Dreaming of Djellabas

CE-avatar Cara/Andrea here,

Are you ready to go on a little journey to . . .

The Red City.

Window Actually, it’s more of a rich terra cotta hue, which shifts from subtle shades of buttery pink to burnt brick in the luminous Moroccan sun. And like its color, its name is tinted with a mysterious magic. Marrakech. A melting pot of rich history and contrasting cultures, where over the centuries Berbers, Moors, Turks, Europeans and Sub-Saharan Africans have created a unique spot where a whirling dervish of ancient traditions and modern flare dance together in sinuous harmony.

I love visiting historic places. There’s an energy and inspiration to them that seems to resonate in the buildings, the people, and, indeed, in the very air. Last month, I was lucky enough to spend four days in Marrakech, a city that has long captured my imagination. Beautiful, exotic, with an edge of raffish danger—how could a writer of historical romance not feel attracted to such a place! And from the very first glimpse of the old medina walls, it did not disappoint.


Gate You approach Marrakech through groves of silvery-gray olive trees, some of which are over 800 years old.  The hot, dry wind rustles softly through the leaves, while in contrast, the snow capped Atlas mountains rise in the distance, framed by a cool blue sky. An ancient palmeraie, or oasis of palms, fringes the city. Once inside the gates, or babs, (there are 10 main ones set in over six miles of winding walls—which, by the by, are made of a mixture of mud, straw and lime known as pisé, which becomes as hard as brick when it dries) you notice the lush green plantings with fountains and pools. Marrakech  is famous for its gardens—after World War II, Winston Churchill came often to stay at the storied La Mamounia Hotel and paint the local flora. He called it “the most lovely spot in the whole world.”

Citynight The city was founded in the 11th century by the Almoravids, and through the centuries it’s changed hands many times—Almohads, Merenids, Saadians, Turks, and French are among the people who have ruled. The people of this region are Berbers, not Arabs, and though they are Muslim, they have always had a great tolerance for other religions. As a crossroads of the legendary trading caravans, Marrakech became a center of commerce and a confluence of cultures. This mix of East and West, north and south has created a fascinating blend of traditions.

Mosque One of the city’s landmarks is the Koutoubia Mosque, built in the 12th century. (The muezzin still calls the faithful to prayer five times each day from its beautifully decorated tower, albeit by a taped recording broadcast via loudspeaker.) Another architectural gem is the Bahia palace, a 160-room walled enclave built in 1880. The craftsmanship is breathtakingly beautiful. Mosaics, intricately carved stone, painted cedarwood and graceful calligraphy—all cornerstones of Islamic art—grace room after room. The effect is mesmerizing.

IsArt1 From the outside, however, you would never guess that the drab, unadorned walls surround such a treasure, and it was fascinating to hear our guide, Abdel, explain why. He told us that one of the tenets of Islam is modesty, in order not to embarrass a less wealthy neighbor, it is traditional to build an exterior that gives no hint of what lies inside. A gate can hide a tiny dwelling, a riad (a house with an interior garden) or a sumptuous palace. The same principle applies to clothing. A burka or voluminous cloak often hides richly decorated caftans or other dress—and the outer layer is removed when one is in private, among friends.

But Marrakech is much more than museums and shrines. It’s alive with vibrant energy. The sounds of music, the cries of the snake charmers, the sizzle of exotic spices and the swirl of bright patterns fill the famous  Jemaa el Fna, which is said to be the busiest square in all of Africa.

Square5 From morning to very late at night, it’s bustling with people who shop, who stroll, who stop to eat a quick meal at one of the many food stalls (roasted sheep’s head is their version of McDonald’s. I was not brave enough to try it, but my friends Jason and Lyman said it was very tasty! Er, they passed on a side order of brains.)

Sheepheads Acrobats and jugglers weave in and out of fortunetellers who gain a modicum of privacy for their readings by hunkering down under a large umbrella. And the snake charmers are quick to drape their wares around unwary tourists. (I ran as fast as my feet would carry me, but again, the intrepid Jason showed no fear.)

Jason&snakes So where did my flight take me? Why, to the souks, of course! In keeping with its rich trading heritage, Marrakech features rambling covered markets that are some of the largest in Africa. Talk about a shopper’s paradise! The choice of merchandise is staggering (quite literally if you are in the market for fine carpets!) It ranges from the usual junky souvenirs to fine antiques, and everything in between. Scarves and djellabas swirl above tall cones of colorful spices and dates. Fanciful leather slippers rub up against polished inlaid wood. Pierced metal lanterns cast a winking light over tribal silver and terra cotta tangine pots. The list is endless, and as I wove through the narrow twists and turns it was hard to know where to look next!

Spice Merchants were aggressive—but in a very nice way. They ended up smiling when I said no, and more often than not they would offer a cup of the ubiquitous sugared mint tea and want to practice their English anyway. “No” was a word I used a lot, yet I still came away with bags of wonderful swag.

Argan oil, which is unique to Morocco is a special treat to take home. It made from the pit of the argan tree fruit, and is used for cooking, cosmetics and as a traditional medicine. Nutty in flavor, it’s very rich in Vitamin E and is said to have potent anti-aging properties. The oil has become something of a cult ingredient in Europe, and I’m sure it will soon be turning up on shelves here.

Fruitwagon Reflecting its French influence, Marrakech is also a hotspot for fine dining, and after a long day spent poking through the dazzling wares, one can choose from among regional dishes like tangines, couscous and vegetable salads or opt for a wide range of international cuisines.

It was way too short a trip and I really look forward to going back and having more time to explore and get out into the countryside—another thing high on my wish list is to see the Sahara desert. Already I have story ideas percolating inside my head. I’m not quite sure when or how, but I plan on working this historic region into some part of a future book.



Souk I’m not quite sure why I always wanted to visit Marrakech. Maybe it was that haunting Crosby, Stills and Nash melody that made it seem so alluring and exotic. (I almost bought a striped djellaba.) Or maybe it was reading in history books about the spice caravans, the Barbary pirates. Whatever it was, it made me fantasize about visiting the city one day. And now I have—and it was even better than I imagined!

J&l Which brings me to my question—do you have that one Special Place you are yearning to visit? A dream location that tickles at your fancy? And conversely, have you ever wanted to go somewhere and then been disappointed because it didn’t live up expectations. Summer is, after all, the time for travel, so please share where your mind has been wandering!

175 thoughts on “Dreaming of Djellabas”

  1. Cara/Andrea, I’m swooning from that lush description and the photos — and my feet are itching like mad. Marrakech is a place I’ve always wanted to go to.
    Southern Spain is another place I’d love to go to, Granada, where the Moorish influence is still visible. Sounds like a perfect opportunity to combine two trips in one.

    Reply
  2. Cara/Andrea, I’m swooning from that lush description and the photos — and my feet are itching like mad. Marrakech is a place I’ve always wanted to go to.
    Southern Spain is another place I’d love to go to, Granada, where the Moorish influence is still visible. Sounds like a perfect opportunity to combine two trips in one.

    Reply
  3. Cara/Andrea, I’m swooning from that lush description and the photos — and my feet are itching like mad. Marrakech is a place I’ve always wanted to go to.
    Southern Spain is another place I’d love to go to, Granada, where the Moorish influence is still visible. Sounds like a perfect opportunity to combine two trips in one.

    Reply
  4. Cara/Andrea, I’m swooning from that lush description and the photos — and my feet are itching like mad. Marrakech is a place I’ve always wanted to go to.
    Southern Spain is another place I’d love to go to, Granada, where the Moorish influence is still visible. Sounds like a perfect opportunity to combine two trips in one.

    Reply
  5. Cara/Andrea, I’m swooning from that lush description and the photos — and my feet are itching like mad. Marrakech is a place I’ve always wanted to go to.
    Southern Spain is another place I’d love to go to, Granada, where the Moorish influence is still visible. Sounds like a perfect opportunity to combine two trips in one.

    Reply
  6. Hi Cara/Andrea
    The one place I really want to visit is Spizbergen. I read about it in a book many many years ago and it seemed so romantic (it was a romance I was reading, of course!) Somehow I don’t think I will ever get there though.
    The place I was really disapointed in was Egypt. The pyramids, sphinx, the valley of the kings. And when I got there unfortunately the Egyptians were completely uninterested in the mythology, and the past. It was just dead. I had been lucky enough to visit Greece on a number of occasions before and it was so different. Greece was so vibrant. The monuments were still alive, the myths were alive. It was possible to believe you were there in ancient times. But Egypt? No.

    Reply
  7. Hi Cara/Andrea
    The one place I really want to visit is Spizbergen. I read about it in a book many many years ago and it seemed so romantic (it was a romance I was reading, of course!) Somehow I don’t think I will ever get there though.
    The place I was really disapointed in was Egypt. The pyramids, sphinx, the valley of the kings. And when I got there unfortunately the Egyptians were completely uninterested in the mythology, and the past. It was just dead. I had been lucky enough to visit Greece on a number of occasions before and it was so different. Greece was so vibrant. The monuments were still alive, the myths were alive. It was possible to believe you were there in ancient times. But Egypt? No.

    Reply
  8. Hi Cara/Andrea
    The one place I really want to visit is Spizbergen. I read about it in a book many many years ago and it seemed so romantic (it was a romance I was reading, of course!) Somehow I don’t think I will ever get there though.
    The place I was really disapointed in was Egypt. The pyramids, sphinx, the valley of the kings. And when I got there unfortunately the Egyptians were completely uninterested in the mythology, and the past. It was just dead. I had been lucky enough to visit Greece on a number of occasions before and it was so different. Greece was so vibrant. The monuments were still alive, the myths were alive. It was possible to believe you were there in ancient times. But Egypt? No.

    Reply
  9. Hi Cara/Andrea
    The one place I really want to visit is Spizbergen. I read about it in a book many many years ago and it seemed so romantic (it was a romance I was reading, of course!) Somehow I don’t think I will ever get there though.
    The place I was really disapointed in was Egypt. The pyramids, sphinx, the valley of the kings. And when I got there unfortunately the Egyptians were completely uninterested in the mythology, and the past. It was just dead. I had been lucky enough to visit Greece on a number of occasions before and it was so different. Greece was so vibrant. The monuments were still alive, the myths were alive. It was possible to believe you were there in ancient times. But Egypt? No.

    Reply
  10. Hi Cara/Andrea
    The one place I really want to visit is Spizbergen. I read about it in a book many many years ago and it seemed so romantic (it was a romance I was reading, of course!) Somehow I don’t think I will ever get there though.
    The place I was really disapointed in was Egypt. The pyramids, sphinx, the valley of the kings. And when I got there unfortunately the Egyptians were completely uninterested in the mythology, and the past. It was just dead. I had been lucky enough to visit Greece on a number of occasions before and it was so different. Greece was so vibrant. The monuments were still alive, the myths were alive. It was possible to believe you were there in ancient times. But Egypt? No.

    Reply
  11. Jenny, be sure to look for Nicola’s new release this fall, Whispers of Scandal which is set in London and Spitzbergen, and features a look at early 19th century artic exploration. (Nicola, please chime in and add details!)
    I’m disappointed to hear about Egypt. A trip down the Nile, and a visit to the Valley of the Kings is high on my wish list.

    Reply
  12. Jenny, be sure to look for Nicola’s new release this fall, Whispers of Scandal which is set in London and Spitzbergen, and features a look at early 19th century artic exploration. (Nicola, please chime in and add details!)
    I’m disappointed to hear about Egypt. A trip down the Nile, and a visit to the Valley of the Kings is high on my wish list.

    Reply
  13. Jenny, be sure to look for Nicola’s new release this fall, Whispers of Scandal which is set in London and Spitzbergen, and features a look at early 19th century artic exploration. (Nicola, please chime in and add details!)
    I’m disappointed to hear about Egypt. A trip down the Nile, and a visit to the Valley of the Kings is high on my wish list.

    Reply
  14. Jenny, be sure to look for Nicola’s new release this fall, Whispers of Scandal which is set in London and Spitzbergen, and features a look at early 19th century artic exploration. (Nicola, please chime in and add details!)
    I’m disappointed to hear about Egypt. A trip down the Nile, and a visit to the Valley of the Kings is high on my wish list.

    Reply
  15. Jenny, be sure to look for Nicola’s new release this fall, Whispers of Scandal which is set in London and Spitzbergen, and features a look at early 19th century artic exploration. (Nicola, please chime in and add details!)
    I’m disappointed to hear about Egypt. A trip down the Nile, and a visit to the Valley of the Kings is high on my wish list.

    Reply
  16. Hi Cara/Andrea, wonderful post. Its made me yearn to travel again, since I’ve not done much. I’d love to see Vienna. Okay, I’d love to see all the great European cities!
    Because I’ve travelled so little, I haven’t yet been disappointed. Last summer I realized a life-long dream when I visited England and Ireland. I loved London, but for a city with a true soul or spirit, Dublin was it for me. Seeing the General Post Office, where the 1916 Easter Rising took place, the Halfpenny Bridge, the statue of Daniel O’Connell, was absolutely thrilling. I also liked Galway City – absolutely gorgeous! I think before I see all the other European Cities on my “Bucket List,” I’ll go back to Ireland.

    Reply
  17. Hi Cara/Andrea, wonderful post. Its made me yearn to travel again, since I’ve not done much. I’d love to see Vienna. Okay, I’d love to see all the great European cities!
    Because I’ve travelled so little, I haven’t yet been disappointed. Last summer I realized a life-long dream when I visited England and Ireland. I loved London, but for a city with a true soul or spirit, Dublin was it for me. Seeing the General Post Office, where the 1916 Easter Rising took place, the Halfpenny Bridge, the statue of Daniel O’Connell, was absolutely thrilling. I also liked Galway City – absolutely gorgeous! I think before I see all the other European Cities on my “Bucket List,” I’ll go back to Ireland.

    Reply
  18. Hi Cara/Andrea, wonderful post. Its made me yearn to travel again, since I’ve not done much. I’d love to see Vienna. Okay, I’d love to see all the great European cities!
    Because I’ve travelled so little, I haven’t yet been disappointed. Last summer I realized a life-long dream when I visited England and Ireland. I loved London, but for a city with a true soul or spirit, Dublin was it for me. Seeing the General Post Office, where the 1916 Easter Rising took place, the Halfpenny Bridge, the statue of Daniel O’Connell, was absolutely thrilling. I also liked Galway City – absolutely gorgeous! I think before I see all the other European Cities on my “Bucket List,” I’ll go back to Ireland.

    Reply
  19. Hi Cara/Andrea, wonderful post. Its made me yearn to travel again, since I’ve not done much. I’d love to see Vienna. Okay, I’d love to see all the great European cities!
    Because I’ve travelled so little, I haven’t yet been disappointed. Last summer I realized a life-long dream when I visited England and Ireland. I loved London, but for a city with a true soul or spirit, Dublin was it for me. Seeing the General Post Office, where the 1916 Easter Rising took place, the Halfpenny Bridge, the statue of Daniel O’Connell, was absolutely thrilling. I also liked Galway City – absolutely gorgeous! I think before I see all the other European Cities on my “Bucket List,” I’ll go back to Ireland.

    Reply
  20. Hi Cara/Andrea, wonderful post. Its made me yearn to travel again, since I’ve not done much. I’d love to see Vienna. Okay, I’d love to see all the great European cities!
    Because I’ve travelled so little, I haven’t yet been disappointed. Last summer I realized a life-long dream when I visited England and Ireland. I loved London, but for a city with a true soul or spirit, Dublin was it for me. Seeing the General Post Office, where the 1916 Easter Rising took place, the Halfpenny Bridge, the statue of Daniel O’Connell, was absolutely thrilling. I also liked Galway City – absolutely gorgeous! I think before I see all the other European Cities on my “Bucket List,” I’ll go back to Ireland.

    Reply
  21. Thanks, Cara, for a glimpse into your trip! I traveled Egypt in December 2004 while living in the Netherlands. We booked a “deluxe” river cruise from Luxor to Aswan with an overnight train ride to Cairo. The “deluxe” was not so “deluxe” and the train ride was an “interesting” experience (disgusting food, overflowing toilet, and a bedouin walking through our car with his entire weapon collection on his back). At the time, it seemed that the trip was a let down because Egypt is dirty, run down, and disorganized. But looking back at the fabulous photos (and reliving the funny moments), it was a magical trip.

    Reply
  22. Thanks, Cara, for a glimpse into your trip! I traveled Egypt in December 2004 while living in the Netherlands. We booked a “deluxe” river cruise from Luxor to Aswan with an overnight train ride to Cairo. The “deluxe” was not so “deluxe” and the train ride was an “interesting” experience (disgusting food, overflowing toilet, and a bedouin walking through our car with his entire weapon collection on his back). At the time, it seemed that the trip was a let down because Egypt is dirty, run down, and disorganized. But looking back at the fabulous photos (and reliving the funny moments), it was a magical trip.

    Reply
  23. Thanks, Cara, for a glimpse into your trip! I traveled Egypt in December 2004 while living in the Netherlands. We booked a “deluxe” river cruise from Luxor to Aswan with an overnight train ride to Cairo. The “deluxe” was not so “deluxe” and the train ride was an “interesting” experience (disgusting food, overflowing toilet, and a bedouin walking through our car with his entire weapon collection on his back). At the time, it seemed that the trip was a let down because Egypt is dirty, run down, and disorganized. But looking back at the fabulous photos (and reliving the funny moments), it was a magical trip.

    Reply
  24. Thanks, Cara, for a glimpse into your trip! I traveled Egypt in December 2004 while living in the Netherlands. We booked a “deluxe” river cruise from Luxor to Aswan with an overnight train ride to Cairo. The “deluxe” was not so “deluxe” and the train ride was an “interesting” experience (disgusting food, overflowing toilet, and a bedouin walking through our car with his entire weapon collection on his back). At the time, it seemed that the trip was a let down because Egypt is dirty, run down, and disorganized. But looking back at the fabulous photos (and reliving the funny moments), it was a magical trip.

    Reply
  25. Thanks, Cara, for a glimpse into your trip! I traveled Egypt in December 2004 while living in the Netherlands. We booked a “deluxe” river cruise from Luxor to Aswan with an overnight train ride to Cairo. The “deluxe” was not so “deluxe” and the train ride was an “interesting” experience (disgusting food, overflowing toilet, and a bedouin walking through our car with his entire weapon collection on his back). At the time, it seemed that the trip was a let down because Egypt is dirty, run down, and disorganized. But looking back at the fabulous photos (and reliving the funny moments), it was a magical trip.

    Reply
  26. Kim, it’s so true that sometimes the “awful” experiences actually turn out to be the most memorable ones. The warts and wrinkles are what make a face interesting. Not necessarily beautiful, but interesting. And sometimes that sort of image sticks with us more than perfect beauty. Maybe because it challenges us, and moves up out of our comfort zones. And that teaches us a lot too,

    Reply
  27. Kim, it’s so true that sometimes the “awful” experiences actually turn out to be the most memorable ones. The warts and wrinkles are what make a face interesting. Not necessarily beautiful, but interesting. And sometimes that sort of image sticks with us more than perfect beauty. Maybe because it challenges us, and moves up out of our comfort zones. And that teaches us a lot too,

    Reply
  28. Kim, it’s so true that sometimes the “awful” experiences actually turn out to be the most memorable ones. The warts and wrinkles are what make a face interesting. Not necessarily beautiful, but interesting. And sometimes that sort of image sticks with us more than perfect beauty. Maybe because it challenges us, and moves up out of our comfort zones. And that teaches us a lot too,

    Reply
  29. Kim, it’s so true that sometimes the “awful” experiences actually turn out to be the most memorable ones. The warts and wrinkles are what make a face interesting. Not necessarily beautiful, but interesting. And sometimes that sort of image sticks with us more than perfect beauty. Maybe because it challenges us, and moves up out of our comfort zones. And that teaches us a lot too,

    Reply
  30. Kim, it’s so true that sometimes the “awful” experiences actually turn out to be the most memorable ones. The warts and wrinkles are what make a face interesting. Not necessarily beautiful, but interesting. And sometimes that sort of image sticks with us more than perfect beauty. Maybe because it challenges us, and moves up out of our comfort zones. And that teaches us a lot too,

    Reply
  31. Scotland is my dream place (with England a close second). In my head, I have fantasies of a perfect, fun, historical oriented trip, but I’ve never got to go (as of yet.)
    But if I ever get the money to blow, that is the first place I’m heading. 🙂
    The snake charmers would have been decked if they had pursued me with their wares and tried to drape them around my neck. I’m glad you’re a fast runner.

    Reply
  32. Scotland is my dream place (with England a close second). In my head, I have fantasies of a perfect, fun, historical oriented trip, but I’ve never got to go (as of yet.)
    But if I ever get the money to blow, that is the first place I’m heading. 🙂
    The snake charmers would have been decked if they had pursued me with their wares and tried to drape them around my neck. I’m glad you’re a fast runner.

    Reply
  33. Scotland is my dream place (with England a close second). In my head, I have fantasies of a perfect, fun, historical oriented trip, but I’ve never got to go (as of yet.)
    But if I ever get the money to blow, that is the first place I’m heading. 🙂
    The snake charmers would have been decked if they had pursued me with their wares and tried to drape them around my neck. I’m glad you’re a fast runner.

    Reply
  34. Scotland is my dream place (with England a close second). In my head, I have fantasies of a perfect, fun, historical oriented trip, but I’ve never got to go (as of yet.)
    But if I ever get the money to blow, that is the first place I’m heading. 🙂
    The snake charmers would have been decked if they had pursued me with their wares and tried to drape them around my neck. I’m glad you’re a fast runner.

    Reply
  35. Scotland is my dream place (with England a close second). In my head, I have fantasies of a perfect, fun, historical oriented trip, but I’ve never got to go (as of yet.)
    But if I ever get the money to blow, that is the first place I’m heading. 🙂
    The snake charmers would have been decked if they had pursued me with their wares and tried to drape them around my neck. I’m glad you’re a fast runner.

    Reply
  36. Oh, save your shillings, hellion! Scotland is a fabulous place (and England too.) I am sure you will not be disappointed.
    And yes, I’m a fast runner! Snakes really give me the creeps, and I didn’t want to get near them. (BTW, it was our guide who took the picture of my friend with my camera, not me!)

    Reply
  37. Oh, save your shillings, hellion! Scotland is a fabulous place (and England too.) I am sure you will not be disappointed.
    And yes, I’m a fast runner! Snakes really give me the creeps, and I didn’t want to get near them. (BTW, it was our guide who took the picture of my friend with my camera, not me!)

    Reply
  38. Oh, save your shillings, hellion! Scotland is a fabulous place (and England too.) I am sure you will not be disappointed.
    And yes, I’m a fast runner! Snakes really give me the creeps, and I didn’t want to get near them. (BTW, it was our guide who took the picture of my friend with my camera, not me!)

    Reply
  39. Oh, save your shillings, hellion! Scotland is a fabulous place (and England too.) I am sure you will not be disappointed.
    And yes, I’m a fast runner! Snakes really give me the creeps, and I didn’t want to get near them. (BTW, it was our guide who took the picture of my friend with my camera, not me!)

    Reply
  40. Oh, save your shillings, hellion! Scotland is a fabulous place (and England too.) I am sure you will not be disappointed.
    And yes, I’m a fast runner! Snakes really give me the creeps, and I didn’t want to get near them. (BTW, it was our guide who took the picture of my friend with my camera, not me!)

    Reply
  41. Ah, Marrakech….. It’s one of those names that radiates Romance, and your description only enhanced it. Let’s get together a Wenchly Tour to visit there and Granada! I’m not been to either, but Salamanca is lovely.
    So many places, never enough time and/or money!

    Reply
  42. Ah, Marrakech….. It’s one of those names that radiates Romance, and your description only enhanced it. Let’s get together a Wenchly Tour to visit there and Granada! I’m not been to either, but Salamanca is lovely.
    So many places, never enough time and/or money!

    Reply
  43. Ah, Marrakech….. It’s one of those names that radiates Romance, and your description only enhanced it. Let’s get together a Wenchly Tour to visit there and Granada! I’m not been to either, but Salamanca is lovely.
    So many places, never enough time and/or money!

    Reply
  44. Ah, Marrakech….. It’s one of those names that radiates Romance, and your description only enhanced it. Let’s get together a Wenchly Tour to visit there and Granada! I’m not been to either, but Salamanca is lovely.
    So many places, never enough time and/or money!

    Reply
  45. Ah, Marrakech….. It’s one of those names that radiates Romance, and your description only enhanced it. Let’s get together a Wenchly Tour to visit there and Granada! I’m not been to either, but Salamanca is lovely.
    So many places, never enough time and/or money!

    Reply
  46. Andrea, loved this blog. Completely loved it!!! We had plans to go in December 2001, then 9/11 happened and then life happened, so we haven’t been there yet. Perhaps some day…
    I want to visit Marrakech, Casablanca (for the architecture), and also the desert out west (Ouarzazate).
    Other places I’m dying to visit are Lhasa in Tibet, Petra in Jordan, Iceland, and Galapagos.

    Reply
  47. Andrea, loved this blog. Completely loved it!!! We had plans to go in December 2001, then 9/11 happened and then life happened, so we haven’t been there yet. Perhaps some day…
    I want to visit Marrakech, Casablanca (for the architecture), and also the desert out west (Ouarzazate).
    Other places I’m dying to visit are Lhasa in Tibet, Petra in Jordan, Iceland, and Galapagos.

    Reply
  48. Andrea, loved this blog. Completely loved it!!! We had plans to go in December 2001, then 9/11 happened and then life happened, so we haven’t been there yet. Perhaps some day…
    I want to visit Marrakech, Casablanca (for the architecture), and also the desert out west (Ouarzazate).
    Other places I’m dying to visit are Lhasa in Tibet, Petra in Jordan, Iceland, and Galapagos.

    Reply
  49. Andrea, loved this blog. Completely loved it!!! We had plans to go in December 2001, then 9/11 happened and then life happened, so we haven’t been there yet. Perhaps some day…
    I want to visit Marrakech, Casablanca (for the architecture), and also the desert out west (Ouarzazate).
    Other places I’m dying to visit are Lhasa in Tibet, Petra in Jordan, Iceland, and Galapagos.

    Reply
  50. Andrea, loved this blog. Completely loved it!!! We had plans to go in December 2001, then 9/11 happened and then life happened, so we haven’t been there yet. Perhaps some day…
    I want to visit Marrakech, Casablanca (for the architecture), and also the desert out west (Ouarzazate).
    Other places I’m dying to visit are Lhasa in Tibet, Petra in Jordan, Iceland, and Galapagos.

    Reply
  51. Mary Jo, i think we need to do a Wenchly Grand Tour of locales guaraenteed to inspire the imagination . . .though i fear it would be a LONG list and would require a year—and a private yacht and plane. Sigh, one of us needs to hit JK Rowling numbers, LOL.

    Reply
  52. Mary Jo, i think we need to do a Wenchly Grand Tour of locales guaraenteed to inspire the imagination . . .though i fear it would be a LONG list and would require a year—and a private yacht and plane. Sigh, one of us needs to hit JK Rowling numbers, LOL.

    Reply
  53. Mary Jo, i think we need to do a Wenchly Grand Tour of locales guaraenteed to inspire the imagination . . .though i fear it would be a LONG list and would require a year—and a private yacht and plane. Sigh, one of us needs to hit JK Rowling numbers, LOL.

    Reply
  54. Mary Jo, i think we need to do a Wenchly Grand Tour of locales guaraenteed to inspire the imagination . . .though i fear it would be a LONG list and would require a year—and a private yacht and plane. Sigh, one of us needs to hit JK Rowling numbers, LOL.

    Reply
  55. Mary Jo, i think we need to do a Wenchly Grand Tour of locales guaraenteed to inspire the imagination . . .though i fear it would be a LONG list and would require a year—and a private yacht and plane. Sigh, one of us needs to hit JK Rowling numbers, LOL.

    Reply
  56. Oh, I LOVED Marrakesh. I spent a week there, staying with friends in the Medina (not far from the Egyptian Spice Market). It’s wonderful to see it through another author’s eyes. Thanks for stirring up the memories!
    And yes, I was a big enough geek that I loaded Crosby, Stills and Nash onto my iPod so I could listen to Marrakesh Express as I rode the train from Casablanca.

    Reply
  57. Oh, I LOVED Marrakesh. I spent a week there, staying with friends in the Medina (not far from the Egyptian Spice Market). It’s wonderful to see it through another author’s eyes. Thanks for stirring up the memories!
    And yes, I was a big enough geek that I loaded Crosby, Stills and Nash onto my iPod so I could listen to Marrakesh Express as I rode the train from Casablanca.

    Reply
  58. Oh, I LOVED Marrakesh. I spent a week there, staying with friends in the Medina (not far from the Egyptian Spice Market). It’s wonderful to see it through another author’s eyes. Thanks for stirring up the memories!
    And yes, I was a big enough geek that I loaded Crosby, Stills and Nash onto my iPod so I could listen to Marrakesh Express as I rode the train from Casablanca.

    Reply
  59. Oh, I LOVED Marrakesh. I spent a week there, staying with friends in the Medina (not far from the Egyptian Spice Market). It’s wonderful to see it through another author’s eyes. Thanks for stirring up the memories!
    And yes, I was a big enough geek that I loaded Crosby, Stills and Nash onto my iPod so I could listen to Marrakesh Express as I rode the train from Casablanca.

    Reply
  60. Oh, I LOVED Marrakesh. I spent a week there, staying with friends in the Medina (not far from the Egyptian Spice Market). It’s wonderful to see it through another author’s eyes. Thanks for stirring up the memories!
    And yes, I was a big enough geek that I loaded Crosby, Stills and Nash onto my iPod so I could listen to Marrakesh Express as I rode the train from Casablanca.

    Reply
  61. Cara/Andrea, thanks for the tip re Nicola’s book.
    Nicola, I’ll keep looking, maybe October/Novemeber?
    I have to admit I was in Egypt 25 years ago. Maybe it has improved.

    Reply
  62. Cara/Andrea, thanks for the tip re Nicola’s book.
    Nicola, I’ll keep looking, maybe October/Novemeber?
    I have to admit I was in Egypt 25 years ago. Maybe it has improved.

    Reply
  63. Cara/Andrea, thanks for the tip re Nicola’s book.
    Nicola, I’ll keep looking, maybe October/Novemeber?
    I have to admit I was in Egypt 25 years ago. Maybe it has improved.

    Reply
  64. Cara/Andrea, thanks for the tip re Nicola’s book.
    Nicola, I’ll keep looking, maybe October/Novemeber?
    I have to admit I was in Egypt 25 years ago. Maybe it has improved.

    Reply
  65. Cara/Andrea, thanks for the tip re Nicola’s book.
    Nicola, I’ll keep looking, maybe October/Novemeber?
    I have to admit I was in Egypt 25 years ago. Maybe it has improved.

    Reply
  66. Enjoyed this post very much, Cara. You evoke the sights, sounds, smells and tastes wonderfully – and I love Middle Eastern cuisine.
    The big plus for me is that one can speak French and talk to people, which I always enjoy. (Years ago, I studied at the Sorbonne and once my French was fluent.) Nowadays, my French seems to involve a lot of Gallic gesticulation. But no matter, at least I feel I can connect with local people which makes me feel less of a tourist and more of a visitor – if you understand my distinction.

    Reply
  67. Enjoyed this post very much, Cara. You evoke the sights, sounds, smells and tastes wonderfully – and I love Middle Eastern cuisine.
    The big plus for me is that one can speak French and talk to people, which I always enjoy. (Years ago, I studied at the Sorbonne and once my French was fluent.) Nowadays, my French seems to involve a lot of Gallic gesticulation. But no matter, at least I feel I can connect with local people which makes me feel less of a tourist and more of a visitor – if you understand my distinction.

    Reply
  68. Enjoyed this post very much, Cara. You evoke the sights, sounds, smells and tastes wonderfully – and I love Middle Eastern cuisine.
    The big plus for me is that one can speak French and talk to people, which I always enjoy. (Years ago, I studied at the Sorbonne and once my French was fluent.) Nowadays, my French seems to involve a lot of Gallic gesticulation. But no matter, at least I feel I can connect with local people which makes me feel less of a tourist and more of a visitor – if you understand my distinction.

    Reply
  69. Enjoyed this post very much, Cara. You evoke the sights, sounds, smells and tastes wonderfully – and I love Middle Eastern cuisine.
    The big plus for me is that one can speak French and talk to people, which I always enjoy. (Years ago, I studied at the Sorbonne and once my French was fluent.) Nowadays, my French seems to involve a lot of Gallic gesticulation. But no matter, at least I feel I can connect with local people which makes me feel less of a tourist and more of a visitor – if you understand my distinction.

    Reply
  70. Enjoyed this post very much, Cara. You evoke the sights, sounds, smells and tastes wonderfully – and I love Middle Eastern cuisine.
    The big plus for me is that one can speak French and talk to people, which I always enjoy. (Years ago, I studied at the Sorbonne and once my French was fluent.) Nowadays, my French seems to involve a lot of Gallic gesticulation. But no matter, at least I feel I can connect with local people which makes me feel less of a tourist and more of a visitor – if you understand my distinction.

    Reply
  71. Thanks, Elizabeth. And yes, I totally agree that being able to communicate with the locals makes a huge difference in traveling. French is very much in evidence around Marrakech, as is English (though that always feels a little like “cheating” if you know what I mean. Alas my French is rusty to,, but I can make myself understood. Sometimes, that is. LOL).

    Reply
  72. Thanks, Elizabeth. And yes, I totally agree that being able to communicate with the locals makes a huge difference in traveling. French is very much in evidence around Marrakech, as is English (though that always feels a little like “cheating” if you know what I mean. Alas my French is rusty to,, but I can make myself understood. Sometimes, that is. LOL).

    Reply
  73. Thanks, Elizabeth. And yes, I totally agree that being able to communicate with the locals makes a huge difference in traveling. French is very much in evidence around Marrakech, as is English (though that always feels a little like “cheating” if you know what I mean. Alas my French is rusty to,, but I can make myself understood. Sometimes, that is. LOL).

    Reply
  74. Thanks, Elizabeth. And yes, I totally agree that being able to communicate with the locals makes a huge difference in traveling. French is very much in evidence around Marrakech, as is English (though that always feels a little like “cheating” if you know what I mean. Alas my French is rusty to,, but I can make myself understood. Sometimes, that is. LOL).

    Reply
  75. Thanks, Elizabeth. And yes, I totally agree that being able to communicate with the locals makes a huge difference in traveling. French is very much in evidence around Marrakech, as is English (though that always feels a little like “cheating” if you know what I mean. Alas my French is rusty to,, but I can make myself understood. Sometimes, that is. LOL).

    Reply
  76. My French is VERY rusty, but I had no problem. Everyone pretty much spoke English (at least enough to sell me something, LOL!). I HIGHLY recommended Morocco to people who want to travel to a Muslim country where they will be safe and treated well. I ran all over by myself and never had a single problem (Turkey too).
    Staying in the Medina is wonderful, but odd. I had to memorize my way by landmark (and they go away at night!): Go past the shoe booth with the owner who asked me to dinner, straight through the market with all the olives, turn right at the ancient arch that leads to the leather market and go through the spice market, turn right when it deadends, go past the bathhouse and around the corner, past the refuse pile, step over the puddle, slip into the DARK cooridor and then go to the only door under an opening to the sky. And all the while the inhabitants are trying to tell you to go back, because you’ve left the main market and they think you’re lost, LOL! It’s like a maze in there (and Fez is WAY worse).

    Reply
  77. My French is VERY rusty, but I had no problem. Everyone pretty much spoke English (at least enough to sell me something, LOL!). I HIGHLY recommended Morocco to people who want to travel to a Muslim country where they will be safe and treated well. I ran all over by myself and never had a single problem (Turkey too).
    Staying in the Medina is wonderful, but odd. I had to memorize my way by landmark (and they go away at night!): Go past the shoe booth with the owner who asked me to dinner, straight through the market with all the olives, turn right at the ancient arch that leads to the leather market and go through the spice market, turn right when it deadends, go past the bathhouse and around the corner, past the refuse pile, step over the puddle, slip into the DARK cooridor and then go to the only door under an opening to the sky. And all the while the inhabitants are trying to tell you to go back, because you’ve left the main market and they think you’re lost, LOL! It’s like a maze in there (and Fez is WAY worse).

    Reply
  78. My French is VERY rusty, but I had no problem. Everyone pretty much spoke English (at least enough to sell me something, LOL!). I HIGHLY recommended Morocco to people who want to travel to a Muslim country where they will be safe and treated well. I ran all over by myself and never had a single problem (Turkey too).
    Staying in the Medina is wonderful, but odd. I had to memorize my way by landmark (and they go away at night!): Go past the shoe booth with the owner who asked me to dinner, straight through the market with all the olives, turn right at the ancient arch that leads to the leather market and go through the spice market, turn right when it deadends, go past the bathhouse and around the corner, past the refuse pile, step over the puddle, slip into the DARK cooridor and then go to the only door under an opening to the sky. And all the while the inhabitants are trying to tell you to go back, because you’ve left the main market and they think you’re lost, LOL! It’s like a maze in there (and Fez is WAY worse).

    Reply
  79. My French is VERY rusty, but I had no problem. Everyone pretty much spoke English (at least enough to sell me something, LOL!). I HIGHLY recommended Morocco to people who want to travel to a Muslim country where they will be safe and treated well. I ran all over by myself and never had a single problem (Turkey too).
    Staying in the Medina is wonderful, but odd. I had to memorize my way by landmark (and they go away at night!): Go past the shoe booth with the owner who asked me to dinner, straight through the market with all the olives, turn right at the ancient arch that leads to the leather market and go through the spice market, turn right when it deadends, go past the bathhouse and around the corner, past the refuse pile, step over the puddle, slip into the DARK cooridor and then go to the only door under an opening to the sky. And all the while the inhabitants are trying to tell you to go back, because you’ve left the main market and they think you’re lost, LOL! It’s like a maze in there (and Fez is WAY worse).

    Reply
  80. My French is VERY rusty, but I had no problem. Everyone pretty much spoke English (at least enough to sell me something, LOL!). I HIGHLY recommended Morocco to people who want to travel to a Muslim country where they will be safe and treated well. I ran all over by myself and never had a single problem (Turkey too).
    Staying in the Medina is wonderful, but odd. I had to memorize my way by landmark (and they go away at night!): Go past the shoe booth with the owner who asked me to dinner, straight through the market with all the olives, turn right at the ancient arch that leads to the leather market and go through the spice market, turn right when it deadends, go past the bathhouse and around the corner, past the refuse pile, step over the puddle, slip into the DARK cooridor and then go to the only door under an opening to the sky. And all the while the inhabitants are trying to tell you to go back, because you’ve left the main market and they think you’re lost, LOL! It’s like a maze in there (and Fez is WAY worse).

    Reply
  81. Cara, I’d go with you in a hot minute! If anyone is looking for a great place to stay, Riad Zarka (riadzarkamarrakech.com) is owned by friends of the people I said with and is a WONDERFUL tiny riad in the heart of the Medina (reasonably priced too). Breakfast was included and it was amazing (they serve this strange chocolate bread with marmalade, so good!).

    Reply
  82. Cara, I’d go with you in a hot minute! If anyone is looking for a great place to stay, Riad Zarka (riadzarkamarrakech.com) is owned by friends of the people I said with and is a WONDERFUL tiny riad in the heart of the Medina (reasonably priced too). Breakfast was included and it was amazing (they serve this strange chocolate bread with marmalade, so good!).

    Reply
  83. Cara, I’d go with you in a hot minute! If anyone is looking for a great place to stay, Riad Zarka (riadzarkamarrakech.com) is owned by friends of the people I said with and is a WONDERFUL tiny riad in the heart of the Medina (reasonably priced too). Breakfast was included and it was amazing (they serve this strange chocolate bread with marmalade, so good!).

    Reply
  84. Cara, I’d go with you in a hot minute! If anyone is looking for a great place to stay, Riad Zarka (riadzarkamarrakech.com) is owned by friends of the people I said with and is a WONDERFUL tiny riad in the heart of the Medina (reasonably priced too). Breakfast was included and it was amazing (they serve this strange chocolate bread with marmalade, so good!).

    Reply
  85. Cara, I’d go with you in a hot minute! If anyone is looking for a great place to stay, Riad Zarka (riadzarkamarrakech.com) is owned by friends of the people I said with and is a WONDERFUL tiny riad in the heart of the Medina (reasonably priced too). Breakfast was included and it was amazing (they serve this strange chocolate bread with marmalade, so good!).

    Reply
  86. LOL on the landmarks, Isobel. I love your navigation system. And so true. I also agree that I felt totally safe and welcome in Marrakech. It’s been a crossroads of so many different cultures that the people are much more tolerant of other beliefs—or certainly seem to be. They couldn’t have been more friendly.

    Reply
  87. LOL on the landmarks, Isobel. I love your navigation system. And so true. I also agree that I felt totally safe and welcome in Marrakech. It’s been a crossroads of so many different cultures that the people are much more tolerant of other beliefs—or certainly seem to be. They couldn’t have been more friendly.

    Reply
  88. LOL on the landmarks, Isobel. I love your navigation system. And so true. I also agree that I felt totally safe and welcome in Marrakech. It’s been a crossroads of so many different cultures that the people are much more tolerant of other beliefs—or certainly seem to be. They couldn’t have been more friendly.

    Reply
  89. LOL on the landmarks, Isobel. I love your navigation system. And so true. I also agree that I felt totally safe and welcome in Marrakech. It’s been a crossroads of so many different cultures that the people are much more tolerant of other beliefs—or certainly seem to be. They couldn’t have been more friendly.

    Reply
  90. LOL on the landmarks, Isobel. I love your navigation system. And so true. I also agree that I felt totally safe and welcome in Marrakech. It’s been a crossroads of so many different cultures that the people are much more tolerant of other beliefs—or certainly seem to be. They couldn’t have been more friendly.

    Reply
  91. Thank you for a super post Cara/Andrea, and also for mentioning Whisper of Scandal and the Arctic setting. Jenny, it’s out at the end of September and yes, it has a background in Arctic exploration and features Spitzbergen. I wrote it after visiting the Arctic on a cruise a few years ago. I have to say that that was a trip that fully lived up to my expectations and was utterly fabulous.
    I haev a list of places with exotic names that I have wanted to visit since I was a child. One is Medicine Hat. Another is Bulawayo, which I’ve been to. Also Damascus after reading Mary Stewart’s book The Gabriel Hounds!

    Reply
  92. Thank you for a super post Cara/Andrea, and also for mentioning Whisper of Scandal and the Arctic setting. Jenny, it’s out at the end of September and yes, it has a background in Arctic exploration and features Spitzbergen. I wrote it after visiting the Arctic on a cruise a few years ago. I have to say that that was a trip that fully lived up to my expectations and was utterly fabulous.
    I haev a list of places with exotic names that I have wanted to visit since I was a child. One is Medicine Hat. Another is Bulawayo, which I’ve been to. Also Damascus after reading Mary Stewart’s book The Gabriel Hounds!

    Reply
  93. Thank you for a super post Cara/Andrea, and also for mentioning Whisper of Scandal and the Arctic setting. Jenny, it’s out at the end of September and yes, it has a background in Arctic exploration and features Spitzbergen. I wrote it after visiting the Arctic on a cruise a few years ago. I have to say that that was a trip that fully lived up to my expectations and was utterly fabulous.
    I haev a list of places with exotic names that I have wanted to visit since I was a child. One is Medicine Hat. Another is Bulawayo, which I’ve been to. Also Damascus after reading Mary Stewart’s book The Gabriel Hounds!

    Reply
  94. Thank you for a super post Cara/Andrea, and also for mentioning Whisper of Scandal and the Arctic setting. Jenny, it’s out at the end of September and yes, it has a background in Arctic exploration and features Spitzbergen. I wrote it after visiting the Arctic on a cruise a few years ago. I have to say that that was a trip that fully lived up to my expectations and was utterly fabulous.
    I haev a list of places with exotic names that I have wanted to visit since I was a child. One is Medicine Hat. Another is Bulawayo, which I’ve been to. Also Damascus after reading Mary Stewart’s book The Gabriel Hounds!

    Reply
  95. Thank you for a super post Cara/Andrea, and also for mentioning Whisper of Scandal and the Arctic setting. Jenny, it’s out at the end of September and yes, it has a background in Arctic exploration and features Spitzbergen. I wrote it after visiting the Arctic on a cruise a few years ago. I have to say that that was a trip that fully lived up to my expectations and was utterly fabulous.
    I haev a list of places with exotic names that I have wanted to visit since I was a child. One is Medicine Hat. Another is Bulawayo, which I’ve been to. Also Damascus after reading Mary Stewart’s book The Gabriel Hounds!

    Reply
  96. Ooooooo, I think Riad Zarka can take maybe 10 people. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to spend a week there with other writers? *sigh*
    I’m hoping to take my mom on a trip next year when she retires: Morocco, Egypt and Turkey (though she may pick Ireland with my dad instead).

    Reply
  97. Ooooooo, I think Riad Zarka can take maybe 10 people. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to spend a week there with other writers? *sigh*
    I’m hoping to take my mom on a trip next year when she retires: Morocco, Egypt and Turkey (though she may pick Ireland with my dad instead).

    Reply
  98. Ooooooo, I think Riad Zarka can take maybe 10 people. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to spend a week there with other writers? *sigh*
    I’m hoping to take my mom on a trip next year when she retires: Morocco, Egypt and Turkey (though she may pick Ireland with my dad instead).

    Reply
  99. Ooooooo, I think Riad Zarka can take maybe 10 people. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to spend a week there with other writers? *sigh*
    I’m hoping to take my mom on a trip next year when she retires: Morocco, Egypt and Turkey (though she may pick Ireland with my dad instead).

    Reply
  100. Ooooooo, I think Riad Zarka can take maybe 10 people. Wouldn’t it be wonderful to spend a week there with other writers? *sigh*
    I’m hoping to take my mom on a trip next year when she retires: Morocco, Egypt and Turkey (though she may pick Ireland with my dad instead).

    Reply
  101. Thank you for the lovely post so I can smell and hear and see the place, even if I never have the chance to go. I’d love to have a yacht and just sail to new ports all the time!
    A wenchly retreat anywhere would be a hoot!

    Reply
  102. Thank you for the lovely post so I can smell and hear and see the place, even if I never have the chance to go. I’d love to have a yacht and just sail to new ports all the time!
    A wenchly retreat anywhere would be a hoot!

    Reply
  103. Thank you for the lovely post so I can smell and hear and see the place, even if I never have the chance to go. I’d love to have a yacht and just sail to new ports all the time!
    A wenchly retreat anywhere would be a hoot!

    Reply
  104. Thank you for the lovely post so I can smell and hear and see the place, even if I never have the chance to go. I’d love to have a yacht and just sail to new ports all the time!
    A wenchly retreat anywhere would be a hoot!

    Reply
  105. Thank you for the lovely post so I can smell and hear and see the place, even if I never have the chance to go. I’d love to have a yacht and just sail to new ports all the time!
    A wenchly retreat anywhere would be a hoot!

    Reply
  106. Thanks, Pat. I think the list of possible Wenchly retreats is growing by the minute. We definitely need a yacht. What fun it would be to have all of us together for creative thinking.I think we would generate enough to propel a vessel across the Mediterranean several times over, LOL!

    Reply
  107. Thanks, Pat. I think the list of possible Wenchly retreats is growing by the minute. We definitely need a yacht. What fun it would be to have all of us together for creative thinking.I think we would generate enough to propel a vessel across the Mediterranean several times over, LOL!

    Reply
  108. Thanks, Pat. I think the list of possible Wenchly retreats is growing by the minute. We definitely need a yacht. What fun it would be to have all of us together for creative thinking.I think we would generate enough to propel a vessel across the Mediterranean several times over, LOL!

    Reply
  109. Thanks, Pat. I think the list of possible Wenchly retreats is growing by the minute. We definitely need a yacht. What fun it would be to have all of us together for creative thinking.I think we would generate enough to propel a vessel across the Mediterranean several times over, LOL!

    Reply
  110. Thanks, Pat. I think the list of possible Wenchly retreats is growing by the minute. We definitely need a yacht. What fun it would be to have all of us together for creative thinking.I think we would generate enough to propel a vessel across the Mediterranean several times over, LOL!

    Reply
  111. Yes, Isobel’s post on her trip to Morocco was fabulous. It’s in the HistoryHoydens’ archives, if anyone’s interested in reading them.
    Nicola, looking forward to an Arctic book. Wow on the setting. I hope you’ll have a story for us soon how you came to choose it.
    Andrea, the fjords of Norway are magnificient. We took a ferry from Newcastle, England to Bergen, Norway over the very bumpy North Sea (Dramamine on Pez) and then took a tiny cruise inwards (east). We hiked a bit. Too a vertical train ride for a bit. Awe-inspiring!

    Reply
  112. Yes, Isobel’s post on her trip to Morocco was fabulous. It’s in the HistoryHoydens’ archives, if anyone’s interested in reading them.
    Nicola, looking forward to an Arctic book. Wow on the setting. I hope you’ll have a story for us soon how you came to choose it.
    Andrea, the fjords of Norway are magnificient. We took a ferry from Newcastle, England to Bergen, Norway over the very bumpy North Sea (Dramamine on Pez) and then took a tiny cruise inwards (east). We hiked a bit. Too a vertical train ride for a bit. Awe-inspiring!

    Reply
  113. Yes, Isobel’s post on her trip to Morocco was fabulous. It’s in the HistoryHoydens’ archives, if anyone’s interested in reading them.
    Nicola, looking forward to an Arctic book. Wow on the setting. I hope you’ll have a story for us soon how you came to choose it.
    Andrea, the fjords of Norway are magnificient. We took a ferry from Newcastle, England to Bergen, Norway over the very bumpy North Sea (Dramamine on Pez) and then took a tiny cruise inwards (east). We hiked a bit. Too a vertical train ride for a bit. Awe-inspiring!

    Reply
  114. Yes, Isobel’s post on her trip to Morocco was fabulous. It’s in the HistoryHoydens’ archives, if anyone’s interested in reading them.
    Nicola, looking forward to an Arctic book. Wow on the setting. I hope you’ll have a story for us soon how you came to choose it.
    Andrea, the fjords of Norway are magnificient. We took a ferry from Newcastle, England to Bergen, Norway over the very bumpy North Sea (Dramamine on Pez) and then took a tiny cruise inwards (east). We hiked a bit. Too a vertical train ride for a bit. Awe-inspiring!

    Reply
  115. Yes, Isobel’s post on her trip to Morocco was fabulous. It’s in the HistoryHoydens’ archives, if anyone’s interested in reading them.
    Nicola, looking forward to an Arctic book. Wow on the setting. I hope you’ll have a story for us soon how you came to choose it.
    Andrea, the fjords of Norway are magnificient. We took a ferry from Newcastle, England to Bergen, Norway over the very bumpy North Sea (Dramamine on Pez) and then took a tiny cruise inwards (east). We hiked a bit. Too a vertical train ride for a bit. Awe-inspiring!

    Reply
  116. Oh, what a lovely post and subject, Andrea/Cara. You’ve got me all excited again about going a-traveling. While I was living in Europe in the 70s, I always hoped to get beyond Europe to North Africa, especially le Maroc. A favorite book of my late teens–some of you will know it–was set there, A GIFT FOR THE SULTAN by Olga Stringfellow, based on the true story of a woman from the British Isles whose ship was kidnapped and she was traded to the sultan. She became the favorite wife of the Sultan of Maroc and advised him, and later their son, on dealings with the French. My parents took a tour of Spain, Maroc and Portugal while I was there and my mother came to see me where I lived in Germany. I’m still not giving up on my dream, though it would certainly be a little more difficult for me now. I’d definitely want someone to come along. I’d go anywhere as soon as I can scrape together the necessary money.
    My next goal is to see the Warriors of the Chinese Emperor’s Tomb at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto. I think they’ll be here a few more months. I fell in love with them in the 1970s when the discovery was first made public. My sister-in-law saw them in the tomb in China. I’d have loved to go with her then. Now I hope to be able to find a bus tour leaving from here for either a day trip or an overnighter. It would be a huge treat for me, a museum rat. I didn’t see the Tutenkhamun exhibition a few months ago, since I had seen most of the principal treasures in the 1960s when they were lent to the City of Winnipeg and on display in the its beautiful Legislative Building, supposedly one of the finest in North America. Yesterday, I visited a friend who comes from Switzerland. She has a glass pane a little bigger than letter-sized of a man, a woman, and a small person dressed like a woman, though less lavishly, in the foreground. We assumed this figure was intended to represent a young girl, probably their daughter. The date on it is, I believe, 1537. It’s beautifully made. Oh, yeah, here I’m going gaga about old stuff again, grin. Occupational hazard for readers and writers of historical romances and novels.

    Reply
  117. Oh, what a lovely post and subject, Andrea/Cara. You’ve got me all excited again about going a-traveling. While I was living in Europe in the 70s, I always hoped to get beyond Europe to North Africa, especially le Maroc. A favorite book of my late teens–some of you will know it–was set there, A GIFT FOR THE SULTAN by Olga Stringfellow, based on the true story of a woman from the British Isles whose ship was kidnapped and she was traded to the sultan. She became the favorite wife of the Sultan of Maroc and advised him, and later their son, on dealings with the French. My parents took a tour of Spain, Maroc and Portugal while I was there and my mother came to see me where I lived in Germany. I’m still not giving up on my dream, though it would certainly be a little more difficult for me now. I’d definitely want someone to come along. I’d go anywhere as soon as I can scrape together the necessary money.
    My next goal is to see the Warriors of the Chinese Emperor’s Tomb at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto. I think they’ll be here a few more months. I fell in love with them in the 1970s when the discovery was first made public. My sister-in-law saw them in the tomb in China. I’d have loved to go with her then. Now I hope to be able to find a bus tour leaving from here for either a day trip or an overnighter. It would be a huge treat for me, a museum rat. I didn’t see the Tutenkhamun exhibition a few months ago, since I had seen most of the principal treasures in the 1960s when they were lent to the City of Winnipeg and on display in the its beautiful Legislative Building, supposedly one of the finest in North America. Yesterday, I visited a friend who comes from Switzerland. She has a glass pane a little bigger than letter-sized of a man, a woman, and a small person dressed like a woman, though less lavishly, in the foreground. We assumed this figure was intended to represent a young girl, probably their daughter. The date on it is, I believe, 1537. It’s beautifully made. Oh, yeah, here I’m going gaga about old stuff again, grin. Occupational hazard for readers and writers of historical romances and novels.

    Reply
  118. Oh, what a lovely post and subject, Andrea/Cara. You’ve got me all excited again about going a-traveling. While I was living in Europe in the 70s, I always hoped to get beyond Europe to North Africa, especially le Maroc. A favorite book of my late teens–some of you will know it–was set there, A GIFT FOR THE SULTAN by Olga Stringfellow, based on the true story of a woman from the British Isles whose ship was kidnapped and she was traded to the sultan. She became the favorite wife of the Sultan of Maroc and advised him, and later their son, on dealings with the French. My parents took a tour of Spain, Maroc and Portugal while I was there and my mother came to see me where I lived in Germany. I’m still not giving up on my dream, though it would certainly be a little more difficult for me now. I’d definitely want someone to come along. I’d go anywhere as soon as I can scrape together the necessary money.
    My next goal is to see the Warriors of the Chinese Emperor’s Tomb at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto. I think they’ll be here a few more months. I fell in love with them in the 1970s when the discovery was first made public. My sister-in-law saw them in the tomb in China. I’d have loved to go with her then. Now I hope to be able to find a bus tour leaving from here for either a day trip or an overnighter. It would be a huge treat for me, a museum rat. I didn’t see the Tutenkhamun exhibition a few months ago, since I had seen most of the principal treasures in the 1960s when they were lent to the City of Winnipeg and on display in the its beautiful Legislative Building, supposedly one of the finest in North America. Yesterday, I visited a friend who comes from Switzerland. She has a glass pane a little bigger than letter-sized of a man, a woman, and a small person dressed like a woman, though less lavishly, in the foreground. We assumed this figure was intended to represent a young girl, probably their daughter. The date on it is, I believe, 1537. It’s beautifully made. Oh, yeah, here I’m going gaga about old stuff again, grin. Occupational hazard for readers and writers of historical romances and novels.

    Reply
  119. Oh, what a lovely post and subject, Andrea/Cara. You’ve got me all excited again about going a-traveling. While I was living in Europe in the 70s, I always hoped to get beyond Europe to North Africa, especially le Maroc. A favorite book of my late teens–some of you will know it–was set there, A GIFT FOR THE SULTAN by Olga Stringfellow, based on the true story of a woman from the British Isles whose ship was kidnapped and she was traded to the sultan. She became the favorite wife of the Sultan of Maroc and advised him, and later their son, on dealings with the French. My parents took a tour of Spain, Maroc and Portugal while I was there and my mother came to see me where I lived in Germany. I’m still not giving up on my dream, though it would certainly be a little more difficult for me now. I’d definitely want someone to come along. I’d go anywhere as soon as I can scrape together the necessary money.
    My next goal is to see the Warriors of the Chinese Emperor’s Tomb at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto. I think they’ll be here a few more months. I fell in love with them in the 1970s when the discovery was first made public. My sister-in-law saw them in the tomb in China. I’d have loved to go with her then. Now I hope to be able to find a bus tour leaving from here for either a day trip or an overnighter. It would be a huge treat for me, a museum rat. I didn’t see the Tutenkhamun exhibition a few months ago, since I had seen most of the principal treasures in the 1960s when they were lent to the City of Winnipeg and on display in the its beautiful Legislative Building, supposedly one of the finest in North America. Yesterday, I visited a friend who comes from Switzerland. She has a glass pane a little bigger than letter-sized of a man, a woman, and a small person dressed like a woman, though less lavishly, in the foreground. We assumed this figure was intended to represent a young girl, probably their daughter. The date on it is, I believe, 1537. It’s beautifully made. Oh, yeah, here I’m going gaga about old stuff again, grin. Occupational hazard for readers and writers of historical romances and novels.

    Reply
  120. Oh, what a lovely post and subject, Andrea/Cara. You’ve got me all excited again about going a-traveling. While I was living in Europe in the 70s, I always hoped to get beyond Europe to North Africa, especially le Maroc. A favorite book of my late teens–some of you will know it–was set there, A GIFT FOR THE SULTAN by Olga Stringfellow, based on the true story of a woman from the British Isles whose ship was kidnapped and she was traded to the sultan. She became the favorite wife of the Sultan of Maroc and advised him, and later their son, on dealings with the French. My parents took a tour of Spain, Maroc and Portugal while I was there and my mother came to see me where I lived in Germany. I’m still not giving up on my dream, though it would certainly be a little more difficult for me now. I’d definitely want someone to come along. I’d go anywhere as soon as I can scrape together the necessary money.
    My next goal is to see the Warriors of the Chinese Emperor’s Tomb at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto. I think they’ll be here a few more months. I fell in love with them in the 1970s when the discovery was first made public. My sister-in-law saw them in the tomb in China. I’d have loved to go with her then. Now I hope to be able to find a bus tour leaving from here for either a day trip or an overnighter. It would be a huge treat for me, a museum rat. I didn’t see the Tutenkhamun exhibition a few months ago, since I had seen most of the principal treasures in the 1960s when they were lent to the City of Winnipeg and on display in the its beautiful Legislative Building, supposedly one of the finest in North America. Yesterday, I visited a friend who comes from Switzerland. She has a glass pane a little bigger than letter-sized of a man, a woman, and a small person dressed like a woman, though less lavishly, in the foreground. We assumed this figure was intended to represent a young girl, probably their daughter. The date on it is, I believe, 1537. It’s beautifully made. Oh, yeah, here I’m going gaga about old stuff again, grin. Occupational hazard for readers and writers of historical romances and novels.

    Reply
  121. Keira, thanks for sharing your Norway experience. It sounds fabulous (except for the rough seas.) I get seasick really easily, but the experience sounds worth the discomfort. Lots of ginger tea! And the walking part would be right up my alley.

    Reply
  122. Keira, thanks for sharing your Norway experience. It sounds fabulous (except for the rough seas.) I get seasick really easily, but the experience sounds worth the discomfort. Lots of ginger tea! And the walking part would be right up my alley.

    Reply
  123. Keira, thanks for sharing your Norway experience. It sounds fabulous (except for the rough seas.) I get seasick really easily, but the experience sounds worth the discomfort. Lots of ginger tea! And the walking part would be right up my alley.

    Reply
  124. Keira, thanks for sharing your Norway experience. It sounds fabulous (except for the rough seas.) I get seasick really easily, but the experience sounds worth the discomfort. Lots of ginger tea! And the walking part would be right up my alley.

    Reply
  125. Keira, thanks for sharing your Norway experience. It sounds fabulous (except for the rough seas.) I get seasick really easily, but the experience sounds worth the discomfort. Lots of ginger tea! And the walking part would be right up my alley.

    Reply
  126. Renurgis, I hope you get a chance to spread your wings and see your dream places. And good luck on getting to see the terra cotta warriors. Now you’ve reminded me of China—another place high on the To Visit List.
    You’re in good company here being a museum rat and someone who goes gaga over old stuff, LOL!

    Reply
  127. Renurgis, I hope you get a chance to spread your wings and see your dream places. And good luck on getting to see the terra cotta warriors. Now you’ve reminded me of China—another place high on the To Visit List.
    You’re in good company here being a museum rat and someone who goes gaga over old stuff, LOL!

    Reply
  128. Renurgis, I hope you get a chance to spread your wings and see your dream places. And good luck on getting to see the terra cotta warriors. Now you’ve reminded me of China—another place high on the To Visit List.
    You’re in good company here being a museum rat and someone who goes gaga over old stuff, LOL!

    Reply
  129. Renurgis, I hope you get a chance to spread your wings and see your dream places. And good luck on getting to see the terra cotta warriors. Now you’ve reminded me of China—another place high on the To Visit List.
    You’re in good company here being a museum rat and someone who goes gaga over old stuff, LOL!

    Reply
  130. Renurgis, I hope you get a chance to spread your wings and see your dream places. And good luck on getting to see the terra cotta warriors. Now you’ve reminded me of China—another place high on the To Visit List.
    You’re in good company here being a museum rat and someone who goes gaga over old stuff, LOL!

    Reply

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