Books for ideas

Hi, Jo here, sliding in a quick post while it’s quiet.

Varicellofeatherhead
Books for ideas. Now it’s not as if we’re short of ideas here. This wench has so many, they’re growing out of her head! We writers always have more ideas than we can use before we die. In fact, it’s amazing writers ever die… Or they’re still all writing away in heaven. (I don’t know if that pleases or depresses me!)

But we want the Word Wenches blog to be about what you all (hundreds and hundreds of you, according to our stats) want to read as well as about what we want to riff about. On Wednesday I used a suggestion from Nina, and today I posted her a book.

Simple, see? Send us your suggestions for blog posts, themes, or simply cute ideas. We don’t guarantee to use them all, but if any catches the interest of a Wench and she uses it, she’ll send the originator a book. If it’s so good we fight over it….
bonus books!

You can put your ideas in a comment to any day’s blog, or you can e-mail Super Sherrie at sholmes@holmesedit.com and she’ll pass it on.

We’re looking forward to seeing what you come up with.

Jo

21 thoughts on “Books for ideas”

  1. How about historical Christmas traditions, or even New Years as well. . . and my brain’s sleeping, since I can’t think of anything else. But I always figure you guys do very well on your own coming up with great stuff without my help! LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  2. How about historical Christmas traditions, or even New Years as well. . . and my brain’s sleeping, since I can’t think of anything else. But I always figure you guys do very well on your own coming up with great stuff without my help! LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  3. How about historical Christmas traditions, or even New Years as well. . . and my brain’s sleeping, since I can’t think of anything else. But I always figure you guys do very well on your own coming up with great stuff without my help! LOL 🙂
    Lois

    Reply
  4. Wenches, if I may be so bold as to suggest…
    Would it be possible for you to blog about your writing processes and your daily schedules? Thanks much in advance.
    A few days ago, I finished reading “Write Away” by Elizabeth George. She is a proponent of detailed outlines. In her book, she describes in great depth how her process works for her. Since I’m naturally a “managing type of woman of a certain age,” er, that is an organized person who loves organizing, outlining sounds far more natural to me.
    I tried a seat-of-the-pants out-of-order kind of writing and the WIP turned out to be one mess (plot holes, characters with disjointed arcs, you-name-the-issue-it-had-it). And every time, I was fighting my natural inclination.
    So I’ve been wondering if it would be possible for you highly known authors to share your thoughts regarding your processes. I’m of course hoping to see if I might be able to discover a style that goes with my nature.
    Thanks a million in advance…

    Reply
  5. Wenches, if I may be so bold as to suggest…
    Would it be possible for you to blog about your writing processes and your daily schedules? Thanks much in advance.
    A few days ago, I finished reading “Write Away” by Elizabeth George. She is a proponent of detailed outlines. In her book, she describes in great depth how her process works for her. Since I’m naturally a “managing type of woman of a certain age,” er, that is an organized person who loves organizing, outlining sounds far more natural to me.
    I tried a seat-of-the-pants out-of-order kind of writing and the WIP turned out to be one mess (plot holes, characters with disjointed arcs, you-name-the-issue-it-had-it). And every time, I was fighting my natural inclination.
    So I’ve been wondering if it would be possible for you highly known authors to share your thoughts regarding your processes. I’m of course hoping to see if I might be able to discover a style that goes with my nature.
    Thanks a million in advance…

    Reply
  6. Wenches, if I may be so bold as to suggest…
    Would it be possible for you to blog about your writing processes and your daily schedules? Thanks much in advance.
    A few days ago, I finished reading “Write Away” by Elizabeth George. She is a proponent of detailed outlines. In her book, she describes in great depth how her process works for her. Since I’m naturally a “managing type of woman of a certain age,” er, that is an organized person who loves organizing, outlining sounds far more natural to me.
    I tried a seat-of-the-pants out-of-order kind of writing and the WIP turned out to be one mess (plot holes, characters with disjointed arcs, you-name-the-issue-it-had-it). And every time, I was fighting my natural inclination.
    So I’ve been wondering if it would be possible for you highly known authors to share your thoughts regarding your processes. I’m of course hoping to see if I might be able to discover a style that goes with my nature.
    Thanks a million in advance…

    Reply
  7. I would love to see you blog about writing connected books. How do you keep straight details concerning recurring characters? Do you know your characters so well that you remember? Do you keep character bios to which you refer? Or what? And do you ever get tired of a character before your readers do?
    Another question: how do you visualize your character? I know, Jo, that you give your readers “portraits” of the Rogues on your website, but did the images come before or after the creation of the characters? Do any of you ever see particular actors or others as your characters? I know that as a reader I have my own images of the characters, and I find that I rarely agree when online groups start casting actors in roles. I always prefer my mental images. 🙂

    Reply
  8. I would love to see you blog about writing connected books. How do you keep straight details concerning recurring characters? Do you know your characters so well that you remember? Do you keep character bios to which you refer? Or what? And do you ever get tired of a character before your readers do?
    Another question: how do you visualize your character? I know, Jo, that you give your readers “portraits” of the Rogues on your website, but did the images come before or after the creation of the characters? Do any of you ever see particular actors or others as your characters? I know that as a reader I have my own images of the characters, and I find that I rarely agree when online groups start casting actors in roles. I always prefer my mental images. 🙂

    Reply
  9. I would love to see you blog about writing connected books. How do you keep straight details concerning recurring characters? Do you know your characters so well that you remember? Do you keep character bios to which you refer? Or what? And do you ever get tired of a character before your readers do?
    Another question: how do you visualize your character? I know, Jo, that you give your readers “portraits” of the Rogues on your website, but did the images come before or after the creation of the characters? Do any of you ever see particular actors or others as your characters? I know that as a reader I have my own images of the characters, and I find that I rarely agree when online groups start casting actors in roles. I always prefer my mental images. 🙂

    Reply
  10. I’d like to know how critique groups work and your opinion of their value. I live pretty far away from the nearest RWA chapter, so I’ve just been typing in the wilderness. I’m not ready to have my babies butchered by strangers, and my friends are not romance readers (plus, they’re my friends. And I want to keep it that way). How many of you depend on critique partners? Who goes it alone?
    As a former English teacher, I know I’m pretty quick with the red pen. As an avid reader, my eyes glaze over at the first sign of cliches, even though I know there’s no new plot under the sun. I wouldn’t want me for a critique partner! Any advice?

    Reply
  11. I’d like to know how critique groups work and your opinion of their value. I live pretty far away from the nearest RWA chapter, so I’ve just been typing in the wilderness. I’m not ready to have my babies butchered by strangers, and my friends are not romance readers (plus, they’re my friends. And I want to keep it that way). How many of you depend on critique partners? Who goes it alone?
    As a former English teacher, I know I’m pretty quick with the red pen. As an avid reader, my eyes glaze over at the first sign of cliches, even though I know there’s no new plot under the sun. I wouldn’t want me for a critique partner! Any advice?

    Reply
  12. I’d like to know how critique groups work and your opinion of their value. I live pretty far away from the nearest RWA chapter, so I’ve just been typing in the wilderness. I’m not ready to have my babies butchered by strangers, and my friends are not romance readers (plus, they’re my friends. And I want to keep it that way). How many of you depend on critique partners? Who goes it alone?
    As a former English teacher, I know I’m pretty quick with the red pen. As an avid reader, my eyes glaze over at the first sign of cliches, even though I know there’s no new plot under the sun. I wouldn’t want me for a critique partner! Any advice?

    Reply
  13. I’m fascinated with pseudonyms. The why (were you embarassed to use your real one?), where (did you get the inspiration for your pen name?), how (did it come about?), who (gave you the idea for it?).
    I think that I’d use a pseudonym (or in my case a ‘Nom de plume’) because I’d be worried I wouldn’t be taken seriously as an author, by the people closest to me.
    Become published under another name and THEN let it be known that you’re that person who wrote the book…
    For those of you who write under a name different than the you were born with, what’s your reasons?

    Reply
  14. I’m fascinated with pseudonyms. The why (were you embarassed to use your real one?), where (did you get the inspiration for your pen name?), how (did it come about?), who (gave you the idea for it?).
    I think that I’d use a pseudonym (or in my case a ‘Nom de plume’) because I’d be worried I wouldn’t be taken seriously as an author, by the people closest to me.
    Become published under another name and THEN let it be known that you’re that person who wrote the book…
    For those of you who write under a name different than the you were born with, what’s your reasons?

    Reply
  15. I’m fascinated with pseudonyms. The why (were you embarassed to use your real one?), where (did you get the inspiration for your pen name?), how (did it come about?), who (gave you the idea for it?).
    I think that I’d use a pseudonym (or in my case a ‘Nom de plume’) because I’d be worried I wouldn’t be taken seriously as an author, by the people closest to me.
    Become published under another name and THEN let it be known that you’re that person who wrote the book…
    For those of you who write under a name different than the you were born with, what’s your reasons?

    Reply
  16. Hi!
    It would be fun to have readers cast actors for heros/heroines in imaginary film versions of their favorite books by Wenches, and then have the authors themselves cast the roles.
    The actors would not have to currently be the right age, or even living. In fact, they could be anybody.
    Fun, hmmm?
    Jane

    Reply
  17. Hi!
    It would be fun to have readers cast actors for heros/heroines in imaginary film versions of their favorite books by Wenches, and then have the authors themselves cast the roles.
    The actors would not have to currently be the right age, or even living. In fact, they could be anybody.
    Fun, hmmm?
    Jane

    Reply
  18. Hi!
    It would be fun to have readers cast actors for heros/heroines in imaginary film versions of their favorite books by Wenches, and then have the authors themselves cast the roles.
    The actors would not have to currently be the right age, or even living. In fact, they could be anybody.
    Fun, hmmm?
    Jane

    Reply

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