What’s a Library?

11889522_426840404178777_9128417454534795324_nCara/Andrea here, I recently attended a lecture on the role of a library in today’s world. The first slide was a big graphic that said, “Myth #1: Library = Books” The speaker—having gotten everyone’s attention—went on to explain how in our fast-changing (as in blink of an eye) society, how we preserve knowledge, and how we use the material that we save, is radically changing as well.



Gilgamesh tabletThe examples were fascinating—and inspiring. We were shown that collections now often include art and objects as well as the traditional books and manuscripts. Examples ranged from paper dresses from the ‘60s, ancient clay tablets of the first written books, medieval playing cards . . . even a collection of brains! (Okay, it was a university lecture, so I doubt your local branch as jars of pickled gray matter stuffed in the closet.) The talk also highlighted the excitement and the challenges of preserving digital Sony-Betamax-Machine-Flickr-user-Matt-Hurstmaterial. One of the things librarians have to think about is how, with all the rapidly changing technology, to make sure they have the devices that can access different obsolete formats. (This library has a storage room full of old tape decks, Betamaxes, VRCs, etc. that they often have to purchase from e-bay.)

Vogue-wordsAnother really interesting aspect of the talk was how librarians are using high tech data mining techniques to create something they call “digital humanities,” which allow researchers to use techniques usually associated with science/economics to explore other disciplines. The example shown was a computer analysis of the most common words used in Vogue magazine over the last one hundred years. The result were then Athena-1made into a graphic image of the words, and from that researchers could learn important things about the cultural shifts of the times. In the late 1800s-early 1900’s, some of the most common words were “Mrs., Miss, party and velvet”—which signaled that the magazine was a society magazine. In the 1950s, the common words “dress, white, hat” signaled it was a fashion magazine. And in the ‘70s, words like “breast cancer, body, health” signaled a new concern with women’s health issues. Other uses include analyzing medieval texts to help read damaged manuscripts.

10446671_404563269739824_7915614652107686039_nThat a library is not just a quiet place filled with shelves of printed books anymore is something I also see closer to home. I just opened this month’s newsletter from my local library (send by e-mail, of course) and the schedule of what’s Chessgoing on is really impressive. There are of course the traditional author lectures and book clubs. But also on offer are a craft salon, a chess day, hands-on internet training for seniors, a “Lord of the Rings” mystery night for kids with a treasure hunt through the stacks, skype “virtual” tours of a museum with the head curator, a family day celebration of Chinese cultural, a film on the Vietnam war, an art exhibit . . . and the list goes on and on.

NewtonsPrincipia KidsNow, I’ve read a number of articles asking whether libraries are obsolete in this day of the internet. But every time I stop by at my local branches (we are lucky enough to have three in my town) the parking lot is full, and the place is hopping with people on the town computers, teens in the study rooms, toddlers enjoying a story hour . . . and yes, people just browsing the shelves for a good book. It really makes me smile.

11146296_385082785021206_2404491133809546005_nHow about you? Have you noticed a change in mission at your local library? Are you happy with the concept of a library being about so much more than books? If you had a magic wand (and an unlimited budget) what other activities or focus would you add to your own local library?

120 thoughts on “What’s a Library?”

  1. I haven’t actually been inside one of the local libraries for years (ducks for cover!).
    However, we live very close to Australia’s National Library. Every book published in Australia is there, but they also have many exhibitions. A recent one included colonial era sketches, maps, and even a letter written by Jane Austen.
    And we go there as often for the café as for anything else, as it overlooks the lake in the city centre!
    I did notice one of our local libraries advertises a lot of themed costume events for young readers.

    Reply
  2. I haven’t actually been inside one of the local libraries for years (ducks for cover!).
    However, we live very close to Australia’s National Library. Every book published in Australia is there, but they also have many exhibitions. A recent one included colonial era sketches, maps, and even a letter written by Jane Austen.
    And we go there as often for the café as for anything else, as it overlooks the lake in the city centre!
    I did notice one of our local libraries advertises a lot of themed costume events for young readers.

    Reply
  3. I haven’t actually been inside one of the local libraries for years (ducks for cover!).
    However, we live very close to Australia’s National Library. Every book published in Australia is there, but they also have many exhibitions. A recent one included colonial era sketches, maps, and even a letter written by Jane Austen.
    And we go there as often for the café as for anything else, as it overlooks the lake in the city centre!
    I did notice one of our local libraries advertises a lot of themed costume events for young readers.

    Reply
  4. I haven’t actually been inside one of the local libraries for years (ducks for cover!).
    However, we live very close to Australia’s National Library. Every book published in Australia is there, but they also have many exhibitions. A recent one included colonial era sketches, maps, and even a letter written by Jane Austen.
    And we go there as often for the café as for anything else, as it overlooks the lake in the city centre!
    I did notice one of our local libraries advertises a lot of themed costume events for young readers.

    Reply
  5. I haven’t actually been inside one of the local libraries for years (ducks for cover!).
    However, we live very close to Australia’s National Library. Every book published in Australia is there, but they also have many exhibitions. A recent one included colonial era sketches, maps, and even a letter written by Jane Austen.
    And we go there as often for the café as for anything else, as it overlooks the lake in the city centre!
    I did notice one of our local libraries advertises a lot of themed costume events for young readers.

    Reply
  6. Sonya, Why not try a visit to your local library? I think you might be very pleasantly surprised at what’s going on there. I have a feeling it’s more than costumed events for kids!
    Your National Library is a great treat to be close to. I visit the Library of Congress when I’m in Washington DC, (the U.S. National Library) and it’s spectacular! Wonderful building and wonderful exhibits.

    Reply
  7. Sonya, Why not try a visit to your local library? I think you might be very pleasantly surprised at what’s going on there. I have a feeling it’s more than costumed events for kids!
    Your National Library is a great treat to be close to. I visit the Library of Congress when I’m in Washington DC, (the U.S. National Library) and it’s spectacular! Wonderful building and wonderful exhibits.

    Reply
  8. Sonya, Why not try a visit to your local library? I think you might be very pleasantly surprised at what’s going on there. I have a feeling it’s more than costumed events for kids!
    Your National Library is a great treat to be close to. I visit the Library of Congress when I’m in Washington DC, (the U.S. National Library) and it’s spectacular! Wonderful building and wonderful exhibits.

    Reply
  9. Sonya, Why not try a visit to your local library? I think you might be very pleasantly surprised at what’s going on there. I have a feeling it’s more than costumed events for kids!
    Your National Library is a great treat to be close to. I visit the Library of Congress when I’m in Washington DC, (the U.S. National Library) and it’s spectacular! Wonderful building and wonderful exhibits.

    Reply
  10. Sonya, Why not try a visit to your local library? I think you might be very pleasantly surprised at what’s going on there. I have a feeling it’s more than costumed events for kids!
    Your National Library is a great treat to be close to. I visit the Library of Congress when I’m in Washington DC, (the U.S. National Library) and it’s spectacular! Wonderful building and wonderful exhibits.

    Reply
  11. I love my county library system.
    Between the time I became an empty-nester and when my husband retired (and we moved a bit farther out), I volunteered at the closest branch for over ten years. And since he has retired, it would be impossible to keep him supplied with enough books to read without the library.
    As to changes, there are a lot more programs for patrons than there used to be, and public use computers and free Wi-Fi in each department. Laptops and Kindles may be borrowed by either adults or children. They allow downloading e-books and streaming media from four sources. The collections of books in languages other than English are very large. The library is definitely different than it was a decade or so ago.
    There are 10 branches in the county and each has a variety of programs each month. In addition to the usual array children’s programs, holiday programs, tax-help, ESL classes, standardized test prep, etc., there are free how-to computer classes for things like Photoshop or MS Word, Excel and Power Point. Also free special interest classes like photography, genealogy, crochet, knitting or other crafts & hobbies. If you ask something they don’t have scheduled, they’ll try to arrange it.
    There’s a monthly calendar of events/programs by the entrance in each branch, and calendars posted for all branches on the library’s website. Several branches have monthly book clubs, different books and different days, so you can attend as many as you like.
    Interlibrary loans are free too these days. (I can remember when we had to pay for the book-rate shipping, but no longer.) I don’t use it that often, but for books that are out of print, or expensive reference books, (or one priced $200 for a used paperback at Amazon or Alibris!)it’s great to be able to get your hands on an actual paper book just by filling in a request form.
    Complaints … not many, but lack of romance novels on the shelves is one. Unless a romance has a hard cover, trade paperback, or large print edition, you’ll seldom find it on the shelves – just on the paperback racks where they get checked out often and worn out quickly. But it is hard to complain too much about that since there are e-books available and I’m going to buy the paperbacks I want anyway.

    Reply
  12. I love my county library system.
    Between the time I became an empty-nester and when my husband retired (and we moved a bit farther out), I volunteered at the closest branch for over ten years. And since he has retired, it would be impossible to keep him supplied with enough books to read without the library.
    As to changes, there are a lot more programs for patrons than there used to be, and public use computers and free Wi-Fi in each department. Laptops and Kindles may be borrowed by either adults or children. They allow downloading e-books and streaming media from four sources. The collections of books in languages other than English are very large. The library is definitely different than it was a decade or so ago.
    There are 10 branches in the county and each has a variety of programs each month. In addition to the usual array children’s programs, holiday programs, tax-help, ESL classes, standardized test prep, etc., there are free how-to computer classes for things like Photoshop or MS Word, Excel and Power Point. Also free special interest classes like photography, genealogy, crochet, knitting or other crafts & hobbies. If you ask something they don’t have scheduled, they’ll try to arrange it.
    There’s a monthly calendar of events/programs by the entrance in each branch, and calendars posted for all branches on the library’s website. Several branches have monthly book clubs, different books and different days, so you can attend as many as you like.
    Interlibrary loans are free too these days. (I can remember when we had to pay for the book-rate shipping, but no longer.) I don’t use it that often, but for books that are out of print, or expensive reference books, (or one priced $200 for a used paperback at Amazon or Alibris!)it’s great to be able to get your hands on an actual paper book just by filling in a request form.
    Complaints … not many, but lack of romance novels on the shelves is one. Unless a romance has a hard cover, trade paperback, or large print edition, you’ll seldom find it on the shelves – just on the paperback racks where they get checked out often and worn out quickly. But it is hard to complain too much about that since there are e-books available and I’m going to buy the paperbacks I want anyway.

    Reply
  13. I love my county library system.
    Between the time I became an empty-nester and when my husband retired (and we moved a bit farther out), I volunteered at the closest branch for over ten years. And since he has retired, it would be impossible to keep him supplied with enough books to read without the library.
    As to changes, there are a lot more programs for patrons than there used to be, and public use computers and free Wi-Fi in each department. Laptops and Kindles may be borrowed by either adults or children. They allow downloading e-books and streaming media from four sources. The collections of books in languages other than English are very large. The library is definitely different than it was a decade or so ago.
    There are 10 branches in the county and each has a variety of programs each month. In addition to the usual array children’s programs, holiday programs, tax-help, ESL classes, standardized test prep, etc., there are free how-to computer classes for things like Photoshop or MS Word, Excel and Power Point. Also free special interest classes like photography, genealogy, crochet, knitting or other crafts & hobbies. If you ask something they don’t have scheduled, they’ll try to arrange it.
    There’s a monthly calendar of events/programs by the entrance in each branch, and calendars posted for all branches on the library’s website. Several branches have monthly book clubs, different books and different days, so you can attend as many as you like.
    Interlibrary loans are free too these days. (I can remember when we had to pay for the book-rate shipping, but no longer.) I don’t use it that often, but for books that are out of print, or expensive reference books, (or one priced $200 for a used paperback at Amazon or Alibris!)it’s great to be able to get your hands on an actual paper book just by filling in a request form.
    Complaints … not many, but lack of romance novels on the shelves is one. Unless a romance has a hard cover, trade paperback, or large print edition, you’ll seldom find it on the shelves – just on the paperback racks where they get checked out often and worn out quickly. But it is hard to complain too much about that since there are e-books available and I’m going to buy the paperbacks I want anyway.

    Reply
  14. I love my county library system.
    Between the time I became an empty-nester and when my husband retired (and we moved a bit farther out), I volunteered at the closest branch for over ten years. And since he has retired, it would be impossible to keep him supplied with enough books to read without the library.
    As to changes, there are a lot more programs for patrons than there used to be, and public use computers and free Wi-Fi in each department. Laptops and Kindles may be borrowed by either adults or children. They allow downloading e-books and streaming media from four sources. The collections of books in languages other than English are very large. The library is definitely different than it was a decade or so ago.
    There are 10 branches in the county and each has a variety of programs each month. In addition to the usual array children’s programs, holiday programs, tax-help, ESL classes, standardized test prep, etc., there are free how-to computer classes for things like Photoshop or MS Word, Excel and Power Point. Also free special interest classes like photography, genealogy, crochet, knitting or other crafts & hobbies. If you ask something they don’t have scheduled, they’ll try to arrange it.
    There’s a monthly calendar of events/programs by the entrance in each branch, and calendars posted for all branches on the library’s website. Several branches have monthly book clubs, different books and different days, so you can attend as many as you like.
    Interlibrary loans are free too these days. (I can remember when we had to pay for the book-rate shipping, but no longer.) I don’t use it that often, but for books that are out of print, or expensive reference books, (or one priced $200 for a used paperback at Amazon or Alibris!)it’s great to be able to get your hands on an actual paper book just by filling in a request form.
    Complaints … not many, but lack of romance novels on the shelves is one. Unless a romance has a hard cover, trade paperback, or large print edition, you’ll seldom find it on the shelves – just on the paperback racks where they get checked out often and worn out quickly. But it is hard to complain too much about that since there are e-books available and I’m going to buy the paperbacks I want anyway.

    Reply
  15. I love my county library system.
    Between the time I became an empty-nester and when my husband retired (and we moved a bit farther out), I volunteered at the closest branch for over ten years. And since he has retired, it would be impossible to keep him supplied with enough books to read without the library.
    As to changes, there are a lot more programs for patrons than there used to be, and public use computers and free Wi-Fi in each department. Laptops and Kindles may be borrowed by either adults or children. They allow downloading e-books and streaming media from four sources. The collections of books in languages other than English are very large. The library is definitely different than it was a decade or so ago.
    There are 10 branches in the county and each has a variety of programs each month. In addition to the usual array children’s programs, holiday programs, tax-help, ESL classes, standardized test prep, etc., there are free how-to computer classes for things like Photoshop or MS Word, Excel and Power Point. Also free special interest classes like photography, genealogy, crochet, knitting or other crafts & hobbies. If you ask something they don’t have scheduled, they’ll try to arrange it.
    There’s a monthly calendar of events/programs by the entrance in each branch, and calendars posted for all branches on the library’s website. Several branches have monthly book clubs, different books and different days, so you can attend as many as you like.
    Interlibrary loans are free too these days. (I can remember when we had to pay for the book-rate shipping, but no longer.) I don’t use it that often, but for books that are out of print, or expensive reference books, (or one priced $200 for a used paperback at Amazon or Alibris!)it’s great to be able to get your hands on an actual paper book just by filling in a request form.
    Complaints … not many, but lack of romance novels on the shelves is one. Unless a romance has a hard cover, trade paperback, or large print edition, you’ll seldom find it on the shelves – just on the paperback racks where they get checked out often and worn out quickly. But it is hard to complain too much about that since there are e-books available and I’m going to buy the paperbacks I want anyway.

    Reply
  16. Fascinating, Cara/Andrea! My local Baltimore County is excellent and busy, but even so, your library lecture included things I haven’t heard of, like the magazine word maps. I’m pretty sure there are no bottled brains in any of the library closets.

    Reply
  17. Fascinating, Cara/Andrea! My local Baltimore County is excellent and busy, but even so, your library lecture included things I haven’t heard of, like the magazine word maps. I’m pretty sure there are no bottled brains in any of the library closets.

    Reply
  18. Fascinating, Cara/Andrea! My local Baltimore County is excellent and busy, but even so, your library lecture included things I haven’t heard of, like the magazine word maps. I’m pretty sure there are no bottled brains in any of the library closets.

    Reply
  19. Fascinating, Cara/Andrea! My local Baltimore County is excellent and busy, but even so, your library lecture included things I haven’t heard of, like the magazine word maps. I’m pretty sure there are no bottled brains in any of the library closets.

    Reply
  20. Fascinating, Cara/Andrea! My local Baltimore County is excellent and busy, but even so, your library lecture included things I haven’t heard of, like the magazine word maps. I’m pretty sure there are no bottled brains in any of the library closets.

    Reply
  21. Like Mary Jo, I found this fascinating.
    Our local library is the head building of a regional library system with outlets in two or three counties. We have bookmobiles making stops within Columbia (largest town in our area) and also in outlying towns in the two counties. The county to the south of us has a similar regional library system. So the counties surrounding Columbia (5th largest city in Missouri) and Jefferson City (State Capitol) are well supplied with library services.
    The activities at our library branches are similar to those described above (no bottled brains). And the library parking lots are usually full.

    Reply
  22. Like Mary Jo, I found this fascinating.
    Our local library is the head building of a regional library system with outlets in two or three counties. We have bookmobiles making stops within Columbia (largest town in our area) and also in outlying towns in the two counties. The county to the south of us has a similar regional library system. So the counties surrounding Columbia (5th largest city in Missouri) and Jefferson City (State Capitol) are well supplied with library services.
    The activities at our library branches are similar to those described above (no bottled brains). And the library parking lots are usually full.

    Reply
  23. Like Mary Jo, I found this fascinating.
    Our local library is the head building of a regional library system with outlets in two or three counties. We have bookmobiles making stops within Columbia (largest town in our area) and also in outlying towns in the two counties. The county to the south of us has a similar regional library system. So the counties surrounding Columbia (5th largest city in Missouri) and Jefferson City (State Capitol) are well supplied with library services.
    The activities at our library branches are similar to those described above (no bottled brains). And the library parking lots are usually full.

    Reply
  24. Like Mary Jo, I found this fascinating.
    Our local library is the head building of a regional library system with outlets in two or three counties. We have bookmobiles making stops within Columbia (largest town in our area) and also in outlying towns in the two counties. The county to the south of us has a similar regional library system. So the counties surrounding Columbia (5th largest city in Missouri) and Jefferson City (State Capitol) are well supplied with library services.
    The activities at our library branches are similar to those described above (no bottled brains). And the library parking lots are usually full.

    Reply
  25. Like Mary Jo, I found this fascinating.
    Our local library is the head building of a regional library system with outlets in two or three counties. We have bookmobiles making stops within Columbia (largest town in our area) and also in outlying towns in the two counties. The county to the south of us has a similar regional library system. So the counties surrounding Columbia (5th largest city in Missouri) and Jefferson City (State Capitol) are well supplied with library services.
    The activities at our library branches are similar to those described above (no bottled brains). And the library parking lots are usually full.

    Reply
  26. Sharon, so glad you have such a wonderful system—and are clearly enjoying it to the fullest! Our libraries have digital lending,and inter-library loans too. We even have museum passes to major NYC museums (The MoMA is quite expensive for a family, so it’s a terrific amenity)The range of services to the community is really heartening.
    Our romance section isn’t great either—yes, paperback get worn out quickly. But it looks VERY well used, and we do get a decent selection of new releases. But as you say, I’m happy to buy paperbacks.
    All in all, I really appreciate that we are a town that really values its libraries!

    Reply
  27. Sharon, so glad you have such a wonderful system—and are clearly enjoying it to the fullest! Our libraries have digital lending,and inter-library loans too. We even have museum passes to major NYC museums (The MoMA is quite expensive for a family, so it’s a terrific amenity)The range of services to the community is really heartening.
    Our romance section isn’t great either—yes, paperback get worn out quickly. But it looks VERY well used, and we do get a decent selection of new releases. But as you say, I’m happy to buy paperbacks.
    All in all, I really appreciate that we are a town that really values its libraries!

    Reply
  28. Sharon, so glad you have such a wonderful system—and are clearly enjoying it to the fullest! Our libraries have digital lending,and inter-library loans too. We even have museum passes to major NYC museums (The MoMA is quite expensive for a family, so it’s a terrific amenity)The range of services to the community is really heartening.
    Our romance section isn’t great either—yes, paperback get worn out quickly. But it looks VERY well used, and we do get a decent selection of new releases. But as you say, I’m happy to buy paperbacks.
    All in all, I really appreciate that we are a town that really values its libraries!

    Reply
  29. Sharon, so glad you have such a wonderful system—and are clearly enjoying it to the fullest! Our libraries have digital lending,and inter-library loans too. We even have museum passes to major NYC museums (The MoMA is quite expensive for a family, so it’s a terrific amenity)The range of services to the community is really heartening.
    Our romance section isn’t great either—yes, paperback get worn out quickly. But it looks VERY well used, and we do get a decent selection of new releases. But as you say, I’m happy to buy paperbacks.
    All in all, I really appreciate that we are a town that really values its libraries!

    Reply
  30. Sharon, so glad you have such a wonderful system—and are clearly enjoying it to the fullest! Our libraries have digital lending,and inter-library loans too. We even have museum passes to major NYC museums (The MoMA is quite expensive for a family, so it’s a terrific amenity)The range of services to the community is really heartening.
    Our romance section isn’t great either—yes, paperback get worn out quickly. But it looks VERY well used, and we do get a decent selection of new releases. But as you say, I’m happy to buy paperbacks.
    All in all, I really appreciate that we are a town that really values its libraries!

    Reply
  31. i love libraries, all kinds! I have cards for Phoenix and three suburbs and use them all for media, book clubs, and programs, for example the Maker Space at the Phoenix main library (got to try 3D printing), exhibits everywhere (from a demo of the clothing Queen Elizabeth I might have worn—all 50 lbs. of it—to a knitted/crocheted recreation of a coral reef), and best of all for me, tada, the county-wide digital library, which has, btw, more romance novels than I could read in a lifetime.
    I’m something of a genre slut—I’ll read almost anything but a cereal box—and I adooore being able to tap my way into Google, Translate, and Wikipedia as I read. When reading a print book, I find myself frustrated as I tap away and nothing happens. How quickly I’ve gotten spoiled by electronic reading! I don’t know what I’d do anymore without Greater Phoenix Digital Library. Probably, get some work done, lol.

    Reply
  32. i love libraries, all kinds! I have cards for Phoenix and three suburbs and use them all for media, book clubs, and programs, for example the Maker Space at the Phoenix main library (got to try 3D printing), exhibits everywhere (from a demo of the clothing Queen Elizabeth I might have worn—all 50 lbs. of it—to a knitted/crocheted recreation of a coral reef), and best of all for me, tada, the county-wide digital library, which has, btw, more romance novels than I could read in a lifetime.
    I’m something of a genre slut—I’ll read almost anything but a cereal box—and I adooore being able to tap my way into Google, Translate, and Wikipedia as I read. When reading a print book, I find myself frustrated as I tap away and nothing happens. How quickly I’ve gotten spoiled by electronic reading! I don’t know what I’d do anymore without Greater Phoenix Digital Library. Probably, get some work done, lol.

    Reply
  33. i love libraries, all kinds! I have cards for Phoenix and three suburbs and use them all for media, book clubs, and programs, for example the Maker Space at the Phoenix main library (got to try 3D printing), exhibits everywhere (from a demo of the clothing Queen Elizabeth I might have worn—all 50 lbs. of it—to a knitted/crocheted recreation of a coral reef), and best of all for me, tada, the county-wide digital library, which has, btw, more romance novels than I could read in a lifetime.
    I’m something of a genre slut—I’ll read almost anything but a cereal box—and I adooore being able to tap my way into Google, Translate, and Wikipedia as I read. When reading a print book, I find myself frustrated as I tap away and nothing happens. How quickly I’ve gotten spoiled by electronic reading! I don’t know what I’d do anymore without Greater Phoenix Digital Library. Probably, get some work done, lol.

    Reply
  34. i love libraries, all kinds! I have cards for Phoenix and three suburbs and use them all for media, book clubs, and programs, for example the Maker Space at the Phoenix main library (got to try 3D printing), exhibits everywhere (from a demo of the clothing Queen Elizabeth I might have worn—all 50 lbs. of it—to a knitted/crocheted recreation of a coral reef), and best of all for me, tada, the county-wide digital library, which has, btw, more romance novels than I could read in a lifetime.
    I’m something of a genre slut—I’ll read almost anything but a cereal box—and I adooore being able to tap my way into Google, Translate, and Wikipedia as I read. When reading a print book, I find myself frustrated as I tap away and nothing happens. How quickly I’ve gotten spoiled by electronic reading! I don’t know what I’d do anymore without Greater Phoenix Digital Library. Probably, get some work done, lol.

    Reply
  35. i love libraries, all kinds! I have cards for Phoenix and three suburbs and use them all for media, book clubs, and programs, for example the Maker Space at the Phoenix main library (got to try 3D printing), exhibits everywhere (from a demo of the clothing Queen Elizabeth I might have worn—all 50 lbs. of it—to a knitted/crocheted recreation of a coral reef), and best of all for me, tada, the county-wide digital library, which has, btw, more romance novels than I could read in a lifetime.
    I’m something of a genre slut—I’ll read almost anything but a cereal box—and I adooore being able to tap my way into Google, Translate, and Wikipedia as I read. When reading a print book, I find myself frustrated as I tap away and nothing happens. How quickly I’ve gotten spoiled by electronic reading! I don’t know what I’d do anymore without Greater Phoenix Digital Library. Probably, get some work done, lol.

    Reply
  36. So far Baltimore has had the best library system of any city in which I’ve lived. I like libraries . Few of them , however, carry the paperback romances and not all even carry the hard back romances. Mysteries make out much better.
    The company where I work has reduced the library to a corner of a room where it once took up half a floor. The company doesn’t even call it a library any more because it isn’t about books. The trouble is many seem to think books are so last year. The librarians are also something like information analysts .
    The public libraries now do more about having computers for people to use than having books.
    I have built up a private library of reference works because no library ha what I need. Even the academic libraries can’t carry everything .
    I haven’t seen brains in a jar in a library.

    Reply
  37. So far Baltimore has had the best library system of any city in which I’ve lived. I like libraries . Few of them , however, carry the paperback romances and not all even carry the hard back romances. Mysteries make out much better.
    The company where I work has reduced the library to a corner of a room where it once took up half a floor. The company doesn’t even call it a library any more because it isn’t about books. The trouble is many seem to think books are so last year. The librarians are also something like information analysts .
    The public libraries now do more about having computers for people to use than having books.
    I have built up a private library of reference works because no library ha what I need. Even the academic libraries can’t carry everything .
    I haven’t seen brains in a jar in a library.

    Reply
  38. So far Baltimore has had the best library system of any city in which I’ve lived. I like libraries . Few of them , however, carry the paperback romances and not all even carry the hard back romances. Mysteries make out much better.
    The company where I work has reduced the library to a corner of a room where it once took up half a floor. The company doesn’t even call it a library any more because it isn’t about books. The trouble is many seem to think books are so last year. The librarians are also something like information analysts .
    The public libraries now do more about having computers for people to use than having books.
    I have built up a private library of reference works because no library ha what I need. Even the academic libraries can’t carry everything .
    I haven’t seen brains in a jar in a library.

    Reply
  39. So far Baltimore has had the best library system of any city in which I’ve lived. I like libraries . Few of them , however, carry the paperback romances and not all even carry the hard back romances. Mysteries make out much better.
    The company where I work has reduced the library to a corner of a room where it once took up half a floor. The company doesn’t even call it a library any more because it isn’t about books. The trouble is many seem to think books are so last year. The librarians are also something like information analysts .
    The public libraries now do more about having computers for people to use than having books.
    I have built up a private library of reference works because no library ha what I need. Even the academic libraries can’t carry everything .
    I haven’t seen brains in a jar in a library.

    Reply
  40. So far Baltimore has had the best library system of any city in which I’ve lived. I like libraries . Few of them , however, carry the paperback romances and not all even carry the hard back romances. Mysteries make out much better.
    The company where I work has reduced the library to a corner of a room where it once took up half a floor. The company doesn’t even call it a library any more because it isn’t about books. The trouble is many seem to think books are so last year. The librarians are also something like information analysts .
    The public libraries now do more about having computers for people to use than having books.
    I have built up a private library of reference works because no library ha what I need. Even the academic libraries can’t carry everything .
    I haven’t seen brains in a jar in a library.

    Reply
  41. The Twin Cities is comprised of not only two cities, Minneapolis and St. Paul, but surrounding cities, towns and suburbs. If you hold a card in one of the county/city/regional library systems, you can use the card at the other systems through Melsa. For example, I can visit a library in St. Paul and check out books, and return them through my own library system. When my kids were young, we spent our summers exploring new libraries; there are well over one hundred. Now, I browse online and my husband picks up my holds on the way home from his work. (If you have trouble keeping track of due dates, online is an excellent answer for you.) I’m fortunate to live in one of the best systems in the state, if not the country, so I rarely have to venture into other systems anymore.

    Reply
  42. The Twin Cities is comprised of not only two cities, Minneapolis and St. Paul, but surrounding cities, towns and suburbs. If you hold a card in one of the county/city/regional library systems, you can use the card at the other systems through Melsa. For example, I can visit a library in St. Paul and check out books, and return them through my own library system. When my kids were young, we spent our summers exploring new libraries; there are well over one hundred. Now, I browse online and my husband picks up my holds on the way home from his work. (If you have trouble keeping track of due dates, online is an excellent answer for you.) I’m fortunate to live in one of the best systems in the state, if not the country, so I rarely have to venture into other systems anymore.

    Reply
  43. The Twin Cities is comprised of not only two cities, Minneapolis and St. Paul, but surrounding cities, towns and suburbs. If you hold a card in one of the county/city/regional library systems, you can use the card at the other systems through Melsa. For example, I can visit a library in St. Paul and check out books, and return them through my own library system. When my kids were young, we spent our summers exploring new libraries; there are well over one hundred. Now, I browse online and my husband picks up my holds on the way home from his work. (If you have trouble keeping track of due dates, online is an excellent answer for you.) I’m fortunate to live in one of the best systems in the state, if not the country, so I rarely have to venture into other systems anymore.

    Reply
  44. The Twin Cities is comprised of not only two cities, Minneapolis and St. Paul, but surrounding cities, towns and suburbs. If you hold a card in one of the county/city/regional library systems, you can use the card at the other systems through Melsa. For example, I can visit a library in St. Paul and check out books, and return them through my own library system. When my kids were young, we spent our summers exploring new libraries; there are well over one hundred. Now, I browse online and my husband picks up my holds on the way home from his work. (If you have trouble keeping track of due dates, online is an excellent answer for you.) I’m fortunate to live in one of the best systems in the state, if not the country, so I rarely have to venture into other systems anymore.

    Reply
  45. The Twin Cities is comprised of not only two cities, Minneapolis and St. Paul, but surrounding cities, towns and suburbs. If you hold a card in one of the county/city/regional library systems, you can use the card at the other systems through Melsa. For example, I can visit a library in St. Paul and check out books, and return them through my own library system. When my kids were young, we spent our summers exploring new libraries; there are well over one hundred. Now, I browse online and my husband picks up my holds on the way home from his work. (If you have trouble keeping track of due dates, online is an excellent answer for you.) I’m fortunate to live in one of the best systems in the state, if not the country, so I rarely have to venture into other systems anymore.

    Reply
  46. Actually, though, real books made from paper are still really important to a library.
    It is unfortunate that the current state of library training seems to be resolutely anti-dead-tree format, setting up an unnecessary either/or situation in which maintaining collections of older materials is seen as an obsolete practice.
    My own city just booted their recently hired library director for his over-zealous weeding.
    (Nope, deciding everything that had not circulated in the past three years had to go –s NOT a valid tactic.
    He used this on reference, sheet music, oversized art books–
    But he did a lot of harm, and this kind of thing is an epidemic.
    There’s no saying the next guy won’t just be better at doing it, since this seems to be what the library schools are pushing now.
    But the belief that libraries can abandon their use of physical books is based on some seriously flawed assumptions, such as:
    That all types of reading – research and translation, for example, are adequately satisfied by having an ebook.
    That all texts are even available as ebooks.
    That all readers have access to the means to read ebooks.
    That all readers are satisfied reading ebook.
    That ebooks don’t face their own systemic downside: format wars, technological changes, and potential degradation of product.
    (We know what happens to a collection of old books, and how to maintain them; do we have any similar systems for flawed electronic data?)
    When faced with such concerns about relying solely on ebooks, the next line of retreat is that stodgy book users can always just go to ILL for their needs.
    Well, that solution assumes that, in fact, your desired book is available from some other library.
    That is, it ignores the overwhelming success of the new library model.
    ILL is a fine solution for obtaining rare materials, but only as long as not all libraries have moved beyond the electronic frontier, so that more conservative libraries remain available as back-ups.
    It relies on the notion that someone, somewhere, is holding onto their old books.
    But what happens when everyone has modernized their systems, and it’s ebooks all the way down?
    We used to be the go-to library for getting rare or obscure stuff.
    But all that – the jazz collections in assorted formats going back to the early 20th century (nope, it isn’t all available in other formats), labor history, small local press stuff, sheet music, obscure reference materials – it all got sent off to the pulpers.
    We don’t have it any more.
    We tossed it, and so did all the other libraries in the system, because we are all super-efficient now, , and pretty much free of nasty old books.
    So, gee, exactly who are we all going to go to in order to borrow the rare stuff we each decided not to keep?
    It’s all right.
    We’ve always been at war with Oceania, and no one can show us differently.

    Reply
  47. Actually, though, real books made from paper are still really important to a library.
    It is unfortunate that the current state of library training seems to be resolutely anti-dead-tree format, setting up an unnecessary either/or situation in which maintaining collections of older materials is seen as an obsolete practice.
    My own city just booted their recently hired library director for his over-zealous weeding.
    (Nope, deciding everything that had not circulated in the past three years had to go –s NOT a valid tactic.
    He used this on reference, sheet music, oversized art books–
    But he did a lot of harm, and this kind of thing is an epidemic.
    There’s no saying the next guy won’t just be better at doing it, since this seems to be what the library schools are pushing now.
    But the belief that libraries can abandon their use of physical books is based on some seriously flawed assumptions, such as:
    That all types of reading – research and translation, for example, are adequately satisfied by having an ebook.
    That all texts are even available as ebooks.
    That all readers have access to the means to read ebooks.
    That all readers are satisfied reading ebook.
    That ebooks don’t face their own systemic downside: format wars, technological changes, and potential degradation of product.
    (We know what happens to a collection of old books, and how to maintain them; do we have any similar systems for flawed electronic data?)
    When faced with such concerns about relying solely on ebooks, the next line of retreat is that stodgy book users can always just go to ILL for their needs.
    Well, that solution assumes that, in fact, your desired book is available from some other library.
    That is, it ignores the overwhelming success of the new library model.
    ILL is a fine solution for obtaining rare materials, but only as long as not all libraries have moved beyond the electronic frontier, so that more conservative libraries remain available as back-ups.
    It relies on the notion that someone, somewhere, is holding onto their old books.
    But what happens when everyone has modernized their systems, and it’s ebooks all the way down?
    We used to be the go-to library for getting rare or obscure stuff.
    But all that – the jazz collections in assorted formats going back to the early 20th century (nope, it isn’t all available in other formats), labor history, small local press stuff, sheet music, obscure reference materials – it all got sent off to the pulpers.
    We don’t have it any more.
    We tossed it, and so did all the other libraries in the system, because we are all super-efficient now, , and pretty much free of nasty old books.
    So, gee, exactly who are we all going to go to in order to borrow the rare stuff we each decided not to keep?
    It’s all right.
    We’ve always been at war with Oceania, and no one can show us differently.

    Reply
  48. Actually, though, real books made from paper are still really important to a library.
    It is unfortunate that the current state of library training seems to be resolutely anti-dead-tree format, setting up an unnecessary either/or situation in which maintaining collections of older materials is seen as an obsolete practice.
    My own city just booted their recently hired library director for his over-zealous weeding.
    (Nope, deciding everything that had not circulated in the past three years had to go –s NOT a valid tactic.
    He used this on reference, sheet music, oversized art books–
    But he did a lot of harm, and this kind of thing is an epidemic.
    There’s no saying the next guy won’t just be better at doing it, since this seems to be what the library schools are pushing now.
    But the belief that libraries can abandon their use of physical books is based on some seriously flawed assumptions, such as:
    That all types of reading – research and translation, for example, are adequately satisfied by having an ebook.
    That all texts are even available as ebooks.
    That all readers have access to the means to read ebooks.
    That all readers are satisfied reading ebook.
    That ebooks don’t face their own systemic downside: format wars, technological changes, and potential degradation of product.
    (We know what happens to a collection of old books, and how to maintain them; do we have any similar systems for flawed electronic data?)
    When faced with such concerns about relying solely on ebooks, the next line of retreat is that stodgy book users can always just go to ILL for their needs.
    Well, that solution assumes that, in fact, your desired book is available from some other library.
    That is, it ignores the overwhelming success of the new library model.
    ILL is a fine solution for obtaining rare materials, but only as long as not all libraries have moved beyond the electronic frontier, so that more conservative libraries remain available as back-ups.
    It relies on the notion that someone, somewhere, is holding onto their old books.
    But what happens when everyone has modernized their systems, and it’s ebooks all the way down?
    We used to be the go-to library for getting rare or obscure stuff.
    But all that – the jazz collections in assorted formats going back to the early 20th century (nope, it isn’t all available in other formats), labor history, small local press stuff, sheet music, obscure reference materials – it all got sent off to the pulpers.
    We don’t have it any more.
    We tossed it, and so did all the other libraries in the system, because we are all super-efficient now, , and pretty much free of nasty old books.
    So, gee, exactly who are we all going to go to in order to borrow the rare stuff we each decided not to keep?
    It’s all right.
    We’ve always been at war with Oceania, and no one can show us differently.

    Reply
  49. Actually, though, real books made from paper are still really important to a library.
    It is unfortunate that the current state of library training seems to be resolutely anti-dead-tree format, setting up an unnecessary either/or situation in which maintaining collections of older materials is seen as an obsolete practice.
    My own city just booted their recently hired library director for his over-zealous weeding.
    (Nope, deciding everything that had not circulated in the past three years had to go –s NOT a valid tactic.
    He used this on reference, sheet music, oversized art books–
    But he did a lot of harm, and this kind of thing is an epidemic.
    There’s no saying the next guy won’t just be better at doing it, since this seems to be what the library schools are pushing now.
    But the belief that libraries can abandon their use of physical books is based on some seriously flawed assumptions, such as:
    That all types of reading – research and translation, for example, are adequately satisfied by having an ebook.
    That all texts are even available as ebooks.
    That all readers have access to the means to read ebooks.
    That all readers are satisfied reading ebook.
    That ebooks don’t face their own systemic downside: format wars, technological changes, and potential degradation of product.
    (We know what happens to a collection of old books, and how to maintain them; do we have any similar systems for flawed electronic data?)
    When faced with such concerns about relying solely on ebooks, the next line of retreat is that stodgy book users can always just go to ILL for their needs.
    Well, that solution assumes that, in fact, your desired book is available from some other library.
    That is, it ignores the overwhelming success of the new library model.
    ILL is a fine solution for obtaining rare materials, but only as long as not all libraries have moved beyond the electronic frontier, so that more conservative libraries remain available as back-ups.
    It relies on the notion that someone, somewhere, is holding onto their old books.
    But what happens when everyone has modernized their systems, and it’s ebooks all the way down?
    We used to be the go-to library for getting rare or obscure stuff.
    But all that – the jazz collections in assorted formats going back to the early 20th century (nope, it isn’t all available in other formats), labor history, small local press stuff, sheet music, obscure reference materials – it all got sent off to the pulpers.
    We don’t have it any more.
    We tossed it, and so did all the other libraries in the system, because we are all super-efficient now, , and pretty much free of nasty old books.
    So, gee, exactly who are we all going to go to in order to borrow the rare stuff we each decided not to keep?
    It’s all right.
    We’ve always been at war with Oceania, and no one can show us differently.

    Reply
  50. Actually, though, real books made from paper are still really important to a library.
    It is unfortunate that the current state of library training seems to be resolutely anti-dead-tree format, setting up an unnecessary either/or situation in which maintaining collections of older materials is seen as an obsolete practice.
    My own city just booted their recently hired library director for his over-zealous weeding.
    (Nope, deciding everything that had not circulated in the past three years had to go –s NOT a valid tactic.
    He used this on reference, sheet music, oversized art books–
    But he did a lot of harm, and this kind of thing is an epidemic.
    There’s no saying the next guy won’t just be better at doing it, since this seems to be what the library schools are pushing now.
    But the belief that libraries can abandon their use of physical books is based on some seriously flawed assumptions, such as:
    That all types of reading – research and translation, for example, are adequately satisfied by having an ebook.
    That all texts are even available as ebooks.
    That all readers have access to the means to read ebooks.
    That all readers are satisfied reading ebook.
    That ebooks don’t face their own systemic downside: format wars, technological changes, and potential degradation of product.
    (We know what happens to a collection of old books, and how to maintain them; do we have any similar systems for flawed electronic data?)
    When faced with such concerns about relying solely on ebooks, the next line of retreat is that stodgy book users can always just go to ILL for their needs.
    Well, that solution assumes that, in fact, your desired book is available from some other library.
    That is, it ignores the overwhelming success of the new library model.
    ILL is a fine solution for obtaining rare materials, but only as long as not all libraries have moved beyond the electronic frontier, so that more conservative libraries remain available as back-ups.
    It relies on the notion that someone, somewhere, is holding onto their old books.
    But what happens when everyone has modernized their systems, and it’s ebooks all the way down?
    We used to be the go-to library for getting rare or obscure stuff.
    But all that – the jazz collections in assorted formats going back to the early 20th century (nope, it isn’t all available in other formats), labor history, small local press stuff, sheet music, obscure reference materials – it all got sent off to the pulpers.
    We don’t have it any more.
    We tossed it, and so did all the other libraries in the system, because we are all super-efficient now, , and pretty much free of nasty old books.
    So, gee, exactly who are we all going to go to in order to borrow the rare stuff we each decided not to keep?
    It’s all right.
    We’ve always been at war with Oceania, and no one can show us differently.

    Reply
  51. My library is part of a county system that has most of the things you’ve mentioned: ESL classes, concerts, movies, storytime, art exhibits, etc. and I’ve taken advantage of some of them. I also enjoy borrowing movies and music CDs.
    Many people have remarked on the lack of romance books in their libraries, but have you checked your library’s ebooks? Mine has most of the newer romances which I can check out and read via Overdrive.
    In some respects I am a bit of a Luddite though, and I was upset when they got rid of the card catalogue cabinets. I read an article years ago about how access to some books has been lost, due to errors in transcribing the information on the index cards to computers. And I hate to see the old books and documents go, although hopefully the libraries will make them available for people to buy, or give them away, before calling the pulpers!

    Reply
  52. My library is part of a county system that has most of the things you’ve mentioned: ESL classes, concerts, movies, storytime, art exhibits, etc. and I’ve taken advantage of some of them. I also enjoy borrowing movies and music CDs.
    Many people have remarked on the lack of romance books in their libraries, but have you checked your library’s ebooks? Mine has most of the newer romances which I can check out and read via Overdrive.
    In some respects I am a bit of a Luddite though, and I was upset when they got rid of the card catalogue cabinets. I read an article years ago about how access to some books has been lost, due to errors in transcribing the information on the index cards to computers. And I hate to see the old books and documents go, although hopefully the libraries will make them available for people to buy, or give them away, before calling the pulpers!

    Reply
  53. My library is part of a county system that has most of the things you’ve mentioned: ESL classes, concerts, movies, storytime, art exhibits, etc. and I’ve taken advantage of some of them. I also enjoy borrowing movies and music CDs.
    Many people have remarked on the lack of romance books in their libraries, but have you checked your library’s ebooks? Mine has most of the newer romances which I can check out and read via Overdrive.
    In some respects I am a bit of a Luddite though, and I was upset when they got rid of the card catalogue cabinets. I read an article years ago about how access to some books has been lost, due to errors in transcribing the information on the index cards to computers. And I hate to see the old books and documents go, although hopefully the libraries will make them available for people to buy, or give them away, before calling the pulpers!

    Reply
  54. My library is part of a county system that has most of the things you’ve mentioned: ESL classes, concerts, movies, storytime, art exhibits, etc. and I’ve taken advantage of some of them. I also enjoy borrowing movies and music CDs.
    Many people have remarked on the lack of romance books in their libraries, but have you checked your library’s ebooks? Mine has most of the newer romances which I can check out and read via Overdrive.
    In some respects I am a bit of a Luddite though, and I was upset when they got rid of the card catalogue cabinets. I read an article years ago about how access to some books has been lost, due to errors in transcribing the information on the index cards to computers. And I hate to see the old books and documents go, although hopefully the libraries will make them available for people to buy, or give them away, before calling the pulpers!

    Reply
  55. My library is part of a county system that has most of the things you’ve mentioned: ESL classes, concerts, movies, storytime, art exhibits, etc. and I’ve taken advantage of some of them. I also enjoy borrowing movies and music CDs.
    Many people have remarked on the lack of romance books in their libraries, but have you checked your library’s ebooks? Mine has most of the newer romances which I can check out and read via Overdrive.
    In some respects I am a bit of a Luddite though, and I was upset when they got rid of the card catalogue cabinets. I read an article years ago about how access to some books has been lost, due to errors in transcribing the information on the index cards to computers. And I hate to see the old books and documents go, although hopefully the libraries will make them available for people to buy, or give them away, before calling the pulpers!

    Reply
  56. I’m VERY impressed, Mary! You are way more tech savvy than I am . How great that your libraries have such a wide selection of digital books. My library is pretty good, but I still prefer paper. (I really don’t miss the tap-tap, but sounds like you really know how to enrich your reading!)

    Reply
  57. I’m VERY impressed, Mary! You are way more tech savvy than I am . How great that your libraries have such a wide selection of digital books. My library is pretty good, but I still prefer paper. (I really don’t miss the tap-tap, but sounds like you really know how to enrich your reading!)

    Reply
  58. I’m VERY impressed, Mary! You are way more tech savvy than I am . How great that your libraries have such a wide selection of digital books. My library is pretty good, but I still prefer paper. (I really don’t miss the tap-tap, but sounds like you really know how to enrich your reading!)

    Reply
  59. I’m VERY impressed, Mary! You are way more tech savvy than I am . How great that your libraries have such a wide selection of digital books. My library is pretty good, but I still prefer paper. (I really don’t miss the tap-tap, but sounds like you really know how to enrich your reading!)

    Reply
  60. I’m VERY impressed, Mary! You are way more tech savvy than I am . How great that your libraries have such a wide selection of digital books. My library is pretty good, but I still prefer paper. (I really don’t miss the tap-tap, but sounds like you really know how to enrich your reading!)

    Reply
  61. Nancy, even good libraries seem to have trouble offering a good selection of romances. It may be because so many come out per month, and without a librarian who knows the genre, it’s hard to know what to buy.
    I think one of the challenges to librarians is to not turn into business office managers. People want computer help, searching online, etc. but IMO that shouldn’t become the main purpose of a library.

    Reply
  62. Nancy, even good libraries seem to have trouble offering a good selection of romances. It may be because so many come out per month, and without a librarian who knows the genre, it’s hard to know what to buy.
    I think one of the challenges to librarians is to not turn into business office managers. People want computer help, searching online, etc. but IMO that shouldn’t become the main purpose of a library.

    Reply
  63. Nancy, even good libraries seem to have trouble offering a good selection of romances. It may be because so many come out per month, and without a librarian who knows the genre, it’s hard to know what to buy.
    I think one of the challenges to librarians is to not turn into business office managers. People want computer help, searching online, etc. but IMO that shouldn’t become the main purpose of a library.

    Reply
  64. Nancy, even good libraries seem to have trouble offering a good selection of romances. It may be because so many come out per month, and without a librarian who knows the genre, it’s hard to know what to buy.
    I think one of the challenges to librarians is to not turn into business office managers. People want computer help, searching online, etc. but IMO that shouldn’t become the main purpose of a library.

    Reply
  65. Nancy, even good libraries seem to have trouble offering a good selection of romances. It may be because so many come out per month, and without a librarian who knows the genre, it’s hard to know what to buy.
    I think one of the challenges to librarians is to not turn into business office managers. People want computer help, searching online, etc. but IMO that shouldn’t become the main purpose of a library.

    Reply
  66. Oh, I’m a Luddite too when it comes to the card catalogues! I loved paging through them, and I agree that some books probably got lost in the shuffle. Our libraries have a wonderful used book sale in the summer that known throughout the region, so older stuff never gets pulped.

    Reply
  67. Oh, I’m a Luddite too when it comes to the card catalogues! I loved paging through them, and I agree that some books probably got lost in the shuffle. Our libraries have a wonderful used book sale in the summer that known throughout the region, so older stuff never gets pulped.

    Reply
  68. Oh, I’m a Luddite too when it comes to the card catalogues! I loved paging through them, and I agree that some books probably got lost in the shuffle. Our libraries have a wonderful used book sale in the summer that known throughout the region, so older stuff never gets pulped.

    Reply
  69. Oh, I’m a Luddite too when it comes to the card catalogues! I loved paging through them, and I agree that some books probably got lost in the shuffle. Our libraries have a wonderful used book sale in the summer that known throughout the region, so older stuff never gets pulped.

    Reply
  70. Oh, I’m a Luddite too when it comes to the card catalogues! I loved paging through them, and I agree that some books probably got lost in the shuffle. Our libraries have a wonderful used book sale in the summer that known throughout the region, so older stuff never gets pulped.

    Reply
  71. My library system has lots of the same kinds of programs that Sharon’s does. There are two special programs I haven’t seen mentioned. One is we can check out State Park Passes (yeah) for a week.
    The second is they have a read to a dog program. It is for beginning readers who are having trouble reading out loud and is a very popular program. Children sign up for 15 min increments. They can bring a book to read to the dog or choose one out of the basket.
    I’ve read that when they have “read to a dog” programs available the children improve rapidly. After all, a dog is friendly, doesn’t correct you, make fun of you, etc.
    Indeed…the paper copy romance section is very limited but I usually can find what I want somewhere.
    It is true that there is a lot of “customer service” for computers, etc but the ladies at my branch do tons of one on one help with the patrons. As in helping them find what they are looking for, etc.
    Definitely the school libraries do tons of technology teaching. My sister who is a media school specialist has to come up with lesson plans etc for them. But she also really enjoys helping the kids find the right book/author/series to get them hooked on reading. That really floats her boat (smile).

    Reply
  72. My library system has lots of the same kinds of programs that Sharon’s does. There are two special programs I haven’t seen mentioned. One is we can check out State Park Passes (yeah) for a week.
    The second is they have a read to a dog program. It is for beginning readers who are having trouble reading out loud and is a very popular program. Children sign up for 15 min increments. They can bring a book to read to the dog or choose one out of the basket.
    I’ve read that when they have “read to a dog” programs available the children improve rapidly. After all, a dog is friendly, doesn’t correct you, make fun of you, etc.
    Indeed…the paper copy romance section is very limited but I usually can find what I want somewhere.
    It is true that there is a lot of “customer service” for computers, etc but the ladies at my branch do tons of one on one help with the patrons. As in helping them find what they are looking for, etc.
    Definitely the school libraries do tons of technology teaching. My sister who is a media school specialist has to come up with lesson plans etc for them. But she also really enjoys helping the kids find the right book/author/series to get them hooked on reading. That really floats her boat (smile).

    Reply
  73. My library system has lots of the same kinds of programs that Sharon’s does. There are two special programs I haven’t seen mentioned. One is we can check out State Park Passes (yeah) for a week.
    The second is they have a read to a dog program. It is for beginning readers who are having trouble reading out loud and is a very popular program. Children sign up for 15 min increments. They can bring a book to read to the dog or choose one out of the basket.
    I’ve read that when they have “read to a dog” programs available the children improve rapidly. After all, a dog is friendly, doesn’t correct you, make fun of you, etc.
    Indeed…the paper copy romance section is very limited but I usually can find what I want somewhere.
    It is true that there is a lot of “customer service” for computers, etc but the ladies at my branch do tons of one on one help with the patrons. As in helping them find what they are looking for, etc.
    Definitely the school libraries do tons of technology teaching. My sister who is a media school specialist has to come up with lesson plans etc for them. But she also really enjoys helping the kids find the right book/author/series to get them hooked on reading. That really floats her boat (smile).

    Reply
  74. My library system has lots of the same kinds of programs that Sharon’s does. There are two special programs I haven’t seen mentioned. One is we can check out State Park Passes (yeah) for a week.
    The second is they have a read to a dog program. It is for beginning readers who are having trouble reading out loud and is a very popular program. Children sign up for 15 min increments. They can bring a book to read to the dog or choose one out of the basket.
    I’ve read that when they have “read to a dog” programs available the children improve rapidly. After all, a dog is friendly, doesn’t correct you, make fun of you, etc.
    Indeed…the paper copy romance section is very limited but I usually can find what I want somewhere.
    It is true that there is a lot of “customer service” for computers, etc but the ladies at my branch do tons of one on one help with the patrons. As in helping them find what they are looking for, etc.
    Definitely the school libraries do tons of technology teaching. My sister who is a media school specialist has to come up with lesson plans etc for them. But she also really enjoys helping the kids find the right book/author/series to get them hooked on reading. That really floats her boat (smile).

    Reply
  75. My library system has lots of the same kinds of programs that Sharon’s does. There are two special programs I haven’t seen mentioned. One is we can check out State Park Passes (yeah) for a week.
    The second is they have a read to a dog program. It is for beginning readers who are having trouble reading out loud and is a very popular program. Children sign up for 15 min increments. They can bring a book to read to the dog or choose one out of the basket.
    I’ve read that when they have “read to a dog” programs available the children improve rapidly. After all, a dog is friendly, doesn’t correct you, make fun of you, etc.
    Indeed…the paper copy romance section is very limited but I usually can find what I want somewhere.
    It is true that there is a lot of “customer service” for computers, etc but the ladies at my branch do tons of one on one help with the patrons. As in helping them find what they are looking for, etc.
    Definitely the school libraries do tons of technology teaching. My sister who is a media school specialist has to come up with lesson plans etc for them. But she also really enjoys helping the kids find the right book/author/series to get them hooked on reading. That really floats her boat (smile).

    Reply
  76. That all sounds wonderful, Vicki. I love the State Park passes, and the Read to a Dog! What a fabulous idea. Dogs respond so well to a voice, and that wagging tail will help kids get excited about reading aloud (and reading in general.)
    My librarians are also really good at helping people with finding what they need, recommending books/series.etc. Encouraging people not to be shy about asking for advice helps expand their ability to use all the resources of the library—which is such a good thing.
    Again, it’s really heartening to hear from all of you that your libraries are so active!

    Reply
  77. That all sounds wonderful, Vicki. I love the State Park passes, and the Read to a Dog! What a fabulous idea. Dogs respond so well to a voice, and that wagging tail will help kids get excited about reading aloud (and reading in general.)
    My librarians are also really good at helping people with finding what they need, recommending books/series.etc. Encouraging people not to be shy about asking for advice helps expand their ability to use all the resources of the library—which is such a good thing.
    Again, it’s really heartening to hear from all of you that your libraries are so active!

    Reply
  78. That all sounds wonderful, Vicki. I love the State Park passes, and the Read to a Dog! What a fabulous idea. Dogs respond so well to a voice, and that wagging tail will help kids get excited about reading aloud (and reading in general.)
    My librarians are also really good at helping people with finding what they need, recommending books/series.etc. Encouraging people not to be shy about asking for advice helps expand their ability to use all the resources of the library—which is such a good thing.
    Again, it’s really heartening to hear from all of you that your libraries are so active!

    Reply
  79. That all sounds wonderful, Vicki. I love the State Park passes, and the Read to a Dog! What a fabulous idea. Dogs respond so well to a voice, and that wagging tail will help kids get excited about reading aloud (and reading in general.)
    My librarians are also really good at helping people with finding what they need, recommending books/series.etc. Encouraging people not to be shy about asking for advice helps expand their ability to use all the resources of the library—which is such a good thing.
    Again, it’s really heartening to hear from all of you that your libraries are so active!

    Reply
  80. That all sounds wonderful, Vicki. I love the State Park passes, and the Read to a Dog! What a fabulous idea. Dogs respond so well to a voice, and that wagging tail will help kids get excited about reading aloud (and reading in general.)
    My librarians are also really good at helping people with finding what they need, recommending books/series.etc. Encouraging people not to be shy about asking for advice helps expand their ability to use all the resources of the library—which is such a good thing.
    Again, it’s really heartening to hear from all of you that your libraries are so active!

    Reply
  81. I have to say, the reading to dogs programs warm my heart.
    Good for the kid, good for the dog.
    They should do it everywhere.

    Reply
  82. I have to say, the reading to dogs programs warm my heart.
    Good for the kid, good for the dog.
    They should do it everywhere.

    Reply
  83. I have to say, the reading to dogs programs warm my heart.
    Good for the kid, good for the dog.
    They should do it everywhere.

    Reply
  84. I have to say, the reading to dogs programs warm my heart.
    Good for the kid, good for the dog.
    They should do it everywhere.

    Reply
  85. I have to say, the reading to dogs programs warm my heart.
    Good for the kid, good for the dog.
    They should do it everywhere.

    Reply

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