Brainstorming

Baltimore_crab
Susan King has been buried under an avalanche of work and while we’re busily unburying her, we thought we’d throw in part of the outline for the brainstorming sessions presented by Mary Jo, Pat, and Susan K (in absentia)presented at RWA last month.  It would be wonderful to hear how other people brainstorm their ideas! (The full session can be ordered by download or CD from RWA)
The photo is of the stained glass crab at the Baltimore airport where Pat flies in to join MJ and SK when they have a Creative Cauldron stirring.

Brainstorming—Alexander Osborn’s Definition

# a method by which a group tries to find a solution for a specific problem by amassing a list of ideas spontaneously contributed its members.

Osborn’s rules for brainstorming sessions

# judgment of ideas is not allowed
# outlandish ideas are encouraged
# a large quantity of ideas is preferred
# members should build on one another’s ideas

 

  Suggestions for Building a Brainstorming Group

*Start with several fairly harmonious, committed writers.  Three to five is a good number—enough to avoid slipping into polarity, not so many as to be overwhelming.

*It’s useful to know your group strengths and weaknesses:
            -One person may be stronger on character, weaker on plotting, or whatever. Work at filling in the gaps, either consciously for current members, or bring in someone who is good with the weaker areas of the others.
            -Be happy with each other’s successes—writing is not a zero sum game
            -Recognize that it’s serious work, no matter how much you’re laughing
            -Be flexible and respectful of whatever project is on the table

If members believe they are being evaluated they become generally ineffective. (the purpose of brainstorming is a freespirited, from the subconscious, barrage of ideas–quantity counts)
Members must be part of the group simply because they wish to contribute; there are no other rewards or incentives.
Members of the group must view themselves as peers; there can be no rank or pecking order. All participants regardless of experienced or position must participate as equals. Similarly ideas generated by the group belong to the group, not to individuals.
Too large a group tends to reduce some members to observers rather than participants

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

*Develop ground rules for the group
            Respect each other’s ideas
            Respect the story and its originator 
            Decide what people should bring, whether it’s written pages or vague ideas         
            Start by each participant stating what she hopes to achieve from the session
            Think in terms of parity so everyone gets equal attention for her project
            When energy starts to flag, drop that project and move on to the next 

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

            Take breaks to rejuvenate the energy:
                        Meals, tea breaks, jug wine,
                        Walks—park, beach, labyrinth,
                        Fun stuff like beading, on-line tarot readings (try www.facade.com),
          Baking cookies, making soup, et al.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
: Techniques

            Verbally kick one person’s story or element around.  She’s responsible for taking notes.
            Conference call for telephone storming session
            E-mails to all.  (This seems to work particularly well for storming book titles.)
            Online live in a chat room
            Free writing

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

V: History and Resources

            http://www.skymark.com/resources/leaders/osborne.asp
            http://www.brainstorming.co.uk/tutorials/historyofbrainstorming.htmlCrabsan_fran

Holler if you have any questions. We obviously can’t post an entire 40 minute session here but we can answer over the weekend!  (and here’s the San Francisco version of the crab)

From MJP:

Okay, I already tried once to add an addendum to Pat’s Brainstorming post, but I came back from San Francisco to find my cable modem fried, one of the mirrored hard drives on my desktop paws up, and the network scrambled.  This is my second attempt at a post–the first one blanked out claiming not enough memory.  (?????)  I can’t even add my usual cat graphic! 

We came up with a brainstorming exercise for our panel, but didn’t have time for it, so I toss it out to you:

If time, EXERCISE: Brainstorming Heathcliff

I have a concept for a new women’s fiction series: taking classic novels and rewriting them as contemporary stories.  The first one I want to do is an updated take on Wuthering Heights.  My heroine, Catherine, has been trapped in an abusive relationship with Heathcliff, who has done his best to isolate and control her.  There’s another man in the picture—her sensitive, nurturing therapist, Edgar Linton.  How do I update this abusive classic into a modern story of a woman’s empowerment as she escapes a catastrophic relations ship and must discover who she really it??

So have fun with it!  Do you have any classic stories you’d like to brainstorm into something different?

And did I mention that on my laptop, I can’t even find Notepad so the formatting on this problematic post will probably be weird?

MJP, in cyber purgatory–but it could be a lot worse

60 thoughts on “Brainstorming”

  1. Yup, Mary Jo, I think you found cyber hell. My only advice… buy new. It’s the fastest and most assured way to “heaven.” (ie: no more funky coded messages that never say what they really mean.)
    To the brainstorming… I’m not real clear on what’s allowed and what’s not, so… here’s a greenboy’s go at it.
    To effectively garner a modern day reader’s sympathy for a woman seeking empowerment, here are some other ideas for setting. Edwardian: Women were just coming into themselves during this time thus giving lots of opportunity for Catherine to latch onto “cutting edge” ideas. African-American, 60’s, deep south: With money sparse in the home, Edgar would more likely be seen as a hero doing a good deed rather than a wolf stealing another man’s wife. Also, if he was Caucasian, that would put both he and Catherine in the hot seat, making their choices tougher and thus more convincing once made. Present Day: I am having trouble seeing a relatable heroine that would allow a physically abusive relationship to continue. A neglectful relationship. yes. A neglectful spouse would make for an interesting (and sexy) middle age story chocked full of unexpected twits and turns. The neglectful husband could become ill, come into a large sum of money and decided to fight for his wife, begin to stalk her and show his true colors…
    Am I all wet on this, MJ? Should I start swimming?

    Reply
  2. Yup, Mary Jo, I think you found cyber hell. My only advice… buy new. It’s the fastest and most assured way to “heaven.” (ie: no more funky coded messages that never say what they really mean.)
    To the brainstorming… I’m not real clear on what’s allowed and what’s not, so… here’s a greenboy’s go at it.
    To effectively garner a modern day reader’s sympathy for a woman seeking empowerment, here are some other ideas for setting. Edwardian: Women were just coming into themselves during this time thus giving lots of opportunity for Catherine to latch onto “cutting edge” ideas. African-American, 60’s, deep south: With money sparse in the home, Edgar would more likely be seen as a hero doing a good deed rather than a wolf stealing another man’s wife. Also, if he was Caucasian, that would put both he and Catherine in the hot seat, making their choices tougher and thus more convincing once made. Present Day: I am having trouble seeing a relatable heroine that would allow a physically abusive relationship to continue. A neglectful relationship. yes. A neglectful spouse would make for an interesting (and sexy) middle age story chocked full of unexpected twits and turns. The neglectful husband could become ill, come into a large sum of money and decided to fight for his wife, begin to stalk her and show his true colors…
    Am I all wet on this, MJ? Should I start swimming?

    Reply
  3. Yup, Mary Jo, I think you found cyber hell. My only advice… buy new. It’s the fastest and most assured way to “heaven.” (ie: no more funky coded messages that never say what they really mean.)
    To the brainstorming… I’m not real clear on what’s allowed and what’s not, so… here’s a greenboy’s go at it.
    To effectively garner a modern day reader’s sympathy for a woman seeking empowerment, here are some other ideas for setting. Edwardian: Women were just coming into themselves during this time thus giving lots of opportunity for Catherine to latch onto “cutting edge” ideas. African-American, 60’s, deep south: With money sparse in the home, Edgar would more likely be seen as a hero doing a good deed rather than a wolf stealing another man’s wife. Also, if he was Caucasian, that would put both he and Catherine in the hot seat, making their choices tougher and thus more convincing once made. Present Day: I am having trouble seeing a relatable heroine that would allow a physically abusive relationship to continue. A neglectful relationship. yes. A neglectful spouse would make for an interesting (and sexy) middle age story chocked full of unexpected twits and turns. The neglectful husband could become ill, come into a large sum of money and decided to fight for his wife, begin to stalk her and show his true colors…
    Am I all wet on this, MJ? Should I start swimming?

    Reply
  4. Yup, Mary Jo, I think you found cyber hell. My only advice… buy new. It’s the fastest and most assured way to “heaven.” (ie: no more funky coded messages that never say what they really mean.)
    To the brainstorming… I’m not real clear on what’s allowed and what’s not, so… here’s a greenboy’s go at it.
    To effectively garner a modern day reader’s sympathy for a woman seeking empowerment, here are some other ideas for setting. Edwardian: Women were just coming into themselves during this time thus giving lots of opportunity for Catherine to latch onto “cutting edge” ideas. African-American, 60’s, deep south: With money sparse in the home, Edgar would more likely be seen as a hero doing a good deed rather than a wolf stealing another man’s wife. Also, if he was Caucasian, that would put both he and Catherine in the hot seat, making their choices tougher and thus more convincing once made. Present Day: I am having trouble seeing a relatable heroine that would allow a physically abusive relationship to continue. A neglectful relationship. yes. A neglectful spouse would make for an interesting (and sexy) middle age story chocked full of unexpected twits and turns. The neglectful husband could become ill, come into a large sum of money and decided to fight for his wife, begin to stalk her and show his true colors…
    Am I all wet on this, MJ? Should I start swimming?

    Reply
  5. Yup, Mary Jo, I think you found cyber hell. My only advice… buy new. It’s the fastest and most assured way to “heaven.” (ie: no more funky coded messages that never say what they really mean.)
    To the brainstorming… I’m not real clear on what’s allowed and what’s not, so… here’s a greenboy’s go at it.
    To effectively garner a modern day reader’s sympathy for a woman seeking empowerment, here are some other ideas for setting. Edwardian: Women were just coming into themselves during this time thus giving lots of opportunity for Catherine to latch onto “cutting edge” ideas. African-American, 60’s, deep south: With money sparse in the home, Edgar would more likely be seen as a hero doing a good deed rather than a wolf stealing another man’s wife. Also, if he was Caucasian, that would put both he and Catherine in the hot seat, making their choices tougher and thus more convincing once made. Present Day: I am having trouble seeing a relatable heroine that would allow a physically abusive relationship to continue. A neglectful relationship. yes. A neglectful spouse would make for an interesting (and sexy) middle age story chocked full of unexpected twits and turns. The neglectful husband could become ill, come into a large sum of money and decided to fight for his wife, begin to stalk her and show his true colors…
    Am I all wet on this, MJ? Should I start swimming?

    Reply
  6. love the crabs!
    would have loved to attend your session. all makes sense and sounds logical, only…not quite sure about what ‘harmonious members’ means. of the same genre? of a placid nature? not given to outbursts? very good at not interrupting?

    Reply
  7. love the crabs!
    would have loved to attend your session. all makes sense and sounds logical, only…not quite sure about what ‘harmonious members’ means. of the same genre? of a placid nature? not given to outbursts? very good at not interrupting?

    Reply
  8. love the crabs!
    would have loved to attend your session. all makes sense and sounds logical, only…not quite sure about what ‘harmonious members’ means. of the same genre? of a placid nature? not given to outbursts? very good at not interrupting?

    Reply
  9. love the crabs!
    would have loved to attend your session. all makes sense and sounds logical, only…not quite sure about what ‘harmonious members’ means. of the same genre? of a placid nature? not given to outbursts? very good at not interrupting?

    Reply
  10. love the crabs!
    would have loved to attend your session. all makes sense and sounds logical, only…not quite sure about what ‘harmonious members’ means. of the same genre? of a placid nature? not given to outbursts? very good at not interrupting?

    Reply
  11. “Harmonious” can mean many things–for instance you don’t want someone who is going to do all the talking and someone who will sit on the sidelines and let everyone else talk. You need equal particpation. And I’ve found it isn’t totally necessary for all the group members to be pubbed or unpubbed. It’s the level of determination that counts.
    Nina, I think you’re doing find, but personally, I’d have Catherine take a hatchet to all the men in her life and then go on a long relaxing voyage to discover herself1

    Reply
  12. “Harmonious” can mean many things–for instance you don’t want someone who is going to do all the talking and someone who will sit on the sidelines and let everyone else talk. You need equal particpation. And I’ve found it isn’t totally necessary for all the group members to be pubbed or unpubbed. It’s the level of determination that counts.
    Nina, I think you’re doing find, but personally, I’d have Catherine take a hatchet to all the men in her life and then go on a long relaxing voyage to discover herself1

    Reply
  13. “Harmonious” can mean many things–for instance you don’t want someone who is going to do all the talking and someone who will sit on the sidelines and let everyone else talk. You need equal particpation. And I’ve found it isn’t totally necessary for all the group members to be pubbed or unpubbed. It’s the level of determination that counts.
    Nina, I think you’re doing find, but personally, I’d have Catherine take a hatchet to all the men in her life and then go on a long relaxing voyage to discover herself1

    Reply
  14. “Harmonious” can mean many things–for instance you don’t want someone who is going to do all the talking and someone who will sit on the sidelines and let everyone else talk. You need equal particpation. And I’ve found it isn’t totally necessary for all the group members to be pubbed or unpubbed. It’s the level of determination that counts.
    Nina, I think you’re doing find, but personally, I’d have Catherine take a hatchet to all the men in her life and then go on a long relaxing voyage to discover herself1

    Reply
  15. “Harmonious” can mean many things–for instance you don’t want someone who is going to do all the talking and someone who will sit on the sidelines and let everyone else talk. You need equal particpation. And I’ve found it isn’t totally necessary for all the group members to be pubbed or unpubbed. It’s the level of determination that counts.
    Nina, I think you’re doing find, but personally, I’d have Catherine take a hatchet to all the men in her life and then go on a long relaxing voyage to discover herself1

    Reply
  16. Pat said… “I’d have Catherine take a hatchet to all the men in her life and then go on a long relaxing voyage to discover herself1”
    I can see this! A hurting woman finds romance onboard the RMS Aquitania. Or a contemp would work too. What happens on the ship… stays on the ship. (or does it?) 🙂
    Oh… here’s another thought… the husband could follow her and come to realize his Catherine is better off with another man thus making him a ripe target for shipboard book #2. Or husband could be a real ass and psychologist hero has the opportunity to save the day! Or maybe Catherine find’s her hero in one of the ports of call after turning her nose up at all the sunbathing shipboard hunks. Maybe she rescues him from some such snafu using her knowledge as a (fill in the blank) That would make for an interesting change of heart following her hatchet act.
    I’ve never been on a cruise. I think I’d like to read a book about a shipboard romance. Does anyone know of any? (other than the Titanic, please)

    Reply
  17. Pat said… “I’d have Catherine take a hatchet to all the men in her life and then go on a long relaxing voyage to discover herself1”
    I can see this! A hurting woman finds romance onboard the RMS Aquitania. Or a contemp would work too. What happens on the ship… stays on the ship. (or does it?) 🙂
    Oh… here’s another thought… the husband could follow her and come to realize his Catherine is better off with another man thus making him a ripe target for shipboard book #2. Or husband could be a real ass and psychologist hero has the opportunity to save the day! Or maybe Catherine find’s her hero in one of the ports of call after turning her nose up at all the sunbathing shipboard hunks. Maybe she rescues him from some such snafu using her knowledge as a (fill in the blank) That would make for an interesting change of heart following her hatchet act.
    I’ve never been on a cruise. I think I’d like to read a book about a shipboard romance. Does anyone know of any? (other than the Titanic, please)

    Reply
  18. Pat said… “I’d have Catherine take a hatchet to all the men in her life and then go on a long relaxing voyage to discover herself1”
    I can see this! A hurting woman finds romance onboard the RMS Aquitania. Or a contemp would work too. What happens on the ship… stays on the ship. (or does it?) 🙂
    Oh… here’s another thought… the husband could follow her and come to realize his Catherine is better off with another man thus making him a ripe target for shipboard book #2. Or husband could be a real ass and psychologist hero has the opportunity to save the day! Or maybe Catherine find’s her hero in one of the ports of call after turning her nose up at all the sunbathing shipboard hunks. Maybe she rescues him from some such snafu using her knowledge as a (fill in the blank) That would make for an interesting change of heart following her hatchet act.
    I’ve never been on a cruise. I think I’d like to read a book about a shipboard romance. Does anyone know of any? (other than the Titanic, please)

    Reply
  19. Pat said… “I’d have Catherine take a hatchet to all the men in her life and then go on a long relaxing voyage to discover herself1”
    I can see this! A hurting woman finds romance onboard the RMS Aquitania. Or a contemp would work too. What happens on the ship… stays on the ship. (or does it?) 🙂
    Oh… here’s another thought… the husband could follow her and come to realize his Catherine is better off with another man thus making him a ripe target for shipboard book #2. Or husband could be a real ass and psychologist hero has the opportunity to save the day! Or maybe Catherine find’s her hero in one of the ports of call after turning her nose up at all the sunbathing shipboard hunks. Maybe she rescues him from some such snafu using her knowledge as a (fill in the blank) That would make for an interesting change of heart following her hatchet act.
    I’ve never been on a cruise. I think I’d like to read a book about a shipboard romance. Does anyone know of any? (other than the Titanic, please)

    Reply
  20. Pat said… “I’d have Catherine take a hatchet to all the men in her life and then go on a long relaxing voyage to discover herself1”
    I can see this! A hurting woman finds romance onboard the RMS Aquitania. Or a contemp would work too. What happens on the ship… stays on the ship. (or does it?) 🙂
    Oh… here’s another thought… the husband could follow her and come to realize his Catherine is better off with another man thus making him a ripe target for shipboard book #2. Or husband could be a real ass and psychologist hero has the opportunity to save the day! Or maybe Catherine find’s her hero in one of the ports of call after turning her nose up at all the sunbathing shipboard hunks. Maybe she rescues him from some such snafu using her knowledge as a (fill in the blank) That would make for an interesting change of heart following her hatchet act.
    I’ve never been on a cruise. I think I’d like to read a book about a shipboard romance. Does anyone know of any? (other than the Titanic, please)

    Reply
  21. From MJP:
    Sounds like you’re having lots of fun kicking the concepts around, Nina! Lots can be done. An abused woman is women’s fiction, not generally romance. (Not that I really consider Wuthering Heights to be a real romance.)
    Maybe Catherine hatchets Heathcliff, takes that cruise, and finds that she likes women a LOT more than men. 🙂 Or she could try the Edwardian setting–that could be fun.
    As to ‘harmonious’ group members–as Pat says, it’s largely a matter of balance and equality. Someone who loves to dominate the talk isn’t very helpful, or a congenital lurker, or someone who is always critical rather than constructive. What’s needed is a serious desire to participate, both giving and taking.
    Mary Jo, still exiled to laptop….

    Reply
  22. From MJP:
    Sounds like you’re having lots of fun kicking the concepts around, Nina! Lots can be done. An abused woman is women’s fiction, not generally romance. (Not that I really consider Wuthering Heights to be a real romance.)
    Maybe Catherine hatchets Heathcliff, takes that cruise, and finds that she likes women a LOT more than men. 🙂 Or she could try the Edwardian setting–that could be fun.
    As to ‘harmonious’ group members–as Pat says, it’s largely a matter of balance and equality. Someone who loves to dominate the talk isn’t very helpful, or a congenital lurker, or someone who is always critical rather than constructive. What’s needed is a serious desire to participate, both giving and taking.
    Mary Jo, still exiled to laptop….

    Reply
  23. From MJP:
    Sounds like you’re having lots of fun kicking the concepts around, Nina! Lots can be done. An abused woman is women’s fiction, not generally romance. (Not that I really consider Wuthering Heights to be a real romance.)
    Maybe Catherine hatchets Heathcliff, takes that cruise, and finds that she likes women a LOT more than men. 🙂 Or she could try the Edwardian setting–that could be fun.
    As to ‘harmonious’ group members–as Pat says, it’s largely a matter of balance and equality. Someone who loves to dominate the talk isn’t very helpful, or a congenital lurker, or someone who is always critical rather than constructive. What’s needed is a serious desire to participate, both giving and taking.
    Mary Jo, still exiled to laptop….

    Reply
  24. From MJP:
    Sounds like you’re having lots of fun kicking the concepts around, Nina! Lots can be done. An abused woman is women’s fiction, not generally romance. (Not that I really consider Wuthering Heights to be a real romance.)
    Maybe Catherine hatchets Heathcliff, takes that cruise, and finds that she likes women a LOT more than men. 🙂 Or she could try the Edwardian setting–that could be fun.
    As to ‘harmonious’ group members–as Pat says, it’s largely a matter of balance and equality. Someone who loves to dominate the talk isn’t very helpful, or a congenital lurker, or someone who is always critical rather than constructive. What’s needed is a serious desire to participate, both giving and taking.
    Mary Jo, still exiled to laptop….

    Reply
  25. From MJP:
    Sounds like you’re having lots of fun kicking the concepts around, Nina! Lots can be done. An abused woman is women’s fiction, not generally romance. (Not that I really consider Wuthering Heights to be a real romance.)
    Maybe Catherine hatchets Heathcliff, takes that cruise, and finds that she likes women a LOT more than men. 🙂 Or she could try the Edwardian setting–that could be fun.
    As to ‘harmonious’ group members–as Pat says, it’s largely a matter of balance and equality. Someone who loves to dominate the talk isn’t very helpful, or a congenital lurker, or someone who is always critical rather than constructive. What’s needed is a serious desire to participate, both giving and taking.
    Mary Jo, still exiled to laptop….

    Reply
  26. I think Catherine should wander into SENSE AND SENSIBILITY and take Colonel Brandon away from Marianne Dashwood, who does not deserve him!
    (Of course, I think he deserves better than Catherine, too….)
    We could have a whole new genre here, matching up characters from different books to make for happier endings.

    Reply
  27. I think Catherine should wander into SENSE AND SENSIBILITY and take Colonel Brandon away from Marianne Dashwood, who does not deserve him!
    (Of course, I think he deserves better than Catherine, too….)
    We could have a whole new genre here, matching up characters from different books to make for happier endings.

    Reply
  28. I think Catherine should wander into SENSE AND SENSIBILITY and take Colonel Brandon away from Marianne Dashwood, who does not deserve him!
    (Of course, I think he deserves better than Catherine, too….)
    We could have a whole new genre here, matching up characters from different books to make for happier endings.

    Reply
  29. I think Catherine should wander into SENSE AND SENSIBILITY and take Colonel Brandon away from Marianne Dashwood, who does not deserve him!
    (Of course, I think he deserves better than Catherine, too….)
    We could have a whole new genre here, matching up characters from different books to make for happier endings.

    Reply
  30. I think Catherine should wander into SENSE AND SENSIBILITY and take Colonel Brandon away from Marianne Dashwood, who does not deserve him!
    (Of course, I think he deserves better than Catherine, too….)
    We could have a whole new genre here, matching up characters from different books to make for happier endings.

    Reply
  31. I never really cared for/understood/got Wuthering Heights. So rewriting it would be a good idea imo.
    Another one that I would love to see rewritten in modern terms would be Jane Eyre. Now I did like Jane Eyre, but can’t you just picture Jane (who had been abandoned at birth and raised in foster care) working for a handsome man, who happens to be raising his bastard child. He wouldn’t be hiding his crazy wife in the attic, since divorce is pretty easy to get now, but perhaps there’d be a touch of Fatal Attraction happening with a woman he once knew? Jane is so frightened she leaves his employ, and somehow manages to track down her biological family, or possibly some of the kids she had been raised with.
    I can see it. It could be a really good story.

    Reply
  32. I never really cared for/understood/got Wuthering Heights. So rewriting it would be a good idea imo.
    Another one that I would love to see rewritten in modern terms would be Jane Eyre. Now I did like Jane Eyre, but can’t you just picture Jane (who had been abandoned at birth and raised in foster care) working for a handsome man, who happens to be raising his bastard child. He wouldn’t be hiding his crazy wife in the attic, since divorce is pretty easy to get now, but perhaps there’d be a touch of Fatal Attraction happening with a woman he once knew? Jane is so frightened she leaves his employ, and somehow manages to track down her biological family, or possibly some of the kids she had been raised with.
    I can see it. It could be a really good story.

    Reply
  33. I never really cared for/understood/got Wuthering Heights. So rewriting it would be a good idea imo.
    Another one that I would love to see rewritten in modern terms would be Jane Eyre. Now I did like Jane Eyre, but can’t you just picture Jane (who had been abandoned at birth and raised in foster care) working for a handsome man, who happens to be raising his bastard child. He wouldn’t be hiding his crazy wife in the attic, since divorce is pretty easy to get now, but perhaps there’d be a touch of Fatal Attraction happening with a woman he once knew? Jane is so frightened she leaves his employ, and somehow manages to track down her biological family, or possibly some of the kids she had been raised with.
    I can see it. It could be a really good story.

    Reply
  34. I never really cared for/understood/got Wuthering Heights. So rewriting it would be a good idea imo.
    Another one that I would love to see rewritten in modern terms would be Jane Eyre. Now I did like Jane Eyre, but can’t you just picture Jane (who had been abandoned at birth and raised in foster care) working for a handsome man, who happens to be raising his bastard child. He wouldn’t be hiding his crazy wife in the attic, since divorce is pretty easy to get now, but perhaps there’d be a touch of Fatal Attraction happening with a woman he once knew? Jane is so frightened she leaves his employ, and somehow manages to track down her biological family, or possibly some of the kids she had been raised with.
    I can see it. It could be a really good story.

    Reply
  35. I never really cared for/understood/got Wuthering Heights. So rewriting it would be a good idea imo.
    Another one that I would love to see rewritten in modern terms would be Jane Eyre. Now I did like Jane Eyre, but can’t you just picture Jane (who had been abandoned at birth and raised in foster care) working for a handsome man, who happens to be raising his bastard child. He wouldn’t be hiding his crazy wife in the attic, since divorce is pretty easy to get now, but perhaps there’d be a touch of Fatal Attraction happening with a woman he once knew? Jane is so frightened she leaves his employ, and somehow manages to track down her biological family, or possibly some of the kids she had been raised with.
    I can see it. It could be a really good story.

    Reply
  36. Wow, I see we ought to throw out a wench idea and let our readers run with it! Taking Jane Eyre to contemporary times could outsell Pride & Prejudice remakes.
    And then if we start taking characters out of one book and putting them in another–we’d have a whole new genre. I’m liking this.

    Reply
  37. Wow, I see we ought to throw out a wench idea and let our readers run with it! Taking Jane Eyre to contemporary times could outsell Pride & Prejudice remakes.
    And then if we start taking characters out of one book and putting them in another–we’d have a whole new genre. I’m liking this.

    Reply
  38. Wow, I see we ought to throw out a wench idea and let our readers run with it! Taking Jane Eyre to contemporary times could outsell Pride & Prejudice remakes.
    And then if we start taking characters out of one book and putting them in another–we’d have a whole new genre. I’m liking this.

    Reply
  39. Wow, I see we ought to throw out a wench idea and let our readers run with it! Taking Jane Eyre to contemporary times could outsell Pride & Prejudice remakes.
    And then if we start taking characters out of one book and putting them in another–we’d have a whole new genre. I’m liking this.

    Reply
  40. Wow, I see we ought to throw out a wench idea and let our readers run with it! Taking Jane Eyre to contemporary times could outsell Pride & Prejudice remakes.
    And then if we start taking characters out of one book and putting them in another–we’d have a whole new genre. I’m liking this.

    Reply
  41. See, I would have had Catherine realize that Edgar was completely wrong for her. She’s a bully and much stronger than he is, and it makes both their lives miserable. And I think Heathcliff is maddened by Cathy’s perversity and selfishness, and turns into a nasty bully, too.
    I would probably have made Heathcliff go off and seek his fortune, and come back fabulously rich, while Catherine’s fortunes fall, so they’re not so unequal in status. Then possibly a taming of the shrew/beast-under-pressure story, where they both have to battle some terrible outside situation and work together. They learn to control the worst in themselves and foster the best, instead of tearing each other apart.

    Reply
  42. See, I would have had Catherine realize that Edgar was completely wrong for her. She’s a bully and much stronger than he is, and it makes both their lives miserable. And I think Heathcliff is maddened by Cathy’s perversity and selfishness, and turns into a nasty bully, too.
    I would probably have made Heathcliff go off and seek his fortune, and come back fabulously rich, while Catherine’s fortunes fall, so they’re not so unequal in status. Then possibly a taming of the shrew/beast-under-pressure story, where they both have to battle some terrible outside situation and work together. They learn to control the worst in themselves and foster the best, instead of tearing each other apart.

    Reply
  43. See, I would have had Catherine realize that Edgar was completely wrong for her. She’s a bully and much stronger than he is, and it makes both their lives miserable. And I think Heathcliff is maddened by Cathy’s perversity and selfishness, and turns into a nasty bully, too.
    I would probably have made Heathcliff go off and seek his fortune, and come back fabulously rich, while Catherine’s fortunes fall, so they’re not so unequal in status. Then possibly a taming of the shrew/beast-under-pressure story, where they both have to battle some terrible outside situation and work together. They learn to control the worst in themselves and foster the best, instead of tearing each other apart.

    Reply
  44. See, I would have had Catherine realize that Edgar was completely wrong for her. She’s a bully and much stronger than he is, and it makes both their lives miserable. And I think Heathcliff is maddened by Cathy’s perversity and selfishness, and turns into a nasty bully, too.
    I would probably have made Heathcliff go off and seek his fortune, and come back fabulously rich, while Catherine’s fortunes fall, so they’re not so unequal in status. Then possibly a taming of the shrew/beast-under-pressure story, where they both have to battle some terrible outside situation and work together. They learn to control the worst in themselves and foster the best, instead of tearing each other apart.

    Reply
  45. See, I would have had Catherine realize that Edgar was completely wrong for her. She’s a bully and much stronger than he is, and it makes both their lives miserable. And I think Heathcliff is maddened by Cathy’s perversity and selfishness, and turns into a nasty bully, too.
    I would probably have made Heathcliff go off and seek his fortune, and come back fabulously rich, while Catherine’s fortunes fall, so they’re not so unequal in status. Then possibly a taming of the shrew/beast-under-pressure story, where they both have to battle some terrible outside situation and work together. They learn to control the worst in themselves and foster the best, instead of tearing each other apart.

    Reply
  46. Sharon Shinn’s JENNA STARBORN is an SF version of JANE EYRE:
    Book Description
    From the award-winning author of the Samaria trilogy-a classic story of a woman with the will to rise above the darkest secrets…
    A baby harvested from the gen-tanks on the planet Baldus.
    A girl scorned by the only family she has ever known.
    A woman brave enough to follow her heart-wherever in the universe it may lead her.

    Reply
  47. Sharon Shinn’s JENNA STARBORN is an SF version of JANE EYRE:
    Book Description
    From the award-winning author of the Samaria trilogy-a classic story of a woman with the will to rise above the darkest secrets…
    A baby harvested from the gen-tanks on the planet Baldus.
    A girl scorned by the only family she has ever known.
    A woman brave enough to follow her heart-wherever in the universe it may lead her.

    Reply
  48. Sharon Shinn’s JENNA STARBORN is an SF version of JANE EYRE:
    Book Description
    From the award-winning author of the Samaria trilogy-a classic story of a woman with the will to rise above the darkest secrets…
    A baby harvested from the gen-tanks on the planet Baldus.
    A girl scorned by the only family she has ever known.
    A woman brave enough to follow her heart-wherever in the universe it may lead her.

    Reply
  49. Sharon Shinn’s JENNA STARBORN is an SF version of JANE EYRE:
    Book Description
    From the award-winning author of the Samaria trilogy-a classic story of a woman with the will to rise above the darkest secrets…
    A baby harvested from the gen-tanks on the planet Baldus.
    A girl scorned by the only family she has ever known.
    A woman brave enough to follow her heart-wherever in the universe it may lead her.

    Reply
  50. Sharon Shinn’s JENNA STARBORN is an SF version of JANE EYRE:
    Book Description
    From the award-winning author of the Samaria trilogy-a classic story of a woman with the will to rise above the darkest secrets…
    A baby harvested from the gen-tanks on the planet Baldus.
    A girl scorned by the only family she has ever known.
    A woman brave enough to follow her heart-wherever in the universe it may lead her.

    Reply
  51. LOL, Anne! I see now why you’ve earned your bestselling status! You’re GOOD at this. “G”
    I adore Shinn and devour everything she writes, but I never quite saw the Jane Eyre power of STARBORN. Still, you’re right, she gave it a better try than anyone else I know.

    Reply
  52. LOL, Anne! I see now why you’ve earned your bestselling status! You’re GOOD at this. “G”
    I adore Shinn and devour everything she writes, but I never quite saw the Jane Eyre power of STARBORN. Still, you’re right, she gave it a better try than anyone else I know.

    Reply
  53. LOL, Anne! I see now why you’ve earned your bestselling status! You’re GOOD at this. “G”
    I adore Shinn and devour everything she writes, but I never quite saw the Jane Eyre power of STARBORN. Still, you’re right, she gave it a better try than anyone else I know.

    Reply
  54. LOL, Anne! I see now why you’ve earned your bestselling status! You’re GOOD at this. “G”
    I adore Shinn and devour everything she writes, but I never quite saw the Jane Eyre power of STARBORN. Still, you’re right, she gave it a better try than anyone else I know.

    Reply
  55. LOL, Anne! I see now why you’ve earned your bestselling status! You’re GOOD at this. “G”
    I adore Shinn and devour everything she writes, but I never quite saw the Jane Eyre power of STARBORN. Still, you’re right, she gave it a better try than anyone else I know.

    Reply

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