Bullet Journals

Anne here. Are you a list-maker? I have to admit, I am. I make shopping lists, to-do lists, packing lists for when I go away, lists of plans and resolutions — all sorts of lists. VisualPackingList

In fact I've graduated from being a keeper of endless scraps of paper to something called a bullet journal. Have you heard of them? It's a craze that's been sweeping the world for the past few years.

If you want to know what I mean search pinterest or google images for "bullet journal" – there are hundreds of examples, ranging from the flamboyant and artistic, to the terse and spare — and even the ever-so-slightly anal. 

A bullet journal is a way of organizing your life, keeping lists of what you need to do (or eat or exercise or whatever.) Some people take it to extremes and create elaborate and detailed lists for almost every aspect of their lives. There is endless scope for perfectionism and procrastination with the bullet journal. It also works — or it does for me. 

BulletJournalI've been keeping a bullet journal for nearly a year now. Mine's not pretty at all — not like some you see on the web, with colorful writing and pretty calligraphy and sketches and meaningful quotes about life. The one on the left is from this site.

No, mine is just a small graph paper book with my not-particularly- elegant black printing. There is a recommended way of setting up a bullet journal, but though I started like that, I didn't continue — there is no right way, just the way that suits you, so in mine, there are just lists of things I need to do, organized under headings, and I cross them out when I've finished.

It helps me remember, prioritize and keep a record of the various things I have to do. I’ve always been a list maker — before I started writing full time, when I was working in paid employment, I carried a large diary that was full of to-do lists with things crossed out as I did them. It’s a great way to be organized and not to let things be forgotten.

And I have to say, it's very satisfying to cross things out. Actually, I have been known to list things already done, just so I can have the satisfaction of seeing the tasks crossed out.

I'm not alone. It's a very human need, apparently.

It seems our brains are wired to worry about things that are left unfinished — it will not let us relax and forget about them. It can be quite intrusive and distracting and we can lose sleep, even when the thing left uncompleted isn't all that important.

However the mere act of listing the things that need to be done can reduce this anxiety. I'm oversimplifying, of course — if you want to read about this in more detail, look up the Zeigarnik effectPicture 12

People have been making lists for thousands of years. Lists are a window into our culture and the lives of everyday as well as famous people. They reflect and reveal our plans and aspirations, our priorities and our beliefs assumptions about what is important in life.

41P6CldtUQL._SX367_BO1,204,203,200_ There is a fascinating book by Shaun Usher called Lists of Note, in which he's collected and reproduced some fascinating lists, ranging from a carefully engraved list of excuses for workmen's absences in Ancient Egypt, to a 9th century Tibetan monk's shopping list, a to-do list of Leonardo DaVinci's, a list of pros and cons of marriage written by Charles Darwin, a list of quite punitive conditions imposed on his first wife by Einstein, Marilyn Monroe's New Year's resolutions and many more.

Lists can make us feel satisfied and in control of our lives, or they can make us feel miserable by setting impossibly high standards that we are bound to fail. The young Benjamin Franklin, for instance, set himself an almost impossible schedule of self-improvement, listing his plan to practice thirteen virtues daily— temperance, silence, order, resolution, frugality, industry, sincerity, justice, moderation, cleanliness, tranquility, chastity, and humility — and keep to a strict daily routine that was left no room for living. It provides a window into his mind and times. And ambition. He was trying to do too much at once. We're all guilty of that at some stage.

Some people make lists for every little thing, as if the making of the list was all that was needing to be done. Psychologists say that obsessive compulsive list makers are trying to create an illusion of control in otherwise chaotic lives. I believe that. I think the increasing demands and contradictions of modern life explains the popularity and growth of the bullet journal movement. It's also, it seems to me, most popular with young people. The web is awash with blogs and videos that showcase, explain and almost preach the virtues of keeping a bullet journal. Images-1

Computers could very easily keep track of our commitments and obligations, and yet these bullet journals are almost exclusively hand written and designed. It's a way of personalizing the control, I think, and those folk with more artistic tendencies use their journals as an way of expressing themselves, as well as being organized. In an age of competing demands and information overload, it's a source of reassurance and control — and pleasure. 

Whatever the reason, all around you, people are making and keeping bullet journals. Ask around — you'll be surprised.

Are you a list maker? Do you keep a bullet journal? Does anyone you know? Had you heard of them? Are you tempted to start one? 

240 thoughts on “Bullet Journals”

  1. I’m a compulsive list maker. If I make a list I get things done. No list means no achievements. My shopping list ensures I don’t forget to buy things, and if I need to drive up to Albury, a list of places to go and things to do helps me to keep the trip efficient. I’ve never heard of a bullet list though.

    Reply
  2. I’m a compulsive list maker. If I make a list I get things done. No list means no achievements. My shopping list ensures I don’t forget to buy things, and if I need to drive up to Albury, a list of places to go and things to do helps me to keep the trip efficient. I’ve never heard of a bullet list though.

    Reply
  3. I’m a compulsive list maker. If I make a list I get things done. No list means no achievements. My shopping list ensures I don’t forget to buy things, and if I need to drive up to Albury, a list of places to go and things to do helps me to keep the trip efficient. I’ve never heard of a bullet list though.

    Reply
  4. I’m a compulsive list maker. If I make a list I get things done. No list means no achievements. My shopping list ensures I don’t forget to buy things, and if I need to drive up to Albury, a list of places to go and things to do helps me to keep the trip efficient. I’ve never heard of a bullet list though.

    Reply
  5. I’m a compulsive list maker. If I make a list I get things done. No list means no achievements. My shopping list ensures I don’t forget to buy things, and if I need to drive up to Albury, a list of places to go and things to do helps me to keep the trip efficient. I’ve never heard of a bullet list though.

    Reply
  6. Yes I’m a list maker, but bullet journaling doesn’t work for me. Each time I’ve tried it, the ‘method’ has messed with me actually getting things done!S
    Lists of Note sounds interesting – will look it up!

    Reply
  7. Yes I’m a list maker, but bullet journaling doesn’t work for me. Each time I’ve tried it, the ‘method’ has messed with me actually getting things done!S
    Lists of Note sounds interesting – will look it up!

    Reply
  8. Yes I’m a list maker, but bullet journaling doesn’t work for me. Each time I’ve tried it, the ‘method’ has messed with me actually getting things done!S
    Lists of Note sounds interesting – will look it up!

    Reply
  9. Yes I’m a list maker, but bullet journaling doesn’t work for me. Each time I’ve tried it, the ‘method’ has messed with me actually getting things done!S
    Lists of Note sounds interesting – will look it up!

    Reply
  10. Yes I’m a list maker, but bullet journaling doesn’t work for me. Each time I’ve tried it, the ‘method’ has messed with me actually getting things done!S
    Lists of Note sounds interesting – will look it up!

    Reply
  11. I am an inveterate list maker. Love getting everything out of my head so I don’t have to keep remembering to remember it :D. I discovered bullet journals a few years ago and have kept one ever since! Love it.

    Reply
  12. I am an inveterate list maker. Love getting everything out of my head so I don’t have to keep remembering to remember it :D. I discovered bullet journals a few years ago and have kept one ever since! Love it.

    Reply
  13. I am an inveterate list maker. Love getting everything out of my head so I don’t have to keep remembering to remember it :D. I discovered bullet journals a few years ago and have kept one ever since! Love it.

    Reply
  14. I am an inveterate list maker. Love getting everything out of my head so I don’t have to keep remembering to remember it :D. I discovered bullet journals a few years ago and have kept one ever since! Love it.

    Reply
  15. I am an inveterate list maker. Love getting everything out of my head so I don’t have to keep remembering to remember it :D. I discovered bullet journals a few years ago and have kept one ever since! Love it.

    Reply
  16. I will add I still use a digital calendar as I find the reminder functions handy (I keep a basic big events on this month list in my bullet journal. I have tried digital to-do lists but always spent more time setting it up and trying to find the perfect app than doing the to-dos. I do my grocery list and other “need to buy” type lists on a very basic app now just because I’m more likely to have my phone with me at the store or if I’m out and about running errands than my bullet journal. But for almost everything else the bullet journal is easier and I just think your brain works differently with handwritten stuff versus electronic. Planning does seem to be very trendy at the moment (There are massive online communities for other types of planners as well). It’s definitely a creative outlet for lots of people and I agree, a bit of a reaction to digital overload. I think crafting has had a resurgence over the last 10 years for the same reason. The human touch, creativity and stress relief!

    Reply
  17. I will add I still use a digital calendar as I find the reminder functions handy (I keep a basic big events on this month list in my bullet journal. I have tried digital to-do lists but always spent more time setting it up and trying to find the perfect app than doing the to-dos. I do my grocery list and other “need to buy” type lists on a very basic app now just because I’m more likely to have my phone with me at the store or if I’m out and about running errands than my bullet journal. But for almost everything else the bullet journal is easier and I just think your brain works differently with handwritten stuff versus electronic. Planning does seem to be very trendy at the moment (There are massive online communities for other types of planners as well). It’s definitely a creative outlet for lots of people and I agree, a bit of a reaction to digital overload. I think crafting has had a resurgence over the last 10 years for the same reason. The human touch, creativity and stress relief!

    Reply
  18. I will add I still use a digital calendar as I find the reminder functions handy (I keep a basic big events on this month list in my bullet journal. I have tried digital to-do lists but always spent more time setting it up and trying to find the perfect app than doing the to-dos. I do my grocery list and other “need to buy” type lists on a very basic app now just because I’m more likely to have my phone with me at the store or if I’m out and about running errands than my bullet journal. But for almost everything else the bullet journal is easier and I just think your brain works differently with handwritten stuff versus electronic. Planning does seem to be very trendy at the moment (There are massive online communities for other types of planners as well). It’s definitely a creative outlet for lots of people and I agree, a bit of a reaction to digital overload. I think crafting has had a resurgence over the last 10 years for the same reason. The human touch, creativity and stress relief!

    Reply
  19. I will add I still use a digital calendar as I find the reminder functions handy (I keep a basic big events on this month list in my bullet journal. I have tried digital to-do lists but always spent more time setting it up and trying to find the perfect app than doing the to-dos. I do my grocery list and other “need to buy” type lists on a very basic app now just because I’m more likely to have my phone with me at the store or if I’m out and about running errands than my bullet journal. But for almost everything else the bullet journal is easier and I just think your brain works differently with handwritten stuff versus electronic. Planning does seem to be very trendy at the moment (There are massive online communities for other types of planners as well). It’s definitely a creative outlet for lots of people and I agree, a bit of a reaction to digital overload. I think crafting has had a resurgence over the last 10 years for the same reason. The human touch, creativity and stress relief!

    Reply
  20. I will add I still use a digital calendar as I find the reminder functions handy (I keep a basic big events on this month list in my bullet journal. I have tried digital to-do lists but always spent more time setting it up and trying to find the perfect app than doing the to-dos. I do my grocery list and other “need to buy” type lists on a very basic app now just because I’m more likely to have my phone with me at the store or if I’m out and about running errands than my bullet journal. But for almost everything else the bullet journal is easier and I just think your brain works differently with handwritten stuff versus electronic. Planning does seem to be very trendy at the moment (There are massive online communities for other types of planners as well). It’s definitely a creative outlet for lots of people and I agree, a bit of a reaction to digital overload. I think crafting has had a resurgence over the last 10 years for the same reason. The human touch, creativity and stress relief!

    Reply
  21. I make lists so much that it is a running joke with my husband that if it doesn’t have a list, it isn’t important. I haven’t tried bullet journaling, but might give it a try.

    Reply
  22. I make lists so much that it is a running joke with my husband that if it doesn’t have a list, it isn’t important. I haven’t tried bullet journaling, but might give it a try.

    Reply
  23. I make lists so much that it is a running joke with my husband that if it doesn’t have a list, it isn’t important. I haven’t tried bullet journaling, but might give it a try.

    Reply
  24. I make lists so much that it is a running joke with my husband that if it doesn’t have a list, it isn’t important. I haven’t tried bullet journaling, but might give it a try.

    Reply
  25. I make lists so much that it is a running joke with my husband that if it doesn’t have a list, it isn’t important. I haven’t tried bullet journaling, but might give it a try.

    Reply
  26. I am a list maker. It was important while I was still working. As jobs were cut, those of us remaining were expected to take on more duties. Setting priorities was important.
    Now that I am retired, don’t have the need for lists that I once had. About the only lists that I keep now are grocery lists.
    However, every now and then, if I feel a little overwhelmed, I pull out a pad and make a list. I always put “make a list” and top so that I can scratch something off right away (smile). Great for morale.

    Reply
  27. I am a list maker. It was important while I was still working. As jobs were cut, those of us remaining were expected to take on more duties. Setting priorities was important.
    Now that I am retired, don’t have the need for lists that I once had. About the only lists that I keep now are grocery lists.
    However, every now and then, if I feel a little overwhelmed, I pull out a pad and make a list. I always put “make a list” and top so that I can scratch something off right away (smile). Great for morale.

    Reply
  28. I am a list maker. It was important while I was still working. As jobs were cut, those of us remaining were expected to take on more duties. Setting priorities was important.
    Now that I am retired, don’t have the need for lists that I once had. About the only lists that I keep now are grocery lists.
    However, every now and then, if I feel a little overwhelmed, I pull out a pad and make a list. I always put “make a list” and top so that I can scratch something off right away (smile). Great for morale.

    Reply
  29. I am a list maker. It was important while I was still working. As jobs were cut, those of us remaining were expected to take on more duties. Setting priorities was important.
    Now that I am retired, don’t have the need for lists that I once had. About the only lists that I keep now are grocery lists.
    However, every now and then, if I feel a little overwhelmed, I pull out a pad and make a list. I always put “make a list” and top so that I can scratch something off right away (smile). Great for morale.

    Reply
  30. I am a list maker. It was important while I was still working. As jobs were cut, those of us remaining were expected to take on more duties. Setting priorities was important.
    Now that I am retired, don’t have the need for lists that I once had. About the only lists that I keep now are grocery lists.
    However, every now and then, if I feel a little overwhelmed, I pull out a pad and make a list. I always put “make a list” and top so that I can scratch something off right away (smile). Great for morale.

    Reply
  31. Never heard of a bullet list. But lists…oh yes! I have those. They make a great brain dump before bed because if I don’t write it down, I feel I can’t sleep because I won’t remember what it was I have to do. And so many times those last minute at night brain dumps are piddly things!
    I have occasionally made BIG lists for all parts of the house, garden, computer activities but just to organize it. Sometimes I work at those lists intently, sometimes not because after all, OTHER things occur that need doing now versus in a couple of weeks.
    As for errand lists….I have to have them on the back of an envelope. I put receipts and coupons on the list. Sometimes I think of new errands while I’m out and insert the new one in the correct slot. Other times I end up rearranging my route and therefore have to rearrange the errands on the list.
    Or I didn’t find what I want at stop 3 and move that search down to stop 5… Think of all the trouble that is to do electronically when with a few circles and directing lines you have moved your things to look for from stop #3 to stop #5.
    As for younger people doing bulleted journals, maybe that is an outgrowth of so many kids having to have and use school planners from an early age through so many years of middle and high school. During back to school sales that are huge sections devoted to planners just for the school year (ex: July 2016 to June 2017)

    Reply
  32. Never heard of a bullet list. But lists…oh yes! I have those. They make a great brain dump before bed because if I don’t write it down, I feel I can’t sleep because I won’t remember what it was I have to do. And so many times those last minute at night brain dumps are piddly things!
    I have occasionally made BIG lists for all parts of the house, garden, computer activities but just to organize it. Sometimes I work at those lists intently, sometimes not because after all, OTHER things occur that need doing now versus in a couple of weeks.
    As for errand lists….I have to have them on the back of an envelope. I put receipts and coupons on the list. Sometimes I think of new errands while I’m out and insert the new one in the correct slot. Other times I end up rearranging my route and therefore have to rearrange the errands on the list.
    Or I didn’t find what I want at stop 3 and move that search down to stop 5… Think of all the trouble that is to do electronically when with a few circles and directing lines you have moved your things to look for from stop #3 to stop #5.
    As for younger people doing bulleted journals, maybe that is an outgrowth of so many kids having to have and use school planners from an early age through so many years of middle and high school. During back to school sales that are huge sections devoted to planners just for the school year (ex: July 2016 to June 2017)

    Reply
  33. Never heard of a bullet list. But lists…oh yes! I have those. They make a great brain dump before bed because if I don’t write it down, I feel I can’t sleep because I won’t remember what it was I have to do. And so many times those last minute at night brain dumps are piddly things!
    I have occasionally made BIG lists for all parts of the house, garden, computer activities but just to organize it. Sometimes I work at those lists intently, sometimes not because after all, OTHER things occur that need doing now versus in a couple of weeks.
    As for errand lists….I have to have them on the back of an envelope. I put receipts and coupons on the list. Sometimes I think of new errands while I’m out and insert the new one in the correct slot. Other times I end up rearranging my route and therefore have to rearrange the errands on the list.
    Or I didn’t find what I want at stop 3 and move that search down to stop 5… Think of all the trouble that is to do electronically when with a few circles and directing lines you have moved your things to look for from stop #3 to stop #5.
    As for younger people doing bulleted journals, maybe that is an outgrowth of so many kids having to have and use school planners from an early age through so many years of middle and high school. During back to school sales that are huge sections devoted to planners just for the school year (ex: July 2016 to June 2017)

    Reply
  34. Never heard of a bullet list. But lists…oh yes! I have those. They make a great brain dump before bed because if I don’t write it down, I feel I can’t sleep because I won’t remember what it was I have to do. And so many times those last minute at night brain dumps are piddly things!
    I have occasionally made BIG lists for all parts of the house, garden, computer activities but just to organize it. Sometimes I work at those lists intently, sometimes not because after all, OTHER things occur that need doing now versus in a couple of weeks.
    As for errand lists….I have to have them on the back of an envelope. I put receipts and coupons on the list. Sometimes I think of new errands while I’m out and insert the new one in the correct slot. Other times I end up rearranging my route and therefore have to rearrange the errands on the list.
    Or I didn’t find what I want at stop 3 and move that search down to stop 5… Think of all the trouble that is to do electronically when with a few circles and directing lines you have moved your things to look for from stop #3 to stop #5.
    As for younger people doing bulleted journals, maybe that is an outgrowth of so many kids having to have and use school planners from an early age through so many years of middle and high school. During back to school sales that are huge sections devoted to planners just for the school year (ex: July 2016 to June 2017)

    Reply
  35. Never heard of a bullet list. But lists…oh yes! I have those. They make a great brain dump before bed because if I don’t write it down, I feel I can’t sleep because I won’t remember what it was I have to do. And so many times those last minute at night brain dumps are piddly things!
    I have occasionally made BIG lists for all parts of the house, garden, computer activities but just to organize it. Sometimes I work at those lists intently, sometimes not because after all, OTHER things occur that need doing now versus in a couple of weeks.
    As for errand lists….I have to have them on the back of an envelope. I put receipts and coupons on the list. Sometimes I think of new errands while I’m out and insert the new one in the correct slot. Other times I end up rearranging my route and therefore have to rearrange the errands on the list.
    Or I didn’t find what I want at stop 3 and move that search down to stop 5… Think of all the trouble that is to do electronically when with a few circles and directing lines you have moved your things to look for from stop #3 to stop #5.
    As for younger people doing bulleted journals, maybe that is an outgrowth of so many kids having to have and use school planners from an early age through so many years of middle and high school. During back to school sales that are huge sections devoted to planners just for the school year (ex: July 2016 to June 2017)

    Reply
  36. I am one of those who has to make a list but doesn’t have to follow it– Just making it gets it organized in my mind… though I finally made a set of lists that I keep in Excel for download to check off when we travel because the list always included the same stuff to check off. I hadn’t heard about the bullet journals, but I keep small spiral notebook next to me to jot notes, make lists, record ideas, etc. They don’t require batteries and fit into my purse. A tour of my old notebooks is a chaotic trip through my thinking (oh, dear!)

    Reply
  37. I am one of those who has to make a list but doesn’t have to follow it– Just making it gets it organized in my mind… though I finally made a set of lists that I keep in Excel for download to check off when we travel because the list always included the same stuff to check off. I hadn’t heard about the bullet journals, but I keep small spiral notebook next to me to jot notes, make lists, record ideas, etc. They don’t require batteries and fit into my purse. A tour of my old notebooks is a chaotic trip through my thinking (oh, dear!)

    Reply
  38. I am one of those who has to make a list but doesn’t have to follow it– Just making it gets it organized in my mind… though I finally made a set of lists that I keep in Excel for download to check off when we travel because the list always included the same stuff to check off. I hadn’t heard about the bullet journals, but I keep small spiral notebook next to me to jot notes, make lists, record ideas, etc. They don’t require batteries and fit into my purse. A tour of my old notebooks is a chaotic trip through my thinking (oh, dear!)

    Reply
  39. I am one of those who has to make a list but doesn’t have to follow it– Just making it gets it organized in my mind… though I finally made a set of lists that I keep in Excel for download to check off when we travel because the list always included the same stuff to check off. I hadn’t heard about the bullet journals, but I keep small spiral notebook next to me to jot notes, make lists, record ideas, etc. They don’t require batteries and fit into my purse. A tour of my old notebooks is a chaotic trip through my thinking (oh, dear!)

    Reply
  40. I am one of those who has to make a list but doesn’t have to follow it– Just making it gets it organized in my mind… though I finally made a set of lists that I keep in Excel for download to check off when we travel because the list always included the same stuff to check off. I hadn’t heard about the bullet journals, but I keep small spiral notebook next to me to jot notes, make lists, record ideas, etc. They don’t require batteries and fit into my purse. A tour of my old notebooks is a chaotic trip through my thinking (oh, dear!)

    Reply
  41. It sounds interesting, but I’m not sure I could keep it up. I start things then somewhere along the line..I lose interest.

    Reply
  42. It sounds interesting, but I’m not sure I could keep it up. I start things then somewhere along the line..I lose interest.

    Reply
  43. It sounds interesting, but I’m not sure I could keep it up. I start things then somewhere along the line..I lose interest.

    Reply
  44. It sounds interesting, but I’m not sure I could keep it up. I start things then somewhere along the line..I lose interest.

    Reply
  45. It sounds interesting, but I’m not sure I could keep it up. I start things then somewhere along the line..I lose interest.

    Reply
  46. The first thing I thought of as I started reading was Pintrest as some folks I know are always saying that they’ll put some thing there to save it. I used to be a real list maker but as I also was a perfectionist and a procrastinator keeping a journal never worked for me. I couldn’t stand sloppy and found ideas did not flow if I tried to keep them in a format that my mind felt should look neat. Used to erase on math and writing assignments if the numbers and letters weren’t neatly made. I kept them on tablets or loose pages and still now in retirement come across lists tucked away which are fun to read see what I once thought was important. Lists nowadays are for groceries and “Ways to Spend Money” should the people from Publisher’s Clearing House show up with that huge check – money for life. LOL
    An artist I follow on FB just sold a page from his journal! He uses a journal to jot down drawings, sayings and ideas as one leads him to another.
    The test and test mania that public education has been involved with for the last several years in the U.S. has pushed things like the teaching of cursive writing from the curriculum. Now the evidence is coming in that notes that are handwritten improve memory over typed notes on computers. With cursive being faster than printing, some interest in cursive is reviving. With the waning interest in Core Curriculum, cursive instruction may come back.
    P.S. No longer a perfectionist but procrastination is still high on my lists.

    Reply
  47. The first thing I thought of as I started reading was Pintrest as some folks I know are always saying that they’ll put some thing there to save it. I used to be a real list maker but as I also was a perfectionist and a procrastinator keeping a journal never worked for me. I couldn’t stand sloppy and found ideas did not flow if I tried to keep them in a format that my mind felt should look neat. Used to erase on math and writing assignments if the numbers and letters weren’t neatly made. I kept them on tablets or loose pages and still now in retirement come across lists tucked away which are fun to read see what I once thought was important. Lists nowadays are for groceries and “Ways to Spend Money” should the people from Publisher’s Clearing House show up with that huge check – money for life. LOL
    An artist I follow on FB just sold a page from his journal! He uses a journal to jot down drawings, sayings and ideas as one leads him to another.
    The test and test mania that public education has been involved with for the last several years in the U.S. has pushed things like the teaching of cursive writing from the curriculum. Now the evidence is coming in that notes that are handwritten improve memory over typed notes on computers. With cursive being faster than printing, some interest in cursive is reviving. With the waning interest in Core Curriculum, cursive instruction may come back.
    P.S. No longer a perfectionist but procrastination is still high on my lists.

    Reply
  48. The first thing I thought of as I started reading was Pintrest as some folks I know are always saying that they’ll put some thing there to save it. I used to be a real list maker but as I also was a perfectionist and a procrastinator keeping a journal never worked for me. I couldn’t stand sloppy and found ideas did not flow if I tried to keep them in a format that my mind felt should look neat. Used to erase on math and writing assignments if the numbers and letters weren’t neatly made. I kept them on tablets or loose pages and still now in retirement come across lists tucked away which are fun to read see what I once thought was important. Lists nowadays are for groceries and “Ways to Spend Money” should the people from Publisher’s Clearing House show up with that huge check – money for life. LOL
    An artist I follow on FB just sold a page from his journal! He uses a journal to jot down drawings, sayings and ideas as one leads him to another.
    The test and test mania that public education has been involved with for the last several years in the U.S. has pushed things like the teaching of cursive writing from the curriculum. Now the evidence is coming in that notes that are handwritten improve memory over typed notes on computers. With cursive being faster than printing, some interest in cursive is reviving. With the waning interest in Core Curriculum, cursive instruction may come back.
    P.S. No longer a perfectionist but procrastination is still high on my lists.

    Reply
  49. The first thing I thought of as I started reading was Pintrest as some folks I know are always saying that they’ll put some thing there to save it. I used to be a real list maker but as I also was a perfectionist and a procrastinator keeping a journal never worked for me. I couldn’t stand sloppy and found ideas did not flow if I tried to keep them in a format that my mind felt should look neat. Used to erase on math and writing assignments if the numbers and letters weren’t neatly made. I kept them on tablets or loose pages and still now in retirement come across lists tucked away which are fun to read see what I once thought was important. Lists nowadays are for groceries and “Ways to Spend Money” should the people from Publisher’s Clearing House show up with that huge check – money for life. LOL
    An artist I follow on FB just sold a page from his journal! He uses a journal to jot down drawings, sayings and ideas as one leads him to another.
    The test and test mania that public education has been involved with for the last several years in the U.S. has pushed things like the teaching of cursive writing from the curriculum. Now the evidence is coming in that notes that are handwritten improve memory over typed notes on computers. With cursive being faster than printing, some interest in cursive is reviving. With the waning interest in Core Curriculum, cursive instruction may come back.
    P.S. No longer a perfectionist but procrastination is still high on my lists.

    Reply
  50. The first thing I thought of as I started reading was Pintrest as some folks I know are always saying that they’ll put some thing there to save it. I used to be a real list maker but as I also was a perfectionist and a procrastinator keeping a journal never worked for me. I couldn’t stand sloppy and found ideas did not flow if I tried to keep them in a format that my mind felt should look neat. Used to erase on math and writing assignments if the numbers and letters weren’t neatly made. I kept them on tablets or loose pages and still now in retirement come across lists tucked away which are fun to read see what I once thought was important. Lists nowadays are for groceries and “Ways to Spend Money” should the people from Publisher’s Clearing House show up with that huge check – money for life. LOL
    An artist I follow on FB just sold a page from his journal! He uses a journal to jot down drawings, sayings and ideas as one leads him to another.
    The test and test mania that public education has been involved with for the last several years in the U.S. has pushed things like the teaching of cursive writing from the curriculum. Now the evidence is coming in that notes that are handwritten improve memory over typed notes on computers. With cursive being faster than printing, some interest in cursive is reviving. With the waning interest in Core Curriculum, cursive instruction may come back.
    P.S. No longer a perfectionist but procrastination is still high on my lists.

    Reply
  51. I too am a list maker. I keep the shopping list and some others on a word processing sheet, stored in DropBox. This is so that it is available whenever we find ourselves out at a store.
    This is not an especially organized list; there is a top section for long term items and a middle section for immediate needs. This one may include the store (or stores) which I know carry the specific item or the brand name of the food or other item if important, and i try not to mix grocery store and non-grocery store items when important. And finally there is a book list at the bottom of this electronic list. It lists Author, Book title, and pub date. I bought the final Mary Balogh Survivor’s club novel yesterday, so that’s off the list. But the blurb at the end listed a new Balogh in November so THAT book is now ON the list. And yes, there are two 2017’s already on the list. I decided to wait for the paperback version of this year’s Nora Roberts stand alone, and Catherine Anderson announced a new novel for January.
    As for other lists, I make most of those on “clean-on-one-side paper” (Usually 1-1/2 x 11 sheets torn into quarters, but our preferred schedule of housekeeping tasks is tied to our electronic calendar, along with doctor appointments, social events, and other defined activities
    I haven’t tried bullet journals and don’t believe that I would like them. But I WILL look into them because you never know.

    Reply
  52. I too am a list maker. I keep the shopping list and some others on a word processing sheet, stored in DropBox. This is so that it is available whenever we find ourselves out at a store.
    This is not an especially organized list; there is a top section for long term items and a middle section for immediate needs. This one may include the store (or stores) which I know carry the specific item or the brand name of the food or other item if important, and i try not to mix grocery store and non-grocery store items when important. And finally there is a book list at the bottom of this electronic list. It lists Author, Book title, and pub date. I bought the final Mary Balogh Survivor’s club novel yesterday, so that’s off the list. But the blurb at the end listed a new Balogh in November so THAT book is now ON the list. And yes, there are two 2017’s already on the list. I decided to wait for the paperback version of this year’s Nora Roberts stand alone, and Catherine Anderson announced a new novel for January.
    As for other lists, I make most of those on “clean-on-one-side paper” (Usually 1-1/2 x 11 sheets torn into quarters, but our preferred schedule of housekeeping tasks is tied to our electronic calendar, along with doctor appointments, social events, and other defined activities
    I haven’t tried bullet journals and don’t believe that I would like them. But I WILL look into them because you never know.

    Reply
  53. I too am a list maker. I keep the shopping list and some others on a word processing sheet, stored in DropBox. This is so that it is available whenever we find ourselves out at a store.
    This is not an especially organized list; there is a top section for long term items and a middle section for immediate needs. This one may include the store (or stores) which I know carry the specific item or the brand name of the food or other item if important, and i try not to mix grocery store and non-grocery store items when important. And finally there is a book list at the bottom of this electronic list. It lists Author, Book title, and pub date. I bought the final Mary Balogh Survivor’s club novel yesterday, so that’s off the list. But the blurb at the end listed a new Balogh in November so THAT book is now ON the list. And yes, there are two 2017’s already on the list. I decided to wait for the paperback version of this year’s Nora Roberts stand alone, and Catherine Anderson announced a new novel for January.
    As for other lists, I make most of those on “clean-on-one-side paper” (Usually 1-1/2 x 11 sheets torn into quarters, but our preferred schedule of housekeeping tasks is tied to our electronic calendar, along with doctor appointments, social events, and other defined activities
    I haven’t tried bullet journals and don’t believe that I would like them. But I WILL look into them because you never know.

    Reply
  54. I too am a list maker. I keep the shopping list and some others on a word processing sheet, stored in DropBox. This is so that it is available whenever we find ourselves out at a store.
    This is not an especially organized list; there is a top section for long term items and a middle section for immediate needs. This one may include the store (or stores) which I know carry the specific item or the brand name of the food or other item if important, and i try not to mix grocery store and non-grocery store items when important. And finally there is a book list at the bottom of this electronic list. It lists Author, Book title, and pub date. I bought the final Mary Balogh Survivor’s club novel yesterday, so that’s off the list. But the blurb at the end listed a new Balogh in November so THAT book is now ON the list. And yes, there are two 2017’s already on the list. I decided to wait for the paperback version of this year’s Nora Roberts stand alone, and Catherine Anderson announced a new novel for January.
    As for other lists, I make most of those on “clean-on-one-side paper” (Usually 1-1/2 x 11 sheets torn into quarters, but our preferred schedule of housekeeping tasks is tied to our electronic calendar, along with doctor appointments, social events, and other defined activities
    I haven’t tried bullet journals and don’t believe that I would like them. But I WILL look into them because you never know.

    Reply
  55. I too am a list maker. I keep the shopping list and some others on a word processing sheet, stored in DropBox. This is so that it is available whenever we find ourselves out at a store.
    This is not an especially organized list; there is a top section for long term items and a middle section for immediate needs. This one may include the store (or stores) which I know carry the specific item or the brand name of the food or other item if important, and i try not to mix grocery store and non-grocery store items when important. And finally there is a book list at the bottom of this electronic list. It lists Author, Book title, and pub date. I bought the final Mary Balogh Survivor’s club novel yesterday, so that’s off the list. But the blurb at the end listed a new Balogh in November so THAT book is now ON the list. And yes, there are two 2017’s already on the list. I decided to wait for the paperback version of this year’s Nora Roberts stand alone, and Catherine Anderson announced a new novel for January.
    As for other lists, I make most of those on “clean-on-one-side paper” (Usually 1-1/2 x 11 sheets torn into quarters, but our preferred schedule of housekeeping tasks is tied to our electronic calendar, along with doctor appointments, social events, and other defined activities
    I haven’t tried bullet journals and don’t believe that I would like them. But I WILL look into them because you never know.

    Reply
  56. I’m the same as you Mel. I keep my appointments and my shopping list on my phone. My bullet list journal has declined in the last few months which coincides with my lack of progress in getting things done! I’m gearing up for another Dorothea Brande intervention I think!

    Reply
  57. I’m the same as you Mel. I keep my appointments and my shopping list on my phone. My bullet list journal has declined in the last few months which coincides with my lack of progress in getting things done! I’m gearing up for another Dorothea Brande intervention I think!

    Reply
  58. I’m the same as you Mel. I keep my appointments and my shopping list on my phone. My bullet list journal has declined in the last few months which coincides with my lack of progress in getting things done! I’m gearing up for another Dorothea Brande intervention I think!

    Reply
  59. I’m the same as you Mel. I keep my appointments and my shopping list on my phone. My bullet list journal has declined in the last few months which coincides with my lack of progress in getting things done! I’m gearing up for another Dorothea Brande intervention I think!

    Reply
  60. I’m the same as you Mel. I keep my appointments and my shopping list on my phone. My bullet list journal has declined in the last few months which coincides with my lack of progress in getting things done! I’m gearing up for another Dorothea Brande intervention I think!

    Reply
  61. Shelagh, I make shopping lists, too, though I occasionally forget to take them with me. 😉
    I remember family shopping trips to Albury when I was a kid — they were infrequent enough that it was a huge treat for us all to have fish and chips afterward in the gardens by the river.

    Reply
  62. Shelagh, I make shopping lists, too, though I occasionally forget to take them with me. 😉
    I remember family shopping trips to Albury when I was a kid — they were infrequent enough that it was a huge treat for us all to have fish and chips afterward in the gardens by the river.

    Reply
  63. Shelagh, I make shopping lists, too, though I occasionally forget to take them with me. 😉
    I remember family shopping trips to Albury when I was a kid — they were infrequent enough that it was a huge treat for us all to have fish and chips afterward in the gardens by the river.

    Reply
  64. Shelagh, I make shopping lists, too, though I occasionally forget to take them with me. 😉
    I remember family shopping trips to Albury when I was a kid — they were infrequent enough that it was a huge treat for us all to have fish and chips afterward in the gardens by the river.

    Reply
  65. Shelagh, I make shopping lists, too, though I occasionally forget to take them with me. 😉
    I remember family shopping trips to Albury when I was a kid — they were infrequent enough that it was a huge treat for us all to have fish and chips afterward in the gardens by the river.

    Reply
  66. Shannon, yes, the recommended method didn’t work for me, either. These days I just have a chunk of time to a double page — a week, a fortnight, a collection of dates, depending on what’s happening in my life — and I list things under headings. I don’t do the monthly plan or any of the other stuff, but having a years worth of things crossed off is a good (and satisfying) reference. Also the record of how long it took me to get my tax done. And writing goes on there, too. Scene by scene.

    Reply
  67. Shannon, yes, the recommended method didn’t work for me, either. These days I just have a chunk of time to a double page — a week, a fortnight, a collection of dates, depending on what’s happening in my life — and I list things under headings. I don’t do the monthly plan or any of the other stuff, but having a years worth of things crossed off is a good (and satisfying) reference. Also the record of how long it took me to get my tax done. And writing goes on there, too. Scene by scene.

    Reply
  68. Shannon, yes, the recommended method didn’t work for me, either. These days I just have a chunk of time to a double page — a week, a fortnight, a collection of dates, depending on what’s happening in my life — and I list things under headings. I don’t do the monthly plan or any of the other stuff, but having a years worth of things crossed off is a good (and satisfying) reference. Also the record of how long it took me to get my tax done. And writing goes on there, too. Scene by scene.

    Reply
  69. Shannon, yes, the recommended method didn’t work for me, either. These days I just have a chunk of time to a double page — a week, a fortnight, a collection of dates, depending on what’s happening in my life — and I list things under headings. I don’t do the monthly plan or any of the other stuff, but having a years worth of things crossed off is a good (and satisfying) reference. Also the record of how long it took me to get my tax done. And writing goes on there, too. Scene by scene.

    Reply
  70. Shannon, yes, the recommended method didn’t work for me, either. These days I just have a chunk of time to a double page — a week, a fortnight, a collection of dates, depending on what’s happening in my life — and I list things under headings. I don’t do the monthly plan or any of the other stuff, but having a years worth of things crossed off is a good (and satisfying) reference. Also the record of how long it took me to get my tax done. And writing goes on there, too. Scene by scene.

    Reply
  71. My friend is a Life Coach and had several posts about bullet journaling. I thought – Wow -that’s cool, but I don’t have that kind of time or organization. But with 4 very active kids and care of my mom, I always have about 1000 lists running around. Some simple, menu for the week, grocery list, to 5 year plan, college ideas, and retirement goals (that’s my 20+) So this year my New Year’s resolution was to get my lists systemized. I spent hours going through planners, organizers, pinterest, and throughout the web. Nothing has the flexibility that I needed, but still meet all my needs. And it dawned on me, just bullet journal what I need, not everything. I love it. I did invest in a big pack of multicolored pens. And I write in the color that makes me happy that day. I also invested in a lot of those flag style post-it notes, so I mark things I am going to refer back to instead of an index. I have a general format for the daily, but just put in what I need when I need it. I did have to let go of my perfect ideal. I miss days, I have class notes, followed by lesson plans, followed by how I want to decorate and what menu I want for the holidays. But I have everything, can find everything.

    Reply
  72. My friend is a Life Coach and had several posts about bullet journaling. I thought – Wow -that’s cool, but I don’t have that kind of time or organization. But with 4 very active kids and care of my mom, I always have about 1000 lists running around. Some simple, menu for the week, grocery list, to 5 year plan, college ideas, and retirement goals (that’s my 20+) So this year my New Year’s resolution was to get my lists systemized. I spent hours going through planners, organizers, pinterest, and throughout the web. Nothing has the flexibility that I needed, but still meet all my needs. And it dawned on me, just bullet journal what I need, not everything. I love it. I did invest in a big pack of multicolored pens. And I write in the color that makes me happy that day. I also invested in a lot of those flag style post-it notes, so I mark things I am going to refer back to instead of an index. I have a general format for the daily, but just put in what I need when I need it. I did have to let go of my perfect ideal. I miss days, I have class notes, followed by lesson plans, followed by how I want to decorate and what menu I want for the holidays. But I have everything, can find everything.

    Reply
  73. My friend is a Life Coach and had several posts about bullet journaling. I thought – Wow -that’s cool, but I don’t have that kind of time or organization. But with 4 very active kids and care of my mom, I always have about 1000 lists running around. Some simple, menu for the week, grocery list, to 5 year plan, college ideas, and retirement goals (that’s my 20+) So this year my New Year’s resolution was to get my lists systemized. I spent hours going through planners, organizers, pinterest, and throughout the web. Nothing has the flexibility that I needed, but still meet all my needs. And it dawned on me, just bullet journal what I need, not everything. I love it. I did invest in a big pack of multicolored pens. And I write in the color that makes me happy that day. I also invested in a lot of those flag style post-it notes, so I mark things I am going to refer back to instead of an index. I have a general format for the daily, but just put in what I need when I need it. I did have to let go of my perfect ideal. I miss days, I have class notes, followed by lesson plans, followed by how I want to decorate and what menu I want for the holidays. But I have everything, can find everything.

    Reply
  74. My friend is a Life Coach and had several posts about bullet journaling. I thought – Wow -that’s cool, but I don’t have that kind of time or organization. But with 4 very active kids and care of my mom, I always have about 1000 lists running around. Some simple, menu for the week, grocery list, to 5 year plan, college ideas, and retirement goals (that’s my 20+) So this year my New Year’s resolution was to get my lists systemized. I spent hours going through planners, organizers, pinterest, and throughout the web. Nothing has the flexibility that I needed, but still meet all my needs. And it dawned on me, just bullet journal what I need, not everything. I love it. I did invest in a big pack of multicolored pens. And I write in the color that makes me happy that day. I also invested in a lot of those flag style post-it notes, so I mark things I am going to refer back to instead of an index. I have a general format for the daily, but just put in what I need when I need it. I did have to let go of my perfect ideal. I miss days, I have class notes, followed by lesson plans, followed by how I want to decorate and what menu I want for the holidays. But I have everything, can find everything.

    Reply
  75. My friend is a Life Coach and had several posts about bullet journaling. I thought – Wow -that’s cool, but I don’t have that kind of time or organization. But with 4 very active kids and care of my mom, I always have about 1000 lists running around. Some simple, menu for the week, grocery list, to 5 year plan, college ideas, and retirement goals (that’s my 20+) So this year my New Year’s resolution was to get my lists systemized. I spent hours going through planners, organizers, pinterest, and throughout the web. Nothing has the flexibility that I needed, but still meet all my needs. And it dawned on me, just bullet journal what I need, not everything. I love it. I did invest in a big pack of multicolored pens. And I write in the color that makes me happy that day. I also invested in a lot of those flag style post-it notes, so I mark things I am going to refer back to instead of an index. I have a general format for the daily, but just put in what I need when I need it. I did have to let go of my perfect ideal. I miss days, I have class notes, followed by lesson plans, followed by how I want to decorate and what menu I want for the holidays. But I have everything, can find everything.

    Reply
  76. Deb, mine goes in fits and starts, but I don’t use my bullet journal as a writing journal as well — it’s just a list of stuff, some of which is crossed off and some which isn’t.
    I “did Dorothea” when I came back from the USA because I hadn’t written much while I was away and I wanted to get back into the zone. As always, it worked a treat.
    For those who are wondering, Deb and Mel are both writer friends of mine, and Doing Dorothea is explained in this link to my website:http://www.annegracie.com/writer-resources/training-the-muse/

    Reply
  77. Deb, mine goes in fits and starts, but I don’t use my bullet journal as a writing journal as well — it’s just a list of stuff, some of which is crossed off and some which isn’t.
    I “did Dorothea” when I came back from the USA because I hadn’t written much while I was away and I wanted to get back into the zone. As always, it worked a treat.
    For those who are wondering, Deb and Mel are both writer friends of mine, and Doing Dorothea is explained in this link to my website:http://www.annegracie.com/writer-resources/training-the-muse/

    Reply
  78. Deb, mine goes in fits and starts, but I don’t use my bullet journal as a writing journal as well — it’s just a list of stuff, some of which is crossed off and some which isn’t.
    I “did Dorothea” when I came back from the USA because I hadn’t written much while I was away and I wanted to get back into the zone. As always, it worked a treat.
    For those who are wondering, Deb and Mel are both writer friends of mine, and Doing Dorothea is explained in this link to my website:http://www.annegracie.com/writer-resources/training-the-muse/

    Reply
  79. Deb, mine goes in fits and starts, but I don’t use my bullet journal as a writing journal as well — it’s just a list of stuff, some of which is crossed off and some which isn’t.
    I “did Dorothea” when I came back from the USA because I hadn’t written much while I was away and I wanted to get back into the zone. As always, it worked a treat.
    For those who are wondering, Deb and Mel are both writer friends of mine, and Doing Dorothea is explained in this link to my website:http://www.annegracie.com/writer-resources/training-the-muse/

    Reply
  80. Deb, mine goes in fits and starts, but I don’t use my bullet journal as a writing journal as well — it’s just a list of stuff, some of which is crossed off and some which isn’t.
    I “did Dorothea” when I came back from the USA because I hadn’t written much while I was away and I wanted to get back into the zone. As always, it worked a treat.
    For those who are wondering, Deb and Mel are both writer friends of mine, and Doing Dorothea is explained in this link to my website:http://www.annegracie.com/writer-resources/training-the-muse/

    Reply
  81. Jeanette, the constant testing of kids and the focus on measurable knowledge and skills rather than a well-rounded education for life drives me mad. I think writing, and drawing and organization that fits the person are hugely invaluable skills. I’d like to see kids taught more things that would help make them happy in the rest of their lives, as well as the subjects deemed to be most valuable in job-seeking.

    Reply
  82. Mel, I think it was you who helped start me on this bullet journal track. You mentioned yours (and pulled it out) and then three or four others at our table pulled one out. Yours is, of course, one of the artistic ones. (Mel is the writer and artist who painted the regency pink lady on my website.) But it surprised me how many people were keeping them, so I looked up bullet journals on the web and thought I might try it. A year later and I still find it incredibly useful and satisfying.

    Reply
  83. Denise, I’m smiling as I read your comment, as that’s a bit how I feel about my bullet journal — just put everything down that I need to have listed. And arrange it for how your life works and how it suits you, rather than the way others suggest it should be used.
    I love that you have colored pens and that it makes you feel happy and on top of your very busy life. Go you!

    Reply
  84. Jeanette, the constant testing of kids and the focus on measurable knowledge and skills rather than a well-rounded education for life drives me mad. I think writing, and drawing and organization that fits the person are hugely invaluable skills. I’d like to see kids taught more things that would help make them happy in the rest of their lives, as well as the subjects deemed to be most valuable in job-seeking.

    Reply
  85. Mel, I think it was you who helped start me on this bullet journal track. You mentioned yours (and pulled it out) and then three or four others at our table pulled one out. Yours is, of course, one of the artistic ones. (Mel is the writer and artist who painted the regency pink lady on my website.) But it surprised me how many people were keeping them, so I looked up bullet journals on the web and thought I might try it. A year later and I still find it incredibly useful and satisfying.

    Reply
  86. Denise, I’m smiling as I read your comment, as that’s a bit how I feel about my bullet journal — just put everything down that I need to have listed. And arrange it for how your life works and how it suits you, rather than the way others suggest it should be used.
    I love that you have colored pens and that it makes you feel happy and on top of your very busy life. Go you!

    Reply
  87. Jeanette, the constant testing of kids and the focus on measurable knowledge and skills rather than a well-rounded education for life drives me mad. I think writing, and drawing and organization that fits the person are hugely invaluable skills. I’d like to see kids taught more things that would help make them happy in the rest of their lives, as well as the subjects deemed to be most valuable in job-seeking.

    Reply
  88. Mel, I think it was you who helped start me on this bullet journal track. You mentioned yours (and pulled it out) and then three or four others at our table pulled one out. Yours is, of course, one of the artistic ones. (Mel is the writer and artist who painted the regency pink lady on my website.) But it surprised me how many people were keeping them, so I looked up bullet journals on the web and thought I might try it. A year later and I still find it incredibly useful and satisfying.

    Reply
  89. Denise, I’m smiling as I read your comment, as that’s a bit how I feel about my bullet journal — just put everything down that I need to have listed. And arrange it for how your life works and how it suits you, rather than the way others suggest it should be used.
    I love that you have colored pens and that it makes you feel happy and on top of your very busy life. Go you!

    Reply
  90. Jeanette, the constant testing of kids and the focus on measurable knowledge and skills rather than a well-rounded education for life drives me mad. I think writing, and drawing and organization that fits the person are hugely invaluable skills. I’d like to see kids taught more things that would help make them happy in the rest of their lives, as well as the subjects deemed to be most valuable in job-seeking.

    Reply
  91. Mel, I think it was you who helped start me on this bullet journal track. You mentioned yours (and pulled it out) and then three or four others at our table pulled one out. Yours is, of course, one of the artistic ones. (Mel is the writer and artist who painted the regency pink lady on my website.) But it surprised me how many people were keeping them, so I looked up bullet journals on the web and thought I might try it. A year later and I still find it incredibly useful and satisfying.

    Reply
  92. Denise, I’m smiling as I read your comment, as that’s a bit how I feel about my bullet journal — just put everything down that I need to have listed. And arrange it for how your life works and how it suits you, rather than the way others suggest it should be used.
    I love that you have colored pens and that it makes you feel happy and on top of your very busy life. Go you!

    Reply
  93. Jeanette, the constant testing of kids and the focus on measurable knowledge and skills rather than a well-rounded education for life drives me mad. I think writing, and drawing and organization that fits the person are hugely invaluable skills. I’d like to see kids taught more things that would help make them happy in the rest of their lives, as well as the subjects deemed to be most valuable in job-seeking.

    Reply
  94. Mel, I think it was you who helped start me on this bullet journal track. You mentioned yours (and pulled it out) and then three or four others at our table pulled one out. Yours is, of course, one of the artistic ones. (Mel is the writer and artist who painted the regency pink lady on my website.) But it surprised me how many people were keeping them, so I looked up bullet journals on the web and thought I might try it. A year later and I still find it incredibly useful and satisfying.

    Reply
  95. Denise, I’m smiling as I read your comment, as that’s a bit how I feel about my bullet journal — just put everything down that I need to have listed. And arrange it for how your life works and how it suits you, rather than the way others suggest it should be used.
    I love that you have colored pens and that it makes you feel happy and on top of your very busy life. Go you!

    Reply
  96. Sue, I do like your books to buy list — I’m forever buying several copies of the one book because I’ve forgotten I already pre-ordered it. Still, I suppose it means I have books to give away.
    I’m impressed with your use of Dropbox. I used to use it all the time, but my main computer — the one I write on — is now too old and dropbox won’t talk to it. The computer might be old, but it does everything I need it to do, and I hate upgrading. I especially hate the new version of Pages, which is what I write in, so Im keeping this one as long as I possibly can.
    As for trying bullet journals, if you have a system that suits you, why change? But if you do go exploring, remember that the way other people do it isn’t necessarily the way that will work for you. Mine is very simple and basic and non-standard, but it works for me, and I’m keeping it.

    Reply
  97. Sue, I do like your books to buy list — I’m forever buying several copies of the one book because I’ve forgotten I already pre-ordered it. Still, I suppose it means I have books to give away.
    I’m impressed with your use of Dropbox. I used to use it all the time, but my main computer — the one I write on — is now too old and dropbox won’t talk to it. The computer might be old, but it does everything I need it to do, and I hate upgrading. I especially hate the new version of Pages, which is what I write in, so Im keeping this one as long as I possibly can.
    As for trying bullet journals, if you have a system that suits you, why change? But if you do go exploring, remember that the way other people do it isn’t necessarily the way that will work for you. Mine is very simple and basic and non-standard, but it works for me, and I’m keeping it.

    Reply
  98. Sue, I do like your books to buy list — I’m forever buying several copies of the one book because I’ve forgotten I already pre-ordered it. Still, I suppose it means I have books to give away.
    I’m impressed with your use of Dropbox. I used to use it all the time, but my main computer — the one I write on — is now too old and dropbox won’t talk to it. The computer might be old, but it does everything I need it to do, and I hate upgrading. I especially hate the new version of Pages, which is what I write in, so Im keeping this one as long as I possibly can.
    As for trying bullet journals, if you have a system that suits you, why change? But if you do go exploring, remember that the way other people do it isn’t necessarily the way that will work for you. Mine is very simple and basic and non-standard, but it works for me, and I’m keeping it.

    Reply
  99. Sue, I do like your books to buy list — I’m forever buying several copies of the one book because I’ve forgotten I already pre-ordered it. Still, I suppose it means I have books to give away.
    I’m impressed with your use of Dropbox. I used to use it all the time, but my main computer — the one I write on — is now too old and dropbox won’t talk to it. The computer might be old, but it does everything I need it to do, and I hate upgrading. I especially hate the new version of Pages, which is what I write in, so Im keeping this one as long as I possibly can.
    As for trying bullet journals, if you have a system that suits you, why change? But if you do go exploring, remember that the way other people do it isn’t necessarily the way that will work for you. Mine is very simple and basic and non-standard, but it works for me, and I’m keeping it.

    Reply
  100. Sue, I do like your books to buy list — I’m forever buying several copies of the one book because I’ve forgotten I already pre-ordered it. Still, I suppose it means I have books to give away.
    I’m impressed with your use of Dropbox. I used to use it all the time, but my main computer — the one I write on — is now too old and dropbox won’t talk to it. The computer might be old, but it does everything I need it to do, and I hate upgrading. I especially hate the new version of Pages, which is what I write in, so Im keeping this one as long as I possibly can.
    As for trying bullet journals, if you have a system that suits you, why change? But if you do go exploring, remember that the way other people do it isn’t necessarily the way that will work for you. Mine is very simple and basic and non-standard, but it works for me, and I’m keeping it.

    Reply
  101. Leslie, I have tried to create a more-or-less standard list to pack for going to writers conferences, but it changes every time, depending on the season, the length of the conference, or the style of conference — for instance some conferences are quite “dress-up” and others are very casual.
    One of the things I like about my Bullet Journal is that after a year (almost) I can look back and see what I was doing, what things concerned me, when I last washed my windows (blush!) how many giveaways I did — that sort of thing. Previously once I’d finished the things on a list I tossed it in the bin. Having a record is useful and interesting. To me, anyway.

    Reply
  102. Leslie, I have tried to create a more-or-less standard list to pack for going to writers conferences, but it changes every time, depending on the season, the length of the conference, or the style of conference — for instance some conferences are quite “dress-up” and others are very casual.
    One of the things I like about my Bullet Journal is that after a year (almost) I can look back and see what I was doing, what things concerned me, when I last washed my windows (blush!) how many giveaways I did — that sort of thing. Previously once I’d finished the things on a list I tossed it in the bin. Having a record is useful and interesting. To me, anyway.

    Reply
  103. Leslie, I have tried to create a more-or-less standard list to pack for going to writers conferences, but it changes every time, depending on the season, the length of the conference, or the style of conference — for instance some conferences are quite “dress-up” and others are very casual.
    One of the things I like about my Bullet Journal is that after a year (almost) I can look back and see what I was doing, what things concerned me, when I last washed my windows (blush!) how many giveaways I did — that sort of thing. Previously once I’d finished the things on a list I tossed it in the bin. Having a record is useful and interesting. To me, anyway.

    Reply
  104. Leslie, I have tried to create a more-or-less standard list to pack for going to writers conferences, but it changes every time, depending on the season, the length of the conference, or the style of conference — for instance some conferences are quite “dress-up” and others are very casual.
    One of the things I like about my Bullet Journal is that after a year (almost) I can look back and see what I was doing, what things concerned me, when I last washed my windows (blush!) how many giveaways I did — that sort of thing. Previously once I’d finished the things on a list I tossed it in the bin. Having a record is useful and interesting. To me, anyway.

    Reply
  105. Leslie, I have tried to create a more-or-less standard list to pack for going to writers conferences, but it changes every time, depending on the season, the length of the conference, or the style of conference — for instance some conferences are quite “dress-up” and others are very casual.
    One of the things I like about my Bullet Journal is that after a year (almost) I can look back and see what I was doing, what things concerned me, when I last washed my windows (blush!) how many giveaways I did — that sort of thing. Previously once I’d finished the things on a list I tossed it in the bin. Having a record is useful and interesting. To me, anyway.

    Reply
  106. Mary, it sounds like you were under quite a bit of stress there.
    The lists I make now are very different to the ones I made when I was working full time in paid employment.
    Because I’m writing, and my time is more or less my own, I can lose track of time.
    I use an old-fashioned write-on calendar for important dates and obligations, but all sorts of things go into my bullet journal — from jobs around the house, for instance tackle a reorganization of some cupboards, or organize a charity collection — to preparation for talks and articles, lists of people to whom I’ve sent a book or a prize, reminders to blog on my own occasional blog, and recently I’ve added in my writing stages — scene by scene in the current story, and I cross each one off as it’s done.
    And as you say, it feels good to cross things off.

    Reply
  107. Mary, it sounds like you were under quite a bit of stress there.
    The lists I make now are very different to the ones I made when I was working full time in paid employment.
    Because I’m writing, and my time is more or less my own, I can lose track of time.
    I use an old-fashioned write-on calendar for important dates and obligations, but all sorts of things go into my bullet journal — from jobs around the house, for instance tackle a reorganization of some cupboards, or organize a charity collection — to preparation for talks and articles, lists of people to whom I’ve sent a book or a prize, reminders to blog on my own occasional blog, and recently I’ve added in my writing stages — scene by scene in the current story, and I cross each one off as it’s done.
    And as you say, it feels good to cross things off.

    Reply
  108. Mary, it sounds like you were under quite a bit of stress there.
    The lists I make now are very different to the ones I made when I was working full time in paid employment.
    Because I’m writing, and my time is more or less my own, I can lose track of time.
    I use an old-fashioned write-on calendar for important dates and obligations, but all sorts of things go into my bullet journal — from jobs around the house, for instance tackle a reorganization of some cupboards, or organize a charity collection — to preparation for talks and articles, lists of people to whom I’ve sent a book or a prize, reminders to blog on my own occasional blog, and recently I’ve added in my writing stages — scene by scene in the current story, and I cross each one off as it’s done.
    And as you say, it feels good to cross things off.

    Reply
  109. Mary, it sounds like you were under quite a bit of stress there.
    The lists I make now are very different to the ones I made when I was working full time in paid employment.
    Because I’m writing, and my time is more or less my own, I can lose track of time.
    I use an old-fashioned write-on calendar for important dates and obligations, but all sorts of things go into my bullet journal — from jobs around the house, for instance tackle a reorganization of some cupboards, or organize a charity collection — to preparation for talks and articles, lists of people to whom I’ve sent a book or a prize, reminders to blog on my own occasional blog, and recently I’ve added in my writing stages — scene by scene in the current story, and I cross each one off as it’s done.
    And as you say, it feels good to cross things off.

    Reply
  110. Mary, it sounds like you were under quite a bit of stress there.
    The lists I make now are very different to the ones I made when I was working full time in paid employment.
    Because I’m writing, and my time is more or less my own, I can lose track of time.
    I use an old-fashioned write-on calendar for important dates and obligations, but all sorts of things go into my bullet journal — from jobs around the house, for instance tackle a reorganization of some cupboards, or organize a charity collection — to preparation for talks and articles, lists of people to whom I’ve sent a book or a prize, reminders to blog on my own occasional blog, and recently I’ve added in my writing stages — scene by scene in the current story, and I cross each one off as it’s done.
    And as you say, it feels good to cross things off.

    Reply
  111. “They make a great brain dump before bed because if I don’t write it down, I feel I can’t sleep because I won’t remember what it was I have to do.”
    This is the Zeigarnik effect. The brain is worried by uncompleted actions, so keeps you distracted, but writing it down, making a plan, and it (and you) relax. Interesting isn’t it? I keep a notebook beside the bed for that very reason, though these days it’s more for ideas for scenes.
    As for students being taught how to plan, there is certainly a renewed interest in it and whole huge on-line communities where methods of planning are hotly debated and obsessed over.
    I’m more of the opinion that a lot of these people are overwhelmed, and are striving to find a way that makes them feel more in control of their lives. And quite a few of them are perfectionists, who spend as much time organizing and decorating their lists than getting them completed. Truly, some of these bullet journals are works of art, as well as cultural documents.

    Reply
  112. “They make a great brain dump before bed because if I don’t write it down, I feel I can’t sleep because I won’t remember what it was I have to do.”
    This is the Zeigarnik effect. The brain is worried by uncompleted actions, so keeps you distracted, but writing it down, making a plan, and it (and you) relax. Interesting isn’t it? I keep a notebook beside the bed for that very reason, though these days it’s more for ideas for scenes.
    As for students being taught how to plan, there is certainly a renewed interest in it and whole huge on-line communities where methods of planning are hotly debated and obsessed over.
    I’m more of the opinion that a lot of these people are overwhelmed, and are striving to find a way that makes them feel more in control of their lives. And quite a few of them are perfectionists, who spend as much time organizing and decorating their lists than getting them completed. Truly, some of these bullet journals are works of art, as well as cultural documents.

    Reply
  113. “They make a great brain dump before bed because if I don’t write it down, I feel I can’t sleep because I won’t remember what it was I have to do.”
    This is the Zeigarnik effect. The brain is worried by uncompleted actions, so keeps you distracted, but writing it down, making a plan, and it (and you) relax. Interesting isn’t it? I keep a notebook beside the bed for that very reason, though these days it’s more for ideas for scenes.
    As for students being taught how to plan, there is certainly a renewed interest in it and whole huge on-line communities where methods of planning are hotly debated and obsessed over.
    I’m more of the opinion that a lot of these people are overwhelmed, and are striving to find a way that makes them feel more in control of their lives. And quite a few of them are perfectionists, who spend as much time organizing and decorating their lists than getting them completed. Truly, some of these bullet journals are works of art, as well as cultural documents.

    Reply
  114. “They make a great brain dump before bed because if I don’t write it down, I feel I can’t sleep because I won’t remember what it was I have to do.”
    This is the Zeigarnik effect. The brain is worried by uncompleted actions, so keeps you distracted, but writing it down, making a plan, and it (and you) relax. Interesting isn’t it? I keep a notebook beside the bed for that very reason, though these days it’s more for ideas for scenes.
    As for students being taught how to plan, there is certainly a renewed interest in it and whole huge on-line communities where methods of planning are hotly debated and obsessed over.
    I’m more of the opinion that a lot of these people are overwhelmed, and are striving to find a way that makes them feel more in control of their lives. And quite a few of them are perfectionists, who spend as much time organizing and decorating their lists than getting them completed. Truly, some of these bullet journals are works of art, as well as cultural documents.

    Reply
  115. “They make a great brain dump before bed because if I don’t write it down, I feel I can’t sleep because I won’t remember what it was I have to do.”
    This is the Zeigarnik effect. The brain is worried by uncompleted actions, so keeps you distracted, but writing it down, making a plan, and it (and you) relax. Interesting isn’t it? I keep a notebook beside the bed for that very reason, though these days it’s more for ideas for scenes.
    As for students being taught how to plan, there is certainly a renewed interest in it and whole huge on-line communities where methods of planning are hotly debated and obsessed over.
    I’m more of the opinion that a lot of these people are overwhelmed, and are striving to find a way that makes them feel more in control of their lives. And quite a few of them are perfectionists, who spend as much time organizing and decorating their lists than getting them completed. Truly, some of these bullet journals are works of art, as well as cultural documents.

    Reply
  116. I often start things and don’t finish them either, Sharon. Especially journals and diaries, because once I’d stopped and fallen behind on my entries, I’d give up.
    But for some reason — perhaps because I find it useful — I have kept it my bullet journal up. I’m not perfectionist about it — I think that helps. I don’t care if it looks messy, or if I put the same things on the list week after week. Or if I don’t tick anything off for a week. I keep it open on the dining room table, and it’s there to be added to or referred to whenever I want.
    When I got home from the USA one of the first things I did was to turn to a new page and start listing the things I had to do. Made me feel good to have it there and waiting.

    Reply
  117. I often start things and don’t finish them either, Sharon. Especially journals and diaries, because once I’d stopped and fallen behind on my entries, I’d give up.
    But for some reason — perhaps because I find it useful — I have kept it my bullet journal up. I’m not perfectionist about it — I think that helps. I don’t care if it looks messy, or if I put the same things on the list week after week. Or if I don’t tick anything off for a week. I keep it open on the dining room table, and it’s there to be added to or referred to whenever I want.
    When I got home from the USA one of the first things I did was to turn to a new page and start listing the things I had to do. Made me feel good to have it there and waiting.

    Reply
  118. I often start things and don’t finish them either, Sharon. Especially journals and diaries, because once I’d stopped and fallen behind on my entries, I’d give up.
    But for some reason — perhaps because I find it useful — I have kept it my bullet journal up. I’m not perfectionist about it — I think that helps. I don’t care if it looks messy, or if I put the same things on the list week after week. Or if I don’t tick anything off for a week. I keep it open on the dining room table, and it’s there to be added to or referred to whenever I want.
    When I got home from the USA one of the first things I did was to turn to a new page and start listing the things I had to do. Made me feel good to have it there and waiting.

    Reply
  119. I often start things and don’t finish them either, Sharon. Especially journals and diaries, because once I’d stopped and fallen behind on my entries, I’d give up.
    But for some reason — perhaps because I find it useful — I have kept it my bullet journal up. I’m not perfectionist about it — I think that helps. I don’t care if it looks messy, or if I put the same things on the list week after week. Or if I don’t tick anything off for a week. I keep it open on the dining room table, and it’s there to be added to or referred to whenever I want.
    When I got home from the USA one of the first things I did was to turn to a new page and start listing the things I had to do. Made me feel good to have it there and waiting.

    Reply
  120. I often start things and don’t finish them either, Sharon. Especially journals and diaries, because once I’d stopped and fallen behind on my entries, I’d give up.
    But for some reason — perhaps because I find it useful — I have kept it my bullet journal up. I’m not perfectionist about it — I think that helps. I don’t care if it looks messy, or if I put the same things on the list week after week. Or if I don’t tick anything off for a week. I keep it open on the dining room table, and it’s there to be added to or referred to whenever I want.
    When I got home from the USA one of the first things I did was to turn to a new page and start listing the things I had to do. Made me feel good to have it there and waiting.

    Reply
  121. I just think your brain works differently with handwritten stuff versus electronic.
    Mel, the research agrees with you on that. It’s more personal, it enters your consciousness by a different pathway, and there is a greater sense of personal control about it. The Zeigarnik effect suggests that the act of writing down something on a list helps reduce stress, because the brain doesn’t like uncompleted activities, but listing them on to-do lists has much the same effect on the brain nagging/worrying about it. The brain feels happier when you make a plan.
    Ive seen some of the on-line communities that obsess over various kinds of planning. At first I wondered if a generation of people grew up without being taught how to be organized, but I think its a way of exerting some kind of personal sense of control over the enormous number of demands and distractions today. And being constantly available on line and on phones only adds to it, in my opinion. I must say, I do chuckle, though, when I see people listing things like drink water.

    Reply
  122. I just think your brain works differently with handwritten stuff versus electronic.
    Mel, the research agrees with you on that. It’s more personal, it enters your consciousness by a different pathway, and there is a greater sense of personal control about it. The Zeigarnik effect suggests that the act of writing down something on a list helps reduce stress, because the brain doesn’t like uncompleted activities, but listing them on to-do lists has much the same effect on the brain nagging/worrying about it. The brain feels happier when you make a plan.
    Ive seen some of the on-line communities that obsess over various kinds of planning. At first I wondered if a generation of people grew up without being taught how to be organized, but I think its a way of exerting some kind of personal sense of control over the enormous number of demands and distractions today. And being constantly available on line and on phones only adds to it, in my opinion. I must say, I do chuckle, though, when I see people listing things like drink water.

    Reply
  123. I just think your brain works differently with handwritten stuff versus electronic.
    Mel, the research agrees with you on that. It’s more personal, it enters your consciousness by a different pathway, and there is a greater sense of personal control about it. The Zeigarnik effect suggests that the act of writing down something on a list helps reduce stress, because the brain doesn’t like uncompleted activities, but listing them on to-do lists has much the same effect on the brain nagging/worrying about it. The brain feels happier when you make a plan.
    Ive seen some of the on-line communities that obsess over various kinds of planning. At first I wondered if a generation of people grew up without being taught how to be organized, but I think its a way of exerting some kind of personal sense of control over the enormous number of demands and distractions today. And being constantly available on line and on phones only adds to it, in my opinion. I must say, I do chuckle, though, when I see people listing things like drink water.

    Reply
  124. I just think your brain works differently with handwritten stuff versus electronic.
    Mel, the research agrees with you on that. It’s more personal, it enters your consciousness by a different pathway, and there is a greater sense of personal control about it. The Zeigarnik effect suggests that the act of writing down something on a list helps reduce stress, because the brain doesn’t like uncompleted activities, but listing them on to-do lists has much the same effect on the brain nagging/worrying about it. The brain feels happier when you make a plan.
    Ive seen some of the on-line communities that obsess over various kinds of planning. At first I wondered if a generation of people grew up without being taught how to be organized, but I think its a way of exerting some kind of personal sense of control over the enormous number of demands and distractions today. And being constantly available on line and on phones only adds to it, in my opinion. I must say, I do chuckle, though, when I see people listing things like drink water.

    Reply
  125. I just think your brain works differently with handwritten stuff versus electronic.
    Mel, the research agrees with you on that. It’s more personal, it enters your consciousness by a different pathway, and there is a greater sense of personal control about it. The Zeigarnik effect suggests that the act of writing down something on a list helps reduce stress, because the brain doesn’t like uncompleted activities, but listing them on to-do lists has much the same effect on the brain nagging/worrying about it. The brain feels happier when you make a plan.
    Ive seen some of the on-line communities that obsess over various kinds of planning. At first I wondered if a generation of people grew up without being taught how to be organized, but I think its a way of exerting some kind of personal sense of control over the enormous number of demands and distractions today. And being constantly available on line and on phones only adds to it, in my opinion. I must say, I do chuckle, though, when I see people listing things like drink water.

    Reply
  126. That’s pretty true in some ways, isn’t it, Gail? Of course the really important things don’t need a list. but forgetting some things can be a disaster.

    Reply
  127. That’s pretty true in some ways, isn’t it, Gail? Of course the really important things don’t need a list. but forgetting some things can be a disaster.

    Reply
  128. That’s pretty true in some ways, isn’t it, Gail? Of course the really important things don’t need a list. but forgetting some things can be a disaster.

    Reply
  129. That’s pretty true in some ways, isn’t it, Gail? Of course the really important things don’t need a list. but forgetting some things can be a disaster.

    Reply
  130. That’s pretty true in some ways, isn’t it, Gail? Of course the really important things don’t need a list. but forgetting some things can be a disaster.

    Reply
  131. I’m a huge list maker, usually on a pink spiral notepad. This is the first I’m hearing of a bullet journal–will have to check it out, thanks!! 🙂

    Reply
  132. I’m a huge list maker, usually on a pink spiral notepad. This is the first I’m hearing of a bullet journal–will have to check it out, thanks!! 🙂

    Reply
  133. I’m a huge list maker, usually on a pink spiral notepad. This is the first I’m hearing of a bullet journal–will have to check it out, thanks!! 🙂

    Reply
  134. I’m a huge list maker, usually on a pink spiral notepad. This is the first I’m hearing of a bullet journal–will have to check it out, thanks!! 🙂

    Reply
  135. I’m a huge list maker, usually on a pink spiral notepad. This is the first I’m hearing of a bullet journal–will have to check it out, thanks!! 🙂

    Reply
  136. Drawing a line through an item on a list is one of life’s modest, but true pleasures, and I am another maker of lists. Mine are usually on scrap paper so I can throw them out as things get checked off because then they look messy, and I want to start a new one on a cleaner piece of paper. I’ve never heard of bullet lists–maybe they’ve made fewer inroads in North America?–but I have zero interest in following anyone else’s theory of organization. I’ll stick to my scrap paper. *G*

    Reply
  137. Drawing a line through an item on a list is one of life’s modest, but true pleasures, and I am another maker of lists. Mine are usually on scrap paper so I can throw them out as things get checked off because then they look messy, and I want to start a new one on a cleaner piece of paper. I’ve never heard of bullet lists–maybe they’ve made fewer inroads in North America?–but I have zero interest in following anyone else’s theory of organization. I’ll stick to my scrap paper. *G*

    Reply
  138. Drawing a line through an item on a list is one of life’s modest, but true pleasures, and I am another maker of lists. Mine are usually on scrap paper so I can throw them out as things get checked off because then they look messy, and I want to start a new one on a cleaner piece of paper. I’ve never heard of bullet lists–maybe they’ve made fewer inroads in North America?–but I have zero interest in following anyone else’s theory of organization. I’ll stick to my scrap paper. *G*

    Reply
  139. Drawing a line through an item on a list is one of life’s modest, but true pleasures, and I am another maker of lists. Mine are usually on scrap paper so I can throw them out as things get checked off because then they look messy, and I want to start a new one on a cleaner piece of paper. I’ve never heard of bullet lists–maybe they’ve made fewer inroads in North America?–but I have zero interest in following anyone else’s theory of organization. I’ll stick to my scrap paper. *G*

    Reply
  140. Drawing a line through an item on a list is one of life’s modest, but true pleasures, and I am another maker of lists. Mine are usually on scrap paper so I can throw them out as things get checked off because then they look messy, and I want to start a new one on a cleaner piece of paper. I’ve never heard of bullet lists–maybe they’ve made fewer inroads in North America?–but I have zero interest in following anyone else’s theory of organization. I’ll stick to my scrap paper. *G*

    Reply
  141. I think I may have been keeping a bullet list journal without actually realising it. I make lists in the Notes app on my phone. That way I always have them with me – and can pick up when anxiety causes me to produce two almost-identical lists! It is also even more satisfying (for me) to delete a list than to put a line through it 🙂
    I think I have some kind of aversion to using real journals on the principal that lists make them messy. At work, I use post it notes which can be thrown away. Even I admit that is an extremely expensive list-writing method!

    Reply
  142. I think I may have been keeping a bullet list journal without actually realising it. I make lists in the Notes app on my phone. That way I always have them with me – and can pick up when anxiety causes me to produce two almost-identical lists! It is also even more satisfying (for me) to delete a list than to put a line through it 🙂
    I think I have some kind of aversion to using real journals on the principal that lists make them messy. At work, I use post it notes which can be thrown away. Even I admit that is an extremely expensive list-writing method!

    Reply
  143. I think I may have been keeping a bullet list journal without actually realising it. I make lists in the Notes app on my phone. That way I always have them with me – and can pick up when anxiety causes me to produce two almost-identical lists! It is also even more satisfying (for me) to delete a list than to put a line through it 🙂
    I think I have some kind of aversion to using real journals on the principal that lists make them messy. At work, I use post it notes which can be thrown away. Even I admit that is an extremely expensive list-writing method!

    Reply
  144. I think I may have been keeping a bullet list journal without actually realising it. I make lists in the Notes app on my phone. That way I always have them with me – and can pick up when anxiety causes me to produce two almost-identical lists! It is also even more satisfying (for me) to delete a list than to put a line through it 🙂
    I think I have some kind of aversion to using real journals on the principal that lists make them messy. At work, I use post it notes which can be thrown away. Even I admit that is an extremely expensive list-writing method!

    Reply
  145. I think I may have been keeping a bullet list journal without actually realising it. I make lists in the Notes app on my phone. That way I always have them with me – and can pick up when anxiety causes me to produce two almost-identical lists! It is also even more satisfying (for me) to delete a list than to put a line through it 🙂
    I think I have some kind of aversion to using real journals on the principal that lists make them messy. At work, I use post it notes which can be thrown away. Even I admit that is an extremely expensive list-writing method!

    Reply
  146. In my former job I was sort of the compliance officer and it seemed I spent my whole life making lists which other people ignored until the day before their item was due. So I can’t endure the idea of making that kind of “things to do” list whatsoever now. I put sticky notes on my Keanu Reeves poster and/or use my pocket calendar (old school, it’s on paper).
    The only lists I use now are data lists – mail log, swap list, blood sugar readings, that sort of thing.
    Bleah to all lists, I say.

    Reply
  147. In my former job I was sort of the compliance officer and it seemed I spent my whole life making lists which other people ignored until the day before their item was due. So I can’t endure the idea of making that kind of “things to do” list whatsoever now. I put sticky notes on my Keanu Reeves poster and/or use my pocket calendar (old school, it’s on paper).
    The only lists I use now are data lists – mail log, swap list, blood sugar readings, that sort of thing.
    Bleah to all lists, I say.

    Reply
  148. In my former job I was sort of the compliance officer and it seemed I spent my whole life making lists which other people ignored until the day before their item was due. So I can’t endure the idea of making that kind of “things to do” list whatsoever now. I put sticky notes on my Keanu Reeves poster and/or use my pocket calendar (old school, it’s on paper).
    The only lists I use now are data lists – mail log, swap list, blood sugar readings, that sort of thing.
    Bleah to all lists, I say.

    Reply
  149. In my former job I was sort of the compliance officer and it seemed I spent my whole life making lists which other people ignored until the day before their item was due. So I can’t endure the idea of making that kind of “things to do” list whatsoever now. I put sticky notes on my Keanu Reeves poster and/or use my pocket calendar (old school, it’s on paper).
    The only lists I use now are data lists – mail log, swap list, blood sugar readings, that sort of thing.
    Bleah to all lists, I say.

    Reply
  150. In my former job I was sort of the compliance officer and it seemed I spent my whole life making lists which other people ignored until the day before their item was due. So I can’t endure the idea of making that kind of “things to do” list whatsoever now. I put sticky notes on my Keanu Reeves poster and/or use my pocket calendar (old school, it’s on paper).
    The only lists I use now are data lists – mail log, swap list, blood sugar readings, that sort of thing.
    Bleah to all lists, I say.

    Reply
  151. Wonderful blog, Anne! I am definitely a list maker, though I wish I could say mine are a pretty as some of the ones you show here. They are the simple, no-nonsense bullet lists.And LOL on adding things already done to have the satisfaction of crossing them off! Guilty as charged!
    Love your historical examples, too. I think it’s so true that writing down a “To Do” list stimulates focus and drive. I know I get more done with that sheet of paper stares up from the corner of my desk. (But yes, overloading it with impossible demands can also be discouraging. Which is why I keep my paper 5″ x&’, and get the satisfaction of frequently reaching the end, getting to crumple it up–TASKS DONE!—and start a new one.

    Reply
  152. Wonderful blog, Anne! I am definitely a list maker, though I wish I could say mine are a pretty as some of the ones you show here. They are the simple, no-nonsense bullet lists.And LOL on adding things already done to have the satisfaction of crossing them off! Guilty as charged!
    Love your historical examples, too. I think it’s so true that writing down a “To Do” list stimulates focus and drive. I know I get more done with that sheet of paper stares up from the corner of my desk. (But yes, overloading it with impossible demands can also be discouraging. Which is why I keep my paper 5″ x&’, and get the satisfaction of frequently reaching the end, getting to crumple it up–TASKS DONE!—and start a new one.

    Reply
  153. Wonderful blog, Anne! I am definitely a list maker, though I wish I could say mine are a pretty as some of the ones you show here. They are the simple, no-nonsense bullet lists.And LOL on adding things already done to have the satisfaction of crossing them off! Guilty as charged!
    Love your historical examples, too. I think it’s so true that writing down a “To Do” list stimulates focus and drive. I know I get more done with that sheet of paper stares up from the corner of my desk. (But yes, overloading it with impossible demands can also be discouraging. Which is why I keep my paper 5″ x&’, and get the satisfaction of frequently reaching the end, getting to crumple it up–TASKS DONE!—and start a new one.

    Reply
  154. Wonderful blog, Anne! I am definitely a list maker, though I wish I could say mine are a pretty as some of the ones you show here. They are the simple, no-nonsense bullet lists.And LOL on adding things already done to have the satisfaction of crossing them off! Guilty as charged!
    Love your historical examples, too. I think it’s so true that writing down a “To Do” list stimulates focus and drive. I know I get more done with that sheet of paper stares up from the corner of my desk. (But yes, overloading it with impossible demands can also be discouraging. Which is why I keep my paper 5″ x&’, and get the satisfaction of frequently reaching the end, getting to crumple it up–TASKS DONE!—and start a new one.

    Reply
  155. Wonderful blog, Anne! I am definitely a list maker, though I wish I could say mine are a pretty as some of the ones you show here. They are the simple, no-nonsense bullet lists.And LOL on adding things already done to have the satisfaction of crossing them off! Guilty as charged!
    Love your historical examples, too. I think it’s so true that writing down a “To Do” list stimulates focus and drive. I know I get more done with that sheet of paper stares up from the corner of my desk. (But yes, overloading it with impossible demands can also be discouraging. Which is why I keep my paper 5″ x&’, and get the satisfaction of frequently reaching the end, getting to crumple it up–TASKS DONE!—and start a new one.

    Reply
  156. Mary Jo, I used to toss out my lists, but now with the bullet journal there is a much longer term record of things I’ve done, and it’s proved useful. But you’re right — we each have to find the system that works for us.

    Reply
  157. Mary Jo, I used to toss out my lists, but now with the bullet journal there is a much longer term record of things I’ve done, and it’s proved useful. But you’re right — we each have to find the system that works for us.

    Reply
  158. Mary Jo, I used to toss out my lists, but now with the bullet journal there is a much longer term record of things I’ve done, and it’s proved useful. But you’re right — we each have to find the system that works for us.

    Reply
  159. Mary Jo, I used to toss out my lists, but now with the bullet journal there is a much longer term record of things I’ve done, and it’s proved useful. But you’re right — we each have to find the system that works for us.

    Reply
  160. Mary Jo, I used to toss out my lists, but now with the bullet journal there is a much longer term record of things I’ve done, and it’s proved useful. But you’re right — we each have to find the system that works for us.

    Reply
  161. Laura, I’m chuckling at the duplicate lists — I’ve done that before.
    Nice that you have an app that suits you. I don’t carry my phone with me a lot of the time — constant interruptions annoy me, and I also forget to charge it a lot of the time, so can’t keep my lists there.

    Reply
  162. Laura, I’m chuckling at the duplicate lists — I’ve done that before.
    Nice that you have an app that suits you. I don’t carry my phone with me a lot of the time — constant interruptions annoy me, and I also forget to charge it a lot of the time, so can’t keep my lists there.

    Reply
  163. Laura, I’m chuckling at the duplicate lists — I’ve done that before.
    Nice that you have an app that suits you. I don’t carry my phone with me a lot of the time — constant interruptions annoy me, and I also forget to charge it a lot of the time, so can’t keep my lists there.

    Reply
  164. Laura, I’m chuckling at the duplicate lists — I’ve done that before.
    Nice that you have an app that suits you. I don’t carry my phone with me a lot of the time — constant interruptions annoy me, and I also forget to charge it a lot of the time, so can’t keep my lists there.

    Reply
  165. Laura, I’m chuckling at the duplicate lists — I’ve done that before.
    Nice that you have an app that suits you. I don’t carry my phone with me a lot of the time — constant interruptions annoy me, and I also forget to charge it a lot of the time, so can’t keep my lists there.

    Reply
  166. Woah.
    No, he’s never complained yet 🙂
    I always feel bad about that burning bus, though. I used to ride those buses all the time. The stop where Sandra Bullock gets on was the same one I used. Never saw her there though 😉

    Reply
  167. Woah.
    No, he’s never complained yet 🙂
    I always feel bad about that burning bus, though. I used to ride those buses all the time. The stop where Sandra Bullock gets on was the same one I used. Never saw her there though 😉

    Reply
  168. Woah.
    No, he’s never complained yet 🙂
    I always feel bad about that burning bus, though. I used to ride those buses all the time. The stop where Sandra Bullock gets on was the same one I used. Never saw her there though 😉

    Reply
  169. Woah.
    No, he’s never complained yet 🙂
    I always feel bad about that burning bus, though. I used to ride those buses all the time. The stop where Sandra Bullock gets on was the same one I used. Never saw her there though 😉

    Reply
  170. Woah.
    No, he’s never complained yet 🙂
    I always feel bad about that burning bus, though. I used to ride those buses all the time. The stop where Sandra Bullock gets on was the same one I used. Never saw her there though 😉

    Reply
  171. I used to be very organizad, used to make lists but I noticed that now I am older I am getting disorganized and scattered. And I don’t care anymore lol

    Reply
  172. I used to be very organizad, used to make lists but I noticed that now I am older I am getting disorganized and scattered. And I don’t care anymore lol

    Reply
  173. I used to be very organizad, used to make lists but I noticed that now I am older I am getting disorganized and scattered. And I don’t care anymore lol

    Reply
  174. I used to be very organizad, used to make lists but I noticed that now I am older I am getting disorganized and scattered. And I don’t care anymore lol

    Reply
  175. I used to be very organizad, used to make lists but I noticed that now I am older I am getting disorganized and scattered. And I don’t care anymore lol

    Reply
  176. I’ve, chuckled through these posts. I love to scratch something off a list and have been known to put something down that’s already done for the sheer pleasure of drawing a line through it and the feeling of accomplishment. I like to keep lists seperate, as I said earlier, sloppy had no appeal. But a journal has one real advantage – it would be hard to say how many times I’ve found lists that repeat themselves over the years.

    Reply
  177. I’ve, chuckled through these posts. I love to scratch something off a list and have been known to put something down that’s already done for the sheer pleasure of drawing a line through it and the feeling of accomplishment. I like to keep lists seperate, as I said earlier, sloppy had no appeal. But a journal has one real advantage – it would be hard to say how many times I’ve found lists that repeat themselves over the years.

    Reply
  178. I’ve, chuckled through these posts. I love to scratch something off a list and have been known to put something down that’s already done for the sheer pleasure of drawing a line through it and the feeling of accomplishment. I like to keep lists seperate, as I said earlier, sloppy had no appeal. But a journal has one real advantage – it would be hard to say how many times I’ve found lists that repeat themselves over the years.

    Reply
  179. I’ve, chuckled through these posts. I love to scratch something off a list and have been known to put something down that’s already done for the sheer pleasure of drawing a line through it and the feeling of accomplishment. I like to keep lists seperate, as I said earlier, sloppy had no appeal. But a journal has one real advantage – it would be hard to say how many times I’ve found lists that repeat themselves over the years.

    Reply
  180. I’ve, chuckled through these posts. I love to scratch something off a list and have been known to put something down that’s already done for the sheer pleasure of drawing a line through it and the feeling of accomplishment. I like to keep lists seperate, as I said earlier, sloppy had no appeal. But a journal has one real advantage – it would be hard to say how many times I’ve found lists that repeat themselves over the years.

    Reply
  181. I am very anal about lists. I make lists for lists I’ve already made. I make several lists on
    same sheet of paper that I’m so confused, I don’t know what I’ve done or not. I make same
    Lists in my calendar, notes, on my cell and then write them down on paper!!😡

    Reply
  182. I am very anal about lists. I make lists for lists I’ve already made. I make several lists on
    same sheet of paper that I’m so confused, I don’t know what I’ve done or not. I make same
    Lists in my calendar, notes, on my cell and then write them down on paper!!😡

    Reply
  183. I am very anal about lists. I make lists for lists I’ve already made. I make several lists on
    same sheet of paper that I’m so confused, I don’t know what I’ve done or not. I make same
    Lists in my calendar, notes, on my cell and then write them down on paper!!😡

    Reply
  184. I am very anal about lists. I make lists for lists I’ve already made. I make several lists on
    same sheet of paper that I’m so confused, I don’t know what I’ve done or not. I make same
    Lists in my calendar, notes, on my cell and then write them down on paper!!😡

    Reply
  185. I am very anal about lists. I make lists for lists I’ve already made. I make several lists on
    same sheet of paper that I’m so confused, I don’t know what I’ve done or not. I make same
    Lists in my calendar, notes, on my cell and then write them down on paper!!😡

    Reply
  186. I’m considering using one to record the contests I enter on Facebook along with their closing dates and how/when the winner is announced and notified. I’ve won some awesome prizes but I do wonder if I’ve missed any because I forgot about them and didn’t check back to see if I’d won. I may also use one for all of the books I’ve read so that I can review them in a timely manner. Since I don’t work I don’t really need them for their actual intended use.

    Reply
  187. I’m considering using one to record the contests I enter on Facebook along with their closing dates and how/when the winner is announced and notified. I’ve won some awesome prizes but I do wonder if I’ve missed any because I forgot about them and didn’t check back to see if I’d won. I may also use one for all of the books I’ve read so that I can review them in a timely manner. Since I don’t work I don’t really need them for their actual intended use.

    Reply
  188. I’m considering using one to record the contests I enter on Facebook along with their closing dates and how/when the winner is announced and notified. I’ve won some awesome prizes but I do wonder if I’ve missed any because I forgot about them and didn’t check back to see if I’d won. I may also use one for all of the books I’ve read so that I can review them in a timely manner. Since I don’t work I don’t really need them for their actual intended use.

    Reply
  189. I’m considering using one to record the contests I enter on Facebook along with their closing dates and how/when the winner is announced and notified. I’ve won some awesome prizes but I do wonder if I’ve missed any because I forgot about them and didn’t check back to see if I’d won. I may also use one for all of the books I’ve read so that I can review them in a timely manner. Since I don’t work I don’t really need them for their actual intended use.

    Reply
  190. I’m considering using one to record the contests I enter on Facebook along with their closing dates and how/when the winner is announced and notified. I’ve won some awesome prizes but I do wonder if I’ve missed any because I forgot about them and didn’t check back to see if I’d won. I may also use one for all of the books I’ve read so that I can review them in a timely manner. Since I don’t work I don’t really need them for their actual intended use.

    Reply
  191. I would love some “real” fish and chips instead of what we have in the US. I had a Scottish friend back in ’71 who made fish and chips for dinner on evening, complete with the malt vinegar and boy did I pig out.

    Reply
  192. I would love some “real” fish and chips instead of what we have in the US. I had a Scottish friend back in ’71 who made fish and chips for dinner on evening, complete with the malt vinegar and boy did I pig out.

    Reply
  193. I would love some “real” fish and chips instead of what we have in the US. I had a Scottish friend back in ’71 who made fish and chips for dinner on evening, complete with the malt vinegar and boy did I pig out.

    Reply
  194. I would love some “real” fish and chips instead of what we have in the US. I had a Scottish friend back in ’71 who made fish and chips for dinner on evening, complete with the malt vinegar and boy did I pig out.

    Reply
  195. I would love some “real” fish and chips instead of what we have in the US. I had a Scottish friend back in ’71 who made fish and chips for dinner on evening, complete with the malt vinegar and boy did I pig out.

    Reply
  196. Molly, I ate fish and chips in LA and also Las Vegas (in an Irish pub) and they were both delicious. So maybe you just have to shop around.

    Reply
  197. Molly, I ate fish and chips in LA and also Las Vegas (in an Irish pub) and they were both delicious. So maybe you just have to shop around.

    Reply
  198. Molly, I ate fish and chips in LA and also Las Vegas (in an Irish pub) and they were both delicious. So maybe you just have to shop around.

    Reply
  199. Molly, I ate fish and chips in LA and also Las Vegas (in an Irish pub) and they were both delicious. So maybe you just have to shop around.

    Reply
  200. Molly, I ate fish and chips in LA and also Las Vegas (in an Irish pub) and they were both delicious. So maybe you just have to shop around.

    Reply
  201. Thanks, Cara/Andrea. I’ve realised, since starting the bullet journal system, that the trouble with tossing away completed “to do” lists is that much later, when I wonder, “Did I ever do x y or z?” there’s no way to check. Now I can just flip back and check. And the satisfaction of throwing way a competed list is relaxed by the pleasure of staring a new page.

    Reply
  202. Thanks, Cara/Andrea. I’ve realised, since starting the bullet journal system, that the trouble with tossing away completed “to do” lists is that much later, when I wonder, “Did I ever do x y or z?” there’s no way to check. Now I can just flip back and check. And the satisfaction of throwing way a competed list is relaxed by the pleasure of staring a new page.

    Reply
  203. Thanks, Cara/Andrea. I’ve realised, since starting the bullet journal system, that the trouble with tossing away completed “to do” lists is that much later, when I wonder, “Did I ever do x y or z?” there’s no way to check. Now I can just flip back and check. And the satisfaction of throwing way a competed list is relaxed by the pleasure of staring a new page.

    Reply
  204. Thanks, Cara/Andrea. I’ve realised, since starting the bullet journal system, that the trouble with tossing away completed “to do” lists is that much later, when I wonder, “Did I ever do x y or z?” there’s no way to check. Now I can just flip back and check. And the satisfaction of throwing way a competed list is relaxed by the pleasure of staring a new page.

    Reply
  205. Thanks, Cara/Andrea. I’ve realised, since starting the bullet journal system, that the trouble with tossing away completed “to do” lists is that much later, when I wonder, “Did I ever do x y or z?” there’s no way to check. Now I can just flip back and check. And the satisfaction of throwing way a competed list is relaxed by the pleasure of staring a new page.

    Reply
  206. That sounds like a good way to go, Molly. As for keeping a book journal, that’s an excellent thought — a lot of people I know have kept reading logs for years, and can refer back to them and recall when they read a book and what they thought of it at the time. I read so many books, but forget many of them. Not the really good ones, of course.

    Reply
  207. That sounds like a good way to go, Molly. As for keeping a book journal, that’s an excellent thought — a lot of people I know have kept reading logs for years, and can refer back to them and recall when they read a book and what they thought of it at the time. I read so many books, but forget many of them. Not the really good ones, of course.

    Reply
  208. That sounds like a good way to go, Molly. As for keeping a book journal, that’s an excellent thought — a lot of people I know have kept reading logs for years, and can refer back to them and recall when they read a book and what they thought of it at the time. I read so many books, but forget many of them. Not the really good ones, of course.

    Reply
  209. That sounds like a good way to go, Molly. As for keeping a book journal, that’s an excellent thought — a lot of people I know have kept reading logs for years, and can refer back to them and recall when they read a book and what they thought of it at the time. I read so many books, but forget many of them. Not the really good ones, of course.

    Reply
  210. That sounds like a good way to go, Molly. As for keeping a book journal, that’s an excellent thought — a lot of people I know have kept reading logs for years, and can refer back to them and recall when they read a book and what they thought of it at the time. I read so many books, but forget many of them. Not the really good ones, of course.

    Reply
  211. I can’t believe I never saw this until today (and went through the comments carefully to see if I had already commented and forgot). I just started a BuJo in June, and I am addicted. Those other sites will really stir up some envy if you let it – some people have time to do all that planning and doodling and..
    I created lists – habit trackers, daily weight, adherence to my fitness program, meals, chores… I have a monthly in list form where I note blog posts (I have two), appointments, and bills. And then I have my dailies – one or two pages each.
    I even just started one for my writing.
    LOVE IT!

    Reply
  212. I can’t believe I never saw this until today (and went through the comments carefully to see if I had already commented and forgot). I just started a BuJo in June, and I am addicted. Those other sites will really stir up some envy if you let it – some people have time to do all that planning and doodling and..
    I created lists – habit trackers, daily weight, adherence to my fitness program, meals, chores… I have a monthly in list form where I note blog posts (I have two), appointments, and bills. And then I have my dailies – one or two pages each.
    I even just started one for my writing.
    LOVE IT!

    Reply
  213. I can’t believe I never saw this until today (and went through the comments carefully to see if I had already commented and forgot). I just started a BuJo in June, and I am addicted. Those other sites will really stir up some envy if you let it – some people have time to do all that planning and doodling and..
    I created lists – habit trackers, daily weight, adherence to my fitness program, meals, chores… I have a monthly in list form where I note blog posts (I have two), appointments, and bills. And then I have my dailies – one or two pages each.
    I even just started one for my writing.
    LOVE IT!

    Reply
  214. I can’t believe I never saw this until today (and went through the comments carefully to see if I had already commented and forgot). I just started a BuJo in June, and I am addicted. Those other sites will really stir up some envy if you let it – some people have time to do all that planning and doodling and..
    I created lists – habit trackers, daily weight, adherence to my fitness program, meals, chores… I have a monthly in list form where I note blog posts (I have two), appointments, and bills. And then I have my dailies – one or two pages each.
    I even just started one for my writing.
    LOVE IT!

    Reply
  215. I can’t believe I never saw this until today (and went through the comments carefully to see if I had already commented and forgot). I just started a BuJo in June, and I am addicted. Those other sites will really stir up some envy if you let it – some people have time to do all that planning and doodling and..
    I created lists – habit trackers, daily weight, adherence to my fitness program, meals, chores… I have a monthly in list form where I note blog posts (I have two), appointments, and bills. And then I have my dailies – one or two pages each.
    I even just started one for my writing.
    LOVE IT!

    Reply

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