Cara Elliott

1valchloesmall   Anne here, taking time out today to interview wench Andrea Pickens in her new incarnation as Cara Elliott.   As Andrea Pickens, she collected a swag of awards for her much beloved Signet Regencies, including a Romantic Times Career Achievement Award. Her Regency Historical "spy" series, starring the swashbuckling students of Mrs. Merlin's Academy for Select Young Ladies, also did very well, and she won the 2008 and 2009 Daphne Du Maurier Award for Best Historical Mystery/Suspense and a 2008 Holt Medallion Award of Excellence. 
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Cara Elliot’s career launches with a trilogy about three unconventional female scholars who formed a bond of friendship through the weekly meetings of their Scientific Society. Each has an expertise in a certain field of science–and each has a slightly shady past that comes back to haunt them. The first book, TO SIN WITH A SCOUNDREL, hits the stands March 1. Sinwithscoundrel
Anne:  So, Cara, why the new name?

 Cara: Well, I wish that I could regale you with some romantic story of being kidnapped by the Duke of Elliott, who found my wit and beauty utterly irresistible. However . . . 

The reason is a bit more pragmatic. As my publisher and I talked about this new series, they asked if I wouldn’t mind adding even more “heat” to my stories. I thought the idea was a good one, and we all decided that why not do something do something dramatic to mark the new direction. My last series was about a trio of swashbuckling females spies, so I liked the idea of peeling off the buckskin breeches and sliding into a slinky little silk dress. (Hey, don’t we all like getting a “makeover” from time to time!) 
 
 Anne: How is Cara Elliott different from Andrea Pickens?

 Cara: The books are, in a word, sexier than my past books. But I like to think that I’ve still kept the emotional depth and complexity that is really at the core of my writing. I love making my characters come alive through dialogue and humor, and I feel the added physical intensity adds yet another dimension. Now, don’t get me wrong, they are definitely NOT erotica, but upping the heat creates some fun fireworks between the heroes and heroines  

 Anne: Will Andrea Pickens still write books?ADFirstBook  
 Cara: Never say never! But right now, I’m working on a new Cara Elliott trilogy.

(And since you are asking about books, I’ll also offer our readers an exclusive look at my very first book. As you can see, spelling has never been one of my strong suits. My family teased me for years about “horeses.”)

Anne: It's gorgeous, and "horeses" is quite a logical spelling, so pooh to teasing families.  I love the premise for the new series. I'm a big fan of "opposites attract" books and in each book of this trilogy you pair a serious, scholarly heroine with a bad-boy hero. In the first book your heroine, Lady Ciara Sheffield is a reclusive widow known for her scientific scholarship, in the second book, the heroine is an expert in ancient antiquities and the third heroine has spent most of her life sailing to exotic ports around the globe, acquiring an expertise in botany.
These sound like serious, clever and interesting women. It's such a refreshing change. What made you choose to write about this kind of heroine?

Cara: I really like writing about people who are both strong and vulnerable. The idea of creating women who were very confident intellectually, but very unsure of themselves emotionally was very intriguing. We all have strengths and weaknesses, and how we learn to balance those conflicting elements is, to me, an integral part of the human experience 

And I also felt that unconventional heroines fit the Regency era very well. It was a time of tumultuous change. Radical new ideas were clashing with the conventional thinking of the past. People were questioning the fundamentals of society, and as a result they were fomenting changes in every aspect of life. For example, you had Beethoven composing emotional symphonies, Byron composing wildly romantic poetry about individual angst, J.M.W. Turner dabbling in impressionistic watercolors and Mary Wollstonecraft writing the first feminist manifestos. MWollstonecraft (That's her portrait on the right.)

I remember seeing a museum exhibit several years ago called “Romantics & Revolutionaries,” which featured a selection of Regency portraits from the National Portrait Gallery in London. I was riveted by the women represented. They were artists, poets, scientist, explorers—but what they all had in common was the courage to defy convention and pursue their passions. I knew right then that I wanted to write a series that would somehow capture their spirit.

Anne:  It sounds wonderful. Tell us about your hero Lucas Bingham, the Earl of Hadley — what drives him. Did you fall in love with him as you wrote?

Cara: I have to admit, I have a rea
l soft spot in my heart for Lucas, and he ended up being one of my favorite heroes. He’s a charming rake who cheerfully admits to having no interest in anything but sybaritic pleasure. But at heart, he’s far more sensitive than he cares to admit, and as his best friend Jack says, he simply needs a challenge to bring out his better nature.

Anne: I'm fond of a charming rake, myself, and  I'm looking forward to meting your Lucas. Did you have to do much research for these books?

Bird  Cara: Why I picked scientists is beyond me—I was absolutely hopeless in math and science in high school! (But hey, that is one of the joys of writing fiction—you get to be the fairy princess or the brilliant chemist.) That said, I certainly didn’t want to embarrass myself by showing my ignorance, so I really did do some research on medicinal plant substances, which figure in the story. Some ornithology also comes into play, so again, I found myself doing some basic reading on the subject. (The history of bird-watching in England is quite fascinating.) But I assure you that I’m not going to be applying to vet or med school anytime soon.

Anne:  Huntress reviews called it "a magnificently compelling read!"  What do you love about this book?

Cara: Well, I know it may sound like a trite PR sound bite, but I really do love the chemistry between Ciara and Lucas. They are both wary of showing emotion, for vastly different reasons, and how they teach each other to overcome their past doubts and fears was a story that I found very challenging and rewarding to write.

I also like the secondary love story, which involves a much older couple. All too often we only see heroes and heroines who are in their 20s or 30s. But love is important at any age!

Anne: I'm with you there — I love secondary romances, too.  Along with all your writing projects, you are also co-teaching a seminar on historical romance at Yale this spring. So, tell us a little about what it’s like to go back to school. (That's Cara/Andrea and Lauren Willig at Yale in the pic below.)

A&L-at-Yale  Cara: It’s been an amazing experience—I’m learning as much as our students. I’ve read the books on our syllabus for pleasure, but re-reading them with an eye to creating the weekly lesson plans and discussion questions has made me see the stories and characters in a whole new light. I have to analyze what I like and don’t like—and why. So it’s made me look at the art of writing a romance in a very rational, critical way. And it’s been interesting to see my own reactions to classics like  Woodiwiss’s “The Flame and the Flower” and Mc Naught’s “Whitney, My Love.” 

YaleLibrary  

The class discussions have been so interesting too. Co-teacher and fellow romance author Lauren Willig and I are finding it absolutely fascinating to hear what the students think about what makes a hero and heroine, and what is the nature of love. Their ideas are fresh and original, and I’m constantly reminded of how wonderful it is to be around the energy and enthusiasm that comes from a spirited exchange of opinions. It’s exciting. And inspiring. I‘d say that we have a great new generation of romance readers—these kids are smart enough to know a good thing when they see it!

Visit Cara's website for more information.

Champagne-pop  Anne: All the very best, Cara, on the launch of this series. It's been great to hear about the background. I can't wait to read the book.

Cara: Thanks, Anne, I've enjoyed the interview.

One lucky person will win a copy of Cara's new book by leaving a response to the following:
Cara enjoys creating offbeat heroines who aren't afraid to pursue their intellectual passions? Any brainy female from history—be it scientist, poet, artist, musician, etc—who has caught your fancy?  

175 thoughts on “Cara Elliott”

  1. I love unconventional heroines, and I love intelligent ones. There are too few unconventional heroines in romances. By definition, the heroine is above the ordinary, and I want to see one who really is extraordinary.
    We also still have the dichotomy in our society that an intelligent woman must be ugly, and a beautiful woman must be an airhead. A man can be both good-looking and intelligent and everyone sees the combination as a plus. I notice that most heroes are almost-supermen, and no one minds that, but most heroines are “the little woman”. AARG! Another example of the unfortunately alive-and-well double standard.

    Reply
  2. I love unconventional heroines, and I love intelligent ones. There are too few unconventional heroines in romances. By definition, the heroine is above the ordinary, and I want to see one who really is extraordinary.
    We also still have the dichotomy in our society that an intelligent woman must be ugly, and a beautiful woman must be an airhead. A man can be both good-looking and intelligent and everyone sees the combination as a plus. I notice that most heroes are almost-supermen, and no one minds that, but most heroines are “the little woman”. AARG! Another example of the unfortunately alive-and-well double standard.

    Reply
  3. I love unconventional heroines, and I love intelligent ones. There are too few unconventional heroines in romances. By definition, the heroine is above the ordinary, and I want to see one who really is extraordinary.
    We also still have the dichotomy in our society that an intelligent woman must be ugly, and a beautiful woman must be an airhead. A man can be both good-looking and intelligent and everyone sees the combination as a plus. I notice that most heroes are almost-supermen, and no one minds that, but most heroines are “the little woman”. AARG! Another example of the unfortunately alive-and-well double standard.

    Reply
  4. I love unconventional heroines, and I love intelligent ones. There are too few unconventional heroines in romances. By definition, the heroine is above the ordinary, and I want to see one who really is extraordinary.
    We also still have the dichotomy in our society that an intelligent woman must be ugly, and a beautiful woman must be an airhead. A man can be both good-looking and intelligent and everyone sees the combination as a plus. I notice that most heroes are almost-supermen, and no one minds that, but most heroines are “the little woman”. AARG! Another example of the unfortunately alive-and-well double standard.

    Reply
  5. I love unconventional heroines, and I love intelligent ones. There are too few unconventional heroines in romances. By definition, the heroine is above the ordinary, and I want to see one who really is extraordinary.
    We also still have the dichotomy in our society that an intelligent woman must be ugly, and a beautiful woman must be an airhead. A man can be both good-looking and intelligent and everyone sees the combination as a plus. I notice that most heroes are almost-supermen, and no one minds that, but most heroines are “the little woman”. AARG! Another example of the unfortunately alive-and-well double standard.

    Reply
  6. My math and science background also leaves much to be desired, but fiction is a great way to pick up bits of knowledge (I know so much more about the history of the Regency period than I did before I started reading romance.) and I always prefer the intelligent, scholarly heroine. Dorothy Sayers is wonderful example of someone who carefully researched the scientific information that she used in her mysteries– one hinged on the difference between organic and inorganic molecules. Looking forward to reading your book.
    Merry
    Merry

    Reply
  7. My math and science background also leaves much to be desired, but fiction is a great way to pick up bits of knowledge (I know so much more about the history of the Regency period than I did before I started reading romance.) and I always prefer the intelligent, scholarly heroine. Dorothy Sayers is wonderful example of someone who carefully researched the scientific information that she used in her mysteries– one hinged on the difference between organic and inorganic molecules. Looking forward to reading your book.
    Merry
    Merry

    Reply
  8. My math and science background also leaves much to be desired, but fiction is a great way to pick up bits of knowledge (I know so much more about the history of the Regency period than I did before I started reading romance.) and I always prefer the intelligent, scholarly heroine. Dorothy Sayers is wonderful example of someone who carefully researched the scientific information that she used in her mysteries– one hinged on the difference between organic and inorganic molecules. Looking forward to reading your book.
    Merry
    Merry

    Reply
  9. My math and science background also leaves much to be desired, but fiction is a great way to pick up bits of knowledge (I know so much more about the history of the Regency period than I did before I started reading romance.) and I always prefer the intelligent, scholarly heroine. Dorothy Sayers is wonderful example of someone who carefully researched the scientific information that she used in her mysteries– one hinged on the difference between organic and inorganic molecules. Looking forward to reading your book.
    Merry
    Merry

    Reply
  10. My math and science background also leaves much to be desired, but fiction is a great way to pick up bits of knowledge (I know so much more about the history of the Regency period than I did before I started reading romance.) and I always prefer the intelligent, scholarly heroine. Dorothy Sayers is wonderful example of someone who carefully researched the scientific information that she used in her mysteries– one hinged on the difference between organic and inorganic molecules. Looking forward to reading your book.
    Merry
    Merry

    Reply
  11. Cara, I love the premise of brainy, unconventional heroines. My brainy real life heroine is Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954). She was an outstanding alumna of Oberlin College with graduate studies in Europe in French, German and Italian; Wilberforce Univ. professor; suffragette for the 19th Constitutional amendment and recognized in 1919 at the International Peace Conference in Zurich.
    Married a real life hero in 1891, Robert Terrell who was 1889 valedictorian of Howard Univ. Law School.

    Reply
  12. Cara, I love the premise of brainy, unconventional heroines. My brainy real life heroine is Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954). She was an outstanding alumna of Oberlin College with graduate studies in Europe in French, German and Italian; Wilberforce Univ. professor; suffragette for the 19th Constitutional amendment and recognized in 1919 at the International Peace Conference in Zurich.
    Married a real life hero in 1891, Robert Terrell who was 1889 valedictorian of Howard Univ. Law School.

    Reply
  13. Cara, I love the premise of brainy, unconventional heroines. My brainy real life heroine is Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954). She was an outstanding alumna of Oberlin College with graduate studies in Europe in French, German and Italian; Wilberforce Univ. professor; suffragette for the 19th Constitutional amendment and recognized in 1919 at the International Peace Conference in Zurich.
    Married a real life hero in 1891, Robert Terrell who was 1889 valedictorian of Howard Univ. Law School.

    Reply
  14. Cara, I love the premise of brainy, unconventional heroines. My brainy real life heroine is Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954). She was an outstanding alumna of Oberlin College with graduate studies in Europe in French, German and Italian; Wilberforce Univ. professor; suffragette for the 19th Constitutional amendment and recognized in 1919 at the International Peace Conference in Zurich.
    Married a real life hero in 1891, Robert Terrell who was 1889 valedictorian of Howard Univ. Law School.

    Reply
  15. Cara, I love the premise of brainy, unconventional heroines. My brainy real life heroine is Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954). She was an outstanding alumna of Oberlin College with graduate studies in Europe in French, German and Italian; Wilberforce Univ. professor; suffragette for the 19th Constitutional amendment and recognized in 1919 at the International Peace Conference in Zurich.
    Married a real life hero in 1891, Robert Terrell who was 1889 valedictorian of Howard Univ. Law School.

    Reply
  16. Cara, congratulations on the publication of To Sin with a Scoundrel. It’s a wonderful read and I must confess to finding Lucas irresistible!
    One of my history heroines is Princess Elizabeth Palatine, the daughter of the Winter Queen, Elizabeth of Bohemia. I suppose she was doubly blessed because she was considered very beautiful as well as very clever. Her nicknames were “The Star of the North” for her beauty and “The Philosophical Princess” for her intelligence. She struck up a correspondence with the French philosopher Rene Descartes and apparently he used to complain that her tricky questions tied him in knots!

    Reply
  17. Cara, congratulations on the publication of To Sin with a Scoundrel. It’s a wonderful read and I must confess to finding Lucas irresistible!
    One of my history heroines is Princess Elizabeth Palatine, the daughter of the Winter Queen, Elizabeth of Bohemia. I suppose she was doubly blessed because she was considered very beautiful as well as very clever. Her nicknames were “The Star of the North” for her beauty and “The Philosophical Princess” for her intelligence. She struck up a correspondence with the French philosopher Rene Descartes and apparently he used to complain that her tricky questions tied him in knots!

    Reply
  18. Cara, congratulations on the publication of To Sin with a Scoundrel. It’s a wonderful read and I must confess to finding Lucas irresistible!
    One of my history heroines is Princess Elizabeth Palatine, the daughter of the Winter Queen, Elizabeth of Bohemia. I suppose she was doubly blessed because she was considered very beautiful as well as very clever. Her nicknames were “The Star of the North” for her beauty and “The Philosophical Princess” for her intelligence. She struck up a correspondence with the French philosopher Rene Descartes and apparently he used to complain that her tricky questions tied him in knots!

    Reply
  19. Cara, congratulations on the publication of To Sin with a Scoundrel. It’s a wonderful read and I must confess to finding Lucas irresistible!
    One of my history heroines is Princess Elizabeth Palatine, the daughter of the Winter Queen, Elizabeth of Bohemia. I suppose she was doubly blessed because she was considered very beautiful as well as very clever. Her nicknames were “The Star of the North” for her beauty and “The Philosophical Princess” for her intelligence. She struck up a correspondence with the French philosopher Rene Descartes and apparently he used to complain that her tricky questions tied him in knots!

    Reply
  20. Cara, congratulations on the publication of To Sin with a Scoundrel. It’s a wonderful read and I must confess to finding Lucas irresistible!
    One of my history heroines is Princess Elizabeth Palatine, the daughter of the Winter Queen, Elizabeth of Bohemia. I suppose she was doubly blessed because she was considered very beautiful as well as very clever. Her nicknames were “The Star of the North” for her beauty and “The Philosophical Princess” for her intelligence. She struck up a correspondence with the French philosopher Rene Descartes and apparently he used to complain that her tricky questions tied him in knots!

    Reply
  21. Congrats on the new release, Cara. I’ve always been fascinated by Boudica, Queen of the Iceni, and how she led her people to revolt against the Romans.

    Reply
  22. Congrats on the new release, Cara. I’ve always been fascinated by Boudica, Queen of the Iceni, and how she led her people to revolt against the Romans.

    Reply
  23. Congrats on the new release, Cara. I’ve always been fascinated by Boudica, Queen of the Iceni, and how she led her people to revolt against the Romans.

    Reply
  24. Congrats on the new release, Cara. I’ve always been fascinated by Boudica, Queen of the Iceni, and how she led her people to revolt against the Romans.

    Reply
  25. Congrats on the new release, Cara. I’ve always been fascinated by Boudica, Queen of the Iceni, and how she led her people to revolt against the Romans.

    Reply
  26. There are many singularly great women in history but I find that I respect any female, fact or fiction, who is simply passionate about HER passion.

    Reply
  27. There are many singularly great women in history but I find that I respect any female, fact or fiction, who is simply passionate about HER passion.

    Reply
  28. There are many singularly great women in history but I find that I respect any female, fact or fiction, who is simply passionate about HER passion.

    Reply
  29. There are many singularly great women in history but I find that I respect any female, fact or fiction, who is simply passionate about HER passion.

    Reply
  30. There are many singularly great women in history but I find that I respect any female, fact or fiction, who is simply passionate about HER passion.

    Reply
  31. Congratulations on the official launch, Cara! Rather than bash you over the head with a bottle of champagne, which would be a great waste, let’s drink the champagne with some nice cheese straws and maybe stuffed mushrooms. *g*
    Having been lucky enough to read the ms. early, I can verify that smart + sexy is a great combo!

    Reply
  32. Congratulations on the official launch, Cara! Rather than bash you over the head with a bottle of champagne, which would be a great waste, let’s drink the champagne with some nice cheese straws and maybe stuffed mushrooms. *g*
    Having been lucky enough to read the ms. early, I can verify that smart + sexy is a great combo!

    Reply
  33. Congratulations on the official launch, Cara! Rather than bash you over the head with a bottle of champagne, which would be a great waste, let’s drink the champagne with some nice cheese straws and maybe stuffed mushrooms. *g*
    Having been lucky enough to read the ms. early, I can verify that smart + sexy is a great combo!

    Reply
  34. Congratulations on the official launch, Cara! Rather than bash you over the head with a bottle of champagne, which would be a great waste, let’s drink the champagne with some nice cheese straws and maybe stuffed mushrooms. *g*
    Having been lucky enough to read the ms. early, I can verify that smart + sexy is a great combo!

    Reply
  35. Congratulations on the official launch, Cara! Rather than bash you over the head with a bottle of champagne, which would be a great waste, let’s drink the champagne with some nice cheese straws and maybe stuffed mushrooms. *g*
    Having been lucky enough to read the ms. early, I can verify that smart + sexy is a great combo!

    Reply
  36. Since I’m a pianist/organist, I’m currently intrigued with 19th century poet Christina Rossetti, whose poem “In the bleak midwinter” was set to music 12 years after her death. She was said to be a woman of striking beauty and immense poetic talent. She was also a devout Christian once engaged to a Roman Catholic who promised to convert. When he didn’t, she broke the engagement and remained single all her life. Through that life she wrote some of the most magnificent poetry, all of it a tribute to Christ. I have a fondness for heroines who follow their passions and dreams instead of “settling” for someone or something that may hold them back.

    Reply
  37. Since I’m a pianist/organist, I’m currently intrigued with 19th century poet Christina Rossetti, whose poem “In the bleak midwinter” was set to music 12 years after her death. She was said to be a woman of striking beauty and immense poetic talent. She was also a devout Christian once engaged to a Roman Catholic who promised to convert. When he didn’t, she broke the engagement and remained single all her life. Through that life she wrote some of the most magnificent poetry, all of it a tribute to Christ. I have a fondness for heroines who follow their passions and dreams instead of “settling” for someone or something that may hold them back.

    Reply
  38. Since I’m a pianist/organist, I’m currently intrigued with 19th century poet Christina Rossetti, whose poem “In the bleak midwinter” was set to music 12 years after her death. She was said to be a woman of striking beauty and immense poetic talent. She was also a devout Christian once engaged to a Roman Catholic who promised to convert. When he didn’t, she broke the engagement and remained single all her life. Through that life she wrote some of the most magnificent poetry, all of it a tribute to Christ. I have a fondness for heroines who follow their passions and dreams instead of “settling” for someone or something that may hold them back.

    Reply
  39. Since I’m a pianist/organist, I’m currently intrigued with 19th century poet Christina Rossetti, whose poem “In the bleak midwinter” was set to music 12 years after her death. She was said to be a woman of striking beauty and immense poetic talent. She was also a devout Christian once engaged to a Roman Catholic who promised to convert. When he didn’t, she broke the engagement and remained single all her life. Through that life she wrote some of the most magnificent poetry, all of it a tribute to Christ. I have a fondness for heroines who follow their passions and dreams instead of “settling” for someone or something that may hold them back.

    Reply
  40. Since I’m a pianist/organist, I’m currently intrigued with 19th century poet Christina Rossetti, whose poem “In the bleak midwinter” was set to music 12 years after her death. She was said to be a woman of striking beauty and immense poetic talent. She was also a devout Christian once engaged to a Roman Catholic who promised to convert. When he didn’t, she broke the engagement and remained single all her life. Through that life she wrote some of the most magnificent poetry, all of it a tribute to Christ. I have a fondness for heroines who follow their passions and dreams instead of “settling” for someone or something that may hold them back.

    Reply
  41. I can’t wait to read this book! My vote for a strong heroine would be Mary Wollstonecraft. She was a brilliant scholar, rescued her sister from a loveless marriage, had two married lovers then a marriage that produced Mary Shelly. Her essay on A Vindication of the Rights of Women features in many a romance author’s novel!

    Reply
  42. I can’t wait to read this book! My vote for a strong heroine would be Mary Wollstonecraft. She was a brilliant scholar, rescued her sister from a loveless marriage, had two married lovers then a marriage that produced Mary Shelly. Her essay on A Vindication of the Rights of Women features in many a romance author’s novel!

    Reply
  43. I can’t wait to read this book! My vote for a strong heroine would be Mary Wollstonecraft. She was a brilliant scholar, rescued her sister from a loveless marriage, had two married lovers then a marriage that produced Mary Shelly. Her essay on A Vindication of the Rights of Women features in many a romance author’s novel!

    Reply
  44. I can’t wait to read this book! My vote for a strong heroine would be Mary Wollstonecraft. She was a brilliant scholar, rescued her sister from a loveless marriage, had two married lovers then a marriage that produced Mary Shelly. Her essay on A Vindication of the Rights of Women features in many a romance author’s novel!

    Reply
  45. I can’t wait to read this book! My vote for a strong heroine would be Mary Wollstonecraft. She was a brilliant scholar, rescued her sister from a loveless marriage, had two married lovers then a marriage that produced Mary Shelly. Her essay on A Vindication of the Rights of Women features in many a romance author’s novel!

    Reply
  46. Anne and Cara, thank you for an entertaining interview!
    I read the ARC so I add to the raving reviews that it is, above all else, a heartwarming love story. There is one scene where Ciara learns something about Lucas that explains his behavior and endears him to her. Nothing beats true love!
    I am envious of the Yalies attending Cara’s class … perhaps both Cara and Lauren can engage in a “semester abroad” here in Hawaii and host the class on the beach.
    Regarding fascinating woman, Pat beat me to the punch with Lady Ada Lovelace, daughter of the infamous Lord Byron. Just imagine the notoriety of being his daughter plus a bluestocking! She is credited with creating the first computer program for Charles Babbage’s analytical engine.
    Ada was a role model for me as a Math scholar in college and then a computer officer in the Air Force. In fact, the DOD named its own language after her, ADA. So here’s to Regency Ladies!

    Reply
  47. Anne and Cara, thank you for an entertaining interview!
    I read the ARC so I add to the raving reviews that it is, above all else, a heartwarming love story. There is one scene where Ciara learns something about Lucas that explains his behavior and endears him to her. Nothing beats true love!
    I am envious of the Yalies attending Cara’s class … perhaps both Cara and Lauren can engage in a “semester abroad” here in Hawaii and host the class on the beach.
    Regarding fascinating woman, Pat beat me to the punch with Lady Ada Lovelace, daughter of the infamous Lord Byron. Just imagine the notoriety of being his daughter plus a bluestocking! She is credited with creating the first computer program for Charles Babbage’s analytical engine.
    Ada was a role model for me as a Math scholar in college and then a computer officer in the Air Force. In fact, the DOD named its own language after her, ADA. So here’s to Regency Ladies!

    Reply
  48. Anne and Cara, thank you for an entertaining interview!
    I read the ARC so I add to the raving reviews that it is, above all else, a heartwarming love story. There is one scene where Ciara learns something about Lucas that explains his behavior and endears him to her. Nothing beats true love!
    I am envious of the Yalies attending Cara’s class … perhaps both Cara and Lauren can engage in a “semester abroad” here in Hawaii and host the class on the beach.
    Regarding fascinating woman, Pat beat me to the punch with Lady Ada Lovelace, daughter of the infamous Lord Byron. Just imagine the notoriety of being his daughter plus a bluestocking! She is credited with creating the first computer program for Charles Babbage’s analytical engine.
    Ada was a role model for me as a Math scholar in college and then a computer officer in the Air Force. In fact, the DOD named its own language after her, ADA. So here’s to Regency Ladies!

    Reply
  49. Anne and Cara, thank you for an entertaining interview!
    I read the ARC so I add to the raving reviews that it is, above all else, a heartwarming love story. There is one scene where Ciara learns something about Lucas that explains his behavior and endears him to her. Nothing beats true love!
    I am envious of the Yalies attending Cara’s class … perhaps both Cara and Lauren can engage in a “semester abroad” here in Hawaii and host the class on the beach.
    Regarding fascinating woman, Pat beat me to the punch with Lady Ada Lovelace, daughter of the infamous Lord Byron. Just imagine the notoriety of being his daughter plus a bluestocking! She is credited with creating the first computer program for Charles Babbage’s analytical engine.
    Ada was a role model for me as a Math scholar in college and then a computer officer in the Air Force. In fact, the DOD named its own language after her, ADA. So here’s to Regency Ladies!

    Reply
  50. Anne and Cara, thank you for an entertaining interview!
    I read the ARC so I add to the raving reviews that it is, above all else, a heartwarming love story. There is one scene where Ciara learns something about Lucas that explains his behavior and endears him to her. Nothing beats true love!
    I am envious of the Yalies attending Cara’s class … perhaps both Cara and Lauren can engage in a “semester abroad” here in Hawaii and host the class on the beach.
    Regarding fascinating woman, Pat beat me to the punch with Lady Ada Lovelace, daughter of the infamous Lord Byron. Just imagine the notoriety of being his daughter plus a bluestocking! She is credited with creating the first computer program for Charles Babbage’s analytical engine.
    Ada was a role model for me as a Math scholar in college and then a computer officer in the Air Force. In fact, the DOD named its own language after her, ADA. So here’s to Regency Ladies!

    Reply
  51. I’ve always admired Mary Shelley, who was graciously allowed to join the boys in their little summer competition, and wrote a classic (Frankenstein) which put their shirts in the dirt 🙂

    Reply
  52. I’ve always admired Mary Shelley, who was graciously allowed to join the boys in their little summer competition, and wrote a classic (Frankenstein) which put their shirts in the dirt 🙂

    Reply
  53. I’ve always admired Mary Shelley, who was graciously allowed to join the boys in their little summer competition, and wrote a classic (Frankenstein) which put their shirts in the dirt 🙂

    Reply
  54. I’ve always admired Mary Shelley, who was graciously allowed to join the boys in their little summer competition, and wrote a classic (Frankenstein) which put their shirts in the dirt 🙂

    Reply
  55. I’ve always admired Mary Shelley, who was graciously allowed to join the boys in their little summer competition, and wrote a classic (Frankenstein) which put their shirts in the dirt 🙂

    Reply
  56. Whoa, that was weird. I’d just finished my comment and tried to hit “post” and my finger slipped and suddenly I’m looking at the I Can Has Cheezburger site! How the heck did that happen? *g*
    I apparently lost my comment so will try to recreate it. Cara/Andrea, you had me the moment you mentioned Scientific Society. I love brainy heroines, and it’s great when the hero matches wits with her. That can be very sexy!

    Reply
  57. Whoa, that was weird. I’d just finished my comment and tried to hit “post” and my finger slipped and suddenly I’m looking at the I Can Has Cheezburger site! How the heck did that happen? *g*
    I apparently lost my comment so will try to recreate it. Cara/Andrea, you had me the moment you mentioned Scientific Society. I love brainy heroines, and it’s great when the hero matches wits with her. That can be very sexy!

    Reply
  58. Whoa, that was weird. I’d just finished my comment and tried to hit “post” and my finger slipped and suddenly I’m looking at the I Can Has Cheezburger site! How the heck did that happen? *g*
    I apparently lost my comment so will try to recreate it. Cara/Andrea, you had me the moment you mentioned Scientific Society. I love brainy heroines, and it’s great when the hero matches wits with her. That can be very sexy!

    Reply
  59. Whoa, that was weird. I’d just finished my comment and tried to hit “post” and my finger slipped and suddenly I’m looking at the I Can Has Cheezburger site! How the heck did that happen? *g*
    I apparently lost my comment so will try to recreate it. Cara/Andrea, you had me the moment you mentioned Scientific Society. I love brainy heroines, and it’s great when the hero matches wits with her. That can be very sexy!

    Reply
  60. Whoa, that was weird. I’d just finished my comment and tried to hit “post” and my finger slipped and suddenly I’m looking at the I Can Has Cheezburger site! How the heck did that happen? *g*
    I apparently lost my comment so will try to recreate it. Cara/Andrea, you had me the moment you mentioned Scientific Society. I love brainy heroines, and it’s great when the hero matches wits with her. That can be very sexy!

    Reply
  61. Kim, that seminar-on-the-beach idea sounds wonderfully appealing, especially as I’m staring out at another 8″ of fresh snow.
    The Countess of Lovelace is one of my favorite women of the Regency too. She suffered through an abusive childhood with a crazy mother. yet perservered in her following her dream. (Can you imagine the gossip she had to endure on account of her father?) I’m in awe of that sort of courage.

    Reply
  62. Kim, that seminar-on-the-beach idea sounds wonderfully appealing, especially as I’m staring out at another 8″ of fresh snow.
    The Countess of Lovelace is one of my favorite women of the Regency too. She suffered through an abusive childhood with a crazy mother. yet perservered in her following her dream. (Can you imagine the gossip she had to endure on account of her father?) I’m in awe of that sort of courage.

    Reply
  63. Kim, that seminar-on-the-beach idea sounds wonderfully appealing, especially as I’m staring out at another 8″ of fresh snow.
    The Countess of Lovelace is one of my favorite women of the Regency too. She suffered through an abusive childhood with a crazy mother. yet perservered in her following her dream. (Can you imagine the gossip she had to endure on account of her father?) I’m in awe of that sort of courage.

    Reply
  64. Kim, that seminar-on-the-beach idea sounds wonderfully appealing, especially as I’m staring out at another 8″ of fresh snow.
    The Countess of Lovelace is one of my favorite women of the Regency too. She suffered through an abusive childhood with a crazy mother. yet perservered in her following her dream. (Can you imagine the gossip she had to endure on account of her father?) I’m in awe of that sort of courage.

    Reply
  65. Kim, that seminar-on-the-beach idea sounds wonderfully appealing, especially as I’m staring out at another 8″ of fresh snow.
    The Countess of Lovelace is one of my favorite women of the Regency too. She suffered through an abusive childhood with a crazy mother. yet perservered in her following her dream. (Can you imagine the gossip she had to endure on account of her father?) I’m in awe of that sort of courage.

    Reply
  66. I too am a day late, but I really enjoyed the interview and congrats on the new series. I’m looking forward to it :o)
    I have to say that Marie Curie has always fascinated me. Her phenomenal yet tragic life is an amazing read in which a brilliant woman triumphed over the adversity of the scientific community and yet, fell tragically short with society.

    Reply
  67. I too am a day late, but I really enjoyed the interview and congrats on the new series. I’m looking forward to it :o)
    I have to say that Marie Curie has always fascinated me. Her phenomenal yet tragic life is an amazing read in which a brilliant woman triumphed over the adversity of the scientific community and yet, fell tragically short with society.

    Reply
  68. I too am a day late, but I really enjoyed the interview and congrats on the new series. I’m looking forward to it :o)
    I have to say that Marie Curie has always fascinated me. Her phenomenal yet tragic life is an amazing read in which a brilliant woman triumphed over the adversity of the scientific community and yet, fell tragically short with society.

    Reply
  69. I too am a day late, but I really enjoyed the interview and congrats on the new series. I’m looking forward to it :o)
    I have to say that Marie Curie has always fascinated me. Her phenomenal yet tragic life is an amazing read in which a brilliant woman triumphed over the adversity of the scientific community and yet, fell tragically short with society.

    Reply
  70. I too am a day late, but I really enjoyed the interview and congrats on the new series. I’m looking forward to it :o)
    I have to say that Marie Curie has always fascinated me. Her phenomenal yet tragic life is an amazing read in which a brilliant woman triumphed over the adversity of the scientific community and yet, fell tragically short with society.

    Reply
  71. Congratulations on your new book, Cara.
    I’ve always been interested in Margaret Mead. She rocked the boat and did things her way. She made people look at life, culture and society in different ways.

    Reply
  72. Congratulations on your new book, Cara.
    I’ve always been interested in Margaret Mead. She rocked the boat and did things her way. She made people look at life, culture and society in different ways.

    Reply
  73. Congratulations on your new book, Cara.
    I’ve always been interested in Margaret Mead. She rocked the boat and did things her way. She made people look at life, culture and society in different ways.

    Reply
  74. Congratulations on your new book, Cara.
    I’ve always been interested in Margaret Mead. She rocked the boat and did things her way. She made people look at life, culture and society in different ways.

    Reply
  75. Congratulations on your new book, Cara.
    I’ve always been interested in Margaret Mead. She rocked the boat and did things her way. She made people look at life, culture and society in different ways.

    Reply
  76. What a wonderful interview! And the new series sounds so exciting!! I was hopeless in both math and science, but I think they would make for 19th c. heroines with a difference, and a fascinating one at that! Congratulations on the series and on the Yale gig; oh, to be a fly on the classroom wall!

    Reply
  77. What a wonderful interview! And the new series sounds so exciting!! I was hopeless in both math and science, but I think they would make for 19th c. heroines with a difference, and a fascinating one at that! Congratulations on the series and on the Yale gig; oh, to be a fly on the classroom wall!

    Reply
  78. What a wonderful interview! And the new series sounds so exciting!! I was hopeless in both math and science, but I think they would make for 19th c. heroines with a difference, and a fascinating one at that! Congratulations on the series and on the Yale gig; oh, to be a fly on the classroom wall!

    Reply
  79. What a wonderful interview! And the new series sounds so exciting!! I was hopeless in both math and science, but I think they would make for 19th c. heroines with a difference, and a fascinating one at that! Congratulations on the series and on the Yale gig; oh, to be a fly on the classroom wall!

    Reply
  80. What a wonderful interview! And the new series sounds so exciting!! I was hopeless in both math and science, but I think they would make for 19th c. heroines with a difference, and a fascinating one at that! Congratulations on the series and on the Yale gig; oh, to be a fly on the classroom wall!

    Reply

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