California Dreaming

CA_House_38As some of you know, I’ve been in the process of not one, but two life-changing events these past months. I’m not sure “husband retiring” rates as high as death or birth, but it has to be right up there with moving across the country. So please excuse my tardiness in posting. My calendar shows a big blank spot on today, and I didn’t even question it, that’s how brain dead I am.(a photo of our new backyard!)

I believe I’ve wondered before how our ancestors managed to pull up roots and move to villages where they knew no one, or crossed countries not even knowing where the next water might be found. With all our 21st century technology, moving is still a frustrating, terrifying, and stressful experience. We had two  cars, cell phones, and walkie-talkies driving over two thousand miles, and I was a wreck at the end of four days. Four months of watching oxen kicking up dust on my covered wagon would have killed me. At least I had the sense to jettison most of our household goods before we left!

So now we’re wrestling with new banks, new utilities, abysmal internet service (In California! Who would have thought it?), new equipment, and a hunt to replace all the furnishings we left behind. We’re enjoying seeing our daughter and her family and friends and looking after our granddaughter for the better part of the summer. But it’s all new and I have no routine! When do I sit down to write?

PatRice_NotoriousAtherton200Fortunately, I finished working on NOTORIOUS ATHERTON before I left. I did not, however, organize a release campaign. There’s only so much organization I can manage, and the move took priority. So on July 23rd, B&N will be the first to release the e-book. I have an excerpt on my website (There are two links on my home page and apparently only one of them works, I’m just noticing.) The cover is another brilliant design from Kim Killion of Killion Group.

The Amazon and Kobo e-books will be out in August, and in October, Book View Café will do a special release for the print version. I bet my pioneer ancestors didn’t produce books while moving across country!

I can’t compete with kitty pics, but if you’d like to tell our readers about your favorite book that includes a protagonist being uprooted from home and settling in a strange place, I  can send one winner an e-copy of NOTORIOUS ATHERTON.

And then we may return to kitty pics because in true Mercury retrograde fashion, Andrea’s computer blew up today, taking her blog with it. I do love a good retrograde!

90 thoughts on “California Dreaming”

  1. Pat, that looks amazingly tropical!
    Having moved around all over in the past 4 years, I sympathize.
    Re books, as I seem to have a thing going in my books about homes (perhaps because of all the moves, plus the older one of emigrating, which is a big one) I often have characters uprooted in small ways, but then they usually end up in an ancestral home belonging to one or the other.
    I suspect that has up sides and down sides, especially if they’re strange to the place. Or if the resident family members are hostile, as in Heyer’s The Unknown Ajax?

    Reply
  2. Pat, that looks amazingly tropical!
    Having moved around all over in the past 4 years, I sympathize.
    Re books, as I seem to have a thing going in my books about homes (perhaps because of all the moves, plus the older one of emigrating, which is a big one) I often have characters uprooted in small ways, but then they usually end up in an ancestral home belonging to one or the other.
    I suspect that has up sides and down sides, especially if they’re strange to the place. Or if the resident family members are hostile, as in Heyer’s The Unknown Ajax?

    Reply
  3. Pat, that looks amazingly tropical!
    Having moved around all over in the past 4 years, I sympathize.
    Re books, as I seem to have a thing going in my books about homes (perhaps because of all the moves, plus the older one of emigrating, which is a big one) I often have characters uprooted in small ways, but then they usually end up in an ancestral home belonging to one or the other.
    I suspect that has up sides and down sides, especially if they’re strange to the place. Or if the resident family members are hostile, as in Heyer’s The Unknown Ajax?

    Reply
  4. Pat, that looks amazingly tropical!
    Having moved around all over in the past 4 years, I sympathize.
    Re books, as I seem to have a thing going in my books about homes (perhaps because of all the moves, plus the older one of emigrating, which is a big one) I often have characters uprooted in small ways, but then they usually end up in an ancestral home belonging to one or the other.
    I suspect that has up sides and down sides, especially if they’re strange to the place. Or if the resident family members are hostile, as in Heyer’s The Unknown Ajax?

    Reply
  5. Pat, that looks amazingly tropical!
    Having moved around all over in the past 4 years, I sympathize.
    Re books, as I seem to have a thing going in my books about homes (perhaps because of all the moves, plus the older one of emigrating, which is a big one) I often have characters uprooted in small ways, but then they usually end up in an ancestral home belonging to one or the other.
    I suspect that has up sides and down sides, especially if they’re strange to the place. Or if the resident family members are hostile, as in Heyer’s The Unknown Ajax?

    Reply
  6. Definitely SoCal, Isobel. I know so many people in the northern area that I’m almost jealous of your location. Almost.
    I’m sure that our regular moving experiences have influenced our books quite a bit, Jo. I don’t remember AJAX, but should I get a spare minute, I’ll look it up. I left all my Heyers behind, so I may as well start again!

    Reply
  7. Definitely SoCal, Isobel. I know so many people in the northern area that I’m almost jealous of your location. Almost.
    I’m sure that our regular moving experiences have influenced our books quite a bit, Jo. I don’t remember AJAX, but should I get a spare minute, I’ll look it up. I left all my Heyers behind, so I may as well start again!

    Reply
  8. Definitely SoCal, Isobel. I know so many people in the northern area that I’m almost jealous of your location. Almost.
    I’m sure that our regular moving experiences have influenced our books quite a bit, Jo. I don’t remember AJAX, but should I get a spare minute, I’ll look it up. I left all my Heyers behind, so I may as well start again!

    Reply
  9. Definitely SoCal, Isobel. I know so many people in the northern area that I’m almost jealous of your location. Almost.
    I’m sure that our regular moving experiences have influenced our books quite a bit, Jo. I don’t remember AJAX, but should I get a spare minute, I’ll look it up. I left all my Heyers behind, so I may as well start again!

    Reply
  10. Definitely SoCal, Isobel. I know so many people in the northern area that I’m almost jealous of your location. Almost.
    I’m sure that our regular moving experiences have influenced our books quite a bit, Jo. I don’t remember AJAX, but should I get a spare minute, I’ll look it up. I left all my Heyers behind, so I may as well start again!

    Reply
  11. Pat, moving is awful. I need to to have a massive clear-out in preparation for house alterations, and I’ve been putting it off for years, as a result. You will need a holiday by the time you’re done.
    But having a new home is soo exciting — new house, new neighborhood — and yours sounds lovely — and new life. All the very best of luck with ti.
    The Unknown Ajax is one of Heyer’s funniest, with Hugo, the hero, having a wicked sense of humor. It will be a treat for you when you get some reading/relaxing time.

    Reply
  12. Pat, moving is awful. I need to to have a massive clear-out in preparation for house alterations, and I’ve been putting it off for years, as a result. You will need a holiday by the time you’re done.
    But having a new home is soo exciting — new house, new neighborhood — and yours sounds lovely — and new life. All the very best of luck with ti.
    The Unknown Ajax is one of Heyer’s funniest, with Hugo, the hero, having a wicked sense of humor. It will be a treat for you when you get some reading/relaxing time.

    Reply
  13. Pat, moving is awful. I need to to have a massive clear-out in preparation for house alterations, and I’ve been putting it off for years, as a result. You will need a holiday by the time you’re done.
    But having a new home is soo exciting — new house, new neighborhood — and yours sounds lovely — and new life. All the very best of luck with ti.
    The Unknown Ajax is one of Heyer’s funniest, with Hugo, the hero, having a wicked sense of humor. It will be a treat for you when you get some reading/relaxing time.

    Reply
  14. Pat, moving is awful. I need to to have a massive clear-out in preparation for house alterations, and I’ve been putting it off for years, as a result. You will need a holiday by the time you’re done.
    But having a new home is soo exciting — new house, new neighborhood — and yours sounds lovely — and new life. All the very best of luck with ti.
    The Unknown Ajax is one of Heyer’s funniest, with Hugo, the hero, having a wicked sense of humor. It will be a treat for you when you get some reading/relaxing time.

    Reply
  15. Pat, moving is awful. I need to to have a massive clear-out in preparation for house alterations, and I’ve been putting it off for years, as a result. You will need a holiday by the time you’re done.
    But having a new home is soo exciting — new house, new neighborhood — and yours sounds lovely — and new life. All the very best of luck with ti.
    The Unknown Ajax is one of Heyer’s funniest, with Hugo, the hero, having a wicked sense of humor. It will be a treat for you when you get some reading/relaxing time.

    Reply
  16. I think the concept of having or finding a home is a major element in most romances. I’ve certainly played with it from my very first book.
    Moving to a strange place and finding a home is probably strongest in my SILK AND SHADOWS. It’s a Count of Monte Cristo-ish story where the enigmatic hero, an Asian prince travels halfway around the world to England in search of revenge, and he knows exactly one person in the country–an aristocratic English explorer whose life he saved in Asia. The very last sentence in the book is, “Welcome home, wanderer, welcome home.”

    Reply
  17. I think the concept of having or finding a home is a major element in most romances. I’ve certainly played with it from my very first book.
    Moving to a strange place and finding a home is probably strongest in my SILK AND SHADOWS. It’s a Count of Monte Cristo-ish story where the enigmatic hero, an Asian prince travels halfway around the world to England in search of revenge, and he knows exactly one person in the country–an aristocratic English explorer whose life he saved in Asia. The very last sentence in the book is, “Welcome home, wanderer, welcome home.”

    Reply
  18. I think the concept of having or finding a home is a major element in most romances. I’ve certainly played with it from my very first book.
    Moving to a strange place and finding a home is probably strongest in my SILK AND SHADOWS. It’s a Count of Monte Cristo-ish story where the enigmatic hero, an Asian prince travels halfway around the world to England in search of revenge, and he knows exactly one person in the country–an aristocratic English explorer whose life he saved in Asia. The very last sentence in the book is, “Welcome home, wanderer, welcome home.”

    Reply
  19. I think the concept of having or finding a home is a major element in most romances. I’ve certainly played with it from my very first book.
    Moving to a strange place and finding a home is probably strongest in my SILK AND SHADOWS. It’s a Count of Monte Cristo-ish story where the enigmatic hero, an Asian prince travels halfway around the world to England in search of revenge, and he knows exactly one person in the country–an aristocratic English explorer whose life he saved in Asia. The very last sentence in the book is, “Welcome home, wanderer, welcome home.”

    Reply
  20. I think the concept of having or finding a home is a major element in most romances. I’ve certainly played with it from my very first book.
    Moving to a strange place and finding a home is probably strongest in my SILK AND SHADOWS. It’s a Count of Monte Cristo-ish story where the enigmatic hero, an Asian prince travels halfway around the world to England in search of revenge, and he knows exactly one person in the country–an aristocratic English explorer whose life he saved in Asia. The very last sentence in the book is, “Welcome home, wanderer, welcome home.”

    Reply
  21. That’s really a fabulous looking cover on the book! “To Beguile A Beast” by Elizabeth Hoyt has a heroine who gets uprooted to a drafty rundown castle in Scotland.

    Reply
  22. That’s really a fabulous looking cover on the book! “To Beguile A Beast” by Elizabeth Hoyt has a heroine who gets uprooted to a drafty rundown castle in Scotland.

    Reply
  23. That’s really a fabulous looking cover on the book! “To Beguile A Beast” by Elizabeth Hoyt has a heroine who gets uprooted to a drafty rundown castle in Scotland.

    Reply
  24. That’s really a fabulous looking cover on the book! “To Beguile A Beast” by Elizabeth Hoyt has a heroine who gets uprooted to a drafty rundown castle in Scotland.

    Reply
  25. That’s really a fabulous looking cover on the book! “To Beguile A Beast” by Elizabeth Hoyt has a heroine who gets uprooted to a drafty rundown castle in Scotland.

    Reply
  26. I’ve been thinking about books with moving as a theme. Most regencies and historicals are grounded in place and time. The exception is the fleeing heiress. Jo Beverly’s Petra, in a Lady’s Secret, in one such Heroine.
    A variation on that theme comes up in Jane Feather’s Beloved Enemy where Virginia as Parliment’s Ward travels across England and into Scotland after being ripped from her beloved home. Towards the end of the book, she builds a home, albeit an unhappy one, in America, finally to be rescued by her hero and returned to her haven.
    Abother book that comes to mind is Philippa Gtegory’s The King Maker’s Daughter. Anne is especially bereft when the family flees to France and lives in exile.
    Moving for me is an arc (and maybe an art). There’s the packing (which I had to do in little more than a week last May), the actual moving, and then the unpacking. Since I live in condos, space is always a problem. During the unpacking I hit a place where the most important things have their place. Where does the rest of the precious stuff go? The day the pictures go up in their final resting spot do I know that I am home. Arc complete.

    Reply
  27. I’ve been thinking about books with moving as a theme. Most regencies and historicals are grounded in place and time. The exception is the fleeing heiress. Jo Beverly’s Petra, in a Lady’s Secret, in one such Heroine.
    A variation on that theme comes up in Jane Feather’s Beloved Enemy where Virginia as Parliment’s Ward travels across England and into Scotland after being ripped from her beloved home. Towards the end of the book, she builds a home, albeit an unhappy one, in America, finally to be rescued by her hero and returned to her haven.
    Abother book that comes to mind is Philippa Gtegory’s The King Maker’s Daughter. Anne is especially bereft when the family flees to France and lives in exile.
    Moving for me is an arc (and maybe an art). There’s the packing (which I had to do in little more than a week last May), the actual moving, and then the unpacking. Since I live in condos, space is always a problem. During the unpacking I hit a place where the most important things have their place. Where does the rest of the precious stuff go? The day the pictures go up in their final resting spot do I know that I am home. Arc complete.

    Reply
  28. I’ve been thinking about books with moving as a theme. Most regencies and historicals are grounded in place and time. The exception is the fleeing heiress. Jo Beverly’s Petra, in a Lady’s Secret, in one such Heroine.
    A variation on that theme comes up in Jane Feather’s Beloved Enemy where Virginia as Parliment’s Ward travels across England and into Scotland after being ripped from her beloved home. Towards the end of the book, she builds a home, albeit an unhappy one, in America, finally to be rescued by her hero and returned to her haven.
    Abother book that comes to mind is Philippa Gtegory’s The King Maker’s Daughter. Anne is especially bereft when the family flees to France and lives in exile.
    Moving for me is an arc (and maybe an art). There’s the packing (which I had to do in little more than a week last May), the actual moving, and then the unpacking. Since I live in condos, space is always a problem. During the unpacking I hit a place where the most important things have their place. Where does the rest of the precious stuff go? The day the pictures go up in their final resting spot do I know that I am home. Arc complete.

    Reply
  29. I’ve been thinking about books with moving as a theme. Most regencies and historicals are grounded in place and time. The exception is the fleeing heiress. Jo Beverly’s Petra, in a Lady’s Secret, in one such Heroine.
    A variation on that theme comes up in Jane Feather’s Beloved Enemy where Virginia as Parliment’s Ward travels across England and into Scotland after being ripped from her beloved home. Towards the end of the book, she builds a home, albeit an unhappy one, in America, finally to be rescued by her hero and returned to her haven.
    Abother book that comes to mind is Philippa Gtegory’s The King Maker’s Daughter. Anne is especially bereft when the family flees to France and lives in exile.
    Moving for me is an arc (and maybe an art). There’s the packing (which I had to do in little more than a week last May), the actual moving, and then the unpacking. Since I live in condos, space is always a problem. During the unpacking I hit a place where the most important things have their place. Where does the rest of the precious stuff go? The day the pictures go up in their final resting spot do I know that I am home. Arc complete.

    Reply
  30. I’ve been thinking about books with moving as a theme. Most regencies and historicals are grounded in place and time. The exception is the fleeing heiress. Jo Beverly’s Petra, in a Lady’s Secret, in one such Heroine.
    A variation on that theme comes up in Jane Feather’s Beloved Enemy where Virginia as Parliment’s Ward travels across England and into Scotland after being ripped from her beloved home. Towards the end of the book, she builds a home, albeit an unhappy one, in America, finally to be rescued by her hero and returned to her haven.
    Abother book that comes to mind is Philippa Gtegory’s The King Maker’s Daughter. Anne is especially bereft when the family flees to France and lives in exile.
    Moving for me is an arc (and maybe an art). There’s the packing (which I had to do in little more than a week last May), the actual moving, and then the unpacking. Since I live in condos, space is always a problem. During the unpacking I hit a place where the most important things have their place. Where does the rest of the precious stuff go? The day the pictures go up in their final resting spot do I know that I am home. Arc complete.

    Reply
  31. Congratulations on your new home! I’m in my forever house now (unless they have to cart me off into a nursing home), but I’ve lived in seven different states and numerous houses. There are boxes unopened in the cellar from three moves ago. I’ll get to them…some day. 🙂
    I would have failed as a pioneer, probably the first one of the Donner Party to be eaten. I have watched way too many Westerns and Little Houses on the Prairie and know I’m an East Coast girl who likes her conveniences.
    In Kate Atkinson’s extraordinary Life After Life, the heroine is not only uprooted, but dies numerous times. When she marries a young German and hangs out with Hitler, that’s the most chilling part of the book.

    Reply
  32. Congratulations on your new home! I’m in my forever house now (unless they have to cart me off into a nursing home), but I’ve lived in seven different states and numerous houses. There are boxes unopened in the cellar from three moves ago. I’ll get to them…some day. 🙂
    I would have failed as a pioneer, probably the first one of the Donner Party to be eaten. I have watched way too many Westerns and Little Houses on the Prairie and know I’m an East Coast girl who likes her conveniences.
    In Kate Atkinson’s extraordinary Life After Life, the heroine is not only uprooted, but dies numerous times. When she marries a young German and hangs out with Hitler, that’s the most chilling part of the book.

    Reply
  33. Congratulations on your new home! I’m in my forever house now (unless they have to cart me off into a nursing home), but I’ve lived in seven different states and numerous houses. There are boxes unopened in the cellar from three moves ago. I’ll get to them…some day. 🙂
    I would have failed as a pioneer, probably the first one of the Donner Party to be eaten. I have watched way too many Westerns and Little Houses on the Prairie and know I’m an East Coast girl who likes her conveniences.
    In Kate Atkinson’s extraordinary Life After Life, the heroine is not only uprooted, but dies numerous times. When she marries a young German and hangs out with Hitler, that’s the most chilling part of the book.

    Reply
  34. Congratulations on your new home! I’m in my forever house now (unless they have to cart me off into a nursing home), but I’ve lived in seven different states and numerous houses. There are boxes unopened in the cellar from three moves ago. I’ll get to them…some day. 🙂
    I would have failed as a pioneer, probably the first one of the Donner Party to be eaten. I have watched way too many Westerns and Little Houses on the Prairie and know I’m an East Coast girl who likes her conveniences.
    In Kate Atkinson’s extraordinary Life After Life, the heroine is not only uprooted, but dies numerous times. When she marries a young German and hangs out with Hitler, that’s the most chilling part of the book.

    Reply
  35. Congratulations on your new home! I’m in my forever house now (unless they have to cart me off into a nursing home), but I’ve lived in seven different states and numerous houses. There are boxes unopened in the cellar from three moves ago. I’ll get to them…some day. 🙂
    I would have failed as a pioneer, probably the first one of the Donner Party to be eaten. I have watched way too many Westerns and Little Houses on the Prairie and know I’m an East Coast girl who likes her conveniences.
    In Kate Atkinson’s extraordinary Life After Life, the heroine is not only uprooted, but dies numerous times. When she marries a young German and hangs out with Hitler, that’s the most chilling part of the book.

    Reply
  36. The story about moving that I remember best is in Jo Beverley’s The Return of a Rogue with an overlap, I think into To Rescue a Rogue. The heroine of Return had to cross the Atlantic .
    I felt for the family that didn’t want to leave their comfortable house to go live in one more suited to be a museum.
    Almost every bride has to move– has to leave her childhood home and go to another where the Mother in law or sister in law or other new relative might not be congenial. Isn’t Rebecca a tale of a bride and her new home?
    Other stories written by the Honorable Word Wenches also have ladies going to isolated castles or moving from the small village to the Great House.
    Mary Jo also has a woman having to cross more than one ocean.
    I hate to move. My husband was in the army and we moved something like 25 times in 16 years. When we bought a house I made certain we had basement and attic and quickly filled them and the two floors of house. The main pieces of furniture were book cases. When I had to move to a condo — we got rid of truck loads of stuff , 6 book cases, and over 50 boxes of books. Even so I still have 10 bookcases full of books and wish I had room for more book cases . I really need another condo just for my library.
    I hate to move. My son was forced to move a short distanceto another apartment when mold moved into his. Do you know it takes as much work to move 150 feet as it does 1500 miles? Only the travel time is different. The packing and unpacking is the same. He even lost the contents of his refrigerator.

    Reply
  37. The story about moving that I remember best is in Jo Beverley’s The Return of a Rogue with an overlap, I think into To Rescue a Rogue. The heroine of Return had to cross the Atlantic .
    I felt for the family that didn’t want to leave their comfortable house to go live in one more suited to be a museum.
    Almost every bride has to move– has to leave her childhood home and go to another where the Mother in law or sister in law or other new relative might not be congenial. Isn’t Rebecca a tale of a bride and her new home?
    Other stories written by the Honorable Word Wenches also have ladies going to isolated castles or moving from the small village to the Great House.
    Mary Jo also has a woman having to cross more than one ocean.
    I hate to move. My husband was in the army and we moved something like 25 times in 16 years. When we bought a house I made certain we had basement and attic and quickly filled them and the two floors of house. The main pieces of furniture were book cases. When I had to move to a condo — we got rid of truck loads of stuff , 6 book cases, and over 50 boxes of books. Even so I still have 10 bookcases full of books and wish I had room for more book cases . I really need another condo just for my library.
    I hate to move. My son was forced to move a short distanceto another apartment when mold moved into his. Do you know it takes as much work to move 150 feet as it does 1500 miles? Only the travel time is different. The packing and unpacking is the same. He even lost the contents of his refrigerator.

    Reply
  38. The story about moving that I remember best is in Jo Beverley’s The Return of a Rogue with an overlap, I think into To Rescue a Rogue. The heroine of Return had to cross the Atlantic .
    I felt for the family that didn’t want to leave their comfortable house to go live in one more suited to be a museum.
    Almost every bride has to move– has to leave her childhood home and go to another where the Mother in law or sister in law or other new relative might not be congenial. Isn’t Rebecca a tale of a bride and her new home?
    Other stories written by the Honorable Word Wenches also have ladies going to isolated castles or moving from the small village to the Great House.
    Mary Jo also has a woman having to cross more than one ocean.
    I hate to move. My husband was in the army and we moved something like 25 times in 16 years. When we bought a house I made certain we had basement and attic and quickly filled them and the two floors of house. The main pieces of furniture were book cases. When I had to move to a condo — we got rid of truck loads of stuff , 6 book cases, and over 50 boxes of books. Even so I still have 10 bookcases full of books and wish I had room for more book cases . I really need another condo just for my library.
    I hate to move. My son was forced to move a short distanceto another apartment when mold moved into his. Do you know it takes as much work to move 150 feet as it does 1500 miles? Only the travel time is different. The packing and unpacking is the same. He even lost the contents of his refrigerator.

    Reply
  39. The story about moving that I remember best is in Jo Beverley’s The Return of a Rogue with an overlap, I think into To Rescue a Rogue. The heroine of Return had to cross the Atlantic .
    I felt for the family that didn’t want to leave their comfortable house to go live in one more suited to be a museum.
    Almost every bride has to move– has to leave her childhood home and go to another where the Mother in law or sister in law or other new relative might not be congenial. Isn’t Rebecca a tale of a bride and her new home?
    Other stories written by the Honorable Word Wenches also have ladies going to isolated castles or moving from the small village to the Great House.
    Mary Jo also has a woman having to cross more than one ocean.
    I hate to move. My husband was in the army and we moved something like 25 times in 16 years. When we bought a house I made certain we had basement and attic and quickly filled them and the two floors of house. The main pieces of furniture were book cases. When I had to move to a condo — we got rid of truck loads of stuff , 6 book cases, and over 50 boxes of books. Even so I still have 10 bookcases full of books and wish I had room for more book cases . I really need another condo just for my library.
    I hate to move. My son was forced to move a short distanceto another apartment when mold moved into his. Do you know it takes as much work to move 150 feet as it does 1500 miles? Only the travel time is different. The packing and unpacking is the same. He even lost the contents of his refrigerator.

    Reply
  40. The story about moving that I remember best is in Jo Beverley’s The Return of a Rogue with an overlap, I think into To Rescue a Rogue. The heroine of Return had to cross the Atlantic .
    I felt for the family that didn’t want to leave their comfortable house to go live in one more suited to be a museum.
    Almost every bride has to move– has to leave her childhood home and go to another where the Mother in law or sister in law or other new relative might not be congenial. Isn’t Rebecca a tale of a bride and her new home?
    Other stories written by the Honorable Word Wenches also have ladies going to isolated castles or moving from the small village to the Great House.
    Mary Jo also has a woman having to cross more than one ocean.
    I hate to move. My husband was in the army and we moved something like 25 times in 16 years. When we bought a house I made certain we had basement and attic and quickly filled them and the two floors of house. The main pieces of furniture were book cases. When I had to move to a condo — we got rid of truck loads of stuff , 6 book cases, and over 50 boxes of books. Even so I still have 10 bookcases full of books and wish I had room for more book cases . I really need another condo just for my library.
    I hate to move. My son was forced to move a short distanceto another apartment when mold moved into his. Do you know it takes as much work to move 150 feet as it does 1500 miles? Only the travel time is different. The packing and unpacking is the same. He even lost the contents of his refrigerator.

    Reply
  41. I think anyone who moves to different areas or even countries is very brave.It must take a bit of an independent character.Me I am a terrible home body.I hated being away at college even tho it was only seventy miles up the road in Bath(I chose the college more on litery merit than anything being addicted to Austen and Heyer even then!)Romantic heroines do move about,an awful lot of homeless governess’ for instance.

    Reply
  42. I think anyone who moves to different areas or even countries is very brave.It must take a bit of an independent character.Me I am a terrible home body.I hated being away at college even tho it was only seventy miles up the road in Bath(I chose the college more on litery merit than anything being addicted to Austen and Heyer even then!)Romantic heroines do move about,an awful lot of homeless governess’ for instance.

    Reply
  43. I think anyone who moves to different areas or even countries is very brave.It must take a bit of an independent character.Me I am a terrible home body.I hated being away at college even tho it was only seventy miles up the road in Bath(I chose the college more on litery merit than anything being addicted to Austen and Heyer even then!)Romantic heroines do move about,an awful lot of homeless governess’ for instance.

    Reply
  44. I think anyone who moves to different areas or even countries is very brave.It must take a bit of an independent character.Me I am a terrible home body.I hated being away at college even tho it was only seventy miles up the road in Bath(I chose the college more on litery merit than anything being addicted to Austen and Heyer even then!)Romantic heroines do move about,an awful lot of homeless governess’ for instance.

    Reply
  45. I think anyone who moves to different areas or even countries is very brave.It must take a bit of an independent character.Me I am a terrible home body.I hated being away at college even tho it was only seventy miles up the road in Bath(I chose the college more on litery merit than anything being addicted to Austen and Heyer even then!)Romantic heroines do move about,an awful lot of homeless governess’ for instance.

    Reply
  46. Ah, a lovely plethora of “moving” books, thank you! I totally sympathize with the storage issues, especially books. Since we’ve been planning our move for a while, I started gathering all my old favorites in e-books as fast as they came out. I have a stuffed e-reader now instead of stuffed shelves. Well, I still have lots of shelves, but not nearly as many. And yes, I used to look for basements too, until, like Maggie, the last one contained boxes I never opened. That’s when I knew we had to get drastic. Love the moving arc! That sounds just about right, except I need more furniture before I can settle and get everything where it belongs.
    Mold, ugh shudder, my sincere sympathies!

    Reply
  47. Ah, a lovely plethora of “moving” books, thank you! I totally sympathize with the storage issues, especially books. Since we’ve been planning our move for a while, I started gathering all my old favorites in e-books as fast as they came out. I have a stuffed e-reader now instead of stuffed shelves. Well, I still have lots of shelves, but not nearly as many. And yes, I used to look for basements too, until, like Maggie, the last one contained boxes I never opened. That’s when I knew we had to get drastic. Love the moving arc! That sounds just about right, except I need more furniture before I can settle and get everything where it belongs.
    Mold, ugh shudder, my sincere sympathies!

    Reply
  48. Ah, a lovely plethora of “moving” books, thank you! I totally sympathize with the storage issues, especially books. Since we’ve been planning our move for a while, I started gathering all my old favorites in e-books as fast as they came out. I have a stuffed e-reader now instead of stuffed shelves. Well, I still have lots of shelves, but not nearly as many. And yes, I used to look for basements too, until, like Maggie, the last one contained boxes I never opened. That’s when I knew we had to get drastic. Love the moving arc! That sounds just about right, except I need more furniture before I can settle and get everything where it belongs.
    Mold, ugh shudder, my sincere sympathies!

    Reply
  49. Ah, a lovely plethora of “moving” books, thank you! I totally sympathize with the storage issues, especially books. Since we’ve been planning our move for a while, I started gathering all my old favorites in e-books as fast as they came out. I have a stuffed e-reader now instead of stuffed shelves. Well, I still have lots of shelves, but not nearly as many. And yes, I used to look for basements too, until, like Maggie, the last one contained boxes I never opened. That’s when I knew we had to get drastic. Love the moving arc! That sounds just about right, except I need more furniture before I can settle and get everything where it belongs.
    Mold, ugh shudder, my sincere sympathies!

    Reply
  50. Ah, a lovely plethora of “moving” books, thank you! I totally sympathize with the storage issues, especially books. Since we’ve been planning our move for a while, I started gathering all my old favorites in e-books as fast as they came out. I have a stuffed e-reader now instead of stuffed shelves. Well, I still have lots of shelves, but not nearly as many. And yes, I used to look for basements too, until, like Maggie, the last one contained boxes I never opened. That’s when I knew we had to get drastic. Love the moving arc! That sounds just about right, except I need more furniture before I can settle and get everything where it belongs.
    Mold, ugh shudder, my sincere sympathies!

    Reply
  51. Sounds like you’ve really been through it, Pat, and you have my sympathy! I hate moving having moved 7 times in the last several years for one reason or another. But never across country! It does make one pare down and clean out though.
    I’ve recently been reading a lot of older, out of print HR’s this summer. Several of the main characters in Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg novels make major moves, beginning with Julian Day and St. John Spague moving from England to America to begin the series.
    Take good care of yourself after the stress of moving. Wishing you much happiness in your new home.
    Donna
    *waving from the very soggy Bluegrass state* 🙂

    Reply
  52. Sounds like you’ve really been through it, Pat, and you have my sympathy! I hate moving having moved 7 times in the last several years for one reason or another. But never across country! It does make one pare down and clean out though.
    I’ve recently been reading a lot of older, out of print HR’s this summer. Several of the main characters in Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg novels make major moves, beginning with Julian Day and St. John Spague moving from England to America to begin the series.
    Take good care of yourself after the stress of moving. Wishing you much happiness in your new home.
    Donna
    *waving from the very soggy Bluegrass state* 🙂

    Reply
  53. Sounds like you’ve really been through it, Pat, and you have my sympathy! I hate moving having moved 7 times in the last several years for one reason or another. But never across country! It does make one pare down and clean out though.
    I’ve recently been reading a lot of older, out of print HR’s this summer. Several of the main characters in Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg novels make major moves, beginning with Julian Day and St. John Spague moving from England to America to begin the series.
    Take good care of yourself after the stress of moving. Wishing you much happiness in your new home.
    Donna
    *waving from the very soggy Bluegrass state* 🙂

    Reply
  54. Sounds like you’ve really been through it, Pat, and you have my sympathy! I hate moving having moved 7 times in the last several years for one reason or another. But never across country! It does make one pare down and clean out though.
    I’ve recently been reading a lot of older, out of print HR’s this summer. Several of the main characters in Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg novels make major moves, beginning with Julian Day and St. John Spague moving from England to America to begin the series.
    Take good care of yourself after the stress of moving. Wishing you much happiness in your new home.
    Donna
    *waving from the very soggy Bluegrass state* 🙂

    Reply
  55. Sounds like you’ve really been through it, Pat, and you have my sympathy! I hate moving having moved 7 times in the last several years for one reason or another. But never across country! It does make one pare down and clean out though.
    I’ve recently been reading a lot of older, out of print HR’s this summer. Several of the main characters in Elswyth Thane’s Williamsburg novels make major moves, beginning with Julian Day and St. John Spague moving from England to America to begin the series.
    Take good care of yourself after the stress of moving. Wishing you much happiness in your new home.
    Donna
    *waving from the very soggy Bluegrass state* 🙂

    Reply
  56. Pat, wish you all the best with settling down. In the winter months, with the wonderful weather, the settling down will hopefully come easier. The thought of moving is so hard! We have one coming up in a year or two, and I’m dreading it. And yet, I do know that once I have moved, life will be much more rewarding. And still, the inertia…

    Reply
  57. Pat, wish you all the best with settling down. In the winter months, with the wonderful weather, the settling down will hopefully come easier. The thought of moving is so hard! We have one coming up in a year or two, and I’m dreading it. And yet, I do know that once I have moved, life will be much more rewarding. And still, the inertia…

    Reply
  58. Pat, wish you all the best with settling down. In the winter months, with the wonderful weather, the settling down will hopefully come easier. The thought of moving is so hard! We have one coming up in a year or two, and I’m dreading it. And yet, I do know that once I have moved, life will be much more rewarding. And still, the inertia…

    Reply
  59. Pat, wish you all the best with settling down. In the winter months, with the wonderful weather, the settling down will hopefully come easier. The thought of moving is so hard! We have one coming up in a year or two, and I’m dreading it. And yet, I do know that once I have moved, life will be much more rewarding. And still, the inertia…

    Reply
  60. Pat, wish you all the best with settling down. In the winter months, with the wonderful weather, the settling down will hopefully come easier. The thought of moving is so hard! We have one coming up in a year or two, and I’m dreading it. And yet, I do know that once I have moved, life will be much more rewarding. And still, the inertia…

    Reply
  61. Carol, I forgot to say that I know the OC Chapter is utterly cool. I just have to figure out how to get up there sometime since the I5 terrifies me!
    And Donna, we still have family in KY. They’re drowning. Really, weather needs to be better organized.
    My sympathies, Keira. Where will you be moving? Being able to anticipate the new place really keeps us moving forward.

    Reply
  62. Carol, I forgot to say that I know the OC Chapter is utterly cool. I just have to figure out how to get up there sometime since the I5 terrifies me!
    And Donna, we still have family in KY. They’re drowning. Really, weather needs to be better organized.
    My sympathies, Keira. Where will you be moving? Being able to anticipate the new place really keeps us moving forward.

    Reply
  63. Carol, I forgot to say that I know the OC Chapter is utterly cool. I just have to figure out how to get up there sometime since the I5 terrifies me!
    And Donna, we still have family in KY. They’re drowning. Really, weather needs to be better organized.
    My sympathies, Keira. Where will you be moving? Being able to anticipate the new place really keeps us moving forward.

    Reply
  64. Carol, I forgot to say that I know the OC Chapter is utterly cool. I just have to figure out how to get up there sometime since the I5 terrifies me!
    And Donna, we still have family in KY. They’re drowning. Really, weather needs to be better organized.
    My sympathies, Keira. Where will you be moving? Being able to anticipate the new place really keeps us moving forward.

    Reply
  65. Carol, I forgot to say that I know the OC Chapter is utterly cool. I just have to figure out how to get up there sometime since the I5 terrifies me!
    And Donna, we still have family in KY. They’re drowning. Really, weather needs to be better organized.
    My sympathies, Keira. Where will you be moving? Being able to anticipate the new place really keeps us moving forward.

    Reply
  66. We spent the past year moving to and settling in in Florida, only to come back up north to finish renovating our summer cottage. Eek! It’s consumed us, and yes my husband retired, too. I wrote a book titled Prospect Street several years ago about a woman moving, renovating and beginning a new life, and I can’t tell you how many times this year I have realized I didn’t give her enough obstacles to be realistic, although she had plenty. Hope all goes well and you settle in happily. Also find that sweet spot in time and place for writing.

    Reply
  67. We spent the past year moving to and settling in in Florida, only to come back up north to finish renovating our summer cottage. Eek! It’s consumed us, and yes my husband retired, too. I wrote a book titled Prospect Street several years ago about a woman moving, renovating and beginning a new life, and I can’t tell you how many times this year I have realized I didn’t give her enough obstacles to be realistic, although she had plenty. Hope all goes well and you settle in happily. Also find that sweet spot in time and place for writing.

    Reply
  68. We spent the past year moving to and settling in in Florida, only to come back up north to finish renovating our summer cottage. Eek! It’s consumed us, and yes my husband retired, too. I wrote a book titled Prospect Street several years ago about a woman moving, renovating and beginning a new life, and I can’t tell you how many times this year I have realized I didn’t give her enough obstacles to be realistic, although she had plenty. Hope all goes well and you settle in happily. Also find that sweet spot in time and place for writing.

    Reply
  69. We spent the past year moving to and settling in in Florida, only to come back up north to finish renovating our summer cottage. Eek! It’s consumed us, and yes my husband retired, too. I wrote a book titled Prospect Street several years ago about a woman moving, renovating and beginning a new life, and I can’t tell you how many times this year I have realized I didn’t give her enough obstacles to be realistic, although she had plenty. Hope all goes well and you settle in happily. Also find that sweet spot in time and place for writing.

    Reply
  70. We spent the past year moving to and settling in in Florida, only to come back up north to finish renovating our summer cottage. Eek! It’s consumed us, and yes my husband retired, too. I wrote a book titled Prospect Street several years ago about a woman moving, renovating and beginning a new life, and I can’t tell you how many times this year I have realized I didn’t give her enough obstacles to be realistic, although she had plenty. Hope all goes well and you settle in happily. Also find that sweet spot in time and place for writing.

    Reply
  71. Emilie, readers would give up half way through the book if you added all the obstacles a renovation faces! Yikes, indeed. Hope you get a chance to relax and enjoy Florida! Perfect to have both a summer and winter home.

    Reply
  72. Emilie, readers would give up half way through the book if you added all the obstacles a renovation faces! Yikes, indeed. Hope you get a chance to relax and enjoy Florida! Perfect to have both a summer and winter home.

    Reply
  73. Emilie, readers would give up half way through the book if you added all the obstacles a renovation faces! Yikes, indeed. Hope you get a chance to relax and enjoy Florida! Perfect to have both a summer and winter home.

    Reply
  74. Emilie, readers would give up half way through the book if you added all the obstacles a renovation faces! Yikes, indeed. Hope you get a chance to relax and enjoy Florida! Perfect to have both a summer and winter home.

    Reply
  75. Emilie, readers would give up half way through the book if you added all the obstacles a renovation faces! Yikes, indeed. Hope you get a chance to relax and enjoy Florida! Perfect to have both a summer and winter home.

    Reply

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