Books to TV

Anne here, and today I'm talking about the books-to-TV process. In recent times I've picked up a few books that sparked TV series — ones I really enjoy, naturally.

Sometimes I see the TV series first, then pick up the books out of curiosity, sometimes the book comes first. It's always a tricky process. Sharpe

When you read the book(s) first, you form a clear impression of the characters, the setting and the tone of the story-world. It can then make watching the TV version problematic — especially if it's not how you envisaged the people, or the tone is wrong —or you can't put your finger on it, but it's just not right! That's if you loved the book version, of course.

Occasionally there will be a few differences in the TV version, but in all other respects it's excellent — and sometimes it adds to and enriches your original experience of the books. Bernard Cornwell's Sharpe series was that for me. I had a clear image of the book-version-Sharpe in my mind —until I saw Sean Bean's screen portrayal of Sharpe which in my opinion eclipsed the original written character, and in subsequent readings of the books I substituted  Sean Bean's Sharpe in my imagination.

GrufyddHornblowerThe TV version of the HORNBLOWER series was the opposite experience for me. I'd never really been keen on the books, had tried them a few times in my youth, and wasn't initially interested in watching the TV series, but Ioan Gruffudd caused me to give it a try—and I loved it. I still haven't picked up the books, though.

Years ago I read Minette Walters's books, and when they were made into TV mini series, I was doubtful as to how faithful they'd be to the original — but they blew me away. I remember seeing a young Daniel Craig in one of them — The Icehouse— as an intense young police sergeant, and he made such an impression I never forgot him, even though he wasn't in a major role. There's a short clip here (Warning — some people might find the language offensive.) BrendaBlethynVERA

Recently I've been enjoying the British crime drama VERA, and after talking about it with a friend who was a big fan of the books, I was prompted to buy some of the Ann Cleeves books that inspired the TV show. Again, there were a few differences, but nothing that prevented me enjoying both the books and the TV series. Brenda Blethyn's wonderful TV portrayal of Vera now influences how I read and interpret the book character.

Hamish MacbethI think if the production is good enough, some small variations from the original don't matter. One TV series I absolutely loved was the HAMISH MACBETH series, a village crime series set in the far north-west of Scotland. However when I went to read the books that sparked the series, they were very different — to the extent that I wondered how people who'd read and loved the books first had reacted to the TV series. For me, the books were disappointing — not because of their intrinsic content, but because I wanted them to be about the cast of characters I'd met and fallen in love with in the TV series.

Of course, many book series are written after a TV series has proved popular. I love the TV show CASTLE, but I've never read the books written to go with the show, supposedly by the Castle character himself, which I think is a fun conceit. Castle

I haven't yet seen the OUTLANDER TV series — (I know, shocking isn't it?) I was keeping it for a treat after I'd finished a book, and then one thing led to another and I still haven't watched it. People tell me it's as good, or even better than the books.

ColinFirthAnd of course no discussion of books-to TV would be complete without a mention of the many versions of Pride and Prejudice — for my money the Colin Firth, Jennifer Ehle version is still the best, though I have enjoyed the various others.

So what about you — what are your favorite book-to-TV adaptations? Are there any you think don't work at all? Have you seen or read any of the ones I've mentioned? What did you think of them?

375 thoughts on “Books to TV”

  1. I absolutely love the BBC “Jane Eyre” starring Timothy Dalton as Mr Rochester. It was done in 1983. He absolutely owns the part. He’s probably too handsome for the role, but it doesn’t get in the way of his performance. I had it originally on VHS, and upgraded to DVD when the time came, because the whole production is first rate.

    Reply
  2. I absolutely love the BBC “Jane Eyre” starring Timothy Dalton as Mr Rochester. It was done in 1983. He absolutely owns the part. He’s probably too handsome for the role, but it doesn’t get in the way of his performance. I had it originally on VHS, and upgraded to DVD when the time came, because the whole production is first rate.

    Reply
  3. I absolutely love the BBC “Jane Eyre” starring Timothy Dalton as Mr Rochester. It was done in 1983. He absolutely owns the part. He’s probably too handsome for the role, but it doesn’t get in the way of his performance. I had it originally on VHS, and upgraded to DVD when the time came, because the whole production is first rate.

    Reply
  4. I absolutely love the BBC “Jane Eyre” starring Timothy Dalton as Mr Rochester. It was done in 1983. He absolutely owns the part. He’s probably too handsome for the role, but it doesn’t get in the way of his performance. I had it originally on VHS, and upgraded to DVD when the time came, because the whole production is first rate.

    Reply
  5. I absolutely love the BBC “Jane Eyre” starring Timothy Dalton as Mr Rochester. It was done in 1983. He absolutely owns the part. He’s probably too handsome for the role, but it doesn’t get in the way of his performance. I had it originally on VHS, and upgraded to DVD when the time came, because the whole production is first rate.

    Reply
  6. I am a huge fan of the Outlander books and have been since the first one in the series was published in 1991. The TV adaptation is fabulous. Perfect casting, in my opinion. I can’t imagine anyone else other than Sam Heughan as Jamie. Ron Moore and his team of writers/producers have been faithful to the essence of the books. The costumes created by Terry Dresbach are out of this world and gorgeous. They were smart enough to hire the author, Diana Gabaldon, as a consultant. She doesn’t always agree with the changes, but has said they do listen to her and do make some changes she suggests. I figure if the author is happy, then I certainly am too.

    Reply
  7. I am a huge fan of the Outlander books and have been since the first one in the series was published in 1991. The TV adaptation is fabulous. Perfect casting, in my opinion. I can’t imagine anyone else other than Sam Heughan as Jamie. Ron Moore and his team of writers/producers have been faithful to the essence of the books. The costumes created by Terry Dresbach are out of this world and gorgeous. They were smart enough to hire the author, Diana Gabaldon, as a consultant. She doesn’t always agree with the changes, but has said they do listen to her and do make some changes she suggests. I figure if the author is happy, then I certainly am too.

    Reply
  8. I am a huge fan of the Outlander books and have been since the first one in the series was published in 1991. The TV adaptation is fabulous. Perfect casting, in my opinion. I can’t imagine anyone else other than Sam Heughan as Jamie. Ron Moore and his team of writers/producers have been faithful to the essence of the books. The costumes created by Terry Dresbach are out of this world and gorgeous. They were smart enough to hire the author, Diana Gabaldon, as a consultant. She doesn’t always agree with the changes, but has said they do listen to her and do make some changes she suggests. I figure if the author is happy, then I certainly am too.

    Reply
  9. I am a huge fan of the Outlander books and have been since the first one in the series was published in 1991. The TV adaptation is fabulous. Perfect casting, in my opinion. I can’t imagine anyone else other than Sam Heughan as Jamie. Ron Moore and his team of writers/producers have been faithful to the essence of the books. The costumes created by Terry Dresbach are out of this world and gorgeous. They were smart enough to hire the author, Diana Gabaldon, as a consultant. She doesn’t always agree with the changes, but has said they do listen to her and do make some changes she suggests. I figure if the author is happy, then I certainly am too.

    Reply
  10. I am a huge fan of the Outlander books and have been since the first one in the series was published in 1991. The TV adaptation is fabulous. Perfect casting, in my opinion. I can’t imagine anyone else other than Sam Heughan as Jamie. Ron Moore and his team of writers/producers have been faithful to the essence of the books. The costumes created by Terry Dresbach are out of this world and gorgeous. They were smart enough to hire the author, Diana Gabaldon, as a consultant. She doesn’t always agree with the changes, but has said they do listen to her and do make some changes she suggests. I figure if the author is happy, then I certainly am too.

    Reply
  11. I’ve been watching the Cadfael series, with Derrick Jacobi in the lead role. I bought series one and two on DVD then left it sitting for months because I love the books so much. I should not have been concerned—it is a truly marvelous adaptation. Jacobi is exactly as I imagined Cadfael, and Sean Pertwee is a delicious Hugh Beringer.

    Reply
  12. I’ve been watching the Cadfael series, with Derrick Jacobi in the lead role. I bought series one and two on DVD then left it sitting for months because I love the books so much. I should not have been concerned—it is a truly marvelous adaptation. Jacobi is exactly as I imagined Cadfael, and Sean Pertwee is a delicious Hugh Beringer.

    Reply
  13. I’ve been watching the Cadfael series, with Derrick Jacobi in the lead role. I bought series one and two on DVD then left it sitting for months because I love the books so much. I should not have been concerned—it is a truly marvelous adaptation. Jacobi is exactly as I imagined Cadfael, and Sean Pertwee is a delicious Hugh Beringer.

    Reply
  14. I’ve been watching the Cadfael series, with Derrick Jacobi in the lead role. I bought series one and two on DVD then left it sitting for months because I love the books so much. I should not have been concerned—it is a truly marvelous adaptation. Jacobi is exactly as I imagined Cadfael, and Sean Pertwee is a delicious Hugh Beringer.

    Reply
  15. I’ve been watching the Cadfael series, with Derrick Jacobi in the lead role. I bought series one and two on DVD then left it sitting for months because I love the books so much. I should not have been concerned—it is a truly marvelous adaptation. Jacobi is exactly as I imagined Cadfael, and Sean Pertwee is a delicious Hugh Beringer.

    Reply
  16. Loved the All Creatures Great and Small series about a veterinarian in England and adored Hornblower. I also enjoyed the books for both of these series.

    Reply
  17. Loved the All Creatures Great and Small series about a veterinarian in England and adored Hornblower. I also enjoyed the books for both of these series.

    Reply
  18. Loved the All Creatures Great and Small series about a veterinarian in England and adored Hornblower. I also enjoyed the books for both of these series.

    Reply
  19. Loved the All Creatures Great and Small series about a veterinarian in England and adored Hornblower. I also enjoyed the books for both of these series.

    Reply
  20. Loved the All Creatures Great and Small series about a veterinarian in England and adored Hornblower. I also enjoyed the books for both of these series.

    Reply
  21. Loved the 1995 P&P show. Another book to TV series I think was quite good was “I Claudius” with Derek Jacobi – and John Hurt as Caligula was incredible

    Reply
  22. Loved the 1995 P&P show. Another book to TV series I think was quite good was “I Claudius” with Derek Jacobi – and John Hurt as Caligula was incredible

    Reply
  23. Loved the 1995 P&P show. Another book to TV series I think was quite good was “I Claudius” with Derek Jacobi – and John Hurt as Caligula was incredible

    Reply
  24. Loved the 1995 P&P show. Another book to TV series I think was quite good was “I Claudius” with Derek Jacobi – and John Hurt as Caligula was incredible

    Reply
  25. Loved the 1995 P&P show. Another book to TV series I think was quite good was “I Claudius” with Derek Jacobi – and John Hurt as Caligula was incredible

    Reply
  26. I was having this conversation with friends over the weekend, about the Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries. About 20 years ago the BBC produced a beautiful adaptation with Edward Petherbridge as Peter Wimsey and Harriet Walter as Harriet Vane. I vividly remember being allowed to stay up to watch them and the joy of finding my Grandfather’s matched set of wartime Gollanz editions when we went to stay with them, just after Strong Poison had finished, which mean that I could read them. I later inherited those editions and Petherbridge and Walter are still how I hear Peter and Harriet every time I re-read them.

    Reply
  27. I was having this conversation with friends over the weekend, about the Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries. About 20 years ago the BBC produced a beautiful adaptation with Edward Petherbridge as Peter Wimsey and Harriet Walter as Harriet Vane. I vividly remember being allowed to stay up to watch them and the joy of finding my Grandfather’s matched set of wartime Gollanz editions when we went to stay with them, just after Strong Poison had finished, which mean that I could read them. I later inherited those editions and Petherbridge and Walter are still how I hear Peter and Harriet every time I re-read them.

    Reply
  28. I was having this conversation with friends over the weekend, about the Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries. About 20 years ago the BBC produced a beautiful adaptation with Edward Petherbridge as Peter Wimsey and Harriet Walter as Harriet Vane. I vividly remember being allowed to stay up to watch them and the joy of finding my Grandfather’s matched set of wartime Gollanz editions when we went to stay with them, just after Strong Poison had finished, which mean that I could read them. I later inherited those editions and Petherbridge and Walter are still how I hear Peter and Harriet every time I re-read them.

    Reply
  29. I was having this conversation with friends over the weekend, about the Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries. About 20 years ago the BBC produced a beautiful adaptation with Edward Petherbridge as Peter Wimsey and Harriet Walter as Harriet Vane. I vividly remember being allowed to stay up to watch them and the joy of finding my Grandfather’s matched set of wartime Gollanz editions when we went to stay with them, just after Strong Poison had finished, which mean that I could read them. I later inherited those editions and Petherbridge and Walter are still how I hear Peter and Harriet every time I re-read them.

    Reply
  30. I was having this conversation with friends over the weekend, about the Lord Peter Wimsey mysteries. About 20 years ago the BBC produced a beautiful adaptation with Edward Petherbridge as Peter Wimsey and Harriet Walter as Harriet Vane. I vividly remember being allowed to stay up to watch them and the joy of finding my Grandfather’s matched set of wartime Gollanz editions when we went to stay with them, just after Strong Poison had finished, which mean that I could read them. I later inherited those editions and Petherbridge and Walter are still how I hear Peter and Harriet every time I re-read them.

    Reply
  31. I have seen at least four versions of “Jane Eyre”, and I think my favorite is still the one with Orsen Wells and Joan Fountain. However, I wouldn’t mind looking at Timothy Dalton for 2 to 4 hours any day of the week (smile).
    “Pride and Prejudice” with Colin Firth (best Mr. Darcy – ever). I do also like the more recent movie version with Keira Knightley. The only version I didn’t care for is the old movie version with Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier. The costuming seemed wrong for the period.
    I could fill up a lot of space here comments about TV/Movie productions of Jane Austin books – “Sense and Sensibility”, “Emma” etc. Generally, I prefer the BBC productions.
    A more recent offering I have been watching on TV is a series based on Sherryl Woods contemporary romance “Chesapeake Shores”. They have made it into a series on the Hallmark Channel here in the US. They have made some changes from the book, but I can’t say the TV series is any less interesting – at least so far.
    Congrats on another great posting. You wenches to such a great job.

    Reply
  32. I have seen at least four versions of “Jane Eyre”, and I think my favorite is still the one with Orsen Wells and Joan Fountain. However, I wouldn’t mind looking at Timothy Dalton for 2 to 4 hours any day of the week (smile).
    “Pride and Prejudice” with Colin Firth (best Mr. Darcy – ever). I do also like the more recent movie version with Keira Knightley. The only version I didn’t care for is the old movie version with Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier. The costuming seemed wrong for the period.
    I could fill up a lot of space here comments about TV/Movie productions of Jane Austin books – “Sense and Sensibility”, “Emma” etc. Generally, I prefer the BBC productions.
    A more recent offering I have been watching on TV is a series based on Sherryl Woods contemporary romance “Chesapeake Shores”. They have made it into a series on the Hallmark Channel here in the US. They have made some changes from the book, but I can’t say the TV series is any less interesting – at least so far.
    Congrats on another great posting. You wenches to such a great job.

    Reply
  33. I have seen at least four versions of “Jane Eyre”, and I think my favorite is still the one with Orsen Wells and Joan Fountain. However, I wouldn’t mind looking at Timothy Dalton for 2 to 4 hours any day of the week (smile).
    “Pride and Prejudice” with Colin Firth (best Mr. Darcy – ever). I do also like the more recent movie version with Keira Knightley. The only version I didn’t care for is the old movie version with Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier. The costuming seemed wrong for the period.
    I could fill up a lot of space here comments about TV/Movie productions of Jane Austin books – “Sense and Sensibility”, “Emma” etc. Generally, I prefer the BBC productions.
    A more recent offering I have been watching on TV is a series based on Sherryl Woods contemporary romance “Chesapeake Shores”. They have made it into a series on the Hallmark Channel here in the US. They have made some changes from the book, but I can’t say the TV series is any less interesting – at least so far.
    Congrats on another great posting. You wenches to such a great job.

    Reply
  34. I have seen at least four versions of “Jane Eyre”, and I think my favorite is still the one with Orsen Wells and Joan Fountain. However, I wouldn’t mind looking at Timothy Dalton for 2 to 4 hours any day of the week (smile).
    “Pride and Prejudice” with Colin Firth (best Mr. Darcy – ever). I do also like the more recent movie version with Keira Knightley. The only version I didn’t care for is the old movie version with Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier. The costuming seemed wrong for the period.
    I could fill up a lot of space here comments about TV/Movie productions of Jane Austin books – “Sense and Sensibility”, “Emma” etc. Generally, I prefer the BBC productions.
    A more recent offering I have been watching on TV is a series based on Sherryl Woods contemporary romance “Chesapeake Shores”. They have made it into a series on the Hallmark Channel here in the US. They have made some changes from the book, but I can’t say the TV series is any less interesting – at least so far.
    Congrats on another great posting. You wenches to such a great job.

    Reply
  35. I have seen at least four versions of “Jane Eyre”, and I think my favorite is still the one with Orsen Wells and Joan Fountain. However, I wouldn’t mind looking at Timothy Dalton for 2 to 4 hours any day of the week (smile).
    “Pride and Prejudice” with Colin Firth (best Mr. Darcy – ever). I do also like the more recent movie version with Keira Knightley. The only version I didn’t care for is the old movie version with Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier. The costuming seemed wrong for the period.
    I could fill up a lot of space here comments about TV/Movie productions of Jane Austin books – “Sense and Sensibility”, “Emma” etc. Generally, I prefer the BBC productions.
    A more recent offering I have been watching on TV is a series based on Sherryl Woods contemporary romance “Chesapeake Shores”. They have made it into a series on the Hallmark Channel here in the US. They have made some changes from the book, but I can’t say the TV series is any less interesting – at least so far.
    Congrats on another great posting. You wenches to such a great job.

    Reply
  36. Ian Carmichael as Lord Peter Wimsey was years ago. I fell in love with the book series then. Books were not quite the same, but when I read and pictured that is who I pictured. All Creatures Great and Small with Christopher Timothy, Robert Hardy, Peter Davison and Lynda Bellingham brought the entire series of books to life. I truly saw those faces when I read the books later. Both these were a very long time ago, and I know there are more recent examples which I have loved, but these two are the first things that came to mind.

    Reply
  37. Ian Carmichael as Lord Peter Wimsey was years ago. I fell in love with the book series then. Books were not quite the same, but when I read and pictured that is who I pictured. All Creatures Great and Small with Christopher Timothy, Robert Hardy, Peter Davison and Lynda Bellingham brought the entire series of books to life. I truly saw those faces when I read the books later. Both these were a very long time ago, and I know there are more recent examples which I have loved, but these two are the first things that came to mind.

    Reply
  38. Ian Carmichael as Lord Peter Wimsey was years ago. I fell in love with the book series then. Books were not quite the same, but when I read and pictured that is who I pictured. All Creatures Great and Small with Christopher Timothy, Robert Hardy, Peter Davison and Lynda Bellingham brought the entire series of books to life. I truly saw those faces when I read the books later. Both these were a very long time ago, and I know there are more recent examples which I have loved, but these two are the first things that came to mind.

    Reply
  39. Ian Carmichael as Lord Peter Wimsey was years ago. I fell in love with the book series then. Books were not quite the same, but when I read and pictured that is who I pictured. All Creatures Great and Small with Christopher Timothy, Robert Hardy, Peter Davison and Lynda Bellingham brought the entire series of books to life. I truly saw those faces when I read the books later. Both these were a very long time ago, and I know there are more recent examples which I have loved, but these two are the first things that came to mind.

    Reply
  40. Ian Carmichael as Lord Peter Wimsey was years ago. I fell in love with the book series then. Books were not quite the same, but when I read and pictured that is who I pictured. All Creatures Great and Small with Christopher Timothy, Robert Hardy, Peter Davison and Lynda Bellingham brought the entire series of books to life. I truly saw those faces when I read the books later. Both these were a very long time ago, and I know there are more recent examples which I have loved, but these two are the first things that came to mind.

    Reply
  41. I must preface this by saying I’m not much of a movie/TV watcher. I’m a reader first and foremost. I think it goes back to not having a television until I moved out of my parents house. I own every Austen adaptation and have varying opinions on each but I agree with you on Firth/Ehle. I’ve never seen any of the others that you mentioned. I was so very disappointed in the Anne of Green Gables series for some reason, the books were just better. I will say that if I happen to see the movie/series before I read the book, I generally go ahead and read the books with the images from the film in my head, but I cannot do it the other way. If I have read the book, I will most likely not see the film so as not to destroy what my brain has created. LOL

    Reply
  42. I must preface this by saying I’m not much of a movie/TV watcher. I’m a reader first and foremost. I think it goes back to not having a television until I moved out of my parents house. I own every Austen adaptation and have varying opinions on each but I agree with you on Firth/Ehle. I’ve never seen any of the others that you mentioned. I was so very disappointed in the Anne of Green Gables series for some reason, the books were just better. I will say that if I happen to see the movie/series before I read the book, I generally go ahead and read the books with the images from the film in my head, but I cannot do it the other way. If I have read the book, I will most likely not see the film so as not to destroy what my brain has created. LOL

    Reply
  43. I must preface this by saying I’m not much of a movie/TV watcher. I’m a reader first and foremost. I think it goes back to not having a television until I moved out of my parents house. I own every Austen adaptation and have varying opinions on each but I agree with you on Firth/Ehle. I’ve never seen any of the others that you mentioned. I was so very disappointed in the Anne of Green Gables series for some reason, the books were just better. I will say that if I happen to see the movie/series before I read the book, I generally go ahead and read the books with the images from the film in my head, but I cannot do it the other way. If I have read the book, I will most likely not see the film so as not to destroy what my brain has created. LOL

    Reply
  44. I must preface this by saying I’m not much of a movie/TV watcher. I’m a reader first and foremost. I think it goes back to not having a television until I moved out of my parents house. I own every Austen adaptation and have varying opinions on each but I agree with you on Firth/Ehle. I’ve never seen any of the others that you mentioned. I was so very disappointed in the Anne of Green Gables series for some reason, the books were just better. I will say that if I happen to see the movie/series before I read the book, I generally go ahead and read the books with the images from the film in my head, but I cannot do it the other way. If I have read the book, I will most likely not see the film so as not to destroy what my brain has created. LOL

    Reply
  45. I must preface this by saying I’m not much of a movie/TV watcher. I’m a reader first and foremost. I think it goes back to not having a television until I moved out of my parents house. I own every Austen adaptation and have varying opinions on each but I agree with you on Firth/Ehle. I’ve never seen any of the others that you mentioned. I was so very disappointed in the Anne of Green Gables series for some reason, the books were just better. I will say that if I happen to see the movie/series before I read the book, I generally go ahead and read the books with the images from the film in my head, but I cannot do it the other way. If I have read the book, I will most likely not see the film so as not to destroy what my brain has created. LOL

    Reply
  46. So many good ones have already been mentioned: Sharpe, Hamish MacBeth, Cadfael, James Herriot, Firth/Ehle’s P&P.
    One tv-movie I liked was Jamaica Inn with Jane Seymour. I saw it in the ’80s so I have no idea if I would still like it. But since that day I have been a fan of Daphne du Maurier’s books.
    I also liked the tv-series Monarch of the Glenn and was lucky enough to find several of Sir Compton Mackenzie’s Highland novels, but quickly found out the series was veeeery loosely based on the books.
    Another tv-series I liked (okay, partly thanks to Richard Armitage 🙂 ) was North & South, but I’m a bit hesitant about reading the book.

    Reply
  47. So many good ones have already been mentioned: Sharpe, Hamish MacBeth, Cadfael, James Herriot, Firth/Ehle’s P&P.
    One tv-movie I liked was Jamaica Inn with Jane Seymour. I saw it in the ’80s so I have no idea if I would still like it. But since that day I have been a fan of Daphne du Maurier’s books.
    I also liked the tv-series Monarch of the Glenn and was lucky enough to find several of Sir Compton Mackenzie’s Highland novels, but quickly found out the series was veeeery loosely based on the books.
    Another tv-series I liked (okay, partly thanks to Richard Armitage 🙂 ) was North & South, but I’m a bit hesitant about reading the book.

    Reply
  48. So many good ones have already been mentioned: Sharpe, Hamish MacBeth, Cadfael, James Herriot, Firth/Ehle’s P&P.
    One tv-movie I liked was Jamaica Inn with Jane Seymour. I saw it in the ’80s so I have no idea if I would still like it. But since that day I have been a fan of Daphne du Maurier’s books.
    I also liked the tv-series Monarch of the Glenn and was lucky enough to find several of Sir Compton Mackenzie’s Highland novels, but quickly found out the series was veeeery loosely based on the books.
    Another tv-series I liked (okay, partly thanks to Richard Armitage 🙂 ) was North & South, but I’m a bit hesitant about reading the book.

    Reply
  49. So many good ones have already been mentioned: Sharpe, Hamish MacBeth, Cadfael, James Herriot, Firth/Ehle’s P&P.
    One tv-movie I liked was Jamaica Inn with Jane Seymour. I saw it in the ’80s so I have no idea if I would still like it. But since that day I have been a fan of Daphne du Maurier’s books.
    I also liked the tv-series Monarch of the Glenn and was lucky enough to find several of Sir Compton Mackenzie’s Highland novels, but quickly found out the series was veeeery loosely based on the books.
    Another tv-series I liked (okay, partly thanks to Richard Armitage 🙂 ) was North & South, but I’m a bit hesitant about reading the book.

    Reply
  50. So many good ones have already been mentioned: Sharpe, Hamish MacBeth, Cadfael, James Herriot, Firth/Ehle’s P&P.
    One tv-movie I liked was Jamaica Inn with Jane Seymour. I saw it in the ’80s so I have no idea if I would still like it. But since that day I have been a fan of Daphne du Maurier’s books.
    I also liked the tv-series Monarch of the Glenn and was lucky enough to find several of Sir Compton Mackenzie’s Highland novels, but quickly found out the series was veeeery loosely based on the books.
    Another tv-series I liked (okay, partly thanks to Richard Armitage 🙂 ) was North & South, but I’m a bit hesitant about reading the book.

    Reply
  51. Thanks, Nancy — I think it must be very hard for an author to consult on something like this. So much of what is conveyed in a novel is done in thoughts and inner reflections, and the screen has to do the same through action, dialogue and subtext, so it can never be entirely the same. But I’m very much looking forward to seeing the TV version. I loved the books.

    Reply
  52. Thanks, Nancy — I think it must be very hard for an author to consult on something like this. So much of what is conveyed in a novel is done in thoughts and inner reflections, and the screen has to do the same through action, dialogue and subtext, so it can never be entirely the same. But I’m very much looking forward to seeing the TV version. I loved the books.

    Reply
  53. Thanks, Nancy — I think it must be very hard for an author to consult on something like this. So much of what is conveyed in a novel is done in thoughts and inner reflections, and the screen has to do the same through action, dialogue and subtext, so it can never be entirely the same. But I’m very much looking forward to seeing the TV version. I loved the books.

    Reply
  54. Thanks, Nancy — I think it must be very hard for an author to consult on something like this. So much of what is conveyed in a novel is done in thoughts and inner reflections, and the screen has to do the same through action, dialogue and subtext, so it can never be entirely the same. But I’m very much looking forward to seeing the TV version. I loved the books.

    Reply
  55. Thanks, Nancy — I think it must be very hard for an author to consult on something like this. So much of what is conveyed in a novel is done in thoughts and inner reflections, and the screen has to do the same through action, dialogue and subtext, so it can never be entirely the same. But I’m very much looking forward to seeing the TV version. I loved the books.

    Reply
  56. Oh, yes, Jude — why didn’t I think of the Cadfael books and TV series? Wonderful, both of them. I remember many years ago I picked up the first of the Cadfael books (An Excellent Mystery) in a bookshop in London — I think I was backpacking at the time. And I loved it and bought the rest of the books as they came out. Much later when I saw the TV series, it was a perfect adaptation, and Derek Jacobi was indeed Cadfael come to life on the screen.

    Reply
  57. Oh, yes, Jude — why didn’t I think of the Cadfael books and TV series? Wonderful, both of them. I remember many years ago I picked up the first of the Cadfael books (An Excellent Mystery) in a bookshop in London — I think I was backpacking at the time. And I loved it and bought the rest of the books as they came out. Much later when I saw the TV series, it was a perfect adaptation, and Derek Jacobi was indeed Cadfael come to life on the screen.

    Reply
  58. Oh, yes, Jude — why didn’t I think of the Cadfael books and TV series? Wonderful, both of them. I remember many years ago I picked up the first of the Cadfael books (An Excellent Mystery) in a bookshop in London — I think I was backpacking at the time. And I loved it and bought the rest of the books as they came out. Much later when I saw the TV series, it was a perfect adaptation, and Derek Jacobi was indeed Cadfael come to life on the screen.

    Reply
  59. Oh, yes, Jude — why didn’t I think of the Cadfael books and TV series? Wonderful, both of them. I remember many years ago I picked up the first of the Cadfael books (An Excellent Mystery) in a bookshop in London — I think I was backpacking at the time. And I loved it and bought the rest of the books as they came out. Much later when I saw the TV series, it was a perfect adaptation, and Derek Jacobi was indeed Cadfael come to life on the screen.

    Reply
  60. Oh, yes, Jude — why didn’t I think of the Cadfael books and TV series? Wonderful, both of them. I remember many years ago I picked up the first of the Cadfael books (An Excellent Mystery) in a bookshop in London — I think I was backpacking at the time. And I loved it and bought the rest of the books as they came out. Much later when I saw the TV series, it was a perfect adaptation, and Derek Jacobi was indeed Cadfael come to life on the screen.

    Reply
  61. Thanks, Oana-Maria — I think Richard Armitage would be wonderful as Darcy. The intensity he brought to his role in North and South was superb. I don’t know Rachel Nichols, but she certainly looks the part.

    Reply
  62. Thanks, Oana-Maria — I think Richard Armitage would be wonderful as Darcy. The intensity he brought to his role in North and South was superb. I don’t know Rachel Nichols, but she certainly looks the part.

    Reply
  63. Thanks, Oana-Maria — I think Richard Armitage would be wonderful as Darcy. The intensity he brought to his role in North and South was superb. I don’t know Rachel Nichols, but she certainly looks the part.

    Reply
  64. Thanks, Oana-Maria — I think Richard Armitage would be wonderful as Darcy. The intensity he brought to his role in North and South was superb. I don’t know Rachel Nichols, but she certainly looks the part.

    Reply
  65. Thanks, Oana-Maria — I think Richard Armitage would be wonderful as Darcy. The intensity he brought to his role in North and South was superb. I don’t know Rachel Nichols, but she certainly looks the part.

    Reply
  66. Karlene, yes, I loved the TV series of All Creatures, too. I remember reading some of the books as a child, and was amused to see that apart from the James Herriot character, the actor who played Siegfried was perfect for the role, too. As were Tricky-Wu and Mrs Pomfret and others.
    With all these suggestions of shows and books I’d almost forgotten, I think I might be having a DVD marathon in my future. 😉

    Reply
  67. Karlene, yes, I loved the TV series of All Creatures, too. I remember reading some of the books as a child, and was amused to see that apart from the James Herriot character, the actor who played Siegfried was perfect for the role, too. As were Tricky-Wu and Mrs Pomfret and others.
    With all these suggestions of shows and books I’d almost forgotten, I think I might be having a DVD marathon in my future. 😉

    Reply
  68. Karlene, yes, I loved the TV series of All Creatures, too. I remember reading some of the books as a child, and was amused to see that apart from the James Herriot character, the actor who played Siegfried was perfect for the role, too. As were Tricky-Wu and Mrs Pomfret and others.
    With all these suggestions of shows and books I’d almost forgotten, I think I might be having a DVD marathon in my future. 😉

    Reply
  69. Karlene, yes, I loved the TV series of All Creatures, too. I remember reading some of the books as a child, and was amused to see that apart from the James Herriot character, the actor who played Siegfried was perfect for the role, too. As were Tricky-Wu and Mrs Pomfret and others.
    With all these suggestions of shows and books I’d almost forgotten, I think I might be having a DVD marathon in my future. 😉

    Reply
  70. Karlene, yes, I loved the TV series of All Creatures, too. I remember reading some of the books as a child, and was amused to see that apart from the James Herriot character, the actor who played Siegfried was perfect for the role, too. As were Tricky-Wu and Mrs Pomfret and others.
    With all these suggestions of shows and books I’d almost forgotten, I think I might be having a DVD marathon in my future. 😉

    Reply
  71. Yes, Miriam, the TV version of I Claudius was superb. So many of the actors were wonderful — Derek Jacobi was brilliant, as was John Hurt as Caligula, I agree, and many others who rose to prominence from that show too. I remember being shocked to realize in retrospect that the Patrick Stewart, who played Sejanus, with his curly blond hair — was the same actor who played Capt Picard in Star Wars. Heres a clip of him. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDwC7YH-1jM I think, too, so many of the British actors have acted on the stage and trained in companies like the Royal Shakespere Company, and bring to the screen a powerful range and subtlety.

    Reply
  72. Yes, Miriam, the TV version of I Claudius was superb. So many of the actors were wonderful — Derek Jacobi was brilliant, as was John Hurt as Caligula, I agree, and many others who rose to prominence from that show too. I remember being shocked to realize in retrospect that the Patrick Stewart, who played Sejanus, with his curly blond hair — was the same actor who played Capt Picard in Star Wars. Heres a clip of him. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDwC7YH-1jM I think, too, so many of the British actors have acted on the stage and trained in companies like the Royal Shakespere Company, and bring to the screen a powerful range and subtlety.

    Reply
  73. Yes, Miriam, the TV version of I Claudius was superb. So many of the actors were wonderful — Derek Jacobi was brilliant, as was John Hurt as Caligula, I agree, and many others who rose to prominence from that show too. I remember being shocked to realize in retrospect that the Patrick Stewart, who played Sejanus, with his curly blond hair — was the same actor who played Capt Picard in Star Wars. Heres a clip of him. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDwC7YH-1jM I think, too, so many of the British actors have acted on the stage and trained in companies like the Royal Shakespere Company, and bring to the screen a powerful range and subtlety.

    Reply
  74. Yes, Miriam, the TV version of I Claudius was superb. So many of the actors were wonderful — Derek Jacobi was brilliant, as was John Hurt as Caligula, I agree, and many others who rose to prominence from that show too. I remember being shocked to realize in retrospect that the Patrick Stewart, who played Sejanus, with his curly blond hair — was the same actor who played Capt Picard in Star Wars. Heres a clip of him. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDwC7YH-1jM I think, too, so many of the British actors have acted on the stage and trained in companies like the Royal Shakespere Company, and bring to the screen a powerful range and subtlety.

    Reply
  75. Yes, Miriam, the TV version of I Claudius was superb. So many of the actors were wonderful — Derek Jacobi was brilliant, as was John Hurt as Caligula, I agree, and many others who rose to prominence from that show too. I remember being shocked to realize in retrospect that the Patrick Stewart, who played Sejanus, with his curly blond hair — was the same actor who played Capt Picard in Star Wars. Heres a clip of him. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDwC7YH-1jM I think, too, so many of the British actors have acted on the stage and trained in companies like the Royal Shakespere Company, and bring to the screen a powerful range and subtlety.

    Reply
  76. Thanks, Mary, I think I’d have to agree with you — Orson Wells brought a power and gravitas to that role, and while Timothy Dalton was excellent, the darkly gothic older version with Orson Wells is the one that sticks in my mind most.
    I did like the P&P version with Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier — he was a beautifully repressed Darcy, I thought, and she was a wonderful Elizabeth. Whoever played Mr Collins did a lovely job, too. Yes the costumes were all wrong, but I remember showing it to a year 11 class of girls who were studying P&P at the time— the school had the old movie and we didn’t have the time to watch the long TV series — and the girls loved it to bits.
    I havent seen Chesapeake Shores — Ill watch out for it.

    Reply
  77. Thanks, Mary, I think I’d have to agree with you — Orson Wells brought a power and gravitas to that role, and while Timothy Dalton was excellent, the darkly gothic older version with Orson Wells is the one that sticks in my mind most.
    I did like the P&P version with Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier — he was a beautifully repressed Darcy, I thought, and she was a wonderful Elizabeth. Whoever played Mr Collins did a lovely job, too. Yes the costumes were all wrong, but I remember showing it to a year 11 class of girls who were studying P&P at the time— the school had the old movie and we didn’t have the time to watch the long TV series — and the girls loved it to bits.
    I havent seen Chesapeake Shores — Ill watch out for it.

    Reply
  78. Thanks, Mary, I think I’d have to agree with you — Orson Wells brought a power and gravitas to that role, and while Timothy Dalton was excellent, the darkly gothic older version with Orson Wells is the one that sticks in my mind most.
    I did like the P&P version with Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier — he was a beautifully repressed Darcy, I thought, and she was a wonderful Elizabeth. Whoever played Mr Collins did a lovely job, too. Yes the costumes were all wrong, but I remember showing it to a year 11 class of girls who were studying P&P at the time— the school had the old movie and we didn’t have the time to watch the long TV series — and the girls loved it to bits.
    I havent seen Chesapeake Shores — Ill watch out for it.

    Reply
  79. Thanks, Mary, I think I’d have to agree with you — Orson Wells brought a power and gravitas to that role, and while Timothy Dalton was excellent, the darkly gothic older version with Orson Wells is the one that sticks in my mind most.
    I did like the P&P version with Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier — he was a beautifully repressed Darcy, I thought, and she was a wonderful Elizabeth. Whoever played Mr Collins did a lovely job, too. Yes the costumes were all wrong, but I remember showing it to a year 11 class of girls who were studying P&P at the time— the school had the old movie and we didn’t have the time to watch the long TV series — and the girls loved it to bits.
    I havent seen Chesapeake Shores — Ill watch out for it.

    Reply
  80. Thanks, Mary, I think I’d have to agree with you — Orson Wells brought a power and gravitas to that role, and while Timothy Dalton was excellent, the darkly gothic older version with Orson Wells is the one that sticks in my mind most.
    I did like the P&P version with Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier — he was a beautifully repressed Darcy, I thought, and she was a wonderful Elizabeth. Whoever played Mr Collins did a lovely job, too. Yes the costumes were all wrong, but I remember showing it to a year 11 class of girls who were studying P&P at the time— the school had the old movie and we didn’t have the time to watch the long TV series — and the girls loved it to bits.
    I havent seen Chesapeake Shores — Ill watch out for it.

    Reply
  81. Thanks, Jenny. I never got into the Lord Peter Wimsey books, though so many of my friends adored them. Maybe it’s time for a re-read. I was pretty young when I decided they weren’t my cup of tea. I might be ready to appreciate them now.
    I recently watched the PD James adaptations, which I remember loving at the time, but sadly, I found them a little dated.

    Reply
  82. Thanks, Jenny. I never got into the Lord Peter Wimsey books, though so many of my friends adored them. Maybe it’s time for a re-read. I was pretty young when I decided they weren’t my cup of tea. I might be ready to appreciate them now.
    I recently watched the PD James adaptations, which I remember loving at the time, but sadly, I found them a little dated.

    Reply
  83. Thanks, Jenny. I never got into the Lord Peter Wimsey books, though so many of my friends adored them. Maybe it’s time for a re-read. I was pretty young when I decided they weren’t my cup of tea. I might be ready to appreciate them now.
    I recently watched the PD James adaptations, which I remember loving at the time, but sadly, I found them a little dated.

    Reply
  84. Thanks, Jenny. I never got into the Lord Peter Wimsey books, though so many of my friends adored them. Maybe it’s time for a re-read. I was pretty young when I decided they weren’t my cup of tea. I might be ready to appreciate them now.
    I recently watched the PD James adaptations, which I remember loving at the time, but sadly, I found them a little dated.

    Reply
  85. Thanks, Jenny. I never got into the Lord Peter Wimsey books, though so many of my friends adored them. Maybe it’s time for a re-read. I was pretty young when I decided they weren’t my cup of tea. I might be ready to appreciate them now.
    I recently watched the PD James adaptations, which I remember loving at the time, but sadly, I found them a little dated.

    Reply
  86. Annette, I watched All Creatures way back when — my mother was a huge fan. It was a lovely series, and Robert Hardy was a wonderful Siegfried. And sadly, when Peter Davidson was Dr Who for a while, I could only see him as Tristram. He was excellent though in a quirky UK series called A Very Peculiar Practice.

    Reply
  87. Annette, I watched All Creatures way back when — my mother was a huge fan. It was a lovely series, and Robert Hardy was a wonderful Siegfried. And sadly, when Peter Davidson was Dr Who for a while, I could only see him as Tristram. He was excellent though in a quirky UK series called A Very Peculiar Practice.

    Reply
  88. Annette, I watched All Creatures way back when — my mother was a huge fan. It was a lovely series, and Robert Hardy was a wonderful Siegfried. And sadly, when Peter Davidson was Dr Who for a while, I could only see him as Tristram. He was excellent though in a quirky UK series called A Very Peculiar Practice.

    Reply
  89. Annette, I watched All Creatures way back when — my mother was a huge fan. It was a lovely series, and Robert Hardy was a wonderful Siegfried. And sadly, when Peter Davidson was Dr Who for a while, I could only see him as Tristram. He was excellent though in a quirky UK series called A Very Peculiar Practice.

    Reply
  90. Annette, I watched All Creatures way back when — my mother was a huge fan. It was a lovely series, and Robert Hardy was a wonderful Siegfried. And sadly, when Peter Davidson was Dr Who for a while, I could only see him as Tristram. He was excellent though in a quirky UK series called A Very Peculiar Practice.

    Reply
  91. Jolanda, my mother adored Monarch of the Glen, and I watched it with her (at the time I didn’t have TV) but I haven’t read the books. Lovely series. And by the way, did you know that the actor who played Kilwillie is the man who wrote Downton Abbey and other excellent productions? Interesting, eh?
    I haven’t read the book version of North and South, either — it was a superb TV series. A lot of American friends haven’t seen it, and thought it was a show about the US Civil War, but if anyone is reading this and thought that — it’s not — it’s set in the north of England, and is well worth watching. Heres a clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hoRNZfoYuvk

    Reply
  92. Jolanda, my mother adored Monarch of the Glen, and I watched it with her (at the time I didn’t have TV) but I haven’t read the books. Lovely series. And by the way, did you know that the actor who played Kilwillie is the man who wrote Downton Abbey and other excellent productions? Interesting, eh?
    I haven’t read the book version of North and South, either — it was a superb TV series. A lot of American friends haven’t seen it, and thought it was a show about the US Civil War, but if anyone is reading this and thought that — it’s not — it’s set in the north of England, and is well worth watching. Heres a clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hoRNZfoYuvk

    Reply
  93. Jolanda, my mother adored Monarch of the Glen, and I watched it with her (at the time I didn’t have TV) but I haven’t read the books. Lovely series. And by the way, did you know that the actor who played Kilwillie is the man who wrote Downton Abbey and other excellent productions? Interesting, eh?
    I haven’t read the book version of North and South, either — it was a superb TV series. A lot of American friends haven’t seen it, and thought it was a show about the US Civil War, but if anyone is reading this and thought that — it’s not — it’s set in the north of England, and is well worth watching. Heres a clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hoRNZfoYuvk

    Reply
  94. Jolanda, my mother adored Monarch of the Glen, and I watched it with her (at the time I didn’t have TV) but I haven’t read the books. Lovely series. And by the way, did you know that the actor who played Kilwillie is the man who wrote Downton Abbey and other excellent productions? Interesting, eh?
    I haven’t read the book version of North and South, either — it was a superb TV series. A lot of American friends haven’t seen it, and thought it was a show about the US Civil War, but if anyone is reading this and thought that — it’s not — it’s set in the north of England, and is well worth watching. Heres a clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hoRNZfoYuvk

    Reply
  95. Jolanda, my mother adored Monarch of the Glen, and I watched it with her (at the time I didn’t have TV) but I haven’t read the books. Lovely series. And by the way, did you know that the actor who played Kilwillie is the man who wrote Downton Abbey and other excellent productions? Interesting, eh?
    I haven’t read the book version of North and South, either — it was a superb TV series. A lot of American friends haven’t seen it, and thought it was a show about the US Civil War, but if anyone is reading this and thought that — it’s not — it’s set in the north of England, and is well worth watching. Heres a clip: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hoRNZfoYuvk

    Reply
  96. Stephanie, I really enjoyed the TV adaptation of Anne of Green Gables, though I have to say, I didn’t grow up on the books, and I’m sure that would make a difference. I think I only read the first one and it was such a long time ago that I only had the vaguest memories of the book when I first saw the TV version, so it didn’t interfere. But watching that show made me want to visit Prince Edward Island, and though I’ve been to Canada a few times, I still haven’t seen the island. One day . . .

    Reply
  97. Stephanie, I really enjoyed the TV adaptation of Anne of Green Gables, though I have to say, I didn’t grow up on the books, and I’m sure that would make a difference. I think I only read the first one and it was such a long time ago that I only had the vaguest memories of the book when I first saw the TV version, so it didn’t interfere. But watching that show made me want to visit Prince Edward Island, and though I’ve been to Canada a few times, I still haven’t seen the island. One day . . .

    Reply
  98. Stephanie, I really enjoyed the TV adaptation of Anne of Green Gables, though I have to say, I didn’t grow up on the books, and I’m sure that would make a difference. I think I only read the first one and it was such a long time ago that I only had the vaguest memories of the book when I first saw the TV version, so it didn’t interfere. But watching that show made me want to visit Prince Edward Island, and though I’ve been to Canada a few times, I still haven’t seen the island. One day . . .

    Reply
  99. Stephanie, I really enjoyed the TV adaptation of Anne of Green Gables, though I have to say, I didn’t grow up on the books, and I’m sure that would make a difference. I think I only read the first one and it was such a long time ago that I only had the vaguest memories of the book when I first saw the TV version, so it didn’t interfere. But watching that show made me want to visit Prince Edward Island, and though I’ve been to Canada a few times, I still haven’t seen the island. One day . . .

    Reply
  100. Stephanie, I really enjoyed the TV adaptation of Anne of Green Gables, though I have to say, I didn’t grow up on the books, and I’m sure that would make a difference. I think I only read the first one and it was such a long time ago that I only had the vaguest memories of the book when I first saw the TV version, so it didn’t interfere. But watching that show made me want to visit Prince Edward Island, and though I’ve been to Canada a few times, I still haven’t seen the island. One day . . .

    Reply
  101. As I’m not a reader of contemporary police dramas/murder mysteries I usually watch these on TV. Vera and DCI Banks are a couple of my favourites.
    I’d read all the Sharpe novels before discovering there was a box set of the DVDs available. Sean Bean’s performance as Richard Sharpe is so good that I can’t now recall my imagined character.
    I enjoyed the films made of Catherine Cookson’s novels and the TV mini series of Barbara Taylor Bradford’s A Woman of Substance and Catherine Gaskin’s Sara Dane, but preferred the books.
    Charles Dickens is a favourite author. Any adaptations of his novels are a must watch. I also loved the idea behind Dickensian where his characters crossed paths and was sorry that there was only one series made.
    Lark Rise to Candleford, Poldark, North and South, and Cranford are just a few series I’ve watched, but as yet have not read the books, but hope to one day.

    Reply
  102. As I’m not a reader of contemporary police dramas/murder mysteries I usually watch these on TV. Vera and DCI Banks are a couple of my favourites.
    I’d read all the Sharpe novels before discovering there was a box set of the DVDs available. Sean Bean’s performance as Richard Sharpe is so good that I can’t now recall my imagined character.
    I enjoyed the films made of Catherine Cookson’s novels and the TV mini series of Barbara Taylor Bradford’s A Woman of Substance and Catherine Gaskin’s Sara Dane, but preferred the books.
    Charles Dickens is a favourite author. Any adaptations of his novels are a must watch. I also loved the idea behind Dickensian where his characters crossed paths and was sorry that there was only one series made.
    Lark Rise to Candleford, Poldark, North and South, and Cranford are just a few series I’ve watched, but as yet have not read the books, but hope to one day.

    Reply
  103. As I’m not a reader of contemporary police dramas/murder mysteries I usually watch these on TV. Vera and DCI Banks are a couple of my favourites.
    I’d read all the Sharpe novels before discovering there was a box set of the DVDs available. Sean Bean’s performance as Richard Sharpe is so good that I can’t now recall my imagined character.
    I enjoyed the films made of Catherine Cookson’s novels and the TV mini series of Barbara Taylor Bradford’s A Woman of Substance and Catherine Gaskin’s Sara Dane, but preferred the books.
    Charles Dickens is a favourite author. Any adaptations of his novels are a must watch. I also loved the idea behind Dickensian where his characters crossed paths and was sorry that there was only one series made.
    Lark Rise to Candleford, Poldark, North and South, and Cranford are just a few series I’ve watched, but as yet have not read the books, but hope to one day.

    Reply
  104. As I’m not a reader of contemporary police dramas/murder mysteries I usually watch these on TV. Vera and DCI Banks are a couple of my favourites.
    I’d read all the Sharpe novels before discovering there was a box set of the DVDs available. Sean Bean’s performance as Richard Sharpe is so good that I can’t now recall my imagined character.
    I enjoyed the films made of Catherine Cookson’s novels and the TV mini series of Barbara Taylor Bradford’s A Woman of Substance and Catherine Gaskin’s Sara Dane, but preferred the books.
    Charles Dickens is a favourite author. Any adaptations of his novels are a must watch. I also loved the idea behind Dickensian where his characters crossed paths and was sorry that there was only one series made.
    Lark Rise to Candleford, Poldark, North and South, and Cranford are just a few series I’ve watched, but as yet have not read the books, but hope to one day.

    Reply
  105. As I’m not a reader of contemporary police dramas/murder mysteries I usually watch these on TV. Vera and DCI Banks are a couple of my favourites.
    I’d read all the Sharpe novels before discovering there was a box set of the DVDs available. Sean Bean’s performance as Richard Sharpe is so good that I can’t now recall my imagined character.
    I enjoyed the films made of Catherine Cookson’s novels and the TV mini series of Barbara Taylor Bradford’s A Woman of Substance and Catherine Gaskin’s Sara Dane, but preferred the books.
    Charles Dickens is a favourite author. Any adaptations of his novels are a must watch. I also loved the idea behind Dickensian where his characters crossed paths and was sorry that there was only one series made.
    Lark Rise to Candleford, Poldark, North and South, and Cranford are just a few series I’ve watched, but as yet have not read the books, but hope to one day.

    Reply
  106. Thanks, Yvonne. “Sean Bean’s performance as Richard Sharpe is so good that I can’t now recall my imagined character.”
    Yes, that’s how it affected me, too.
    Yvonne, grab your Crandford DVDs and watch them immediately. Dame Judi Dench — need I say more?
    I’ve watched the modern Poldark, and enjoyed it, but Poldark’s constant unshaven scruffiness irritated me — it felt wrong for the period, especially when he went unshaven to events like a ball or formal event. There was a much older adaptation and I only saw parts of it — again, it was in my non-TV-owning period — but it was excellent I think.

    Reply
  107. Thanks, Yvonne. “Sean Bean’s performance as Richard Sharpe is so good that I can’t now recall my imagined character.”
    Yes, that’s how it affected me, too.
    Yvonne, grab your Crandford DVDs and watch them immediately. Dame Judi Dench — need I say more?
    I’ve watched the modern Poldark, and enjoyed it, but Poldark’s constant unshaven scruffiness irritated me — it felt wrong for the period, especially when he went unshaven to events like a ball or formal event. There was a much older adaptation and I only saw parts of it — again, it was in my non-TV-owning period — but it was excellent I think.

    Reply
  108. Thanks, Yvonne. “Sean Bean’s performance as Richard Sharpe is so good that I can’t now recall my imagined character.”
    Yes, that’s how it affected me, too.
    Yvonne, grab your Crandford DVDs and watch them immediately. Dame Judi Dench — need I say more?
    I’ve watched the modern Poldark, and enjoyed it, but Poldark’s constant unshaven scruffiness irritated me — it felt wrong for the period, especially when he went unshaven to events like a ball or formal event. There was a much older adaptation and I only saw parts of it — again, it was in my non-TV-owning period — but it was excellent I think.

    Reply
  109. Thanks, Yvonne. “Sean Bean’s performance as Richard Sharpe is so good that I can’t now recall my imagined character.”
    Yes, that’s how it affected me, too.
    Yvonne, grab your Crandford DVDs and watch them immediately. Dame Judi Dench — need I say more?
    I’ve watched the modern Poldark, and enjoyed it, but Poldark’s constant unshaven scruffiness irritated me — it felt wrong for the period, especially when he went unshaven to events like a ball or formal event. There was a much older adaptation and I only saw parts of it — again, it was in my non-TV-owning period — but it was excellent I think.

    Reply
  110. Thanks, Yvonne. “Sean Bean’s performance as Richard Sharpe is so good that I can’t now recall my imagined character.”
    Yes, that’s how it affected me, too.
    Yvonne, grab your Crandford DVDs and watch them immediately. Dame Judi Dench — need I say more?
    I’ve watched the modern Poldark, and enjoyed it, but Poldark’s constant unshaven scruffiness irritated me — it felt wrong for the period, especially when he went unshaven to events like a ball or formal event. There was a much older adaptation and I only saw parts of it — again, it was in my non-TV-owning period — but it was excellent I think.

    Reply
  111. Sorry, Anne. No cricism allowed about latest version of Poldark! Usually I’m annoyed about things that are blatantly wrong for the historical period, but…well…all is forgiven in this case!

    Reply
  112. Sorry, Anne. No cricism allowed about latest version of Poldark! Usually I’m annoyed about things that are blatantly wrong for the historical period, but…well…all is forgiven in this case!

    Reply
  113. Sorry, Anne. No cricism allowed about latest version of Poldark! Usually I’m annoyed about things that are blatantly wrong for the historical period, but…well…all is forgiven in this case!

    Reply
  114. Sorry, Anne. No cricism allowed about latest version of Poldark! Usually I’m annoyed about things that are blatantly wrong for the historical period, but…well…all is forgiven in this case!

    Reply
  115. Sorry, Anne. No cricism allowed about latest version of Poldark! Usually I’m annoyed about things that are blatantly wrong for the historical period, but…well…all is forgiven in this case!

    Reply
  116. There was an even earlier film version of P&P, I think around 1937-38, with even more inappropriate costumes (but more age-appropriate Bennet daughters). I can only describe it as camp, though it was not intended as such. If you ever come across it, it’s wonderfully entertaining.

    Reply
  117. There was an even earlier film version of P&P, I think around 1937-38, with even more inappropriate costumes (but more age-appropriate Bennet daughters). I can only describe it as camp, though it was not intended as such. If you ever come across it, it’s wonderfully entertaining.

    Reply
  118. There was an even earlier film version of P&P, I think around 1937-38, with even more inappropriate costumes (but more age-appropriate Bennet daughters). I can only describe it as camp, though it was not intended as such. If you ever come across it, it’s wonderfully entertaining.

    Reply
  119. There was an even earlier film version of P&P, I think around 1937-38, with even more inappropriate costumes (but more age-appropriate Bennet daughters). I can only describe it as camp, though it was not intended as such. If you ever come across it, it’s wonderfully entertaining.

    Reply
  120. There was an even earlier film version of P&P, I think around 1937-38, with even more inappropriate costumes (but more age-appropriate Bennet daughters). I can only describe it as camp, though it was not intended as such. If you ever come across it, it’s wonderfully entertaining.

    Reply
  121. Favorite book-to-TV adaptations? Just about anything the BBC or other British TV channels have made! Though mostly the ones I can think of are about crimes and detectives, like Poirot, Midsommer Murders or Wycliffe. Well, except for All the Creatures Great and Small. Sometimes I’ve liked their TV adaptations more than the original books.
    any book-to-TV adaptations I think don’t work at all, well, adaptations based on Nora Roberts’ books come to mind. I love her books, but I don’t love any of the TV movies based on them.

    Reply
  122. Favorite book-to-TV adaptations? Just about anything the BBC or other British TV channels have made! Though mostly the ones I can think of are about crimes and detectives, like Poirot, Midsommer Murders or Wycliffe. Well, except for All the Creatures Great and Small. Sometimes I’ve liked their TV adaptations more than the original books.
    any book-to-TV adaptations I think don’t work at all, well, adaptations based on Nora Roberts’ books come to mind. I love her books, but I don’t love any of the TV movies based on them.

    Reply
  123. Favorite book-to-TV adaptations? Just about anything the BBC or other British TV channels have made! Though mostly the ones I can think of are about crimes and detectives, like Poirot, Midsommer Murders or Wycliffe. Well, except for All the Creatures Great and Small. Sometimes I’ve liked their TV adaptations more than the original books.
    any book-to-TV adaptations I think don’t work at all, well, adaptations based on Nora Roberts’ books come to mind. I love her books, but I don’t love any of the TV movies based on them.

    Reply
  124. Favorite book-to-TV adaptations? Just about anything the BBC or other British TV channels have made! Though mostly the ones I can think of are about crimes and detectives, like Poirot, Midsommer Murders or Wycliffe. Well, except for All the Creatures Great and Small. Sometimes I’ve liked their TV adaptations more than the original books.
    any book-to-TV adaptations I think don’t work at all, well, adaptations based on Nora Roberts’ books come to mind. I love her books, but I don’t love any of the TV movies based on them.

    Reply
  125. Favorite book-to-TV adaptations? Just about anything the BBC or other British TV channels have made! Though mostly the ones I can think of are about crimes and detectives, like Poirot, Midsommer Murders or Wycliffe. Well, except for All the Creatures Great and Small. Sometimes I’ve liked their TV adaptations more than the original books.
    any book-to-TV adaptations I think don’t work at all, well, adaptations based on Nora Roberts’ books come to mind. I love her books, but I don’t love any of the TV movies based on them.

    Reply
  126. Minna, I think the Brits do crime superbly well. I suspect romance is much harder to turn into a movie because so much of it is happening internally — hard to act out, and maybe not enough action in the plot. Georgette Heyer books would make wonderful TV or movies, I think because they have lively and interesting and sometimes adventurous plots, as well as romance.

    Reply
  127. Minna, I think the Brits do crime superbly well. I suspect romance is much harder to turn into a movie because so much of it is happening internally — hard to act out, and maybe not enough action in the plot. Georgette Heyer books would make wonderful TV or movies, I think because they have lively and interesting and sometimes adventurous plots, as well as romance.

    Reply
  128. Minna, I think the Brits do crime superbly well. I suspect romance is much harder to turn into a movie because so much of it is happening internally — hard to act out, and maybe not enough action in the plot. Georgette Heyer books would make wonderful TV or movies, I think because they have lively and interesting and sometimes adventurous plots, as well as romance.

    Reply
  129. Minna, I think the Brits do crime superbly well. I suspect romance is much harder to turn into a movie because so much of it is happening internally — hard to act out, and maybe not enough action in the plot. Georgette Heyer books would make wonderful TV or movies, I think because they have lively and interesting and sometimes adventurous plots, as well as romance.

    Reply
  130. Minna, I think the Brits do crime superbly well. I suspect romance is much harder to turn into a movie because so much of it is happening internally — hard to act out, and maybe not enough action in the plot. Georgette Heyer books would make wonderful TV or movies, I think because they have lively and interesting and sometimes adventurous plots, as well as romance.

    Reply
  131. Mary, I think the version I mentioned — with Laurence Olivier and Greer Garson might be the same one — it was made in 1940. And Mr Collins was definitely very camp and OTT, as was Mrs Bennet and Lady Catherine.

    Reply
  132. Mary, I think the version I mentioned — with Laurence Olivier and Greer Garson might be the same one — it was made in 1940. And Mr Collins was definitely very camp and OTT, as was Mrs Bennet and Lady Catherine.

    Reply
  133. Mary, I think the version I mentioned — with Laurence Olivier and Greer Garson might be the same one — it was made in 1940. And Mr Collins was definitely very camp and OTT, as was Mrs Bennet and Lady Catherine.

    Reply
  134. Mary, I think the version I mentioned — with Laurence Olivier and Greer Garson might be the same one — it was made in 1940. And Mr Collins was definitely very camp and OTT, as was Mrs Bennet and Lady Catherine.

    Reply
  135. Mary, I think the version I mentioned — with Laurence Olivier and Greer Garson might be the same one — it was made in 1940. And Mr Collins was definitely very camp and OTT, as was Mrs Bennet and Lady Catherine.

    Reply
  136. I have to agree with Beryl! Though actually I mainly watch Poldark for the delicious relationship between Dwight Enys and Caroline Penvenen. I loved it in the first adaptation and I watched this one curious to see if my Dr Enys childhood crush reasserted itself.Which it did!

    Reply
  137. I have to agree with Beryl! Though actually I mainly watch Poldark for the delicious relationship between Dwight Enys and Caroline Penvenen. I loved it in the first adaptation and I watched this one curious to see if my Dr Enys childhood crush reasserted itself.Which it did!

    Reply
  138. I have to agree with Beryl! Though actually I mainly watch Poldark for the delicious relationship between Dwight Enys and Caroline Penvenen. I loved it in the first adaptation and I watched this one curious to see if my Dr Enys childhood crush reasserted itself.Which it did!

    Reply
  139. I have to agree with Beryl! Though actually I mainly watch Poldark for the delicious relationship between Dwight Enys and Caroline Penvenen. I loved it in the first adaptation and I watched this one curious to see if my Dr Enys childhood crush reasserted itself.Which it did!

    Reply
  140. I have to agree with Beryl! Though actually I mainly watch Poldark for the delicious relationship between Dwight Enys and Caroline Penvenen. I loved it in the first adaptation and I watched this one curious to see if my Dr Enys childhood crush reasserted itself.Which it did!

    Reply
  141. LOL Nicola — clearly I am being too tough on the shaving issue. I have only vague memories of the original Poldark — it was in my non-TV -owning days, but I remember being impressed with the few episodes I watched.
    Which ever series, however, its a wonderful story with compelling characters.

    Reply
  142. LOL Nicola — clearly I am being too tough on the shaving issue. I have only vague memories of the original Poldark — it was in my non-TV -owning days, but I remember being impressed with the few episodes I watched.
    Which ever series, however, its a wonderful story with compelling characters.

    Reply
  143. LOL Nicola — clearly I am being too tough on the shaving issue. I have only vague memories of the original Poldark — it was in my non-TV -owning days, but I remember being impressed with the few episodes I watched.
    Which ever series, however, its a wonderful story with compelling characters.

    Reply
  144. LOL Nicola — clearly I am being too tough on the shaving issue. I have only vague memories of the original Poldark — it was in my non-TV -owning days, but I remember being impressed with the few episodes I watched.
    Which ever series, however, its a wonderful story with compelling characters.

    Reply
  145. LOL Nicola — clearly I am being too tough on the shaving issue. I have only vague memories of the original Poldark — it was in my non-TV -owning days, but I remember being impressed with the few episodes I watched.
    Which ever series, however, its a wonderful story with compelling characters.

    Reply
  146. I love nearly all the ones mentioned above. The BBC really are the masters of the craft of translating books to the screen. Another one I really enjoyed was Middlemarch. Juliet Aubrey was a perfect Dorothea for me. For the Cadfael series I watched the dvds and now I’m reading the books because I liked it so much. This was a really interesting post Anne.

    Reply
  147. I love nearly all the ones mentioned above. The BBC really are the masters of the craft of translating books to the screen. Another one I really enjoyed was Middlemarch. Juliet Aubrey was a perfect Dorothea for me. For the Cadfael series I watched the dvds and now I’m reading the books because I liked it so much. This was a really interesting post Anne.

    Reply
  148. I love nearly all the ones mentioned above. The BBC really are the masters of the craft of translating books to the screen. Another one I really enjoyed was Middlemarch. Juliet Aubrey was a perfect Dorothea for me. For the Cadfael series I watched the dvds and now I’m reading the books because I liked it so much. This was a really interesting post Anne.

    Reply
  149. I love nearly all the ones mentioned above. The BBC really are the masters of the craft of translating books to the screen. Another one I really enjoyed was Middlemarch. Juliet Aubrey was a perfect Dorothea for me. For the Cadfael series I watched the dvds and now I’m reading the books because I liked it so much. This was a really interesting post Anne.

    Reply
  150. I love nearly all the ones mentioned above. The BBC really are the masters of the craft of translating books to the screen. Another one I really enjoyed was Middlemarch. Juliet Aubrey was a perfect Dorothea for me. For the Cadfael series I watched the dvds and now I’m reading the books because I liked it so much. This was a really interesting post Anne.

    Reply
  151. You would think that Nora Roberts’ books would make wonderful TV or movies, too, but let’s just whoever made the movies I mentioned certainly wasn’t employed by the BBC!

    Reply
  152. You would think that Nora Roberts’ books would make wonderful TV or movies, too, but let’s just whoever made the movies I mentioned certainly wasn’t employed by the BBC!

    Reply
  153. You would think that Nora Roberts’ books would make wonderful TV or movies, too, but let’s just whoever made the movies I mentioned certainly wasn’t employed by the BBC!

    Reply
  154. You would think that Nora Roberts’ books would make wonderful TV or movies, too, but let’s just whoever made the movies I mentioned certainly wasn’t employed by the BBC!

    Reply
  155. You would think that Nora Roberts’ books would make wonderful TV or movies, too, but let’s just whoever made the movies I mentioned certainly wasn’t employed by the BBC!

    Reply
  156. I didn’t know that about ‘Kilwillie’, Anne.
    That seems to happen more often: the actress who played ‘Rose’ in Upstairs Downstairs wrote the House of Eliott series – another great tv-series.

    Reply
  157. I didn’t know that about ‘Kilwillie’, Anne.
    That seems to happen more often: the actress who played ‘Rose’ in Upstairs Downstairs wrote the House of Eliott series – another great tv-series.

    Reply
  158. I didn’t know that about ‘Kilwillie’, Anne.
    That seems to happen more often: the actress who played ‘Rose’ in Upstairs Downstairs wrote the House of Eliott series – another great tv-series.

    Reply
  159. I didn’t know that about ‘Kilwillie’, Anne.
    That seems to happen more often: the actress who played ‘Rose’ in Upstairs Downstairs wrote the House of Eliott series – another great tv-series.

    Reply
  160. I didn’t know that about ‘Kilwillie’, Anne.
    That seems to happen more often: the actress who played ‘Rose’ in Upstairs Downstairs wrote the House of Eliott series – another great tv-series.

    Reply
  161. Inspector Morse! And I’ll just go,ahead and date myself by mentioning The Pallisers with Susan Hampshire as Lady Glendora. It was a loooong series, but very well done.

    Reply
  162. Inspector Morse! And I’ll just go,ahead and date myself by mentioning The Pallisers with Susan Hampshire as Lady Glendora. It was a loooong series, but very well done.

    Reply
  163. Inspector Morse! And I’ll just go,ahead and date myself by mentioning The Pallisers with Susan Hampshire as Lady Glendora. It was a loooong series, but very well done.

    Reply
  164. Inspector Morse! And I’ll just go,ahead and date myself by mentioning The Pallisers with Susan Hampshire as Lady Glendora. It was a loooong series, but very well done.

    Reply
  165. Inspector Morse! And I’ll just go,ahead and date myself by mentioning The Pallisers with Susan Hampshire as Lady Glendora. It was a loooong series, but very well done.

    Reply
  166. I generally prefer reading the books first, but yes, sometimes been disappointed by movies or TV series. I think the Keira Knightley/ Matthew McFayden will always be how I see Pride & Prejudice (wasn’t disappointed at all), although I haven’t been able to see the Colin Firth version yet. The one really bad book to TV conversion that stands out for me, though, was one of Elizabeth George’s Inspector Lynley novels. I got more and more confused while I was watching it, and at the end I realized why- the plot had been changed! To the degree that the murderer was a different person! Wow what a rude awakening,

    Reply
  167. I generally prefer reading the books first, but yes, sometimes been disappointed by movies or TV series. I think the Keira Knightley/ Matthew McFayden will always be how I see Pride & Prejudice (wasn’t disappointed at all), although I haven’t been able to see the Colin Firth version yet. The one really bad book to TV conversion that stands out for me, though, was one of Elizabeth George’s Inspector Lynley novels. I got more and more confused while I was watching it, and at the end I realized why- the plot had been changed! To the degree that the murderer was a different person! Wow what a rude awakening,

    Reply
  168. I generally prefer reading the books first, but yes, sometimes been disappointed by movies or TV series. I think the Keira Knightley/ Matthew McFayden will always be how I see Pride & Prejudice (wasn’t disappointed at all), although I haven’t been able to see the Colin Firth version yet. The one really bad book to TV conversion that stands out for me, though, was one of Elizabeth George’s Inspector Lynley novels. I got more and more confused while I was watching it, and at the end I realized why- the plot had been changed! To the degree that the murderer was a different person! Wow what a rude awakening,

    Reply
  169. I generally prefer reading the books first, but yes, sometimes been disappointed by movies or TV series. I think the Keira Knightley/ Matthew McFayden will always be how I see Pride & Prejudice (wasn’t disappointed at all), although I haven’t been able to see the Colin Firth version yet. The one really bad book to TV conversion that stands out for me, though, was one of Elizabeth George’s Inspector Lynley novels. I got more and more confused while I was watching it, and at the end I realized why- the plot had been changed! To the degree that the murderer was a different person! Wow what a rude awakening,

    Reply
  170. I generally prefer reading the books first, but yes, sometimes been disappointed by movies or TV series. I think the Keira Knightley/ Matthew McFayden will always be how I see Pride & Prejudice (wasn’t disappointed at all), although I haven’t been able to see the Colin Firth version yet. The one really bad book to TV conversion that stands out for me, though, was one of Elizabeth George’s Inspector Lynley novels. I got more and more confused while I was watching it, and at the end I realized why- the plot had been changed! To the degree that the murderer was a different person! Wow what a rude awakening,

    Reply
  171. I think some of Nora’s books would indeed make good movies — especially the ones with a bit of action and plot over and above the romance plot.
    Pity the screen adaptation people didn’t see that.

    Reply
  172. I think some of Nora’s books would indeed make good movies — especially the ones with a bit of action and plot over and above the romance plot.
    Pity the screen adaptation people didn’t see that.

    Reply
  173. I think some of Nora’s books would indeed make good movies — especially the ones with a bit of action and plot over and above the romance plot.
    Pity the screen adaptation people didn’t see that.

    Reply
  174. I think some of Nora’s books would indeed make good movies — especially the ones with a bit of action and plot over and above the romance plot.
    Pity the screen adaptation people didn’t see that.

    Reply
  175. I think some of Nora’s books would indeed make good movies — especially the ones with a bit of action and plot over and above the romance plot.
    Pity the screen adaptation people didn’t see that.

    Reply
  176. Thanks, Linda. I never saw the Pallisers, but I remember Susan Hampshire in a number of excellent productions, including Monarch of the Glen — and wasn’t she Fleur in the original production of the Forsythe Saga?

    Reply
  177. Thanks, Linda. I never saw the Pallisers, but I remember Susan Hampshire in a number of excellent productions, including Monarch of the Glen — and wasn’t she Fleur in the original production of the Forsythe Saga?

    Reply
  178. Thanks, Linda. I never saw the Pallisers, but I remember Susan Hampshire in a number of excellent productions, including Monarch of the Glen — and wasn’t she Fleur in the original production of the Forsythe Saga?

    Reply
  179. Thanks, Linda. I never saw the Pallisers, but I remember Susan Hampshire in a number of excellent productions, including Monarch of the Glen — and wasn’t she Fleur in the original production of the Forsythe Saga?

    Reply
  180. Thanks, Linda. I never saw the Pallisers, but I remember Susan Hampshire in a number of excellent productions, including Monarch of the Glen — and wasn’t she Fleur in the original production of the Forsythe Saga?

    Reply
  181. Chi-An, the Colin Firth version of Pride and Prejudice is a made-for TV series, and its many peoples favorite because as well as being an excellent production,with 6 episodes, its the most faithful to the original book — nothing is left out. I really liked the Keira Knightly version as well — except for the pig wandering through the house, which was ridiculous — but a movie cannot possibly fit in everything. Theyre both interesting for the different interpretations, as is the 1940 black and white movie with Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier.
    I enjoyed the Inspector Lynley series too, but wasnt a devotee, and cant remember that episode.

    Reply
  182. Chi-An, the Colin Firth version of Pride and Prejudice is a made-for TV series, and its many peoples favorite because as well as being an excellent production,with 6 episodes, its the most faithful to the original book — nothing is left out. I really liked the Keira Knightly version as well — except for the pig wandering through the house, which was ridiculous — but a movie cannot possibly fit in everything. Theyre both interesting for the different interpretations, as is the 1940 black and white movie with Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier.
    I enjoyed the Inspector Lynley series too, but wasnt a devotee, and cant remember that episode.

    Reply
  183. Chi-An, the Colin Firth version of Pride and Prejudice is a made-for TV series, and its many peoples favorite because as well as being an excellent production,with 6 episodes, its the most faithful to the original book — nothing is left out. I really liked the Keira Knightly version as well — except for the pig wandering through the house, which was ridiculous — but a movie cannot possibly fit in everything. Theyre both interesting for the different interpretations, as is the 1940 black and white movie with Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier.
    I enjoyed the Inspector Lynley series too, but wasnt a devotee, and cant remember that episode.

    Reply
  184. Chi-An, the Colin Firth version of Pride and Prejudice is a made-for TV series, and its many peoples favorite because as well as being an excellent production,with 6 episodes, its the most faithful to the original book — nothing is left out. I really liked the Keira Knightly version as well — except for the pig wandering through the house, which was ridiculous — but a movie cannot possibly fit in everything. Theyre both interesting for the different interpretations, as is the 1940 black and white movie with Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier.
    I enjoyed the Inspector Lynley series too, but wasnt a devotee, and cant remember that episode.

    Reply
  185. Chi-An, the Colin Firth version of Pride and Prejudice is a made-for TV series, and its many peoples favorite because as well as being an excellent production,with 6 episodes, its the most faithful to the original book — nothing is left out. I really liked the Keira Knightly version as well — except for the pig wandering through the house, which was ridiculous — but a movie cannot possibly fit in everything. Theyre both interesting for the different interpretations, as is the 1940 black and white movie with Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier.
    I enjoyed the Inspector Lynley series too, but wasnt a devotee, and cant remember that episode.

    Reply
  186. An excellent post I’m not a fan of TV (or movies) watching, but I have enjoyed many of the series mentioned above. I particularly loved the Cadfael series and both Peter Wimsey series.

    Reply
  187. An excellent post I’m not a fan of TV (or movies) watching, but I have enjoyed many of the series mentioned above. I particularly loved the Cadfael series and both Peter Wimsey series.

    Reply
  188. An excellent post I’m not a fan of TV (or movies) watching, but I have enjoyed many of the series mentioned above. I particularly loved the Cadfael series and both Peter Wimsey series.

    Reply
  189. An excellent post I’m not a fan of TV (or movies) watching, but I have enjoyed many of the series mentioned above. I particularly loved the Cadfael series and both Peter Wimsey series.

    Reply
  190. An excellent post I’m not a fan of TV (or movies) watching, but I have enjoyed many of the series mentioned above. I particularly loved the Cadfael series and both Peter Wimsey series.

    Reply
  191. See, I always had problems with Timothy Dalton as Rochester. I could never get past that, “Do you consider me handseome, Jane?” and she says no. Seriously? Does she see upside down? It makes much more sense in the vesion with Samantha Morton and my closer personal friend Ciaran Hinds. At least to me.

    Reply
  192. See, I always had problems with Timothy Dalton as Rochester. I could never get past that, “Do you consider me handseome, Jane?” and she says no. Seriously? Does she see upside down? It makes much more sense in the vesion with Samantha Morton and my closer personal friend Ciaran Hinds. At least to me.

    Reply
  193. See, I always had problems with Timothy Dalton as Rochester. I could never get past that, “Do you consider me handseome, Jane?” and she says no. Seriously? Does she see upside down? It makes much more sense in the vesion with Samantha Morton and my closer personal friend Ciaran Hinds. At least to me.

    Reply
  194. See, I always had problems with Timothy Dalton as Rochester. I could never get past that, “Do you consider me handseome, Jane?” and she says no. Seriously? Does she see upside down? It makes much more sense in the vesion with Samantha Morton and my closer personal friend Ciaran Hinds. At least to me.

    Reply
  195. See, I always had problems with Timothy Dalton as Rochester. I could never get past that, “Do you consider me handseome, Jane?” and she says no. Seriously? Does she see upside down? It makes much more sense in the vesion with Samantha Morton and my closer personal friend Ciaran Hinds. At least to me.

    Reply
  196. Ah, the Robin Ellis Poldark was to me the best all round. I feel about this version with Aiden Turner the way I feel about the Kiera Knightley P&P, that it’s the graphic novel version. I want more words.
    As for Sharpe, I was a devotee of the books long before they filmed them, and I have to say that overall it was one ofthe most perfectly cast shows every, from every Chosen Man to Hogan to Harps and Sharpe himself. And then there was the BBC Rep company filling all the minor roles. Perfection

    Reply
  197. Ah, the Robin Ellis Poldark was to me the best all round. I feel about this version with Aiden Turner the way I feel about the Kiera Knightley P&P, that it’s the graphic novel version. I want more words.
    As for Sharpe, I was a devotee of the books long before they filmed them, and I have to say that overall it was one ofthe most perfectly cast shows every, from every Chosen Man to Hogan to Harps and Sharpe himself. And then there was the BBC Rep company filling all the minor roles. Perfection

    Reply
  198. Ah, the Robin Ellis Poldark was to me the best all round. I feel about this version with Aiden Turner the way I feel about the Kiera Knightley P&P, that it’s the graphic novel version. I want more words.
    As for Sharpe, I was a devotee of the books long before they filmed them, and I have to say that overall it was one ofthe most perfectly cast shows every, from every Chosen Man to Hogan to Harps and Sharpe himself. And then there was the BBC Rep company filling all the minor roles. Perfection

    Reply
  199. Ah, the Robin Ellis Poldark was to me the best all round. I feel about this version with Aiden Turner the way I feel about the Kiera Knightley P&P, that it’s the graphic novel version. I want more words.
    As for Sharpe, I was a devotee of the books long before they filmed them, and I have to say that overall it was one ofthe most perfectly cast shows every, from every Chosen Man to Hogan to Harps and Sharpe himself. And then there was the BBC Rep company filling all the minor roles. Perfection

    Reply
  200. Ah, the Robin Ellis Poldark was to me the best all round. I feel about this version with Aiden Turner the way I feel about the Kiera Knightley P&P, that it’s the graphic novel version. I want more words.
    As for Sharpe, I was a devotee of the books long before they filmed them, and I have to say that overall it was one ofthe most perfectly cast shows every, from every Chosen Man to Hogan to Harps and Sharpe himself. And then there was the BBC Rep company filling all the minor roles. Perfection

    Reply
  201. I like that — the graphic novel version — yes, it’s a bit like that, though I have enjoyed both.
    And I, too was a devotee of all the Sharpe novels before they brought out the superb TV version, and all the actors were wonderful, I agree.
    Bernard Cornwell is a brilliant writer — I’ve enjoyed his other books too. He even hooked me into his sea novels — and I’m not much of a sea person.

    Reply
  202. I like that — the graphic novel version — yes, it’s a bit like that, though I have enjoyed both.
    And I, too was a devotee of all the Sharpe novels before they brought out the superb TV version, and all the actors were wonderful, I agree.
    Bernard Cornwell is a brilliant writer — I’ve enjoyed his other books too. He even hooked me into his sea novels — and I’m not much of a sea person.

    Reply
  203. I like that — the graphic novel version — yes, it’s a bit like that, though I have enjoyed both.
    And I, too was a devotee of all the Sharpe novels before they brought out the superb TV version, and all the actors were wonderful, I agree.
    Bernard Cornwell is a brilliant writer — I’ve enjoyed his other books too. He even hooked me into his sea novels — and I’m not much of a sea person.

    Reply
  204. I like that — the graphic novel version — yes, it’s a bit like that, though I have enjoyed both.
    And I, too was a devotee of all the Sharpe novels before they brought out the superb TV version, and all the actors were wonderful, I agree.
    Bernard Cornwell is a brilliant writer — I’ve enjoyed his other books too. He even hooked me into his sea novels — and I’m not much of a sea person.

    Reply
  205. I like that — the graphic novel version — yes, it’s a bit like that, though I have enjoyed both.
    And I, too was a devotee of all the Sharpe novels before they brought out the superb TV version, and all the actors were wonderful, I agree.
    Bernard Cornwell is a brilliant writer — I’ve enjoyed his other books too. He even hooked me into his sea novels — and I’m not much of a sea person.

    Reply
  206. I thought Ian Carmichael was all wrong as Lord Peter Wimsey, and really detracted from my enjoyment of the TV programs. Too heavyset and too old. And he didn’t capture the humor of the character either. I haven’t seen the Edward Petherbridge, but he is much closer to my mental image, perhaps I’ll watch that version.
    I, Claudius was the best ever, and memorable even all these years later.

    Reply
  207. I thought Ian Carmichael was all wrong as Lord Peter Wimsey, and really detracted from my enjoyment of the TV programs. Too heavyset and too old. And he didn’t capture the humor of the character either. I haven’t seen the Edward Petherbridge, but he is much closer to my mental image, perhaps I’ll watch that version.
    I, Claudius was the best ever, and memorable even all these years later.

    Reply
  208. I thought Ian Carmichael was all wrong as Lord Peter Wimsey, and really detracted from my enjoyment of the TV programs. Too heavyset and too old. And he didn’t capture the humor of the character either. I haven’t seen the Edward Petherbridge, but he is much closer to my mental image, perhaps I’ll watch that version.
    I, Claudius was the best ever, and memorable even all these years later.

    Reply
  209. I thought Ian Carmichael was all wrong as Lord Peter Wimsey, and really detracted from my enjoyment of the TV programs. Too heavyset and too old. And he didn’t capture the humor of the character either. I haven’t seen the Edward Petherbridge, but he is much closer to my mental image, perhaps I’ll watch that version.
    I, Claudius was the best ever, and memorable even all these years later.

    Reply
  210. I thought Ian Carmichael was all wrong as Lord Peter Wimsey, and really detracted from my enjoyment of the TV programs. Too heavyset and too old. And he didn’t capture the humor of the character either. I haven’t seen the Edward Petherbridge, but he is much closer to my mental image, perhaps I’ll watch that version.
    I, Claudius was the best ever, and memorable even all these years later.

    Reply
  211. Karin, I cant imagine Ian Carmichael as Wimsey. I would have thought a younger, more dashing actor, and yes, with a wry sense of humor. Ian Carmichael is a wonderful actor — he was brilliant in the UK House of Cards (the original production) but Wimsey needs a different kind of character.
    Its the same in the current production of Agatha Christies Tommy and Tuppence series. I was never much of a fan of those books, but theres the same kind of casting mismatch in having David Walliams play Tommy. Just not right.

    Reply
  212. Karin, I cant imagine Ian Carmichael as Wimsey. I would have thought a younger, more dashing actor, and yes, with a wry sense of humor. Ian Carmichael is a wonderful actor — he was brilliant in the UK House of Cards (the original production) but Wimsey needs a different kind of character.
    Its the same in the current production of Agatha Christies Tommy and Tuppence series. I was never much of a fan of those books, but theres the same kind of casting mismatch in having David Walliams play Tommy. Just not right.

    Reply
  213. Karin, I cant imagine Ian Carmichael as Wimsey. I would have thought a younger, more dashing actor, and yes, with a wry sense of humor. Ian Carmichael is a wonderful actor — he was brilliant in the UK House of Cards (the original production) but Wimsey needs a different kind of character.
    Its the same in the current production of Agatha Christies Tommy and Tuppence series. I was never much of a fan of those books, but theres the same kind of casting mismatch in having David Walliams play Tommy. Just not right.

    Reply
  214. Karin, I cant imagine Ian Carmichael as Wimsey. I would have thought a younger, more dashing actor, and yes, with a wry sense of humor. Ian Carmichael is a wonderful actor — he was brilliant in the UK House of Cards (the original production) but Wimsey needs a different kind of character.
    Its the same in the current production of Agatha Christies Tommy and Tuppence series. I was never much of a fan of those books, but theres the same kind of casting mismatch in having David Walliams play Tommy. Just not right.

    Reply
  215. Karin, I cant imagine Ian Carmichael as Wimsey. I would have thought a younger, more dashing actor, and yes, with a wry sense of humor. Ian Carmichael is a wonderful actor — he was brilliant in the UK House of Cards (the original production) but Wimsey needs a different kind of character.
    Its the same in the current production of Agatha Christies Tommy and Tuppence series. I was never much of a fan of those books, but theres the same kind of casting mismatch in having David Walliams play Tommy. Just not right.

    Reply
  216. The Original PBS Series of Poldark starred Robin Ellis and to me he is still the best one. I had read the Poldark books by Winston Graham before I saw the series and he fit the part really well He also Acted in some other Masterpiece theater roles. I think some of the adaptations the Dickens Novels. I agree with Anne that the current Poldark while he may do the character right he does not look like Ross Poldark.

    Reply
  217. The Original PBS Series of Poldark starred Robin Ellis and to me he is still the best one. I had read the Poldark books by Winston Graham before I saw the series and he fit the part really well He also Acted in some other Masterpiece theater roles. I think some of the adaptations the Dickens Novels. I agree with Anne that the current Poldark while he may do the character right he does not look like Ross Poldark.

    Reply
  218. The Original PBS Series of Poldark starred Robin Ellis and to me he is still the best one. I had read the Poldark books by Winston Graham before I saw the series and he fit the part really well He also Acted in some other Masterpiece theater roles. I think some of the adaptations the Dickens Novels. I agree with Anne that the current Poldark while he may do the character right he does not look like Ross Poldark.

    Reply
  219. The Original PBS Series of Poldark starred Robin Ellis and to me he is still the best one. I had read the Poldark books by Winston Graham before I saw the series and he fit the part really well He also Acted in some other Masterpiece theater roles. I think some of the adaptations the Dickens Novels. I agree with Anne that the current Poldark while he may do the character right he does not look like Ross Poldark.

    Reply
  220. The Original PBS Series of Poldark starred Robin Ellis and to me he is still the best one. I had read the Poldark books by Winston Graham before I saw the series and he fit the part really well He also Acted in some other Masterpiece theater roles. I think some of the adaptations the Dickens Novels. I agree with Anne that the current Poldark while he may do the character right he does not look like Ross Poldark.

    Reply
  221. The Timothy Dalton “Jane Eyre” is the first video I ever watched. I was enchanted. At the time, I was afraid no one could eclipse Orson Welles’ performance in the movie. But Timothy Dalton broods very well.

    Reply
  222. The Timothy Dalton “Jane Eyre” is the first video I ever watched. I was enchanted. At the time, I was afraid no one could eclipse Orson Welles’ performance in the movie. But Timothy Dalton broods very well.

    Reply
  223. The Timothy Dalton “Jane Eyre” is the first video I ever watched. I was enchanted. At the time, I was afraid no one could eclipse Orson Welles’ performance in the movie. But Timothy Dalton broods very well.

    Reply
  224. The Timothy Dalton “Jane Eyre” is the first video I ever watched. I was enchanted. At the time, I was afraid no one could eclipse Orson Welles’ performance in the movie. But Timothy Dalton broods very well.

    Reply
  225. The Timothy Dalton “Jane Eyre” is the first video I ever watched. I was enchanted. At the time, I was afraid no one could eclipse Orson Welles’ performance in the movie. But Timothy Dalton broods very well.

    Reply
  226. There are several other book to TV incarnations that come to mind: TV versions of Ellery Queen, Rex Stout’s Nero Wolfe, and, of course, Erle Stanley Gardner’s iconic Perry Mason. One that might not be remembered, although I loved it was the PBS version of Dick Francis’s “Whip Hand.” I’d never read him before. And I guess I could add Robert B. Parker’s “Spencer” and Tess Gerritsen’s “Rizzoli and Isles.” I reckon my TV taste often runs to murder and mayhem.

    Reply
  227. There are several other book to TV incarnations that come to mind: TV versions of Ellery Queen, Rex Stout’s Nero Wolfe, and, of course, Erle Stanley Gardner’s iconic Perry Mason. One that might not be remembered, although I loved it was the PBS version of Dick Francis’s “Whip Hand.” I’d never read him before. And I guess I could add Robert B. Parker’s “Spencer” and Tess Gerritsen’s “Rizzoli and Isles.” I reckon my TV taste often runs to murder and mayhem.

    Reply
  228. There are several other book to TV incarnations that come to mind: TV versions of Ellery Queen, Rex Stout’s Nero Wolfe, and, of course, Erle Stanley Gardner’s iconic Perry Mason. One that might not be remembered, although I loved it was the PBS version of Dick Francis’s “Whip Hand.” I’d never read him before. And I guess I could add Robert B. Parker’s “Spencer” and Tess Gerritsen’s “Rizzoli and Isles.” I reckon my TV taste often runs to murder and mayhem.

    Reply
  229. There are several other book to TV incarnations that come to mind: TV versions of Ellery Queen, Rex Stout’s Nero Wolfe, and, of course, Erle Stanley Gardner’s iconic Perry Mason. One that might not be remembered, although I loved it was the PBS version of Dick Francis’s “Whip Hand.” I’d never read him before. And I guess I could add Robert B. Parker’s “Spencer” and Tess Gerritsen’s “Rizzoli and Isles.” I reckon my TV taste often runs to murder and mayhem.

    Reply
  230. There are several other book to TV incarnations that come to mind: TV versions of Ellery Queen, Rex Stout’s Nero Wolfe, and, of course, Erle Stanley Gardner’s iconic Perry Mason. One that might not be remembered, although I loved it was the PBS version of Dick Francis’s “Whip Hand.” I’d never read him before. And I guess I could add Robert B. Parker’s “Spencer” and Tess Gerritsen’s “Rizzoli and Isles.” I reckon my TV taste often runs to murder and mayhem.

    Reply
  231. I hope you’ll make the chance to watch the Outlander series. I was skeptical at first when I saw the casting. Just didn’t think the actors could fill the shoes of Claire and Jamie. My daughter and I have read all the books so far published, and really love the characters. We find the series to be beautifully done, and Claire and Jamie have come to life!! It’s well worth the time to view. It stays close enough to the books that I don’t know how anyone could quibble.
    By the way, our husbands refuse to read the books as they are so long, but love the series as much as we do.
    We all watch it together.

    Reply
  232. I hope you’ll make the chance to watch the Outlander series. I was skeptical at first when I saw the casting. Just didn’t think the actors could fill the shoes of Claire and Jamie. My daughter and I have read all the books so far published, and really love the characters. We find the series to be beautifully done, and Claire and Jamie have come to life!! It’s well worth the time to view. It stays close enough to the books that I don’t know how anyone could quibble.
    By the way, our husbands refuse to read the books as they are so long, but love the series as much as we do.
    We all watch it together.

    Reply
  233. I hope you’ll make the chance to watch the Outlander series. I was skeptical at first when I saw the casting. Just didn’t think the actors could fill the shoes of Claire and Jamie. My daughter and I have read all the books so far published, and really love the characters. We find the series to be beautifully done, and Claire and Jamie have come to life!! It’s well worth the time to view. It stays close enough to the books that I don’t know how anyone could quibble.
    By the way, our husbands refuse to read the books as they are so long, but love the series as much as we do.
    We all watch it together.

    Reply
  234. I hope you’ll make the chance to watch the Outlander series. I was skeptical at first when I saw the casting. Just didn’t think the actors could fill the shoes of Claire and Jamie. My daughter and I have read all the books so far published, and really love the characters. We find the series to be beautifully done, and Claire and Jamie have come to life!! It’s well worth the time to view. It stays close enough to the books that I don’t know how anyone could quibble.
    By the way, our husbands refuse to read the books as they are so long, but love the series as much as we do.
    We all watch it together.

    Reply
  235. I hope you’ll make the chance to watch the Outlander series. I was skeptical at first when I saw the casting. Just didn’t think the actors could fill the shoes of Claire and Jamie. My daughter and I have read all the books so far published, and really love the characters. We find the series to be beautifully done, and Claire and Jamie have come to life!! It’s well worth the time to view. It stays close enough to the books that I don’t know how anyone could quibble.
    By the way, our husbands refuse to read the books as they are so long, but love the series as much as we do.
    We all watch it together.

    Reply
  236. The Phryne Fisher book to TV series has been the best. Second best – and it’s almost a tie for first – is the tv show on Netflix “Longmire” based on the books by Craig Johnson. I like the books more than the show because the show has taken a darker tone in some ways. I love M.C. Beaton’s Agatha Raisin series, but I do not like the TV casting or character development. That blond is not Agatha!

    Reply
  237. The Phryne Fisher book to TV series has been the best. Second best – and it’s almost a tie for first – is the tv show on Netflix “Longmire” based on the books by Craig Johnson. I like the books more than the show because the show has taken a darker tone in some ways. I love M.C. Beaton’s Agatha Raisin series, but I do not like the TV casting or character development. That blond is not Agatha!

    Reply
  238. The Phryne Fisher book to TV series has been the best. Second best – and it’s almost a tie for first – is the tv show on Netflix “Longmire” based on the books by Craig Johnson. I like the books more than the show because the show has taken a darker tone in some ways. I love M.C. Beaton’s Agatha Raisin series, but I do not like the TV casting or character development. That blond is not Agatha!

    Reply
  239. The Phryne Fisher book to TV series has been the best. Second best – and it’s almost a tie for first – is the tv show on Netflix “Longmire” based on the books by Craig Johnson. I like the books more than the show because the show has taken a darker tone in some ways. I love M.C. Beaton’s Agatha Raisin series, but I do not like the TV casting or character development. That blond is not Agatha!

    Reply
  240. The Phryne Fisher book to TV series has been the best. Second best – and it’s almost a tie for first – is the tv show on Netflix “Longmire” based on the books by Craig Johnson. I like the books more than the show because the show has taken a darker tone in some ways. I love M.C. Beaton’s Agatha Raisin series, but I do not like the TV casting or character development. That blond is not Agatha!

    Reply
  241. Thanks H.Harra — I love the clothes in the Phrynne series — just gorrrgeous. And for me, coming from Melbourne, where its set, it is also fun to spot familiar locations.

    Reply
  242. Thanks H.Harra — I love the clothes in the Phrynne series — just gorrrgeous. And for me, coming from Melbourne, where its set, it is also fun to spot familiar locations.

    Reply
  243. Thanks H.Harra — I love the clothes in the Phrynne series — just gorrrgeous. And for me, coming from Melbourne, where its set, it is also fun to spot familiar locations.

    Reply
  244. Thanks H.Harra — I love the clothes in the Phrynne series — just gorrrgeous. And for me, coming from Melbourne, where its set, it is also fun to spot familiar locations.

    Reply
  245. Thanks H.Harra — I love the clothes in the Phrynne series — just gorrrgeous. And for me, coming from Melbourne, where its set, it is also fun to spot familiar locations.

    Reply
  246. I fell in love with Sean Bean’s Sharpe and then read the books, which I also liked but he was already Sharpe in my mind. Can’t believe he just put on his original costume 9 years later for the last episodes/movie. I saw the TV series Hornblower first then read Forester’s novels – crumbs, wasn’t I smacked out of any silly Ioan Gruffudd resemblance. Both novels and TV series of Miss Fisher have long been favourites in this house, first my daughter (in primary school no less – how did I explain Cocaine Blues? Long story) – even with the changes in character relationships (where’s her Chinese lover?), but I love both versions. We saw the costumes up here in Brisbane – to die for!So practical: the long floaty pants for ladies of a certain age in the hot weather. Loved it!

    Reply
  247. I fell in love with Sean Bean’s Sharpe and then read the books, which I also liked but he was already Sharpe in my mind. Can’t believe he just put on his original costume 9 years later for the last episodes/movie. I saw the TV series Hornblower first then read Forester’s novels – crumbs, wasn’t I smacked out of any silly Ioan Gruffudd resemblance. Both novels and TV series of Miss Fisher have long been favourites in this house, first my daughter (in primary school no less – how did I explain Cocaine Blues? Long story) – even with the changes in character relationships (where’s her Chinese lover?), but I love both versions. We saw the costumes up here in Brisbane – to die for!So practical: the long floaty pants for ladies of a certain age in the hot weather. Loved it!

    Reply
  248. I fell in love with Sean Bean’s Sharpe and then read the books, which I also liked but he was already Sharpe in my mind. Can’t believe he just put on his original costume 9 years later for the last episodes/movie. I saw the TV series Hornblower first then read Forester’s novels – crumbs, wasn’t I smacked out of any silly Ioan Gruffudd resemblance. Both novels and TV series of Miss Fisher have long been favourites in this house, first my daughter (in primary school no less – how did I explain Cocaine Blues? Long story) – even with the changes in character relationships (where’s her Chinese lover?), but I love both versions. We saw the costumes up here in Brisbane – to die for!So practical: the long floaty pants for ladies of a certain age in the hot weather. Loved it!

    Reply
  249. I fell in love with Sean Bean’s Sharpe and then read the books, which I also liked but he was already Sharpe in my mind. Can’t believe he just put on his original costume 9 years later for the last episodes/movie. I saw the TV series Hornblower first then read Forester’s novels – crumbs, wasn’t I smacked out of any silly Ioan Gruffudd resemblance. Both novels and TV series of Miss Fisher have long been favourites in this house, first my daughter (in primary school no less – how did I explain Cocaine Blues? Long story) – even with the changes in character relationships (where’s her Chinese lover?), but I love both versions. We saw the costumes up here in Brisbane – to die for!So practical: the long floaty pants for ladies of a certain age in the hot weather. Loved it!

    Reply
  250. I fell in love with Sean Bean’s Sharpe and then read the books, which I also liked but he was already Sharpe in my mind. Can’t believe he just put on his original costume 9 years later for the last episodes/movie. I saw the TV series Hornblower first then read Forester’s novels – crumbs, wasn’t I smacked out of any silly Ioan Gruffudd resemblance. Both novels and TV series of Miss Fisher have long been favourites in this house, first my daughter (in primary school no less – how did I explain Cocaine Blues? Long story) – even with the changes in character relationships (where’s her Chinese lover?), but I love both versions. We saw the costumes up here in Brisbane – to die for!So practical: the long floaty pants for ladies of a certain age in the hot weather. Loved it!

    Reply
  251. BBC always nails it for me, from Cadfael to P&P. I can’t stand to watch the Hollywood version of P&P. (Really? Five-foot wide hoop skirts in 1814?) Possibly my all-time favorite novel is “Frenchman’s Creek” by DuMaurier. The Joan Fontaine movie is acceptable, though the acting is so OTT and miscast (a Spaniard playing the Frenchman?). The later version by Masterpiece Theatre starring Tara Fitzgerald and Anthony Delon was actually better, even though they added political aspects that were never in the book! I just wish I could find a DVD of that one that isn’t either $89 or suspiciously cheap & used, like it’s been recorded off of someone’s TV. My VHS copy is long-exhausted.

    Reply
  252. BBC always nails it for me, from Cadfael to P&P. I can’t stand to watch the Hollywood version of P&P. (Really? Five-foot wide hoop skirts in 1814?) Possibly my all-time favorite novel is “Frenchman’s Creek” by DuMaurier. The Joan Fontaine movie is acceptable, though the acting is so OTT and miscast (a Spaniard playing the Frenchman?). The later version by Masterpiece Theatre starring Tara Fitzgerald and Anthony Delon was actually better, even though they added political aspects that were never in the book! I just wish I could find a DVD of that one that isn’t either $89 or suspiciously cheap & used, like it’s been recorded off of someone’s TV. My VHS copy is long-exhausted.

    Reply
  253. BBC always nails it for me, from Cadfael to P&P. I can’t stand to watch the Hollywood version of P&P. (Really? Five-foot wide hoop skirts in 1814?) Possibly my all-time favorite novel is “Frenchman’s Creek” by DuMaurier. The Joan Fontaine movie is acceptable, though the acting is so OTT and miscast (a Spaniard playing the Frenchman?). The later version by Masterpiece Theatre starring Tara Fitzgerald and Anthony Delon was actually better, even though they added political aspects that were never in the book! I just wish I could find a DVD of that one that isn’t either $89 or suspiciously cheap & used, like it’s been recorded off of someone’s TV. My VHS copy is long-exhausted.

    Reply
  254. BBC always nails it for me, from Cadfael to P&P. I can’t stand to watch the Hollywood version of P&P. (Really? Five-foot wide hoop skirts in 1814?) Possibly my all-time favorite novel is “Frenchman’s Creek” by DuMaurier. The Joan Fontaine movie is acceptable, though the acting is so OTT and miscast (a Spaniard playing the Frenchman?). The later version by Masterpiece Theatre starring Tara Fitzgerald and Anthony Delon was actually better, even though they added political aspects that were never in the book! I just wish I could find a DVD of that one that isn’t either $89 or suspiciously cheap & used, like it’s been recorded off of someone’s TV. My VHS copy is long-exhausted.

    Reply
  255. BBC always nails it for me, from Cadfael to P&P. I can’t stand to watch the Hollywood version of P&P. (Really? Five-foot wide hoop skirts in 1814?) Possibly my all-time favorite novel is “Frenchman’s Creek” by DuMaurier. The Joan Fontaine movie is acceptable, though the acting is so OTT and miscast (a Spaniard playing the Frenchman?). The later version by Masterpiece Theatre starring Tara Fitzgerald and Anthony Delon was actually better, even though they added political aspects that were never in the book! I just wish I could find a DVD of that one that isn’t either $89 or suspiciously cheap & used, like it’s been recorded off of someone’s TV. My VHS copy is long-exhausted.

    Reply
  256. Eugenia, I hear you on not being able to get a reasonably priced copy of the dvd because of the regional restrictions. They bug me enormously. If we are prepared to pay postage etc why can’t we buy and play programs from other countries? I recently bought an all-regions DVD player and now I can play programs from the USA, the UK and elsewhere. The DVD player cost me a whole $100. It’s pretty much paid for itself, as I’ve finally been able to watch movies that friends overseas have sent me.

    Reply
  257. Eugenia, I hear you on not being able to get a reasonably priced copy of the dvd because of the regional restrictions. They bug me enormously. If we are prepared to pay postage etc why can’t we buy and play programs from other countries? I recently bought an all-regions DVD player and now I can play programs from the USA, the UK and elsewhere. The DVD player cost me a whole $100. It’s pretty much paid for itself, as I’ve finally been able to watch movies that friends overseas have sent me.

    Reply
  258. Eugenia, I hear you on not being able to get a reasonably priced copy of the dvd because of the regional restrictions. They bug me enormously. If we are prepared to pay postage etc why can’t we buy and play programs from other countries? I recently bought an all-regions DVD player and now I can play programs from the USA, the UK and elsewhere. The DVD player cost me a whole $100. It’s pretty much paid for itself, as I’ve finally been able to watch movies that friends overseas have sent me.

    Reply
  259. Eugenia, I hear you on not being able to get a reasonably priced copy of the dvd because of the regional restrictions. They bug me enormously. If we are prepared to pay postage etc why can’t we buy and play programs from other countries? I recently bought an all-regions DVD player and now I can play programs from the USA, the UK and elsewhere. The DVD player cost me a whole $100. It’s pretty much paid for itself, as I’ve finally been able to watch movies that friends overseas have sent me.

    Reply
  260. Eugenia, I hear you on not being able to get a reasonably priced copy of the dvd because of the regional restrictions. They bug me enormously. If we are prepared to pay postage etc why can’t we buy and play programs from other countries? I recently bought an all-regions DVD player and now I can play programs from the USA, the UK and elsewhere. The DVD player cost me a whole $100. It’s pretty much paid for itself, as I’ve finally been able to watch movies that friends overseas have sent me.

    Reply
  261. I’m late to the party, but here’s a few I think are fabulous books into TV: The Jewel in the Crown, Little Dorrit and Our Mutual Friend. All of these are superb adaptations. I also enjoyed Daniel Deronda and The Forsythe Saga.

    Reply
  262. I’m late to the party, but here’s a few I think are fabulous books into TV: The Jewel in the Crown, Little Dorrit and Our Mutual Friend. All of these are superb adaptations. I also enjoyed Daniel Deronda and The Forsythe Saga.

    Reply
  263. I’m late to the party, but here’s a few I think are fabulous books into TV: The Jewel in the Crown, Little Dorrit and Our Mutual Friend. All of these are superb adaptations. I also enjoyed Daniel Deronda and The Forsythe Saga.

    Reply
  264. I’m late to the party, but here’s a few I think are fabulous books into TV: The Jewel in the Crown, Little Dorrit and Our Mutual Friend. All of these are superb adaptations. I also enjoyed Daniel Deronda and The Forsythe Saga.

    Reply
  265. I’m late to the party, but here’s a few I think are fabulous books into TV: The Jewel in the Crown, Little Dorrit and Our Mutual Friend. All of these are superb adaptations. I also enjoyed Daniel Deronda and The Forsythe Saga.

    Reply

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