Books & Bibliophiles

Cara/Andrea here, just back from a fabulous research trip to London. Alas, timing was such that I missed meeting up with Jo and Nicola for a Wench Tea Party, but it was still an amazing experience—but more on my travels in my next blog!

Radclifffe-camera Today I’m talking about libraries—I made a stop at my local branch the other day, intending to pick up a Harry Potter DVD and a biography on Casanova that I had read about. But as often happens when I walk by the display of new acquisitions, my gaze strayed and I found myself drawn to a lovely book entitled “The Library: An illustrated History.” How could I resist! (That’s a pic I took of the Radcliffe Camera, part of the Bodleian Library at Oxford, not my local branch!)

Tucking it under my arm, I hurried to the check-out, grinning like a Bedlamite. One of the things I love about libraries (and bookstores, though they are a more expensive delight) is that serendipitous discovery, that unlooked-for treasure that sends a happy little thrill coursing down my spine. Now some of my friends find that shopping for clothes or shoes lifts their spirits. But me, I’d much rather have a good book than a pair of bargain Manolo Blanicks (okay, maybe I’d like the book  AND the Blanicks.)

Oldest na book276 That said, “The Library: An Illustrated History,” by Stuart A. P. Murray and co-published by the American Library Association, proved to be a fun journey through the centuries, with plenty of offbeat digressions on the development of printing, paper, and the notable bibliophiles in history who were passionate about the written word.

According to the  ALA, Americans made 1.3 billion visits to libraries in 2008, and borrowed over 2 billion items. Now, I happen to love little tidbits of information like this. But I have to confess, though there were many modern fact and figures, the most interesting part of the book for me were the anecdotes from history. So, without further ado, here are some of the things I learned . . . 

“Library” derives from liber, the Latin word for book. The earliest known library was discovered during the 1970s in the ancient city Ebla, in modern-day Syria. Dating back to around 2500 BCE, it contained close to 20,000 clay tablets written in cuneiform, the earliest form of written language.

Library alex273 The Egyptians developed the first paper-like material (papyrus), which was used for elaborate scrolls. (The Greeks called papyrus rolls biblion, and the clay pots where they were stored bibliotheke—a place to keep books.) Using this new “technology” as well as clay tablets, they compiled the renowned ancient library at Alexandria. It is said that the library at Pergamum, in Asia Minor, began to rival Alexandria and so the Egyptians refused to export papyrus to them. Undaunted, Pergamum began to use calf, sheep and goat skin to write on—and so the Latin word for such material became pergamenum. Which explains our word “parchment.”

The Romans came up with the ‘codex’ form of book, in which scrolls were folded into “pages”. (Julius Caesar is credited with being the first to do so with his dispatches to Gaul.) This form evolved into cutting the folds, allowing for writing on both sides of the sheet. Stiff covers, usually of wood, were used to protect the pages, and thus we have the origins of our modern book. (Today, a codex refers to a manuscript from the Middle Ages or earlier.)

DukeHumfreyslibrary Theft of books has been a problem throughout the ages. In the Middle Ages, the monastic libraries took to chaining the most popular books to desks and lecterns. On my recent trip to Oxford, I visited the Bodleian Library and actually saw this in Duke Humfrey’s medieval library, a section that is still open to scholars today. (Nicola informed me that people who apply for research privileges must sign a pledge that includes a promises not to burn the books—the danger from candles were a huge threat in medieval times.) Because of the chains, the books must be shelved with the pages facing outward.

Book curses have also been employed (with questionable results.) One of my favorites is a Medieval Spanish warning: Him that stealeth or borroweth and returneth not this book, let it change into a serpent in his hand and rend him. Let him be struck by palsy and all his members blasted. Let bookworms gnaw his entrails and let the flames of hell consume him forever. (Uhhh, the nickel a day fine for overdue books at my local library seems quite mild in comparison.)

RB Cotton For me, one of the most interesting early bibliophiles was Sir Robert Bruce Cotton. A scholar and politician, he compiled a spectacular collection of books, coins and antiquities during the mid-1500s, including the original manuscript of Beowulf and the Lindisfarne Gospels, a seventh century illuminated manuscript from northern England.

180px-LindisfarneFol27rIncipitMatt The Cottonian Library used  a unique system of cataloguing its books. Fourteen bus
ts of famous Romans were placed atop the various bookshelves and cabinets, and each item of the collection was listed with the letter of its Roman (N for Nero, etc.) a letter for the shelf, and then a Roman numeral for where on the shelf it sat. In 1702, Cotton’s grandson bequeathed the collection to the state, and in the 1750s, the British Museum and Library took charge of it. I find it endearing that the British Library still keeps Cotton’s original books organized by his “Roman” system. (The Dewey Decimal Classification didn’t come into being until 1876.)

Library of congress277 Our Library of Congress was established in 1800, in the same act that authorized the transfer of government to Washington, DC. At first, it was, as the name implies, only for members of Congress. Thomas Jefferson, an avid bibliophile took a great interest in recommending acquisitions. When the nascent collection was burned to a crisp during the War of 1812, (Nicola, we forgive you Brits) Jefferson offered to sell Congress his private collection of 6,487 books (appraised at $23,950) to begin anew. Now, that’s one government expenditure that I heartily agree with!

230px-British_library_london One of the things that struck me as I read the book was the incredibly wide range of libraries there are around the world—from a traveling burro with a book sack slung over its back in rural Columbia to the dazzling splendor of the Vatican galleries, they come in all sizes and shapes. And some are artistic treasures in their own right. The contents are mind-boggling as well, from the broad scope of the New York Public Library to the innumerable arcane and eclectic specialized collections. Books, books, books—what a source of constant awe and delight! (here's my library . . . not quite as impressive as the sleek, modern new British Library shown above.) My-library

Now that you heard my “show and tell”, have you made any fun “finds” at the library recently? And have you visited a library, famous or otherwise, that simply awed you? I’ll never forget my first visit to the old British Library, where I saw the original manuscript for Jane Eyre on display.

135 thoughts on “Books & Bibliophiles”

  1. Andrea, I love libraries. If I hadn’t become a teacher I’d have been a librarian, I think. As a child libraries fed my voracious reading appetite and offered me the world on a metaphorical plate.
    Librarians, seeing my tastes, introduced me to new authors. It was a dare in a library from a school friend that prompted me to borrow my first Georgette Heyer book from the adult section, and that helped shaped me as the writer I am.
    As an undergraduate I did some research work for a professor in the State Library in Melbourne, under a huge dome, and later, when I went on to do my own research had access to old newspapers and archives with some splendid treasures. And librarians have helped me track down research materials for my current books. Librarians are heroic!
    But I think the most moving thing I ever saw on display in a library was an exhibition of pages from classic novels, hand written in spidery 19th century writing. Jane Austen included. Wonderful.

    Reply
  2. Andrea, I love libraries. If I hadn’t become a teacher I’d have been a librarian, I think. As a child libraries fed my voracious reading appetite and offered me the world on a metaphorical plate.
    Librarians, seeing my tastes, introduced me to new authors. It was a dare in a library from a school friend that prompted me to borrow my first Georgette Heyer book from the adult section, and that helped shaped me as the writer I am.
    As an undergraduate I did some research work for a professor in the State Library in Melbourne, under a huge dome, and later, when I went on to do my own research had access to old newspapers and archives with some splendid treasures. And librarians have helped me track down research materials for my current books. Librarians are heroic!
    But I think the most moving thing I ever saw on display in a library was an exhibition of pages from classic novels, hand written in spidery 19th century writing. Jane Austen included. Wonderful.

    Reply
  3. Andrea, I love libraries. If I hadn’t become a teacher I’d have been a librarian, I think. As a child libraries fed my voracious reading appetite and offered me the world on a metaphorical plate.
    Librarians, seeing my tastes, introduced me to new authors. It was a dare in a library from a school friend that prompted me to borrow my first Georgette Heyer book from the adult section, and that helped shaped me as the writer I am.
    As an undergraduate I did some research work for a professor in the State Library in Melbourne, under a huge dome, and later, when I went on to do my own research had access to old newspapers and archives with some splendid treasures. And librarians have helped me track down research materials for my current books. Librarians are heroic!
    But I think the most moving thing I ever saw on display in a library was an exhibition of pages from classic novels, hand written in spidery 19th century writing. Jane Austen included. Wonderful.

    Reply
  4. Andrea, I love libraries. If I hadn’t become a teacher I’d have been a librarian, I think. As a child libraries fed my voracious reading appetite and offered me the world on a metaphorical plate.
    Librarians, seeing my tastes, introduced me to new authors. It was a dare in a library from a school friend that prompted me to borrow my first Georgette Heyer book from the adult section, and that helped shaped me as the writer I am.
    As an undergraduate I did some research work for a professor in the State Library in Melbourne, under a huge dome, and later, when I went on to do my own research had access to old newspapers and archives with some splendid treasures. And librarians have helped me track down research materials for my current books. Librarians are heroic!
    But I think the most moving thing I ever saw on display in a library was an exhibition of pages from classic novels, hand written in spidery 19th century writing. Jane Austen included. Wonderful.

    Reply
  5. Andrea, I love libraries. If I hadn’t become a teacher I’d have been a librarian, I think. As a child libraries fed my voracious reading appetite and offered me the world on a metaphorical plate.
    Librarians, seeing my tastes, introduced me to new authors. It was a dare in a library from a school friend that prompted me to borrow my first Georgette Heyer book from the adult section, and that helped shaped me as the writer I am.
    As an undergraduate I did some research work for a professor in the State Library in Melbourne, under a huge dome, and later, when I went on to do my own research had access to old newspapers and archives with some splendid treasures. And librarians have helped me track down research materials for my current books. Librarians are heroic!
    But I think the most moving thing I ever saw on display in a library was an exhibition of pages from classic novels, hand written in spidery 19th century writing. Jane Austen included. Wonderful.

    Reply
  6. Sherrie, here. To me, libraries are hallowed ground, and I go there to worship the printed word. I love books so much that I’ve converted one bedroom in my house to a library, with floor-to-ceiling bookshelves on 3 walls, & desk & sofa on the 3rd wall. I also have multiple bookshelves in my dining room, living room, master bedroom, office, and even in the laundry room.
    One of my “fun finds” was the cache of Sotheby’s full-color catalogs I purchased for ten cents apiece at a library book sale. I took one look at the cache and bought the lot. For a writer, they are a priceless treasure trove of detailed photographs and descriptions of historical items (most of them Regency) such as snuffboxes, furniture, clothing, paintings, etc. The descriptions accompanying each photograph are very detailed. A writer/researcher’s delight.

    Reply
  7. Sherrie, here. To me, libraries are hallowed ground, and I go there to worship the printed word. I love books so much that I’ve converted one bedroom in my house to a library, with floor-to-ceiling bookshelves on 3 walls, & desk & sofa on the 3rd wall. I also have multiple bookshelves in my dining room, living room, master bedroom, office, and even in the laundry room.
    One of my “fun finds” was the cache of Sotheby’s full-color catalogs I purchased for ten cents apiece at a library book sale. I took one look at the cache and bought the lot. For a writer, they are a priceless treasure trove of detailed photographs and descriptions of historical items (most of them Regency) such as snuffboxes, furniture, clothing, paintings, etc. The descriptions accompanying each photograph are very detailed. A writer/researcher’s delight.

    Reply
  8. Sherrie, here. To me, libraries are hallowed ground, and I go there to worship the printed word. I love books so much that I’ve converted one bedroom in my house to a library, with floor-to-ceiling bookshelves on 3 walls, & desk & sofa on the 3rd wall. I also have multiple bookshelves in my dining room, living room, master bedroom, office, and even in the laundry room.
    One of my “fun finds” was the cache of Sotheby’s full-color catalogs I purchased for ten cents apiece at a library book sale. I took one look at the cache and bought the lot. For a writer, they are a priceless treasure trove of detailed photographs and descriptions of historical items (most of them Regency) such as snuffboxes, furniture, clothing, paintings, etc. The descriptions accompanying each photograph are very detailed. A writer/researcher’s delight.

    Reply
  9. Sherrie, here. To me, libraries are hallowed ground, and I go there to worship the printed word. I love books so much that I’ve converted one bedroom in my house to a library, with floor-to-ceiling bookshelves on 3 walls, & desk & sofa on the 3rd wall. I also have multiple bookshelves in my dining room, living room, master bedroom, office, and even in the laundry room.
    One of my “fun finds” was the cache of Sotheby’s full-color catalogs I purchased for ten cents apiece at a library book sale. I took one look at the cache and bought the lot. For a writer, they are a priceless treasure trove of detailed photographs and descriptions of historical items (most of them Regency) such as snuffboxes, furniture, clothing, paintings, etc. The descriptions accompanying each photograph are very detailed. A writer/researcher’s delight.

    Reply
  10. Sherrie, here. To me, libraries are hallowed ground, and I go there to worship the printed word. I love books so much that I’ve converted one bedroom in my house to a library, with floor-to-ceiling bookshelves on 3 walls, & desk & sofa on the 3rd wall. I also have multiple bookshelves in my dining room, living room, master bedroom, office, and even in the laundry room.
    One of my “fun finds” was the cache of Sotheby’s full-color catalogs I purchased for ten cents apiece at a library book sale. I took one look at the cache and bought the lot. For a writer, they are a priceless treasure trove of detailed photographs and descriptions of historical items (most of them Regency) such as snuffboxes, furniture, clothing, paintings, etc. The descriptions accompanying each photograph are very detailed. A writer/researcher’s delight.

    Reply
  11. Wonderful post! I’m lucky enough to work in a library, though it comes with 800+ teenagers.There’s nothing that tickles me more than putting books on display and having kids check them right out (no chains here). This week I put up the top 2009 Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) picks (plus Printz and their other award winners) and 1/3 of them are gone already.
    We’ve got a wonderful history section I’ve used for my own research—all the castle books came home with me for the summer.:)But some of my finds have been unpleasant—apple cores behind the books, crushed soda cans, half-eaten sandwiches, etc.Some people just don’t read the “No food or drink in the library” sign.

    Reply
  12. Wonderful post! I’m lucky enough to work in a library, though it comes with 800+ teenagers.There’s nothing that tickles me more than putting books on display and having kids check them right out (no chains here). This week I put up the top 2009 Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) picks (plus Printz and their other award winners) and 1/3 of them are gone already.
    We’ve got a wonderful history section I’ve used for my own research—all the castle books came home with me for the summer.:)But some of my finds have been unpleasant—apple cores behind the books, crushed soda cans, half-eaten sandwiches, etc.Some people just don’t read the “No food or drink in the library” sign.

    Reply
  13. Wonderful post! I’m lucky enough to work in a library, though it comes with 800+ teenagers.There’s nothing that tickles me more than putting books on display and having kids check them right out (no chains here). This week I put up the top 2009 Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) picks (plus Printz and their other award winners) and 1/3 of them are gone already.
    We’ve got a wonderful history section I’ve used for my own research—all the castle books came home with me for the summer.:)But some of my finds have been unpleasant—apple cores behind the books, crushed soda cans, half-eaten sandwiches, etc.Some people just don’t read the “No food or drink in the library” sign.

    Reply
  14. Wonderful post! I’m lucky enough to work in a library, though it comes with 800+ teenagers.There’s nothing that tickles me more than putting books on display and having kids check them right out (no chains here). This week I put up the top 2009 Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) picks (plus Printz and their other award winners) and 1/3 of them are gone already.
    We’ve got a wonderful history section I’ve used for my own research—all the castle books came home with me for the summer.:)But some of my finds have been unpleasant—apple cores behind the books, crushed soda cans, half-eaten sandwiches, etc.Some people just don’t read the “No food or drink in the library” sign.

    Reply
  15. Wonderful post! I’m lucky enough to work in a library, though it comes with 800+ teenagers.There’s nothing that tickles me more than putting books on display and having kids check them right out (no chains here). This week I put up the top 2009 Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) picks (plus Printz and their other award winners) and 1/3 of them are gone already.
    We’ve got a wonderful history section I’ve used for my own research—all the castle books came home with me for the summer.:)But some of my finds have been unpleasant—apple cores behind the books, crushed soda cans, half-eaten sandwiches, etc.Some people just don’t read the “No food or drink in the library” sign.

    Reply
  16. Oh, LOL on sneaking into the adult section of the library, Anne. I grew up in a small town, and while now they have a wonderful, large library, when i was a kid, the town library was in a room of our school library—and there was a sign: No Children Allowed. Well, I was a voracious reader and tired of the “children’s” selection, so I used to sneak in to look at the far more interesting books. I was VERY put out when they caught me trying to check out a Jacques Cousteau book on sharks and wouldn’t let me have it. I argued, and a call to my mother totally backed me up. After a long (and I take it rather stern) lecture on the duty to encourage intellectual curiosity, I won the right to check out adult books . . .within reason.

    Reply
  17. Oh, LOL on sneaking into the adult section of the library, Anne. I grew up in a small town, and while now they have a wonderful, large library, when i was a kid, the town library was in a room of our school library—and there was a sign: No Children Allowed. Well, I was a voracious reader and tired of the “children’s” selection, so I used to sneak in to look at the far more interesting books. I was VERY put out when they caught me trying to check out a Jacques Cousteau book on sharks and wouldn’t let me have it. I argued, and a call to my mother totally backed me up. After a long (and I take it rather stern) lecture on the duty to encourage intellectual curiosity, I won the right to check out adult books . . .within reason.

    Reply
  18. Oh, LOL on sneaking into the adult section of the library, Anne. I grew up in a small town, and while now they have a wonderful, large library, when i was a kid, the town library was in a room of our school library—and there was a sign: No Children Allowed. Well, I was a voracious reader and tired of the “children’s” selection, so I used to sneak in to look at the far more interesting books. I was VERY put out when they caught me trying to check out a Jacques Cousteau book on sharks and wouldn’t let me have it. I argued, and a call to my mother totally backed me up. After a long (and I take it rather stern) lecture on the duty to encourage intellectual curiosity, I won the right to check out adult books . . .within reason.

    Reply
  19. Oh, LOL on sneaking into the adult section of the library, Anne. I grew up in a small town, and while now they have a wonderful, large library, when i was a kid, the town library was in a room of our school library—and there was a sign: No Children Allowed. Well, I was a voracious reader and tired of the “children’s” selection, so I used to sneak in to look at the far more interesting books. I was VERY put out when they caught me trying to check out a Jacques Cousteau book on sharks and wouldn’t let me have it. I argued, and a call to my mother totally backed me up. After a long (and I take it rather stern) lecture on the duty to encourage intellectual curiosity, I won the right to check out adult books . . .within reason.

    Reply
  20. Oh, LOL on sneaking into the adult section of the library, Anne. I grew up in a small town, and while now they have a wonderful, large library, when i was a kid, the town library was in a room of our school library—and there was a sign: No Children Allowed. Well, I was a voracious reader and tired of the “children’s” selection, so I used to sneak in to look at the far more interesting books. I was VERY put out when they caught me trying to check out a Jacques Cousteau book on sharks and wouldn’t let me have it. I argued, and a call to my mother totally backed me up. After a long (and I take it rather stern) lecture on the duty to encourage intellectual curiosity, I won the right to check out adult books . . .within reason.

    Reply
  21. Maggie, like Anne I’m a little envious—being a librarian is high on my list, even if the job comes with 800 teenagers! How great of you to work at sparking their love of books and reading. I’m hoping that young people discover that curling up with a good book is even more fun than video games.

    Reply
  22. Maggie, like Anne I’m a little envious—being a librarian is high on my list, even if the job comes with 800 teenagers! How great of you to work at sparking their love of books and reading. I’m hoping that young people discover that curling up with a good book is even more fun than video games.

    Reply
  23. Maggie, like Anne I’m a little envious—being a librarian is high on my list, even if the job comes with 800 teenagers! How great of you to work at sparking their love of books and reading. I’m hoping that young people discover that curling up with a good book is even more fun than video games.

    Reply
  24. Maggie, like Anne I’m a little envious—being a librarian is high on my list, even if the job comes with 800 teenagers! How great of you to work at sparking their love of books and reading. I’m hoping that young people discover that curling up with a good book is even more fun than video games.

    Reply
  25. Maggie, like Anne I’m a little envious—being a librarian is high on my list, even if the job comes with 800 teenagers! How great of you to work at sparking their love of books and reading. I’m hoping that young people discover that curling up with a good book is even more fun than video games.

    Reply
  26. Sherrie,
    I’ve always loved libraries too. They are places of wonderment and a sanctuary when I am feeling down—the sight of all the amazing choices—fiction, history, biographies, humor, how-tos—never fails to lift my spirits. When I was in college, there was a fabulous section tucked away in the stacks of the main library called “The Arts of the Book” collection. I made friends with the curator and spent hours up there perusing the assorted collections of ephemera (bookplates, hand-printed private press books,broadsides, etc) and watch the bookbinders restoring rare books. It was heaven!

    Reply
  27. Sherrie,
    I’ve always loved libraries too. They are places of wonderment and a sanctuary when I am feeling down—the sight of all the amazing choices—fiction, history, biographies, humor, how-tos—never fails to lift my spirits. When I was in college, there was a fabulous section tucked away in the stacks of the main library called “The Arts of the Book” collection. I made friends with the curator and spent hours up there perusing the assorted collections of ephemera (bookplates, hand-printed private press books,broadsides, etc) and watch the bookbinders restoring rare books. It was heaven!

    Reply
  28. Sherrie,
    I’ve always loved libraries too. They are places of wonderment and a sanctuary when I am feeling down—the sight of all the amazing choices—fiction, history, biographies, humor, how-tos—never fails to lift my spirits. When I was in college, there was a fabulous section tucked away in the stacks of the main library called “The Arts of the Book” collection. I made friends with the curator and spent hours up there perusing the assorted collections of ephemera (bookplates, hand-printed private press books,broadsides, etc) and watch the bookbinders restoring rare books. It was heaven!

    Reply
  29. Sherrie,
    I’ve always loved libraries too. They are places of wonderment and a sanctuary when I am feeling down—the sight of all the amazing choices—fiction, history, biographies, humor, how-tos—never fails to lift my spirits. When I was in college, there was a fabulous section tucked away in the stacks of the main library called “The Arts of the Book” collection. I made friends with the curator and spent hours up there perusing the assorted collections of ephemera (bookplates, hand-printed private press books,broadsides, etc) and watch the bookbinders restoring rare books. It was heaven!

    Reply
  30. Sherrie,
    I’ve always loved libraries too. They are places of wonderment and a sanctuary when I am feeling down—the sight of all the amazing choices—fiction, history, biographies, humor, how-tos—never fails to lift my spirits. When I was in college, there was a fabulous section tucked away in the stacks of the main library called “The Arts of the Book” collection. I made friends with the curator and spent hours up there perusing the assorted collections of ephemera (bookplates, hand-printed private press books,broadsides, etc) and watch the bookbinders restoring rare books. It was heaven!

    Reply
  31. Oh, I love libraries. Ever since I was a kid, I’d go to the library and take out stacks of books. I read novels and science books, mainly.
    A few years ago I discovered interlibrary loans, which widened my access to all 40 libraries in the local system. And then I got a library card from a library in another system. Now I can get books from most of the state. Readers’ paradise!
    I discovered all the Wenches at the library. Wonderful places, libraries.

    Reply
  32. Oh, I love libraries. Ever since I was a kid, I’d go to the library and take out stacks of books. I read novels and science books, mainly.
    A few years ago I discovered interlibrary loans, which widened my access to all 40 libraries in the local system. And then I got a library card from a library in another system. Now I can get books from most of the state. Readers’ paradise!
    I discovered all the Wenches at the library. Wonderful places, libraries.

    Reply
  33. Oh, I love libraries. Ever since I was a kid, I’d go to the library and take out stacks of books. I read novels and science books, mainly.
    A few years ago I discovered interlibrary loans, which widened my access to all 40 libraries in the local system. And then I got a library card from a library in another system. Now I can get books from most of the state. Readers’ paradise!
    I discovered all the Wenches at the library. Wonderful places, libraries.

    Reply
  34. Oh, I love libraries. Ever since I was a kid, I’d go to the library and take out stacks of books. I read novels and science books, mainly.
    A few years ago I discovered interlibrary loans, which widened my access to all 40 libraries in the local system. And then I got a library card from a library in another system. Now I can get books from most of the state. Readers’ paradise!
    I discovered all the Wenches at the library. Wonderful places, libraries.

    Reply
  35. Oh, I love libraries. Ever since I was a kid, I’d go to the library and take out stacks of books. I read novels and science books, mainly.
    A few years ago I discovered interlibrary loans, which widened my access to all 40 libraries in the local system. And then I got a library card from a library in another system. Now I can get books from most of the state. Readers’ paradise!
    I discovered all the Wenches at the library. Wonderful places, libraries.

    Reply
  36. Sherrie, I’m so jealous! I’d love to have had the chance to purchase the Sotheby’s cache. How interesting and I can imagine how detailed the descriptions are. I auctioned a few things through a large house in Chicago when my aunt passed and the amount of detail I had to give and they added to was amazing.
    I ‘outgrew’ the library at my elementary school in third grade. I was going to the local high school and city library to check out books by the fifth grade that I would never have had access to otherwise. And I too had to fight to take out ‘adult’ books, though what they considered adult at the time, like the Cousteau, would be required reading in many classrooms now.
    Alas, my local library no longer likes me. I took out a stack of books for a project and returned them to the outdoor return bin (something I have since avoided at all cost) and received a notice that the Stephen Hawking book was not returned. After many months of arguing with them (it was very expensive) I found it on the shelf, right where it belongs. By that time though, I’d lost my library privileges. *sigh* I now buy the books I need from used bookstores, etc. The older the copy, the better.

    Reply
  37. Sherrie, I’m so jealous! I’d love to have had the chance to purchase the Sotheby’s cache. How interesting and I can imagine how detailed the descriptions are. I auctioned a few things through a large house in Chicago when my aunt passed and the amount of detail I had to give and they added to was amazing.
    I ‘outgrew’ the library at my elementary school in third grade. I was going to the local high school and city library to check out books by the fifth grade that I would never have had access to otherwise. And I too had to fight to take out ‘adult’ books, though what they considered adult at the time, like the Cousteau, would be required reading in many classrooms now.
    Alas, my local library no longer likes me. I took out a stack of books for a project and returned them to the outdoor return bin (something I have since avoided at all cost) and received a notice that the Stephen Hawking book was not returned. After many months of arguing with them (it was very expensive) I found it on the shelf, right where it belongs. By that time though, I’d lost my library privileges. *sigh* I now buy the books I need from used bookstores, etc. The older the copy, the better.

    Reply
  38. Sherrie, I’m so jealous! I’d love to have had the chance to purchase the Sotheby’s cache. How interesting and I can imagine how detailed the descriptions are. I auctioned a few things through a large house in Chicago when my aunt passed and the amount of detail I had to give and they added to was amazing.
    I ‘outgrew’ the library at my elementary school in third grade. I was going to the local high school and city library to check out books by the fifth grade that I would never have had access to otherwise. And I too had to fight to take out ‘adult’ books, though what they considered adult at the time, like the Cousteau, would be required reading in many classrooms now.
    Alas, my local library no longer likes me. I took out a stack of books for a project and returned them to the outdoor return bin (something I have since avoided at all cost) and received a notice that the Stephen Hawking book was not returned. After many months of arguing with them (it was very expensive) I found it on the shelf, right where it belongs. By that time though, I’d lost my library privileges. *sigh* I now buy the books I need from used bookstores, etc. The older the copy, the better.

    Reply
  39. Sherrie, I’m so jealous! I’d love to have had the chance to purchase the Sotheby’s cache. How interesting and I can imagine how detailed the descriptions are. I auctioned a few things through a large house in Chicago when my aunt passed and the amount of detail I had to give and they added to was amazing.
    I ‘outgrew’ the library at my elementary school in third grade. I was going to the local high school and city library to check out books by the fifth grade that I would never have had access to otherwise. And I too had to fight to take out ‘adult’ books, though what they considered adult at the time, like the Cousteau, would be required reading in many classrooms now.
    Alas, my local library no longer likes me. I took out a stack of books for a project and returned them to the outdoor return bin (something I have since avoided at all cost) and received a notice that the Stephen Hawking book was not returned. After many months of arguing with them (it was very expensive) I found it on the shelf, right where it belongs. By that time though, I’d lost my library privileges. *sigh* I now buy the books I need from used bookstores, etc. The older the copy, the better.

    Reply
  40. Sherrie, I’m so jealous! I’d love to have had the chance to purchase the Sotheby’s cache. How interesting and I can imagine how detailed the descriptions are. I auctioned a few things through a large house in Chicago when my aunt passed and the amount of detail I had to give and they added to was amazing.
    I ‘outgrew’ the library at my elementary school in third grade. I was going to the local high school and city library to check out books by the fifth grade that I would never have had access to otherwise. And I too had to fight to take out ‘adult’ books, though what they considered adult at the time, like the Cousteau, would be required reading in many classrooms now.
    Alas, my local library no longer likes me. I took out a stack of books for a project and returned them to the outdoor return bin (something I have since avoided at all cost) and received a notice that the Stephen Hawking book was not returned. After many months of arguing with them (it was very expensive) I found it on the shelf, right where it belongs. By that time though, I’d lost my library privileges. *sigh* I now buy the books I need from used bookstores, etc. The older the copy, the better.

    Reply
  41. Cara/Andrea, talking about libraries here is like feeding crack cocaine to addicts. *g* I can see this blog done as an animated cartoon dance through the history of libraries.
    I particularly like the burro with the book sack. In my book Angel Rogue, the American heroine was raised by a father who was a traveling book peddler in New England. They’d take books to remove farms, staying a night or two and talking about books before moving on. He had annual rounds of places he visited. Needless to say, this really happened. Wonderful!
    Mary Jo, who house looks a lot like Sherrie’s bookwise

    Reply
  42. Cara/Andrea, talking about libraries here is like feeding crack cocaine to addicts. *g* I can see this blog done as an animated cartoon dance through the history of libraries.
    I particularly like the burro with the book sack. In my book Angel Rogue, the American heroine was raised by a father who was a traveling book peddler in New England. They’d take books to remove farms, staying a night or two and talking about books before moving on. He had annual rounds of places he visited. Needless to say, this really happened. Wonderful!
    Mary Jo, who house looks a lot like Sherrie’s bookwise

    Reply
  43. Cara/Andrea, talking about libraries here is like feeding crack cocaine to addicts. *g* I can see this blog done as an animated cartoon dance through the history of libraries.
    I particularly like the burro with the book sack. In my book Angel Rogue, the American heroine was raised by a father who was a traveling book peddler in New England. They’d take books to remove farms, staying a night or two and talking about books before moving on. He had annual rounds of places he visited. Needless to say, this really happened. Wonderful!
    Mary Jo, who house looks a lot like Sherrie’s bookwise

    Reply
  44. Cara/Andrea, talking about libraries here is like feeding crack cocaine to addicts. *g* I can see this blog done as an animated cartoon dance through the history of libraries.
    I particularly like the burro with the book sack. In my book Angel Rogue, the American heroine was raised by a father who was a traveling book peddler in New England. They’d take books to remove farms, staying a night or two and talking about books before moving on. He had annual rounds of places he visited. Needless to say, this really happened. Wonderful!
    Mary Jo, who house looks a lot like Sherrie’s bookwise

    Reply
  45. Cara/Andrea, talking about libraries here is like feeding crack cocaine to addicts. *g* I can see this blog done as an animated cartoon dance through the history of libraries.
    I particularly like the burro with the book sack. In my book Angel Rogue, the American heroine was raised by a father who was a traveling book peddler in New England. They’d take books to remove farms, staying a night or two and talking about books before moving on. He had annual rounds of places he visited. Needless to say, this really happened. Wonderful!
    Mary Jo, who house looks a lot like Sherrie’s bookwise

    Reply
  46. Theo, that’s a terrible story about your local branch—you should deinitely show them the book and ask for your card back (along with an apology!) EVERYONE should have a library card. Free access to books is one of the fundamental things that makes this country so great

    Reply
  47. Theo, that’s a terrible story about your local branch—you should deinitely show them the book and ask for your card back (along with an apology!) EVERYONE should have a library card. Free access to books is one of the fundamental things that makes this country so great

    Reply
  48. Theo, that’s a terrible story about your local branch—you should deinitely show them the book and ask for your card back (along with an apology!) EVERYONE should have a library card. Free access to books is one of the fundamental things that makes this country so great

    Reply
  49. Theo, that’s a terrible story about your local branch—you should deinitely show them the book and ask for your card back (along with an apology!) EVERYONE should have a library card. Free access to books is one of the fundamental things that makes this country so great

    Reply
  50. Theo, that’s a terrible story about your local branch—you should deinitely show them the book and ask for your card back (along with an apology!) EVERYONE should have a library card. Free access to books is one of the fundamental things that makes this country so great

    Reply
  51. Oh, Mary Jo, I remember Angel Rogue and the book peddling father!
    The book I blogged about has a picture of the burro-library—he/she has a very snazzy saddle blanket with the sack attached. I’m sure the villagers see it from miles away and start gathering to peruse the New arrivals

    Reply
  52. Oh, Mary Jo, I remember Angel Rogue and the book peddling father!
    The book I blogged about has a picture of the burro-library—he/she has a very snazzy saddle blanket with the sack attached. I’m sure the villagers see it from miles away and start gathering to peruse the New arrivals

    Reply
  53. Oh, Mary Jo, I remember Angel Rogue and the book peddling father!
    The book I blogged about has a picture of the burro-library—he/she has a very snazzy saddle blanket with the sack attached. I’m sure the villagers see it from miles away and start gathering to peruse the New arrivals

    Reply
  54. Oh, Mary Jo, I remember Angel Rogue and the book peddling father!
    The book I blogged about has a picture of the burro-library—he/she has a very snazzy saddle blanket with the sack attached. I’m sure the villagers see it from miles away and start gathering to peruse the New arrivals

    Reply
  55. Oh, Mary Jo, I remember Angel Rogue and the book peddling father!
    The book I blogged about has a picture of the burro-library—he/she has a very snazzy saddle blanket with the sack attached. I’m sure the villagers see it from miles away and start gathering to peruse the New arrivals

    Reply
  56. I love libraries. Like a number of others, when young I had to fight to check out books considered too old for me. My mother argued forcefully that if I could read it, I should be allowed to take it out. Today, unfortunately, the DC public libraries are not very romance friendly. Much to my sorrow, the one branch that had a decent collection sold them as used books when the library was closed for renovation.
    Because I live in Washington, DC, I get to take advantage of Thomas Jefferson’s largesse. Nowadays anyone can read a book in the LOC, but I think you need to be a researcher or work for Congress to actually take one offsite. I got a friend who works for the Senate to check out Diana Norman’s “FitzEmpress Law” for me. It’s OOP and very expensive to buy, so I was grateful I got to read it for free — my tax dollars at work!

    Reply
  57. I love libraries. Like a number of others, when young I had to fight to check out books considered too old for me. My mother argued forcefully that if I could read it, I should be allowed to take it out. Today, unfortunately, the DC public libraries are not very romance friendly. Much to my sorrow, the one branch that had a decent collection sold them as used books when the library was closed for renovation.
    Because I live in Washington, DC, I get to take advantage of Thomas Jefferson’s largesse. Nowadays anyone can read a book in the LOC, but I think you need to be a researcher or work for Congress to actually take one offsite. I got a friend who works for the Senate to check out Diana Norman’s “FitzEmpress Law” for me. It’s OOP and very expensive to buy, so I was grateful I got to read it for free — my tax dollars at work!

    Reply
  58. I love libraries. Like a number of others, when young I had to fight to check out books considered too old for me. My mother argued forcefully that if I could read it, I should be allowed to take it out. Today, unfortunately, the DC public libraries are not very romance friendly. Much to my sorrow, the one branch that had a decent collection sold them as used books when the library was closed for renovation.
    Because I live in Washington, DC, I get to take advantage of Thomas Jefferson’s largesse. Nowadays anyone can read a book in the LOC, but I think you need to be a researcher or work for Congress to actually take one offsite. I got a friend who works for the Senate to check out Diana Norman’s “FitzEmpress Law” for me. It’s OOP and very expensive to buy, so I was grateful I got to read it for free — my tax dollars at work!

    Reply
  59. I love libraries. Like a number of others, when young I had to fight to check out books considered too old for me. My mother argued forcefully that if I could read it, I should be allowed to take it out. Today, unfortunately, the DC public libraries are not very romance friendly. Much to my sorrow, the one branch that had a decent collection sold them as used books when the library was closed for renovation.
    Because I live in Washington, DC, I get to take advantage of Thomas Jefferson’s largesse. Nowadays anyone can read a book in the LOC, but I think you need to be a researcher or work for Congress to actually take one offsite. I got a friend who works for the Senate to check out Diana Norman’s “FitzEmpress Law” for me. It’s OOP and very expensive to buy, so I was grateful I got to read it for free — my tax dollars at work!

    Reply
  60. I love libraries. Like a number of others, when young I had to fight to check out books considered too old for me. My mother argued forcefully that if I could read it, I should be allowed to take it out. Today, unfortunately, the DC public libraries are not very romance friendly. Much to my sorrow, the one branch that had a decent collection sold them as used books when the library was closed for renovation.
    Because I live in Washington, DC, I get to take advantage of Thomas Jefferson’s largesse. Nowadays anyone can read a book in the LOC, but I think you need to be a researcher or work for Congress to actually take one offsite. I got a friend who works for the Senate to check out Diana Norman’s “FitzEmpress Law” for me. It’s OOP and very expensive to buy, so I was grateful I got to read it for free — my tax dollars at work!

    Reply
  61. On. lucky you, Susan/DC to be close to the Library of Congress. I’ve heard they have an amazing collection of folk song recordings and other oral histories—yet another wonderful way to preserve the past.

    Reply
  62. On. lucky you, Susan/DC to be close to the Library of Congress. I’ve heard they have an amazing collection of folk song recordings and other oral histories—yet another wonderful way to preserve the past.

    Reply
  63. On. lucky you, Susan/DC to be close to the Library of Congress. I’ve heard they have an amazing collection of folk song recordings and other oral histories—yet another wonderful way to preserve the past.

    Reply
  64. On. lucky you, Susan/DC to be close to the Library of Congress. I’ve heard they have an amazing collection of folk song recordings and other oral histories—yet another wonderful way to preserve the past.

    Reply
  65. On. lucky you, Susan/DC to be close to the Library of Congress. I’ve heard they have an amazing collection of folk song recordings and other oral histories—yet another wonderful way to preserve the past.

    Reply
  66. I like libraries. That said, I will say that it has been several years since I’ve been in one. Mostly because I’ll buy my own books.
    I remember my first library. Went as a group in 2nd grade. One of the Carnigie(sp?) two story buildings, Kids below and adults above. It was a great day when I went up the stairs, mostly to read the New Yorker cartoons, well, books too.
    I did visit the National Library of Congress as a Sailor in WWll.
    Currently reading “A Gentle Madness” by Nicholas Basbanes. Its about famous Bibliophiles and their collections. Quite interesting.

    Reply
  67. I like libraries. That said, I will say that it has been several years since I’ve been in one. Mostly because I’ll buy my own books.
    I remember my first library. Went as a group in 2nd grade. One of the Carnigie(sp?) two story buildings, Kids below and adults above. It was a great day when I went up the stairs, mostly to read the New Yorker cartoons, well, books too.
    I did visit the National Library of Congress as a Sailor in WWll.
    Currently reading “A Gentle Madness” by Nicholas Basbanes. Its about famous Bibliophiles and their collections. Quite interesting.

    Reply
  68. I like libraries. That said, I will say that it has been several years since I’ve been in one. Mostly because I’ll buy my own books.
    I remember my first library. Went as a group in 2nd grade. One of the Carnigie(sp?) two story buildings, Kids below and adults above. It was a great day when I went up the stairs, mostly to read the New Yorker cartoons, well, books too.
    I did visit the National Library of Congress as a Sailor in WWll.
    Currently reading “A Gentle Madness” by Nicholas Basbanes. Its about famous Bibliophiles and their collections. Quite interesting.

    Reply
  69. I like libraries. That said, I will say that it has been several years since I’ve been in one. Mostly because I’ll buy my own books.
    I remember my first library. Went as a group in 2nd grade. One of the Carnigie(sp?) two story buildings, Kids below and adults above. It was a great day when I went up the stairs, mostly to read the New Yorker cartoons, well, books too.
    I did visit the National Library of Congress as a Sailor in WWll.
    Currently reading “A Gentle Madness” by Nicholas Basbanes. Its about famous Bibliophiles and their collections. Quite interesting.

    Reply
  70. I like libraries. That said, I will say that it has been several years since I’ve been in one. Mostly because I’ll buy my own books.
    I remember my first library. Went as a group in 2nd grade. One of the Carnigie(sp?) two story buildings, Kids below and adults above. It was a great day when I went up the stairs, mostly to read the New Yorker cartoons, well, books too.
    I did visit the National Library of Congress as a Sailor in WWll.
    Currently reading “A Gentle Madness” by Nicholas Basbanes. Its about famous Bibliophiles and their collections. Quite interesting.

    Reply
  71. Michelle, the Mariners Museum sounds fascinating. I love seeing the prints and printed matter in a library’s collection. My college library had the world’s biggest collection of playing cards (including tarot) and I remember a huge exhibit they put on—very cool! I’m still toying with how to use the info (I still have the catalogue) in one of my books.

    Reply
  72. Michelle, the Mariners Museum sounds fascinating. I love seeing the prints and printed matter in a library’s collection. My college library had the world’s biggest collection of playing cards (including tarot) and I remember a huge exhibit they put on—very cool! I’m still toying with how to use the info (I still have the catalogue) in one of my books.

    Reply
  73. Michelle, the Mariners Museum sounds fascinating. I love seeing the prints and printed matter in a library’s collection. My college library had the world’s biggest collection of playing cards (including tarot) and I remember a huge exhibit they put on—very cool! I’m still toying with how to use the info (I still have the catalogue) in one of my books.

    Reply
  74. Michelle, the Mariners Museum sounds fascinating. I love seeing the prints and printed matter in a library’s collection. My college library had the world’s biggest collection of playing cards (including tarot) and I remember a huge exhibit they put on—very cool! I’m still toying with how to use the info (I still have the catalogue) in one of my books.

    Reply
  75. Michelle, the Mariners Museum sounds fascinating. I love seeing the prints and printed matter in a library’s collection. My college library had the world’s biggest collection of playing cards (including tarot) and I remember a huge exhibit they put on—very cool! I’m still toying with how to use the info (I still have the catalogue) in one of my books.

    Reply
  76. Thanks for sharing, Louis. The book I blogged about mentioned that Carnegie was a huge patron of public libraries and many cities around the country owe their lovely buildings to him. And thanks for the heads-up on “A Gentle Madness.”I have been meaning to read it and now have it on my list for my next library visit.

    Reply
  77. Thanks for sharing, Louis. The book I blogged about mentioned that Carnegie was a huge patron of public libraries and many cities around the country owe their lovely buildings to him. And thanks for the heads-up on “A Gentle Madness.”I have been meaning to read it and now have it on my list for my next library visit.

    Reply
  78. Thanks for sharing, Louis. The book I blogged about mentioned that Carnegie was a huge patron of public libraries and many cities around the country owe their lovely buildings to him. And thanks for the heads-up on “A Gentle Madness.”I have been meaning to read it and now have it on my list for my next library visit.

    Reply
  79. Thanks for sharing, Louis. The book I blogged about mentioned that Carnegie was a huge patron of public libraries and many cities around the country owe their lovely buildings to him. And thanks for the heads-up on “A Gentle Madness.”I have been meaning to read it and now have it on my list for my next library visit.

    Reply
  80. Thanks for sharing, Louis. The book I blogged about mentioned that Carnegie was a huge patron of public libraries and many cities around the country owe their lovely buildings to him. And thanks for the heads-up on “A Gentle Madness.”I have been meaning to read it and now have it on my list for my next library visit.

    Reply
  81. Thank you for a delightful and informative post. I have always loved libraries and visit them whenever we travel. I am lucky enough to work at one – a small county library that is located in a 1925 railroad station. I’ve printed off your post to take to work and share with my coworkers on Monday. Will have to check out this book to see about getting it for our library. Will have to restrain myself from getting it for myself. My home library is overly full already – 20+ bookcases full and 40 boxes waiting to be unpacked. My poor husband thought my working at a library would curb my book buying. All it did was introduce me to more books and authors I just had to have..

    Reply
  82. Thank you for a delightful and informative post. I have always loved libraries and visit them whenever we travel. I am lucky enough to work at one – a small county library that is located in a 1925 railroad station. I’ve printed off your post to take to work and share with my coworkers on Monday. Will have to check out this book to see about getting it for our library. Will have to restrain myself from getting it for myself. My home library is overly full already – 20+ bookcases full and 40 boxes waiting to be unpacked. My poor husband thought my working at a library would curb my book buying. All it did was introduce me to more books and authors I just had to have..

    Reply
  83. Thank you for a delightful and informative post. I have always loved libraries and visit them whenever we travel. I am lucky enough to work at one – a small county library that is located in a 1925 railroad station. I’ve printed off your post to take to work and share with my coworkers on Monday. Will have to check out this book to see about getting it for our library. Will have to restrain myself from getting it for myself. My home library is overly full already – 20+ bookcases full and 40 boxes waiting to be unpacked. My poor husband thought my working at a library would curb my book buying. All it did was introduce me to more books and authors I just had to have..

    Reply
  84. Thank you for a delightful and informative post. I have always loved libraries and visit them whenever we travel. I am lucky enough to work at one – a small county library that is located in a 1925 railroad station. I’ve printed off your post to take to work and share with my coworkers on Monday. Will have to check out this book to see about getting it for our library. Will have to restrain myself from getting it for myself. My home library is overly full already – 20+ bookcases full and 40 boxes waiting to be unpacked. My poor husband thought my working at a library would curb my book buying. All it did was introduce me to more books and authors I just had to have..

    Reply
  85. Thank you for a delightful and informative post. I have always loved libraries and visit them whenever we travel. I am lucky enough to work at one – a small county library that is located in a 1925 railroad station. I’ve printed off your post to take to work and share with my coworkers on Monday. Will have to check out this book to see about getting it for our library. Will have to restrain myself from getting it for myself. My home library is overly full already – 20+ bookcases full and 40 boxes waiting to be unpacked. My poor husband thought my working at a library would curb my book buying. All it did was introduce me to more books and authors I just had to have..

    Reply
  86. Lucky you, Patricia! The train station sounds delightful—I love quirky spaces. One of my local libraries is the Pequot Library, built in 1893 by the noted American architect Robert Robertson on the site of the mansion of it benefactors. It still has many of the ornate original details and is a joy to enter. (It also houses a great rare book collection, again due to its orginal patrons.)
    I’m glad you enjoyed the post, and hope your colleagues find it fun too. (And I would definitely recommend the book for your library.)

    Reply
  87. Lucky you, Patricia! The train station sounds delightful—I love quirky spaces. One of my local libraries is the Pequot Library, built in 1893 by the noted American architect Robert Robertson on the site of the mansion of it benefactors. It still has many of the ornate original details and is a joy to enter. (It also houses a great rare book collection, again due to its orginal patrons.)
    I’m glad you enjoyed the post, and hope your colleagues find it fun too. (And I would definitely recommend the book for your library.)

    Reply
  88. Lucky you, Patricia! The train station sounds delightful—I love quirky spaces. One of my local libraries is the Pequot Library, built in 1893 by the noted American architect Robert Robertson on the site of the mansion of it benefactors. It still has many of the ornate original details and is a joy to enter. (It also houses a great rare book collection, again due to its orginal patrons.)
    I’m glad you enjoyed the post, and hope your colleagues find it fun too. (And I would definitely recommend the book for your library.)

    Reply
  89. Lucky you, Patricia! The train station sounds delightful—I love quirky spaces. One of my local libraries is the Pequot Library, built in 1893 by the noted American architect Robert Robertson on the site of the mansion of it benefactors. It still has many of the ornate original details and is a joy to enter. (It also houses a great rare book collection, again due to its orginal patrons.)
    I’m glad you enjoyed the post, and hope your colleagues find it fun too. (And I would definitely recommend the book for your library.)

    Reply
  90. Lucky you, Patricia! The train station sounds delightful—I love quirky spaces. One of my local libraries is the Pequot Library, built in 1893 by the noted American architect Robert Robertson on the site of the mansion of it benefactors. It still has many of the ornate original details and is a joy to enter. (It also houses a great rare book collection, again due to its orginal patrons.)
    I’m glad you enjoyed the post, and hope your colleagues find it fun too. (And I would definitely recommend the book for your library.)

    Reply
  91. Obviously, all this talk of libraries has hit a nerve close to your readers’ hearts! 🙂
    In May, I had a delightful trip to Ireland, Scotland and England. In Dublin, I got to see the Book of Kells and the gorgeous book room at Trinity College, Dublin. The smell of old books was like a warm welcome on a rainy day. And to see the Book of Kells, even under glass, was a huge thrill. On this trip, I also had my first visit to the British Library. I could have spent the whole day in there! Original manuscripts from Jane Austen, Mozart, the Magna Carta, etc. Incredible.
    My dad and husband are bibliophiles so I fit right in. We enjoy our “gentle madness.” We’re always a little afraid that the floors will cave under the weight of all those books, but it’s worth the risk. 🙂

    Reply
  92. Obviously, all this talk of libraries has hit a nerve close to your readers’ hearts! 🙂
    In May, I had a delightful trip to Ireland, Scotland and England. In Dublin, I got to see the Book of Kells and the gorgeous book room at Trinity College, Dublin. The smell of old books was like a warm welcome on a rainy day. And to see the Book of Kells, even under glass, was a huge thrill. On this trip, I also had my first visit to the British Library. I could have spent the whole day in there! Original manuscripts from Jane Austen, Mozart, the Magna Carta, etc. Incredible.
    My dad and husband are bibliophiles so I fit right in. We enjoy our “gentle madness.” We’re always a little afraid that the floors will cave under the weight of all those books, but it’s worth the risk. 🙂

    Reply
  93. Obviously, all this talk of libraries has hit a nerve close to your readers’ hearts! 🙂
    In May, I had a delightful trip to Ireland, Scotland and England. In Dublin, I got to see the Book of Kells and the gorgeous book room at Trinity College, Dublin. The smell of old books was like a warm welcome on a rainy day. And to see the Book of Kells, even under glass, was a huge thrill. On this trip, I also had my first visit to the British Library. I could have spent the whole day in there! Original manuscripts from Jane Austen, Mozart, the Magna Carta, etc. Incredible.
    My dad and husband are bibliophiles so I fit right in. We enjoy our “gentle madness.” We’re always a little afraid that the floors will cave under the weight of all those books, but it’s worth the risk. 🙂

    Reply
  94. Obviously, all this talk of libraries has hit a nerve close to your readers’ hearts! 🙂
    In May, I had a delightful trip to Ireland, Scotland and England. In Dublin, I got to see the Book of Kells and the gorgeous book room at Trinity College, Dublin. The smell of old books was like a warm welcome on a rainy day. And to see the Book of Kells, even under glass, was a huge thrill. On this trip, I also had my first visit to the British Library. I could have spent the whole day in there! Original manuscripts from Jane Austen, Mozart, the Magna Carta, etc. Incredible.
    My dad and husband are bibliophiles so I fit right in. We enjoy our “gentle madness.” We’re always a little afraid that the floors will cave under the weight of all those books, but it’s worth the risk. 🙂

    Reply
  95. Obviously, all this talk of libraries has hit a nerve close to your readers’ hearts! 🙂
    In May, I had a delightful trip to Ireland, Scotland and England. In Dublin, I got to see the Book of Kells and the gorgeous book room at Trinity College, Dublin. The smell of old books was like a warm welcome on a rainy day. And to see the Book of Kells, even under glass, was a huge thrill. On this trip, I also had my first visit to the British Library. I could have spent the whole day in there! Original manuscripts from Jane Austen, Mozart, the Magna Carta, etc. Incredible.
    My dad and husband are bibliophiles so I fit right in. We enjoy our “gentle madness.” We’re always a little afraid that the floors will cave under the weight of all those books, but it’s worth the risk. 🙂

    Reply
  96. Anne, the Book of Kells is high on my To Be Seen list. And the display room of the British Library, with its wealth of treasures, is always a a favorite stop when I am in London. I’m afraid my madness is more than a gentle one

    Reply
  97. Anne, the Book of Kells is high on my To Be Seen list. And the display room of the British Library, with its wealth of treasures, is always a a favorite stop when I am in London. I’m afraid my madness is more than a gentle one

    Reply
  98. Anne, the Book of Kells is high on my To Be Seen list. And the display room of the British Library, with its wealth of treasures, is always a a favorite stop when I am in London. I’m afraid my madness is more than a gentle one

    Reply
  99. Anne, the Book of Kells is high on my To Be Seen list. And the display room of the British Library, with its wealth of treasures, is always a a favorite stop when I am in London. I’m afraid my madness is more than a gentle one

    Reply
  100. Anne, the Book of Kells is high on my To Be Seen list. And the display room of the British Library, with its wealth of treasures, is always a a favorite stop when I am in London. I’m afraid my madness is more than a gentle one

    Reply
  101. Much belated post, but I think you would love to look at this book.
    DeLaubier, Guillaume The Most Beautiful Libraries in the World Harry N. Abrams 2003
    It is basically a picture book of some of the most gorgeous libraries. Many of them are baroque and it is amazing what they did with marble, gilt and cherubim. My sister lives in Southport and won’t let me in the Pequot Library. She knows I will never resurface. (I am also banned from the multistory block long Barnes and Noble in Manhattan.)
    If you can enjoy books virtually, the British Library has “books” online that you actually flip the pages. I think the Lindesfarne gospel is there as well as the original Alice in Wonderland. The Library of Congress has most of their folk music collection online now.

    Reply
  102. Much belated post, but I think you would love to look at this book.
    DeLaubier, Guillaume The Most Beautiful Libraries in the World Harry N. Abrams 2003
    It is basically a picture book of some of the most gorgeous libraries. Many of them are baroque and it is amazing what they did with marble, gilt and cherubim. My sister lives in Southport and won’t let me in the Pequot Library. She knows I will never resurface. (I am also banned from the multistory block long Barnes and Noble in Manhattan.)
    If you can enjoy books virtually, the British Library has “books” online that you actually flip the pages. I think the Lindesfarne gospel is there as well as the original Alice in Wonderland. The Library of Congress has most of their folk music collection online now.

    Reply
  103. Much belated post, but I think you would love to look at this book.
    DeLaubier, Guillaume The Most Beautiful Libraries in the World Harry N. Abrams 2003
    It is basically a picture book of some of the most gorgeous libraries. Many of them are baroque and it is amazing what they did with marble, gilt and cherubim. My sister lives in Southport and won’t let me in the Pequot Library. She knows I will never resurface. (I am also banned from the multistory block long Barnes and Noble in Manhattan.)
    If you can enjoy books virtually, the British Library has “books” online that you actually flip the pages. I think the Lindesfarne gospel is there as well as the original Alice in Wonderland. The Library of Congress has most of their folk music collection online now.

    Reply
  104. Much belated post, but I think you would love to look at this book.
    DeLaubier, Guillaume The Most Beautiful Libraries in the World Harry N. Abrams 2003
    It is basically a picture book of some of the most gorgeous libraries. Many of them are baroque and it is amazing what they did with marble, gilt and cherubim. My sister lives in Southport and won’t let me in the Pequot Library. She knows I will never resurface. (I am also banned from the multistory block long Barnes and Noble in Manhattan.)
    If you can enjoy books virtually, the British Library has “books” online that you actually flip the pages. I think the Lindesfarne gospel is there as well as the original Alice in Wonderland. The Library of Congress has most of their folk music collection online now.

    Reply
  105. Much belated post, but I think you would love to look at this book.
    DeLaubier, Guillaume The Most Beautiful Libraries in the World Harry N. Abrams 2003
    It is basically a picture book of some of the most gorgeous libraries. Many of them are baroque and it is amazing what they did with marble, gilt and cherubim. My sister lives in Southport and won’t let me in the Pequot Library. She knows I will never resurface. (I am also banned from the multistory block long Barnes and Noble in Manhattan.)
    If you can enjoy books virtually, the British Library has “books” online that you actually flip the pages. I think the Lindesfarne gospel is there as well as the original Alice in Wonderland. The Library of Congress has most of their folk music collection online now.

    Reply
  106. Thanks so much for the heads-up on the Abrams library book. Lyn. I hadn’t seen it before . . . now I have yet another book to find room for! I had to laugh over your comment about the Pequot Library. Yes, you can definitely get seduced into staying there for hours. As for the huge B&N in NYC, my friends know I’m a goner once I pass through the front doors.
    I love the British Library’s “Turning the Pages.” They have an extraordinary collection of rare books online. You should also check out the Beinecke Rare Book Library online. They have the pages of Voynich Manuscript, which is fun to see.

    Reply
  107. Thanks so much for the heads-up on the Abrams library book. Lyn. I hadn’t seen it before . . . now I have yet another book to find room for! I had to laugh over your comment about the Pequot Library. Yes, you can definitely get seduced into staying there for hours. As for the huge B&N in NYC, my friends know I’m a goner once I pass through the front doors.
    I love the British Library’s “Turning the Pages.” They have an extraordinary collection of rare books online. You should also check out the Beinecke Rare Book Library online. They have the pages of Voynich Manuscript, which is fun to see.

    Reply
  108. Thanks so much for the heads-up on the Abrams library book. Lyn. I hadn’t seen it before . . . now I have yet another book to find room for! I had to laugh over your comment about the Pequot Library. Yes, you can definitely get seduced into staying there for hours. As for the huge B&N in NYC, my friends know I’m a goner once I pass through the front doors.
    I love the British Library’s “Turning the Pages.” They have an extraordinary collection of rare books online. You should also check out the Beinecke Rare Book Library online. They have the pages of Voynich Manuscript, which is fun to see.

    Reply
  109. Thanks so much for the heads-up on the Abrams library book. Lyn. I hadn’t seen it before . . . now I have yet another book to find room for! I had to laugh over your comment about the Pequot Library. Yes, you can definitely get seduced into staying there for hours. As for the huge B&N in NYC, my friends know I’m a goner once I pass through the front doors.
    I love the British Library’s “Turning the Pages.” They have an extraordinary collection of rare books online. You should also check out the Beinecke Rare Book Library online. They have the pages of Voynich Manuscript, which is fun to see.

    Reply
  110. Thanks so much for the heads-up on the Abrams library book. Lyn. I hadn’t seen it before . . . now I have yet another book to find room for! I had to laugh over your comment about the Pequot Library. Yes, you can definitely get seduced into staying there for hours. As for the huge B&N in NYC, my friends know I’m a goner once I pass through the front doors.
    I love the British Library’s “Turning the Pages.” They have an extraordinary collection of rare books online. You should also check out the Beinecke Rare Book Library online. They have the pages of Voynich Manuscript, which is fun to see.

    Reply

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