for centuries it was one of the busiest waterways in the world.
    I visited the Air & Space Museum years ago on the Mall. I guess it moved or is that a bigger branch? I went with my dad who is far more interested in art than science. But he was in WWII after all so he got into the planes.

    Reply
  30. I love Greenwich, Shannon. A couple of years ago I took the boat trip and it struck me how empty the Thames is now, when for centuries it was one of the busiest waterways in the world.
    I visited the Air & Space Museum years ago on the Mall. I guess it moved or is that a bigger branch? I went with my dad who is far more interested in art than science. But he was in WWII after all so he got into the planes.

    Reply
  31. I love museums. When I travel, my days are planned around visiting as many as I can fit in. I’m happy in any museum, but I especially love ones with atypical settings. The Isabella Steward Gardner in Boston is one of my favorites for that reason, as is the Frick in NYC. I also love the Cloisters in NYC. The setting is as lovely as the art.

    Reply
  32. I love museums. When I travel, my days are planned around visiting as many as I can fit in. I’m happy in any museum, but I especially love ones with atypical settings. The Isabella Steward Gardner in Boston is one of my favorites for that reason, as is the Frick in NYC. I also love the Cloisters in NYC. The setting is as lovely as the art.

    Reply
  33. I love museums. When I travel, my days are planned around visiting as many as I can fit in. I’m happy in any museum, but I especially love ones with atypical settings. The Isabella Steward Gardner in Boston is one of my favorites for that reason, as is the Frick in NYC. I also love the Cloisters in NYC. The setting is as lovely as the art.

    Reply
  34. I love museums. When I travel, my days are planned around visiting as many as I can fit in. I’m happy in any museum, but I especially love ones with atypical settings. The Isabella Steward Gardner in Boston is one of my favorites for that reason, as is the Frick in NYC. I also love the Cloisters in NYC. The setting is as lovely as the art.

    Reply
  35. I love museums. When I travel, my days are planned around visiting as many as I can fit in. I’m happy in any museum, but I especially love ones with atypical settings. The Isabella Steward Gardner in Boston is one of my favorites for that reason, as is the Frick in NYC. I also love the Cloisters in NYC. The setting is as lovely as the art.

    Reply
  36. Although Colonial Williamsburg VA is most well known for its reconstructed and reproduction buildings and furnishings, The Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg have amazing collections of British and American decorative and folk arts.

    Reply
  37. Although Colonial Williamsburg VA is most well known for its reconstructed and reproduction buildings and furnishings, The Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg have amazing collections of British and American decorative and folk arts.

    Reply
  38. Although Colonial Williamsburg VA is most well known for its reconstructed and reproduction buildings and furnishings, The Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg have amazing collections of British and American decorative and folk arts.

    Reply
  39. Although Colonial Williamsburg VA is most well known for its reconstructed and reproduction buildings and furnishings, The Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg have amazing collections of British and American decorative and folk arts.

    Reply
  40. Although Colonial Williamsburg VA is most well known for its reconstructed and reproduction buildings and furnishings, The Art Museums of Colonial Williamsburg have amazing collections of British and American decorative and folk arts.

    Reply
  41. I don’t think we’ll make it to the Dulwich Picture Gallery when we visit London next month, but we do plan to visit Sir John Soane’s museum, so it was interesting to hear about his roof lantern design. I also love small museums; I have learned some fascinating things because I had the time to thoroughly examine exhibits without having to fight a crowd.

    Reply
  42. I don’t think we’ll make it to the Dulwich Picture Gallery when we visit London next month, but we do plan to visit Sir John Soane’s museum, so it was interesting to hear about his roof lantern design. I also love small museums; I have learned some fascinating things because I had the time to thoroughly examine exhibits without having to fight a crowd.

    Reply
  43. I don’t think we’ll make it to the Dulwich Picture Gallery when we visit London next month, but we do plan to visit Sir John Soane’s museum, so it was interesting to hear about his roof lantern design. I also love small museums; I have learned some fascinating things because I had the time to thoroughly examine exhibits without having to fight a crowd.

    Reply
  44. I don’t think we’ll make it to the Dulwich Picture Gallery when we visit London next month, but we do plan to visit Sir John Soane’s museum, so it was interesting to hear about his roof lantern design. I also love small museums; I have learned some fascinating things because I had the time to thoroughly examine exhibits without having to fight a crowd.

    Reply
  45. I don’t think we’ll make it to the Dulwich Picture Gallery when we visit London next month, but we do plan to visit Sir John Soane’s museum, so it was interesting to hear about his roof lantern design. I also love small museums; I have learned some fascinating things because I had the time to thoroughly examine exhibits without having to fight a crowd.

    Reply
  46. I’m putting the Dulwich Gallery on my bucket list, and I’m also looking forward to reading Miranda’s book! This question is right up my alley because I collect out-of-the-way museums. I just visited the Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum which was recently reopened in New York after a complete renovation, and it’s great. In NJ there’s the Newark Museum which specializes in art from Asian and African civilizations, plus American folk art. And my favorite sculpture garden is the one on the grounds of the Pepsico headquarters in Purchase, NY. It’s closed for renovation right now but will reopen later this year. People are always amazed when they see this gorgeous place, which is free and open to the public, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

    Reply
  47. I’m putting the Dulwich Gallery on my bucket list, and I’m also looking forward to reading Miranda’s book! This question is right up my alley because I collect out-of-the-way museums. I just visited the Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum which was recently reopened in New York after a complete renovation, and it’s great. In NJ there’s the Newark Museum which specializes in art from Asian and African civilizations, plus American folk art. And my favorite sculpture garden is the one on the grounds of the Pepsico headquarters in Purchase, NY. It’s closed for renovation right now but will reopen later this year. People are always amazed when they see this gorgeous place, which is free and open to the public, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

    Reply
  48. I’m putting the Dulwich Gallery on my bucket list, and I’m also looking forward to reading Miranda’s book! This question is right up my alley because I collect out-of-the-way museums. I just visited the Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum which was recently reopened in New York after a complete renovation, and it’s great. In NJ there’s the Newark Museum which specializes in art from Asian and African civilizations, plus American folk art. And my favorite sculpture garden is the one on the grounds of the Pepsico headquarters in Purchase, NY. It’s closed for renovation right now but will reopen later this year. People are always amazed when they see this gorgeous place, which is free and open to the public, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

    Reply
  49. I’m putting the Dulwich Gallery on my bucket list, and I’m also looking forward to reading Miranda’s book! This question is right up my alley because I collect out-of-the-way museums. I just visited the Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum which was recently reopened in New York after a complete renovation, and it’s great. In NJ there’s the Newark Museum which specializes in art from Asian and African civilizations, plus American folk art. And my favorite sculpture garden is the one on the grounds of the Pepsico headquarters in Purchase, NY. It’s closed for renovation right now but will reopen later this year. People are always amazed when they see this gorgeous place, which is free and open to the public, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

    Reply
  50. I’m putting the Dulwich Gallery on my bucket list, and I’m also looking forward to reading Miranda’s book! This question is right up my alley because I collect out-of-the-way museums. I just visited the Cooper-Hewitt Design Museum which was recently reopened in New York after a complete renovation, and it’s great. In NJ there’s the Newark Museum which specializes in art from Asian and African civilizations, plus American folk art. And my favorite sculpture garden is the one on the grounds of the Pepsico headquarters in Purchase, NY. It’s closed for renovation right now but will reopen later this year. People are always amazed when they see this gorgeous place, which is free and open to the public, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

    Reply
  51. If anyone is near Rockland, Maine, please do not miss the Farnsworth Art Museum. An excellent collection of Wythe art. Also visit Monhegan Island, the inspiration for much of their art.

    Reply
  52. If anyone is near Rockland, Maine, please do not miss the Farnsworth Art Museum. An excellent collection of Wythe art. Also visit Monhegan Island, the inspiration for much of their art.

    Reply
  53. If anyone is near Rockland, Maine, please do not miss the Farnsworth Art Museum. An excellent collection of Wythe art. Also visit Monhegan Island, the inspiration for much of their art.

    Reply
  54. If anyone is near Rockland, Maine, please do not miss the Farnsworth Art Museum. An excellent collection of Wythe art. Also visit Monhegan Island, the inspiration for much of their art.

    Reply
  55. If anyone is near Rockland, Maine, please do not miss the Farnsworth Art Museum. An excellent collection of Wythe art. Also visit Monhegan Island, the inspiration for much of their art.

    Reply
  56. One of my treasured memories is visiting the Museo Civico in Sansepolcro to see Piero della Francesco’s Resurrection. This was many years ago, so I don’t know if the museum’s arrangement has changed, but it was displayed in a room all by itself. I was there with my husband and children, and we were the only ones in the museum other than the guard. It was an extraordinary experience.

    Reply
  57. One of my treasured memories is visiting the Museo Civico in Sansepolcro to see Piero della Francesco’s Resurrection. This was many years ago, so I don’t know if the museum’s arrangement has changed, but it was displayed in a room all by itself. I was there with my husband and children, and we were the only ones in the museum other than the guard. It was an extraordinary experience.

    Reply
  58. One of my treasured memories is visiting the Museo Civico in Sansepolcro to see Piero della Francesco’s Resurrection. This was many years ago, so I don’t know if the museum’s arrangement has changed, but it was displayed in a room all by itself. I was there with my husband and children, and we were the only ones in the museum other than the guard. It was an extraordinary experience.

    Reply
  59. One of my treasured memories is visiting the Museo Civico in Sansepolcro to see Piero della Francesco’s Resurrection. This was many years ago, so I don’t know if the museum’s arrangement has changed, but it was displayed in a room all by itself. I was there with my husband and children, and we were the only ones in the museum other than the guard. It was an extraordinary experience.

    Reply
  60. One of my treasured memories is visiting the Museo Civico in Sansepolcro to see Piero della Francesco’s Resurrection. This was many years ago, so I don’t know if the museum’s arrangement has changed, but it was displayed in a room all by itself. I was there with my husband and children, and we were the only ones in the museum other than the guard. It was an extraordinary experience.

    Reply
  61. We must be museum twins, Amanda, because each of those three is among my all time favorites. I was at the Gardner a few weeks ago and a little discombobulated by the new modern entrance. I sighed with relief to find the old place unchanged inside. (Though I wouldn’t mind better lighting and labeling!)

    Reply
  62. We must be museum twins, Amanda, because each of those three is among my all time favorites. I was at the Gardner a few weeks ago and a little discombobulated by the new modern entrance. I sighed with relief to find the old place unchanged inside. (Though I wouldn’t mind better lighting and labeling!)

    Reply
  63. We must be museum twins, Amanda, because each of those three is among my all time favorites. I was at the Gardner a few weeks ago and a little discombobulated by the new modern entrance. I sighed with relief to find the old place unchanged inside. (Though I wouldn’t mind better lighting and labeling!)

    Reply
  64. We must be museum twins, Amanda, because each of those three is among my all time favorites. I was at the Gardner a few weeks ago and a little discombobulated by the new modern entrance. I sighed with relief to find the old place unchanged inside. (Though I wouldn’t mind better lighting and labeling!)

    Reply
  65. We must be museum twins, Amanda, because each of those three is among my all time favorites. I was at the Gardner a few weeks ago and a little discombobulated by the new modern entrance. I sighed with relief to find the old place unchanged inside. (Though I wouldn’t mind better lighting and labeling!)

    Reply
  66. Thanks for those suggestions, Karin. The Cooper-Heweitt has wonderful exhibits. A few years ago they had one on the history of tableware – catnip to the historical novelist. I learned so much.

    Reply
  67. Thanks for those suggestions, Karin. The Cooper-Heweitt has wonderful exhibits. A few years ago they had one on the history of tableware – catnip to the historical novelist. I learned so much.

    Reply
  68. Thanks for those suggestions, Karin. The Cooper-Heweitt has wonderful exhibits. A few years ago they had one on the history of tableware – catnip to the historical novelist. I learned so much.

    Reply
  69. Thanks for those suggestions, Karin. The Cooper-Heweitt has wonderful exhibits. A few years ago they had one on the history of tableware – catnip to the historical novelist. I learned so much.

    Reply
  70. Thanks for those suggestions, Karin. The Cooper-Heweitt has wonderful exhibits. A few years ago they had one on the history of tableware – catnip to the historical novelist. I learned so much.

    Reply
  71. I never made it to Sansepolcro, Lilian, so I’m jealous. Many years ago I saw the Piero Madonna at Monterchi, when it was still in the tiny chapel in the middle of a dusty village. I gather it’s now in a museum built for it, which is good from the historic preservation point of view though less atmospheric!

    Reply
  72. I never made it to Sansepolcro, Lilian, so I’m jealous. Many years ago I saw the Piero Madonna at Monterchi, when it was still in the tiny chapel in the middle of a dusty village. I gather it’s now in a museum built for it, which is good from the historic preservation point of view though less atmospheric!

    Reply
  73. I never made it to Sansepolcro, Lilian, so I’m jealous. Many years ago I saw the Piero Madonna at Monterchi, when it was still in the tiny chapel in the middle of a dusty village. I gather it’s now in a museum built for it, which is good from the historic preservation point of view though less atmospheric!

    Reply
  74. I never made it to Sansepolcro, Lilian, so I’m jealous. Many years ago I saw the Piero Madonna at Monterchi, when it was still in the tiny chapel in the middle of a dusty village. I gather it’s now in a museum built for it, which is good from the historic preservation point of view though less atmospheric!

    Reply
  75. I never made it to Sansepolcro, Lilian, so I’m jealous. Many years ago I saw the Piero Madonna at Monterchi, when it was still in the tiny chapel in the middle of a dusty village. I gather it’s now in a museum built for it, which is good from the historic preservation point of view though less atmospheric!

    Reply
  76. Thanks so much for sharing Dulwich with us, Miranda. I love offbeat museums, and it’s no surprise that London—which has such a rich assortment of quirky places—has some of my favorites. On my last visit, I discovered the Dockland Museum, down near Canary Wharf, and found it absolutely fascinating! It’s a bit of a trek from the usual places tourists go, but well worth the trip.

    Reply
  77. Thanks so much for sharing Dulwich with us, Miranda. I love offbeat museums, and it’s no surprise that London—which has such a rich assortment of quirky places—has some of my favorites. On my last visit, I discovered the Dockland Museum, down near Canary Wharf, and found it absolutely fascinating! It’s a bit of a trek from the usual places tourists go, but well worth the trip.

    Reply
  78. Thanks so much for sharing Dulwich with us, Miranda. I love offbeat museums, and it’s no surprise that London—which has such a rich assortment of quirky places—has some of my favorites. On my last visit, I discovered the Dockland Museum, down near Canary Wharf, and found it absolutely fascinating! It’s a bit of a trek from the usual places tourists go, but well worth the trip.

    Reply
  79. Thanks so much for sharing Dulwich with us, Miranda. I love offbeat museums, and it’s no surprise that London—which has such a rich assortment of quirky places—has some of my favorites. On my last visit, I discovered the Dockland Museum, down near Canary Wharf, and found it absolutely fascinating! It’s a bit of a trek from the usual places tourists go, but well worth the trip.

    Reply
  80. Thanks so much for sharing Dulwich with us, Miranda. I love offbeat museums, and it’s no surprise that London—which has such a rich assortment of quirky places—has some of my favorites. On my last visit, I discovered the Dockland Museum, down near Canary Wharf, and found it absolutely fascinating! It’s a bit of a trek from the usual places tourists go, but well worth the trip.

    Reply
  81. Miranda, thanks for visiting the Wenches again! Your museum back story for your hero is fascinating.
    I was trying to think what great little museum to mention when someone else listed the Cloisters, which stopped me in my tracks. It’s not at all obscure but it’s soooooo wonderful!!!

    Reply
  82. Miranda, thanks for visiting the Wenches again! Your museum back story for your hero is fascinating.
    I was trying to think what great little museum to mention when someone else listed the Cloisters, which stopped me in my tracks. It’s not at all obscure but it’s soooooo wonderful!!!

    Reply
  83. Miranda, thanks for visiting the Wenches again! Your museum back story for your hero is fascinating.
    I was trying to think what great little museum to mention when someone else listed the Cloisters, which stopped me in my tracks. It’s not at all obscure but it’s soooooo wonderful!!!

    Reply
  84. Miranda, thanks for visiting the Wenches again! Your museum back story for your hero is fascinating.
    I was trying to think what great little museum to mention when someone else listed the Cloisters, which stopped me in my tracks. It’s not at all obscure but it’s soooooo wonderful!!!

    Reply
  85. Miranda, thanks for visiting the Wenches again! Your museum back story for your hero is fascinating.
    I was trying to think what great little museum to mention when someone else listed the Cloisters, which stopped me in my tracks. It’s not at all obscure but it’s soooooo wonderful!!!

    Reply
  86. I, too, plan on going to England this year and will put Dulwich on my list. Thank you for the history.
    These are 3 museums I love, though they are not really hidden. The first is The Chester Beatty Library in Dublin, fascinating collections and too much to see in one visit.
    The other 2 are here in Washington, DC — The National Building Museum, because I love the building itself, and The Textile Museum with exhibits that awe me with what can be done with fabric, yarns, threads, etc.

    Reply
  87. I, too, plan on going to England this year and will put Dulwich on my list. Thank you for the history.
    These are 3 museums I love, though they are not really hidden. The first is The Chester Beatty Library in Dublin, fascinating collections and too much to see in one visit.
    The other 2 are here in Washington, DC — The National Building Museum, because I love the building itself, and The Textile Museum with exhibits that awe me with what can be done with fabric, yarns, threads, etc.

    Reply
  88. I, too, plan on going to England this year and will put Dulwich on my list. Thank you for the history.
    These are 3 museums I love, though they are not really hidden. The first is The Chester Beatty Library in Dublin, fascinating collections and too much to see in one visit.
    The other 2 are here in Washington, DC — The National Building Museum, because I love the building itself, and The Textile Museum with exhibits that awe me with what can be done with fabric, yarns, threads, etc.

    Reply
  89. I, too, plan on going to England this year and will put Dulwich on my list. Thank you for the history.
    These are 3 museums I love, though they are not really hidden. The first is The Chester Beatty Library in Dublin, fascinating collections and too much to see in one visit.
    The other 2 are here in Washington, DC — The National Building Museum, because I love the building itself, and The Textile Museum with exhibits that awe me with what can be done with fabric, yarns, threads, etc.

    Reply
  90. I, too, plan on going to England this year and will put Dulwich on my list. Thank you for the history.
    These are 3 museums I love, though they are not really hidden. The first is The Chester Beatty Library in Dublin, fascinating collections and too much to see in one visit.
    The other 2 are here in Washington, DC — The National Building Museum, because I love the building itself, and The Textile Museum with exhibits that awe me with what can be done with fabric, yarns, threads, etc.

    Reply
  91. I do love museums, all kinds of museums, but it’s the smaller ones that I hold closest to my heart. There’s something a bit intimidating about the big ones. In NYC I love the Pierrepont Morgan Library, and here in Washington, DC I love the Phillips Collection. And, though it is a Very Big Museum indeed, I have a soft spot for the V&A in London because it has such a wonderful collection of clothing — very helpful in helping me picture just what the heroes and heroines of historical romances wore.
    My husband says that knowing whether we’ve saved enough for retirement depends on what we want to do. If we want to to be frequent visitor to the National Gallery in DC we probably have enough money. If, however, we want to be frequent visitors to the National Gallery in London, we may not.

    Reply
  92. I do love museums, all kinds of museums, but it’s the smaller ones that I hold closest to my heart. There’s something a bit intimidating about the big ones. In NYC I love the Pierrepont Morgan Library, and here in Washington, DC I love the Phillips Collection. And, though it is a Very Big Museum indeed, I have a soft spot for the V&A in London because it has such a wonderful collection of clothing — very helpful in helping me picture just what the heroes and heroines of historical romances wore.
    My husband says that knowing whether we’ve saved enough for retirement depends on what we want to do. If we want to to be frequent visitor to the National Gallery in DC we probably have enough money. If, however, we want to be frequent visitors to the National Gallery in London, we may not.

    Reply
  93. I do love museums, all kinds of museums, but it’s the smaller ones that I hold closest to my heart. There’s something a bit intimidating about the big ones. In NYC I love the Pierrepont Morgan Library, and here in Washington, DC I love the Phillips Collection. And, though it is a Very Big Museum indeed, I have a soft spot for the V&A in London because it has such a wonderful collection of clothing — very helpful in helping me picture just what the heroes and heroines of historical romances wore.
    My husband says that knowing whether we’ve saved enough for retirement depends on what we want to do. If we want to to be frequent visitor to the National Gallery in DC we probably have enough money. If, however, we want to be frequent visitors to the National Gallery in London, we may not.

    Reply
  94. I do love museums, all kinds of museums, but it’s the smaller ones that I hold closest to my heart. There’s something a bit intimidating about the big ones. In NYC I love the Pierrepont Morgan Library, and here in Washington, DC I love the Phillips Collection. And, though it is a Very Big Museum indeed, I have a soft spot for the V&A in London because it has such a wonderful collection of clothing — very helpful in helping me picture just what the heroes and heroines of historical romances wore.
    My husband says that knowing whether we’ve saved enough for retirement depends on what we want to do. If we want to to be frequent visitor to the National Gallery in DC we probably have enough money. If, however, we want to be frequent visitors to the National Gallery in London, we may not.

    Reply
  95. I do love museums, all kinds of museums, but it’s the smaller ones that I hold closest to my heart. There’s something a bit intimidating about the big ones. In NYC I love the Pierrepont Morgan Library, and here in Washington, DC I love the Phillips Collection. And, though it is a Very Big Museum indeed, I have a soft spot for the V&A in London because it has such a wonderful collection of clothing — very helpful in helping me picture just what the heroes and heroines of historical romances wore.
    My husband says that knowing whether we’ve saved enough for retirement depends on what we want to do. If we want to to be frequent visitor to the National Gallery in DC we probably have enough money. If, however, we want to be frequent visitors to the National Gallery in London, we may not.

    Reply
  96. There’s still the main A&S on the Mall. But they had too many planes and the shuttle, so they built this huge, ginormous museum out by Dulles International Airport. Why by Dulles? you ask. Because then they could literally fly the new planes in and drive them into their new “garage.”

    Reply
  97. There’s still the main A&S on the Mall. But they had too many planes and the shuttle, so they built this huge, ginormous museum out by Dulles International Airport. Why by Dulles? you ask. Because then they could literally fly the new planes in and drive them into their new “garage.”

    Reply
  98. There’s still the main A&S on the Mall. But they had too many planes and the shuttle, so they built this huge, ginormous museum out by Dulles International Airport. Why by Dulles? you ask. Because then they could literally fly the new planes in and drive them into their new “garage.”

    Reply
  99. There’s still the main A&S on the Mall. But they had too many planes and the shuttle, so they built this huge, ginormous museum out by Dulles International Airport. Why by Dulles? you ask. Because then they could literally fly the new planes in and drive them into their new “garage.”

    Reply
  100. There’s still the main A&S on the Mall. But they had too many planes and the shuttle, so they built this huge, ginormous museum out by Dulles International Airport. Why by Dulles? you ask. Because then they could literally fly the new planes in and drive them into their new “garage.”

    Reply
  101. I’m a lover of all things old and vintage so it’s no wonder I love historical novels but obviously I was also the weird child that went to every museum at every chance I got LOL I still do from time to time and I came across this lovely charming gem at the heart of Kansas City. It’s called the National Museum of Toys and Miniatures. They have a collection of vintage dollhouses and dolls and of course miniatures from all over the world. I’m planning on going back this year because they’re adding a new collection of porcelain dolls by a Spaniard artist =D
    http://toyandminiaturemuseum.org/

    Reply
  102. I’m a lover of all things old and vintage so it’s no wonder I love historical novels but obviously I was also the weird child that went to every museum at every chance I got LOL I still do from time to time and I came across this lovely charming gem at the heart of Kansas City. It’s called the National Museum of Toys and Miniatures. They have a collection of vintage dollhouses and dolls and of course miniatures from all over the world. I’m planning on going back this year because they’re adding a new collection of porcelain dolls by a Spaniard artist =D
    http://toyandminiaturemuseum.org/

    Reply
  103. I’m a lover of all things old and vintage so it’s no wonder I love historical novels but obviously I was also the weird child that went to every museum at every chance I got LOL I still do from time to time and I came across this lovely charming gem at the heart of Kansas City. It’s called the National Museum of Toys and Miniatures. They have a collection of vintage dollhouses and dolls and of course miniatures from all over the world. I’m planning on going back this year because they’re adding a new collection of porcelain dolls by a Spaniard artist =D
    http://toyandminiaturemuseum.org/

    Reply
  104. I’m a lover of all things old and vintage so it’s no wonder I love historical novels but obviously I was also the weird child that went to every museum at every chance I got LOL I still do from time to time and I came across this lovely charming gem at the heart of Kansas City. It’s called the National Museum of Toys and Miniatures. They have a collection of vintage dollhouses and dolls and of course miniatures from all over the world. I’m planning on going back this year because they’re adding a new collection of porcelain dolls by a Spaniard artist =D
    http://toyandminiaturemuseum.org/

    Reply
  105. I’m a lover of all things old and vintage so it’s no wonder I love historical novels but obviously I was also the weird child that went to every museum at every chance I got LOL I still do from time to time and I came across this lovely charming gem at the heart of Kansas City. It’s called the National Museum of Toys and Miniatures. They have a collection of vintage dollhouses and dolls and of course miniatures from all over the world. I’m planning on going back this year because they’re adding a new collection of porcelain dolls by a Spaniard artist =D
    http://toyandminiaturemuseum.org/

    Reply
  106. A wonderful museum in NYC is the Tenement Museum in the Lower East Side, giving you a feel for what it was like to live the way so many immigrants of the late 19th and early 20th centuries did. And believe it or not, the NY Public Library at 42nd always has amazing exhibits, often about books!

    Reply
  107. A wonderful museum in NYC is the Tenement Museum in the Lower East Side, giving you a feel for what it was like to live the way so many immigrants of the late 19th and early 20th centuries did. And believe it or not, the NY Public Library at 42nd always has amazing exhibits, often about books!

    Reply
  108. A wonderful museum in NYC is the Tenement Museum in the Lower East Side, giving you a feel for what it was like to live the way so many immigrants of the late 19th and early 20th centuries did. And believe it or not, the NY Public Library at 42nd always has amazing exhibits, often about books!

    Reply
  109. A wonderful museum in NYC is the Tenement Museum in the Lower East Side, giving you a feel for what it was like to live the way so many immigrants of the late 19th and early 20th centuries did. And believe it or not, the NY Public Library at 42nd always has amazing exhibits, often about books!

    Reply
  110. A wonderful museum in NYC is the Tenement Museum in the Lower East Side, giving you a feel for what it was like to live the way so many immigrants of the late 19th and early 20th centuries did. And believe it or not, the NY Public Library at 42nd always has amazing exhibits, often about books!

    Reply
  111. I am so excited about this latest Word Wenches entry. Your book is going on my wish list immediately, what’s not to love?…two of my favorites in one package…..Regency romance and art history back story.
    When you posed your question, I immediately thought of the Gardner museum in Boston, it has to be my all time favorite. But since it has been mentioned now, I have pondered over the question and wondered why it was so important to me to still put my own thought out there. I have also loved the smaller lesser-known museum experiences best. We always try to visit at least one museum on every trip, so I guess these become your fondest memories of vacations. I love all kinds of museums big and small and I’m now going to go back over everyone’s comments and make notes for future visits.
    I’d like to offer an idea for museum loving visitors to San Antonio. The Elizabeth McNey. The house she owned houses the museum and the architecture lovely, but the inner courtyard gardens with amazing tile work are very inspiring.

    Reply
  112. I am so excited about this latest Word Wenches entry. Your book is going on my wish list immediately, what’s not to love?…two of my favorites in one package…..Regency romance and art history back story.
    When you posed your question, I immediately thought of the Gardner museum in Boston, it has to be my all time favorite. But since it has been mentioned now, I have pondered over the question and wondered why it was so important to me to still put my own thought out there. I have also loved the smaller lesser-known museum experiences best. We always try to visit at least one museum on every trip, so I guess these become your fondest memories of vacations. I love all kinds of museums big and small and I’m now going to go back over everyone’s comments and make notes for future visits.
    I’d like to offer an idea for museum loving visitors to San Antonio. The Elizabeth McNey. The house she owned houses the museum and the architecture lovely, but the inner courtyard gardens with amazing tile work are very inspiring.

    Reply
  113. I am so excited about this latest Word Wenches entry. Your book is going on my wish list immediately, what’s not to love?…two of my favorites in one package…..Regency romance and art history back story.
    When you posed your question, I immediately thought of the Gardner museum in Boston, it has to be my all time favorite. But since it has been mentioned now, I have pondered over the question and wondered why it was so important to me to still put my own thought out there. I have also loved the smaller lesser-known museum experiences best. We always try to visit at least one museum on every trip, so I guess these become your fondest memories of vacations. I love all kinds of museums big and small and I’m now going to go back over everyone’s comments and make notes for future visits.
    I’d like to offer an idea for museum loving visitors to San Antonio. The Elizabeth McNey. The house she owned houses the museum and the architecture lovely, but the inner courtyard gardens with amazing tile work are very inspiring.

    Reply
  114. I am so excited about this latest Word Wenches entry. Your book is going on my wish list immediately, what’s not to love?…two of my favorites in one package…..Regency romance and art history back story.
    When you posed your question, I immediately thought of the Gardner museum in Boston, it has to be my all time favorite. But since it has been mentioned now, I have pondered over the question and wondered why it was so important to me to still put my own thought out there. I have also loved the smaller lesser-known museum experiences best. We always try to visit at least one museum on every trip, so I guess these become your fondest memories of vacations. I love all kinds of museums big and small and I’m now going to go back over everyone’s comments and make notes for future visits.
    I’d like to offer an idea for museum loving visitors to San Antonio. The Elizabeth McNey. The house she owned houses the museum and the architecture lovely, but the inner courtyard gardens with amazing tile work are very inspiring.

    Reply
  115. I am so excited about this latest Word Wenches entry. Your book is going on my wish list immediately, what’s not to love?…two of my favorites in one package…..Regency romance and art history back story.
    When you posed your question, I immediately thought of the Gardner museum in Boston, it has to be my all time favorite. But since it has been mentioned now, I have pondered over the question and wondered why it was so important to me to still put my own thought out there. I have also loved the smaller lesser-known museum experiences best. We always try to visit at least one museum on every trip, so I guess these become your fondest memories of vacations. I love all kinds of museums big and small and I’m now going to go back over everyone’s comments and make notes for future visits.
    I’d like to offer an idea for museum loving visitors to San Antonio. The Elizabeth McNey. The house she owned houses the museum and the architecture lovely, but the inner courtyard gardens with amazing tile work are very inspiring.

    Reply
  116. we’ve got some interesting sites nearby in Morristown, NJ – Jockey Hollow where the Continental Army spent two winters, while General Washington & his staff stayed in the Ford mainsion (now a National Park site) – and the local Morris Museum often has wonderful exhibits.

    Reply
  117. we’ve got some interesting sites nearby in Morristown, NJ – Jockey Hollow where the Continental Army spent two winters, while General Washington & his staff stayed in the Ford mainsion (now a National Park site) – and the local Morris Museum often has wonderful exhibits.

    Reply
  118. we’ve got some interesting sites nearby in Morristown, NJ – Jockey Hollow where the Continental Army spent two winters, while General Washington & his staff stayed in the Ford mainsion (now a National Park site) – and the local Morris Museum often has wonderful exhibits.

    Reply
  119. we’ve got some interesting sites nearby in Morristown, NJ – Jockey Hollow where the Continental Army spent two winters, while General Washington & his staff stayed in the Ford mainsion (now a National Park site) – and the local Morris Museum often has wonderful exhibits.

    Reply
  120. we’ve got some interesting sites nearby in Morristown, NJ – Jockey Hollow where the Continental Army spent two winters, while General Washington & his staff stayed in the Ford mainsion (now a National Park site) – and the local Morris Museum often has wonderful exhibits.

    Reply
  121. I love going to museums and we always try to get to a few state or national parks every year. One year we were leaving Chattanooga and saw a sign for Russell Cave. It’s a national monument with a cave that shows signs of human habitation going back 10,000 years. http://www.nps. gov/ ruca/ index. htm It was a fun place to discover.
    Congratulations on your new release!

    Reply
  122. I love going to museums and we always try to get to a few state or national parks every year. One year we were leaving Chattanooga and saw a sign for Russell Cave. It’s a national monument with a cave that shows signs of human habitation going back 10,000 years. http://www.nps. gov/ ruca/ index. htm It was a fun place to discover.
    Congratulations on your new release!

    Reply
  123. I love going to museums and we always try to get to a few state or national parks every year. One year we were leaving Chattanooga and saw a sign for Russell Cave. It’s a national monument with a cave that shows signs of human habitation going back 10,000 years. http://www.nps. gov/ ruca/ index. htm It was a fun place to discover.
    Congratulations on your new release!

    Reply
  124. I love going to museums and we always try to get to a few state or national parks every year. One year we were leaving Chattanooga and saw a sign for Russell Cave. It’s a national monument with a cave that shows signs of human habitation going back 10,000 years. http://www.nps. gov/ ruca/ index. htm It was a fun place to discover.
    Congratulations on your new release!

    Reply
  125. I love going to museums and we always try to get to a few state or national parks every year. One year we were leaving Chattanooga and saw a sign for Russell Cave. It’s a national monument with a cave that shows signs of human habitation going back 10,000 years. http://www.nps. gov/ ruca/ index. htm It was a fun place to discover.
    Congratulations on your new release!

    Reply
  126. Somewhat off the main track is the museum at Chad’s Ford. I don’t know how well known it is. I contains works by N C Wyeth, Andrew Wyeth, and Peter Wyeth. When we were there (more than 25 years ago) the upstairs gallery had an exhibition of illustrations by women artists.
    One of the things I specialy like about this museum is that it considers illustrations to be find art.

    Reply
  127. Somewhat off the main track is the museum at Chad’s Ford. I don’t know how well known it is. I contains works by N C Wyeth, Andrew Wyeth, and Peter Wyeth. When we were there (more than 25 years ago) the upstairs gallery had an exhibition of illustrations by women artists.
    One of the things I specialy like about this museum is that it considers illustrations to be find art.

    Reply
  128. Somewhat off the main track is the museum at Chad’s Ford. I don’t know how well known it is. I contains works by N C Wyeth, Andrew Wyeth, and Peter Wyeth. When we were there (more than 25 years ago) the upstairs gallery had an exhibition of illustrations by women artists.
    One of the things I specialy like about this museum is that it considers illustrations to be find art.

    Reply
  129. Somewhat off the main track is the museum at Chad’s Ford. I don’t know how well known it is. I contains works by N C Wyeth, Andrew Wyeth, and Peter Wyeth. When we were there (more than 25 years ago) the upstairs gallery had an exhibition of illustrations by women artists.
    One of the things I specialy like about this museum is that it considers illustrations to be find art.

    Reply
  130. Somewhat off the main track is the museum at Chad’s Ford. I don’t know how well known it is. I contains works by N C Wyeth, Andrew Wyeth, and Peter Wyeth. When we were there (more than 25 years ago) the upstairs gallery had an exhibition of illustrations by women artists.
    One of the things I specialy like about this museum is that it considers illustrations to be find art.

    Reply
  131. I do also love museums, and your question about a lesser known one has reminded me inmediately of Bilbao Fine Arts Museum (Basque country, Northern Spain).
    Every tourist that goes to Bilbao goes to the Guggenheim Museum b/c of, well, the amazing building created by Frank O. Gehry. And it’s great, but what it’s inside is not half so interesting as what you can see in this other museum. It’s not very large, but it contains great paintings specially from the Spanish and Flemish Schools.
    As the wikipedia says. …one of the richest Spanish museums outside Madrid. It houses a valuable and quite comprehensive collection of Basque, Spanish and European art from the Middle Ages to contemporary, including paintings by old masters like El Greco, Cranach, Murillo, Goya, Van Dyck, Ruisdael and Bellotto, together with 19th century and modern: Sorolla, Mary Cassatt, Gauguin, Henri Le Sidaner, James Ensor, Peter Blake and Francis Bacon.
    I just love it!

    Reply
  132. I do also love museums, and your question about a lesser known one has reminded me inmediately of Bilbao Fine Arts Museum (Basque country, Northern Spain).
    Every tourist that goes to Bilbao goes to the Guggenheim Museum b/c of, well, the amazing building created by Frank O. Gehry. And it’s great, but what it’s inside is not half so interesting as what you can see in this other museum. It’s not very large, but it contains great paintings specially from the Spanish and Flemish Schools.
    As the wikipedia says. …one of the richest Spanish museums outside Madrid. It houses a valuable and quite comprehensive collection of Basque, Spanish and European art from the Middle Ages to contemporary, including paintings by old masters like El Greco, Cranach, Murillo, Goya, Van Dyck, Ruisdael and Bellotto, together with 19th century and modern: Sorolla, Mary Cassatt, Gauguin, Henri Le Sidaner, James Ensor, Peter Blake and Francis Bacon.
    I just love it!

    Reply
  133. I do also love museums, and your question about a lesser known one has reminded me inmediately of Bilbao Fine Arts Museum (Basque country, Northern Spain).
    Every tourist that goes to Bilbao goes to the Guggenheim Museum b/c of, well, the amazing building created by Frank O. Gehry. And it’s great, but what it’s inside is not half so interesting as what you can see in this other museum. It’s not very large, but it contains great paintings specially from the Spanish and Flemish Schools.
    As the wikipedia says. …one of the richest Spanish museums outside Madrid. It houses a valuable and quite comprehensive collection of Basque, Spanish and European art from the Middle Ages to contemporary, including paintings by old masters like El Greco, Cranach, Murillo, Goya, Van Dyck, Ruisdael and Bellotto, together with 19th century and modern: Sorolla, Mary Cassatt, Gauguin, Henri Le Sidaner, James Ensor, Peter Blake and Francis Bacon.
    I just love it!

    Reply
  134. I do also love museums, and your question about a lesser known one has reminded me inmediately of Bilbao Fine Arts Museum (Basque country, Northern Spain).
    Every tourist that goes to Bilbao goes to the Guggenheim Museum b/c of, well, the amazing building created by Frank O. Gehry. And it’s great, but what it’s inside is not half so interesting as what you can see in this other museum. It’s not very large, but it contains great paintings specially from the Spanish and Flemish Schools.
    As the wikipedia says. …one of the richest Spanish museums outside Madrid. It houses a valuable and quite comprehensive collection of Basque, Spanish and European art from the Middle Ages to contemporary, including paintings by old masters like El Greco, Cranach, Murillo, Goya, Van Dyck, Ruisdael and Bellotto, together with 19th century and modern: Sorolla, Mary Cassatt, Gauguin, Henri Le Sidaner, James Ensor, Peter Blake and Francis Bacon.
    I just love it!

    Reply
  135. I do also love museums, and your question about a lesser known one has reminded me inmediately of Bilbao Fine Arts Museum (Basque country, Northern Spain).
    Every tourist that goes to Bilbao goes to the Guggenheim Museum b/c of, well, the amazing building created by Frank O. Gehry. And it’s great, but what it’s inside is not half so interesting as what you can see in this other museum. It’s not very large, but it contains great paintings specially from the Spanish and Flemish Schools.
    As the wikipedia says. …one of the richest Spanish museums outside Madrid. It houses a valuable and quite comprehensive collection of Basque, Spanish and European art from the Middle Ages to contemporary, including paintings by old masters like El Greco, Cranach, Murillo, Goya, Van Dyck, Ruisdael and Bellotto, together with 19th century and modern: Sorolla, Mary Cassatt, Gauguin, Henri Le Sidaner, James Ensor, Peter Blake and Francis Bacon.
    I just love it!

    Reply

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