Book Trailers

Davyleaves
That’s Davy inspecting the future wine on the vine earlier in the year. The grapes are a-swelling. 🙂

Book trailers are a new way of attracting readers, but most are for contemporary romance, especially romantic suspense and paranormal.

Lbaar
There aren’t many for historical romance, however, and I think I know why. I thought about doing one for LADY BEWARE, but I had trouble finding the right images. My covers aren’t particularly useful there, and period art, though lovely, Br3
doesn’t quite do it. I have lots of photos of period interiors, stately homes, parks, and even costumes in museums, but it’s the people. Short of stealing images from movies, I couldn’t find pictures of people in good period dress doing something vaguely relevant to the story.
Dance

I love the idea of trailers for historicals, however, and I’ve found some on line. I’d love to hear what you think. Do you like these? Would you like to see more? Do they make you want to read the book? What would you like to see in the perfect historical trailer?

Lady Merry’s Dashing Champion

The Becketts of Romney Marshl
(This one needs something extra for me to view it, but it might work for you.)

Surrender To The Highlander
(down a bit on the left.)

To Tempt A Scotsman
Her Irish Warrior

Touch of Texas

Rivals For The Crown

Lessons of Desire

Two with some magical elements.
Twilight Magic

Wench Mary Jo’s The Marriage Spell

Over to you!

Jo

140 thoughts on “Book Trailers”

  1. I’ve yet to do a trailer, but I keep thinking that since I know all the people who own all the costumes, and my camera has a video function, I really have no excuse. LOL! Maybe I’ll attempt something for LORD SCANDAL when it comes out next year . . .

    Reply
  2. I’ve yet to do a trailer, but I keep thinking that since I know all the people who own all the costumes, and my camera has a video function, I really have no excuse. LOL! Maybe I’ll attempt something for LORD SCANDAL when it comes out next year . . .

    Reply
  3. I’ve yet to do a trailer, but I keep thinking that since I know all the people who own all the costumes, and my camera has a video function, I really have no excuse. LOL! Maybe I’ll attempt something for LORD SCANDAL when it comes out next year . . .

    Reply
  4. I’ve yet to do a trailer, but I keep thinking that since I know all the people who own all the costumes, and my camera has a video function, I really have no excuse. LOL! Maybe I’ll attempt something for LORD SCANDAL when it comes out next year . . .

    Reply
  5. I’ve yet to do a trailer, but I keep thinking that since I know all the people who own all the costumes, and my camera has a video function, I really have no excuse. LOL! Maybe I’ll attempt something for LORD SCANDAL when it comes out next year . . .

    Reply
  6. From Sherrie:
    I think book trailers are neat, and would love to see more for historicals. I don’t go looking for trailers, but if an author has one on her Web site, I think it’s good PR.
    What I’d like to see in trailers is a sense of the feel/mood of the book, lush images, nonintrusive music, and enough about the story to pique my interest. I also appreciate a “play” button instead of having it load automatically whenever I visit an author’s Web site or when I hit the “back” button to return to her home page. In addition, I appreciate the video being small enough to fit my monitor so I can see the whole thing without having to scroll up or down as I had to with Lady Merry’s Dashing Champion.
    I also like time to view the images and read the text instead of a kaleidescope of images and words whizzing by. And I’m beginning to like the ones that are narrated, with powerful images and not much text, over those that just have music and text speeding by.

    Reply
  7. From Sherrie:
    I think book trailers are neat, and would love to see more for historicals. I don’t go looking for trailers, but if an author has one on her Web site, I think it’s good PR.
    What I’d like to see in trailers is a sense of the feel/mood of the book, lush images, nonintrusive music, and enough about the story to pique my interest. I also appreciate a “play” button instead of having it load automatically whenever I visit an author’s Web site or when I hit the “back” button to return to her home page. In addition, I appreciate the video being small enough to fit my monitor so I can see the whole thing without having to scroll up or down as I had to with Lady Merry’s Dashing Champion.
    I also like time to view the images and read the text instead of a kaleidescope of images and words whizzing by. And I’m beginning to like the ones that are narrated, with powerful images and not much text, over those that just have music and text speeding by.

    Reply
  8. From Sherrie:
    I think book trailers are neat, and would love to see more for historicals. I don’t go looking for trailers, but if an author has one on her Web site, I think it’s good PR.
    What I’d like to see in trailers is a sense of the feel/mood of the book, lush images, nonintrusive music, and enough about the story to pique my interest. I also appreciate a “play” button instead of having it load automatically whenever I visit an author’s Web site or when I hit the “back” button to return to her home page. In addition, I appreciate the video being small enough to fit my monitor so I can see the whole thing without having to scroll up or down as I had to with Lady Merry’s Dashing Champion.
    I also like time to view the images and read the text instead of a kaleidescope of images and words whizzing by. And I’m beginning to like the ones that are narrated, with powerful images and not much text, over those that just have music and text speeding by.

    Reply
  9. From Sherrie:
    I think book trailers are neat, and would love to see more for historicals. I don’t go looking for trailers, but if an author has one on her Web site, I think it’s good PR.
    What I’d like to see in trailers is a sense of the feel/mood of the book, lush images, nonintrusive music, and enough about the story to pique my interest. I also appreciate a “play” button instead of having it load automatically whenever I visit an author’s Web site or when I hit the “back” button to return to her home page. In addition, I appreciate the video being small enough to fit my monitor so I can see the whole thing without having to scroll up or down as I had to with Lady Merry’s Dashing Champion.
    I also like time to view the images and read the text instead of a kaleidescope of images and words whizzing by. And I’m beginning to like the ones that are narrated, with powerful images and not much text, over those that just have music and text speeding by.

    Reply
  10. From Sherrie:
    I think book trailers are neat, and would love to see more for historicals. I don’t go looking for trailers, but if an author has one on her Web site, I think it’s good PR.
    What I’d like to see in trailers is a sense of the feel/mood of the book, lush images, nonintrusive music, and enough about the story to pique my interest. I also appreciate a “play” button instead of having it load automatically whenever I visit an author’s Web site or when I hit the “back” button to return to her home page. In addition, I appreciate the video being small enough to fit my monitor so I can see the whole thing without having to scroll up or down as I had to with Lady Merry’s Dashing Champion.
    I also like time to view the images and read the text instead of a kaleidescope of images and words whizzing by. And I’m beginning to like the ones that are narrated, with powerful images and not much text, over those that just have music and text speeding by.

    Reply
  11. I think Sherri summed it up nicely. I avoid book trailers because they usually just irritate me, but in the interests of science 🙂 I watched all these except one I couldn’t get to play.
    Voice-overs are definitely better because they improve the pacing, IMO. The flying text is either too fast or too slow, and the text bytes have to be so abbreviated that some of them are disjointed. I also didn’t care for the live actors, but as I said, I’m easily irritated so that could just be personal taste. Out of all of these, only the Shari Anton made me make a note to check the book out (not counting the MJP which I’ve already read). I’m a sucker for that type of plot and might’ve picked up the book on the basis of the plot description alone, but the atmosphere of the trailer definitely reinforced my interest.
    I was a little startled by the groin close-up in To Tempt a Scotsman, but hey it’s the only title I remember.

    Reply
  12. I think Sherri summed it up nicely. I avoid book trailers because they usually just irritate me, but in the interests of science 🙂 I watched all these except one I couldn’t get to play.
    Voice-overs are definitely better because they improve the pacing, IMO. The flying text is either too fast or too slow, and the text bytes have to be so abbreviated that some of them are disjointed. I also didn’t care for the live actors, but as I said, I’m easily irritated so that could just be personal taste. Out of all of these, only the Shari Anton made me make a note to check the book out (not counting the MJP which I’ve already read). I’m a sucker for that type of plot and might’ve picked up the book on the basis of the plot description alone, but the atmosphere of the trailer definitely reinforced my interest.
    I was a little startled by the groin close-up in To Tempt a Scotsman, but hey it’s the only title I remember.

    Reply
  13. I think Sherri summed it up nicely. I avoid book trailers because they usually just irritate me, but in the interests of science 🙂 I watched all these except one I couldn’t get to play.
    Voice-overs are definitely better because they improve the pacing, IMO. The flying text is either too fast or too slow, and the text bytes have to be so abbreviated that some of them are disjointed. I also didn’t care for the live actors, but as I said, I’m easily irritated so that could just be personal taste. Out of all of these, only the Shari Anton made me make a note to check the book out (not counting the MJP which I’ve already read). I’m a sucker for that type of plot and might’ve picked up the book on the basis of the plot description alone, but the atmosphere of the trailer definitely reinforced my interest.
    I was a little startled by the groin close-up in To Tempt a Scotsman, but hey it’s the only title I remember.

    Reply
  14. I think Sherri summed it up nicely. I avoid book trailers because they usually just irritate me, but in the interests of science 🙂 I watched all these except one I couldn’t get to play.
    Voice-overs are definitely better because they improve the pacing, IMO. The flying text is either too fast or too slow, and the text bytes have to be so abbreviated that some of them are disjointed. I also didn’t care for the live actors, but as I said, I’m easily irritated so that could just be personal taste. Out of all of these, only the Shari Anton made me make a note to check the book out (not counting the MJP which I’ve already read). I’m a sucker for that type of plot and might’ve picked up the book on the basis of the plot description alone, but the atmosphere of the trailer definitely reinforced my interest.
    I was a little startled by the groin close-up in To Tempt a Scotsman, but hey it’s the only title I remember.

    Reply
  15. I think Sherri summed it up nicely. I avoid book trailers because they usually just irritate me, but in the interests of science 🙂 I watched all these except one I couldn’t get to play.
    Voice-overs are definitely better because they improve the pacing, IMO. The flying text is either too fast or too slow, and the text bytes have to be so abbreviated that some of them are disjointed. I also didn’t care for the live actors, but as I said, I’m easily irritated so that could just be personal taste. Out of all of these, only the Shari Anton made me make a note to check the book out (not counting the MJP which I’ve already read). I’m a sucker for that type of plot and might’ve picked up the book on the basis of the plot description alone, but the atmosphere of the trailer definitely reinforced my interest.
    I was a little startled by the groin close-up in To Tempt a Scotsman, but hey it’s the only title I remember.

    Reply
  16. I check out the videos of books by favorite writers, but I don’t look for vidios–nor do I think I am likely to be persuaded to buy a book on the basis of a video.
    And I loathe being forced to watch a video in order to get to other information on the writer’s web page. In fact, just this week I scratched one of my hit-and-miss authors from my list because I went to her site seeking information on her latest book but would have been forced to endure a cutsey video to get to the information.

    Reply
  17. I check out the videos of books by favorite writers, but I don’t look for vidios–nor do I think I am likely to be persuaded to buy a book on the basis of a video.
    And I loathe being forced to watch a video in order to get to other information on the writer’s web page. In fact, just this week I scratched one of my hit-and-miss authors from my list because I went to her site seeking information on her latest book but would have been forced to endure a cutsey video to get to the information.

    Reply
  18. I check out the videos of books by favorite writers, but I don’t look for vidios–nor do I think I am likely to be persuaded to buy a book on the basis of a video.
    And I loathe being forced to watch a video in order to get to other information on the writer’s web page. In fact, just this week I scratched one of my hit-and-miss authors from my list because I went to her site seeking information on her latest book but would have been forced to endure a cutsey video to get to the information.

    Reply
  19. I check out the videos of books by favorite writers, but I don’t look for vidios–nor do I think I am likely to be persuaded to buy a book on the basis of a video.
    And I loathe being forced to watch a video in order to get to other information on the writer’s web page. In fact, just this week I scratched one of my hit-and-miss authors from my list because I went to her site seeking information on her latest book but would have been forced to endure a cutsey video to get to the information.

    Reply
  20. I check out the videos of books by favorite writers, but I don’t look for vidios–nor do I think I am likely to be persuaded to buy a book on the basis of a video.
    And I loathe being forced to watch a video in order to get to other information on the writer’s web page. In fact, just this week I scratched one of my hit-and-miss authors from my list because I went to her site seeking information on her latest book but would have been forced to endure a cutsey video to get to the information.

    Reply
  21. I have a fairly up-to-date computer but lack patience with technology. I couldn’t view half the links, or they loaded so slowly that I gave up on them. Of the other half that I saw, I cut them all off before they finished because they bored me and gave me nothing that would incite me to buy a book. I need excerpts.
    That said, I’ve done a trailer in hopes of enticing the visual readers among us. And you’re right, Jo, finding historical material–particularly people, who are the heart and soul of romance—is nigh on impossible. Kalen, if you can find people with wonderfully visual faces or bodies to put into those costumes, go for it. Just finding the right costume to fit the period gave me headaches. Nakedness worked best. “G”

    Reply
  22. I have a fairly up-to-date computer but lack patience with technology. I couldn’t view half the links, or they loaded so slowly that I gave up on them. Of the other half that I saw, I cut them all off before they finished because they bored me and gave me nothing that would incite me to buy a book. I need excerpts.
    That said, I’ve done a trailer in hopes of enticing the visual readers among us. And you’re right, Jo, finding historical material–particularly people, who are the heart and soul of romance—is nigh on impossible. Kalen, if you can find people with wonderfully visual faces or bodies to put into those costumes, go for it. Just finding the right costume to fit the period gave me headaches. Nakedness worked best. “G”

    Reply
  23. I have a fairly up-to-date computer but lack patience with technology. I couldn’t view half the links, or they loaded so slowly that I gave up on them. Of the other half that I saw, I cut them all off before they finished because they bored me and gave me nothing that would incite me to buy a book. I need excerpts.
    That said, I’ve done a trailer in hopes of enticing the visual readers among us. And you’re right, Jo, finding historical material–particularly people, who are the heart and soul of romance—is nigh on impossible. Kalen, if you can find people with wonderfully visual faces or bodies to put into those costumes, go for it. Just finding the right costume to fit the period gave me headaches. Nakedness worked best. “G”

    Reply
  24. I have a fairly up-to-date computer but lack patience with technology. I couldn’t view half the links, or they loaded so slowly that I gave up on them. Of the other half that I saw, I cut them all off before they finished because they bored me and gave me nothing that would incite me to buy a book. I need excerpts.
    That said, I’ve done a trailer in hopes of enticing the visual readers among us. And you’re right, Jo, finding historical material–particularly people, who are the heart and soul of romance—is nigh on impossible. Kalen, if you can find people with wonderfully visual faces or bodies to put into those costumes, go for it. Just finding the right costume to fit the period gave me headaches. Nakedness worked best. “G”

    Reply
  25. I have a fairly up-to-date computer but lack patience with technology. I couldn’t view half the links, or they loaded so slowly that I gave up on them. Of the other half that I saw, I cut them all off before they finished because they bored me and gave me nothing that would incite me to buy a book. I need excerpts.
    That said, I’ve done a trailer in hopes of enticing the visual readers among us. And you’re right, Jo, finding historical material–particularly people, who are the heart and soul of romance—is nigh on impossible. Kalen, if you can find people with wonderfully visual faces or bodies to put into those costumes, go for it. Just finding the right costume to fit the period gave me headaches. Nakedness worked best. “G”

    Reply
  26. I agree that historical book trailers pose a unique challenge – you can’t just purchase some stock photos and music and expect to get the right feel. But I don’t think they have to be particularly involved or accurate to be effective (though I did love the voice-over of Mary Jo’s!).
    I’ve had very positive response to one I did for Eloisa James (shameless plug alert!): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V6C43wdyO9Q
    It doesn’t really tell anything about the plot or the characters, but it captures a bit of the tone and seemed to pique people’s interest – which was my intention. I figure people know where to go to find plot summaries or excerpts, so it’s best to leave them wanting more. Which is why my favorites are those that are short (60 seconds is my max attention span) and simple, giving just a feel for the book or its concept.
    I’ll be interested to see whether trailers are just a fad or if they continue to have impact. I think Christine Feehan has done research that shows they can be effective as a promotional tool, though I imagine it depends a lot on visibility. Personally, they don’t usually send me running for the book, but I have noticed myself recognizing names/covers from trailers I’ve seen.

    Reply
  27. I agree that historical book trailers pose a unique challenge – you can’t just purchase some stock photos and music and expect to get the right feel. But I don’t think they have to be particularly involved or accurate to be effective (though I did love the voice-over of Mary Jo’s!).
    I’ve had very positive response to one I did for Eloisa James (shameless plug alert!): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V6C43wdyO9Q
    It doesn’t really tell anything about the plot or the characters, but it captures a bit of the tone and seemed to pique people’s interest – which was my intention. I figure people know where to go to find plot summaries or excerpts, so it’s best to leave them wanting more. Which is why my favorites are those that are short (60 seconds is my max attention span) and simple, giving just a feel for the book or its concept.
    I’ll be interested to see whether trailers are just a fad or if they continue to have impact. I think Christine Feehan has done research that shows they can be effective as a promotional tool, though I imagine it depends a lot on visibility. Personally, they don’t usually send me running for the book, but I have noticed myself recognizing names/covers from trailers I’ve seen.

    Reply
  28. I agree that historical book trailers pose a unique challenge – you can’t just purchase some stock photos and music and expect to get the right feel. But I don’t think they have to be particularly involved or accurate to be effective (though I did love the voice-over of Mary Jo’s!).
    I’ve had very positive response to one I did for Eloisa James (shameless plug alert!): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V6C43wdyO9Q
    It doesn’t really tell anything about the plot or the characters, but it captures a bit of the tone and seemed to pique people’s interest – which was my intention. I figure people know where to go to find plot summaries or excerpts, so it’s best to leave them wanting more. Which is why my favorites are those that are short (60 seconds is my max attention span) and simple, giving just a feel for the book or its concept.
    I’ll be interested to see whether trailers are just a fad or if they continue to have impact. I think Christine Feehan has done research that shows they can be effective as a promotional tool, though I imagine it depends a lot on visibility. Personally, they don’t usually send me running for the book, but I have noticed myself recognizing names/covers from trailers I’ve seen.

    Reply
  29. I agree that historical book trailers pose a unique challenge – you can’t just purchase some stock photos and music and expect to get the right feel. But I don’t think they have to be particularly involved or accurate to be effective (though I did love the voice-over of Mary Jo’s!).
    I’ve had very positive response to one I did for Eloisa James (shameless plug alert!): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V6C43wdyO9Q
    It doesn’t really tell anything about the plot or the characters, but it captures a bit of the tone and seemed to pique people’s interest – which was my intention. I figure people know where to go to find plot summaries or excerpts, so it’s best to leave them wanting more. Which is why my favorites are those that are short (60 seconds is my max attention span) and simple, giving just a feel for the book or its concept.
    I’ll be interested to see whether trailers are just a fad or if they continue to have impact. I think Christine Feehan has done research that shows they can be effective as a promotional tool, though I imagine it depends a lot on visibility. Personally, they don’t usually send me running for the book, but I have noticed myself recognizing names/covers from trailers I’ve seen.

    Reply
  30. I agree that historical book trailers pose a unique challenge – you can’t just purchase some stock photos and music and expect to get the right feel. But I don’t think they have to be particularly involved or accurate to be effective (though I did love the voice-over of Mary Jo’s!).
    I’ve had very positive response to one I did for Eloisa James (shameless plug alert!): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V6C43wdyO9Q
    It doesn’t really tell anything about the plot or the characters, but it captures a bit of the tone and seemed to pique people’s interest – which was my intention. I figure people know where to go to find plot summaries or excerpts, so it’s best to leave them wanting more. Which is why my favorites are those that are short (60 seconds is my max attention span) and simple, giving just a feel for the book or its concept.
    I’ll be interested to see whether trailers are just a fad or if they continue to have impact. I think Christine Feehan has done research that shows they can be effective as a promotional tool, though I imagine it depends a lot on visibility. Personally, they don’t usually send me running for the book, but I have noticed myself recognizing names/covers from trailers I’ve seen.

    Reply
  31. I feel like a premature grumpy old lady on this one (Hey! You kids! Get offa my lawn!), but I just don’t get book trailers. They don’t make me more likely to buy a book, and in cases where I think the imagery is silly or cheesy or if I don’t like the music, they make me LESS likely to buy.
    Maybe it’s just that I’m so much more a verbal thinker than a visual one, but I think it’s more that I like to do my own visualization. I’ve never been much of a fan of music videos for the same reason. I still remember being in high school in the late 80’s, when videos were still newish. There was a song getting a lot of airplay that I liked because the lyrics spoke to me as a young woman getting ready to leave home and see what adventures awaited me as an independent person outside the stifling small-town atmosphere I’d grown up in. But then I saw the video–scantily clad women rolling around on sportscars. And it almost ruined the song for me. When it came on the radio, I couldn’t get the video images out of my brain, so it no longer seemed like a statement of power and independence, but instead just another example of objectifying women.
    Obviously, you’re not going to have such an extreme contrast between my image and the author’s in a book trailer. But they still don’t really mesh with how I imagine stories as I read.
    Does anyone know if they’re a popular marketing tactic outside of romance? Because I’m writing alternate history/adventure now. I know worrying about how I’ll be expected to market a book I haven’t even finished, much less sold, is putting the cart several miles before the horse, but that’s never stopped me before…

    Reply
  32. I feel like a premature grumpy old lady on this one (Hey! You kids! Get offa my lawn!), but I just don’t get book trailers. They don’t make me more likely to buy a book, and in cases where I think the imagery is silly or cheesy or if I don’t like the music, they make me LESS likely to buy.
    Maybe it’s just that I’m so much more a verbal thinker than a visual one, but I think it’s more that I like to do my own visualization. I’ve never been much of a fan of music videos for the same reason. I still remember being in high school in the late 80’s, when videos were still newish. There was a song getting a lot of airplay that I liked because the lyrics spoke to me as a young woman getting ready to leave home and see what adventures awaited me as an independent person outside the stifling small-town atmosphere I’d grown up in. But then I saw the video–scantily clad women rolling around on sportscars. And it almost ruined the song for me. When it came on the radio, I couldn’t get the video images out of my brain, so it no longer seemed like a statement of power and independence, but instead just another example of objectifying women.
    Obviously, you’re not going to have such an extreme contrast between my image and the author’s in a book trailer. But they still don’t really mesh with how I imagine stories as I read.
    Does anyone know if they’re a popular marketing tactic outside of romance? Because I’m writing alternate history/adventure now. I know worrying about how I’ll be expected to market a book I haven’t even finished, much less sold, is putting the cart several miles before the horse, but that’s never stopped me before…

    Reply
  33. I feel like a premature grumpy old lady on this one (Hey! You kids! Get offa my lawn!), but I just don’t get book trailers. They don’t make me more likely to buy a book, and in cases where I think the imagery is silly or cheesy or if I don’t like the music, they make me LESS likely to buy.
    Maybe it’s just that I’m so much more a verbal thinker than a visual one, but I think it’s more that I like to do my own visualization. I’ve never been much of a fan of music videos for the same reason. I still remember being in high school in the late 80’s, when videos were still newish. There was a song getting a lot of airplay that I liked because the lyrics spoke to me as a young woman getting ready to leave home and see what adventures awaited me as an independent person outside the stifling small-town atmosphere I’d grown up in. But then I saw the video–scantily clad women rolling around on sportscars. And it almost ruined the song for me. When it came on the radio, I couldn’t get the video images out of my brain, so it no longer seemed like a statement of power and independence, but instead just another example of objectifying women.
    Obviously, you’re not going to have such an extreme contrast between my image and the author’s in a book trailer. But they still don’t really mesh with how I imagine stories as I read.
    Does anyone know if they’re a popular marketing tactic outside of romance? Because I’m writing alternate history/adventure now. I know worrying about how I’ll be expected to market a book I haven’t even finished, much less sold, is putting the cart several miles before the horse, but that’s never stopped me before…

    Reply
  34. I feel like a premature grumpy old lady on this one (Hey! You kids! Get offa my lawn!), but I just don’t get book trailers. They don’t make me more likely to buy a book, and in cases where I think the imagery is silly or cheesy or if I don’t like the music, they make me LESS likely to buy.
    Maybe it’s just that I’m so much more a verbal thinker than a visual one, but I think it’s more that I like to do my own visualization. I’ve never been much of a fan of music videos for the same reason. I still remember being in high school in the late 80’s, when videos were still newish. There was a song getting a lot of airplay that I liked because the lyrics spoke to me as a young woman getting ready to leave home and see what adventures awaited me as an independent person outside the stifling small-town atmosphere I’d grown up in. But then I saw the video–scantily clad women rolling around on sportscars. And it almost ruined the song for me. When it came on the radio, I couldn’t get the video images out of my brain, so it no longer seemed like a statement of power and independence, but instead just another example of objectifying women.
    Obviously, you’re not going to have such an extreme contrast between my image and the author’s in a book trailer. But they still don’t really mesh with how I imagine stories as I read.
    Does anyone know if they’re a popular marketing tactic outside of romance? Because I’m writing alternate history/adventure now. I know worrying about how I’ll be expected to market a book I haven’t even finished, much less sold, is putting the cart several miles before the horse, but that’s never stopped me before…

    Reply
  35. I feel like a premature grumpy old lady on this one (Hey! You kids! Get offa my lawn!), but I just don’t get book trailers. They don’t make me more likely to buy a book, and in cases where I think the imagery is silly or cheesy or if I don’t like the music, they make me LESS likely to buy.
    Maybe it’s just that I’m so much more a verbal thinker than a visual one, but I think it’s more that I like to do my own visualization. I’ve never been much of a fan of music videos for the same reason. I still remember being in high school in the late 80’s, when videos were still newish. There was a song getting a lot of airplay that I liked because the lyrics spoke to me as a young woman getting ready to leave home and see what adventures awaited me as an independent person outside the stifling small-town atmosphere I’d grown up in. But then I saw the video–scantily clad women rolling around on sportscars. And it almost ruined the song for me. When it came on the radio, I couldn’t get the video images out of my brain, so it no longer seemed like a statement of power and independence, but instead just another example of objectifying women.
    Obviously, you’re not going to have such an extreme contrast between my image and the author’s in a book trailer. But they still don’t really mesh with how I imagine stories as I read.
    Does anyone know if they’re a popular marketing tactic outside of romance? Because I’m writing alternate history/adventure now. I know worrying about how I’ll be expected to market a book I haven’t even finished, much less sold, is putting the cart several miles before the horse, but that’s never stopped me before…

    Reply
  36. Good one, Lindsey. (I just wrote a message that disappeared, so if I repeat myself, sorry.)
    That shows that period images can work as a general enticement, but I also think Georgian offers more active and sensual images than Regency.
    I don’t think trailers are going to be essential, Susan, and I think their chief advantage may be in catching the interest of potential readerls who don’t already buy our books, especially if the trailer gets any buzz.
    However now, with more and more of them, getting buzz is harder.
    Essentially, it’s still new and no one knows,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  37. Good one, Lindsey. (I just wrote a message that disappeared, so if I repeat myself, sorry.)
    That shows that period images can work as a general enticement, but I also think Georgian offers more active and sensual images than Regency.
    I don’t think trailers are going to be essential, Susan, and I think their chief advantage may be in catching the interest of potential readerls who don’t already buy our books, especially if the trailer gets any buzz.
    However now, with more and more of them, getting buzz is harder.
    Essentially, it’s still new and no one knows,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  38. Good one, Lindsey. (I just wrote a message that disappeared, so if I repeat myself, sorry.)
    That shows that period images can work as a general enticement, but I also think Georgian offers more active and sensual images than Regency.
    I don’t think trailers are going to be essential, Susan, and I think their chief advantage may be in catching the interest of potential readerls who don’t already buy our books, especially if the trailer gets any buzz.
    However now, with more and more of them, getting buzz is harder.
    Essentially, it’s still new and no one knows,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  39. Good one, Lindsey. (I just wrote a message that disappeared, so if I repeat myself, sorry.)
    That shows that period images can work as a general enticement, but I also think Georgian offers more active and sensual images than Regency.
    I don’t think trailers are going to be essential, Susan, and I think their chief advantage may be in catching the interest of potential readerls who don’t already buy our books, especially if the trailer gets any buzz.
    However now, with more and more of them, getting buzz is harder.
    Essentially, it’s still new and no one knows,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  40. Good one, Lindsey. (I just wrote a message that disappeared, so if I repeat myself, sorry.)
    That shows that period images can work as a general enticement, but I also think Georgian offers more active and sensual images than Regency.
    I don’t think trailers are going to be essential, Susan, and I think their chief advantage may be in catching the interest of potential readerls who don’t already buy our books, especially if the trailer gets any buzz.
    However now, with more and more of them, getting buzz is harder.
    Essentially, it’s still new and no one knows,
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  41. As a reader, I can tell you that the most effective marketing tool to get me to read new authors has been cross marketing. Ex. I’m a huge Jo fan, so I ended up here. Now I’ve read Loretta, Candice Hern and Anne Gracie. Further, you have a link to Smart Bitches Trashy Books. They have little ads on their site, which I generally tune out. However, I recently spotted a flash ad for Janet Mullaney’s Rules of Gentility, which led me to her website and an excerpt. Now, I’m a potential reader.
    As for book trailers, I think it’s a double-edged sword. Yes, a good one might attract some potential readers, but if you have an ineffective, boring, or worse, annoying book trailer, you run the risk of turning off a potential reader. Also, my question is this. Are these trailers being shown on sites like You Tube, to which a younger, more visually oriented crowd is being marketed? I can see where that might work. An effective trailer could bring attention to your book or website. On the other hand, an ineffective one will probable just be ignored. But, I believe that having an unappealing book trailer on your website could actually hinder your efforts. If I’m already at your website, I’m interested. I say let the writing sell itself, put in an excerpt.
    Regarding the actual trailers you listed Jo, I watched three in random order. The first didn’t appeal to me in any way. The second one enticed me to look further into the book. During the third, my mind wandered about half way through despite the fact that I thought it was the best produced. If your actually interested in my opinion in depth, I would be happy to offer it.
    I’m truly surprised that authors are expected to do so much self-promotion. Do the publishers offer seminars on business and marketing? As a former accountant, I would say look at the cost vs. the benefits. Will I see any return on my investment? Is my $3000(?) best spent on a book trailer or a professionally designed website or some other marketing idea (flash ad on another site, print ad)? Also ask yourself, what is my goal? To attract a wider audience, entertain my current one, sell my current new title, achieve name recognition?
    It’s always been my opinion that just because you can do something doesn’t necessarily mean you should.
    Sincerly and long-windedly,
    Joyce

    Reply
  42. As a reader, I can tell you that the most effective marketing tool to get me to read new authors has been cross marketing. Ex. I’m a huge Jo fan, so I ended up here. Now I’ve read Loretta, Candice Hern and Anne Gracie. Further, you have a link to Smart Bitches Trashy Books. They have little ads on their site, which I generally tune out. However, I recently spotted a flash ad for Janet Mullaney’s Rules of Gentility, which led me to her website and an excerpt. Now, I’m a potential reader.
    As for book trailers, I think it’s a double-edged sword. Yes, a good one might attract some potential readers, but if you have an ineffective, boring, or worse, annoying book trailer, you run the risk of turning off a potential reader. Also, my question is this. Are these trailers being shown on sites like You Tube, to which a younger, more visually oriented crowd is being marketed? I can see where that might work. An effective trailer could bring attention to your book or website. On the other hand, an ineffective one will probable just be ignored. But, I believe that having an unappealing book trailer on your website could actually hinder your efforts. If I’m already at your website, I’m interested. I say let the writing sell itself, put in an excerpt.
    Regarding the actual trailers you listed Jo, I watched three in random order. The first didn’t appeal to me in any way. The second one enticed me to look further into the book. During the third, my mind wandered about half way through despite the fact that I thought it was the best produced. If your actually interested in my opinion in depth, I would be happy to offer it.
    I’m truly surprised that authors are expected to do so much self-promotion. Do the publishers offer seminars on business and marketing? As a former accountant, I would say look at the cost vs. the benefits. Will I see any return on my investment? Is my $3000(?) best spent on a book trailer or a professionally designed website or some other marketing idea (flash ad on another site, print ad)? Also ask yourself, what is my goal? To attract a wider audience, entertain my current one, sell my current new title, achieve name recognition?
    It’s always been my opinion that just because you can do something doesn’t necessarily mean you should.
    Sincerly and long-windedly,
    Joyce

    Reply
  43. As a reader, I can tell you that the most effective marketing tool to get me to read new authors has been cross marketing. Ex. I’m a huge Jo fan, so I ended up here. Now I’ve read Loretta, Candice Hern and Anne Gracie. Further, you have a link to Smart Bitches Trashy Books. They have little ads on their site, which I generally tune out. However, I recently spotted a flash ad for Janet Mullaney’s Rules of Gentility, which led me to her website and an excerpt. Now, I’m a potential reader.
    As for book trailers, I think it’s a double-edged sword. Yes, a good one might attract some potential readers, but if you have an ineffective, boring, or worse, annoying book trailer, you run the risk of turning off a potential reader. Also, my question is this. Are these trailers being shown on sites like You Tube, to which a younger, more visually oriented crowd is being marketed? I can see where that might work. An effective trailer could bring attention to your book or website. On the other hand, an ineffective one will probable just be ignored. But, I believe that having an unappealing book trailer on your website could actually hinder your efforts. If I’m already at your website, I’m interested. I say let the writing sell itself, put in an excerpt.
    Regarding the actual trailers you listed Jo, I watched three in random order. The first didn’t appeal to me in any way. The second one enticed me to look further into the book. During the third, my mind wandered about half way through despite the fact that I thought it was the best produced. If your actually interested in my opinion in depth, I would be happy to offer it.
    I’m truly surprised that authors are expected to do so much self-promotion. Do the publishers offer seminars on business and marketing? As a former accountant, I would say look at the cost vs. the benefits. Will I see any return on my investment? Is my $3000(?) best spent on a book trailer or a professionally designed website or some other marketing idea (flash ad on another site, print ad)? Also ask yourself, what is my goal? To attract a wider audience, entertain my current one, sell my current new title, achieve name recognition?
    It’s always been my opinion that just because you can do something doesn’t necessarily mean you should.
    Sincerly and long-windedly,
    Joyce

    Reply
  44. As a reader, I can tell you that the most effective marketing tool to get me to read new authors has been cross marketing. Ex. I’m a huge Jo fan, so I ended up here. Now I’ve read Loretta, Candice Hern and Anne Gracie. Further, you have a link to Smart Bitches Trashy Books. They have little ads on their site, which I generally tune out. However, I recently spotted a flash ad for Janet Mullaney’s Rules of Gentility, which led me to her website and an excerpt. Now, I’m a potential reader.
    As for book trailers, I think it’s a double-edged sword. Yes, a good one might attract some potential readers, but if you have an ineffective, boring, or worse, annoying book trailer, you run the risk of turning off a potential reader. Also, my question is this. Are these trailers being shown on sites like You Tube, to which a younger, more visually oriented crowd is being marketed? I can see where that might work. An effective trailer could bring attention to your book or website. On the other hand, an ineffective one will probable just be ignored. But, I believe that having an unappealing book trailer on your website could actually hinder your efforts. If I’m already at your website, I’m interested. I say let the writing sell itself, put in an excerpt.
    Regarding the actual trailers you listed Jo, I watched three in random order. The first didn’t appeal to me in any way. The second one enticed me to look further into the book. During the third, my mind wandered about half way through despite the fact that I thought it was the best produced. If your actually interested in my opinion in depth, I would be happy to offer it.
    I’m truly surprised that authors are expected to do so much self-promotion. Do the publishers offer seminars on business and marketing? As a former accountant, I would say look at the cost vs. the benefits. Will I see any return on my investment? Is my $3000(?) best spent on a book trailer or a professionally designed website or some other marketing idea (flash ad on another site, print ad)? Also ask yourself, what is my goal? To attract a wider audience, entertain my current one, sell my current new title, achieve name recognition?
    It’s always been my opinion that just because you can do something doesn’t necessarily mean you should.
    Sincerly and long-windedly,
    Joyce

    Reply
  45. As a reader, I can tell you that the most effective marketing tool to get me to read new authors has been cross marketing. Ex. I’m a huge Jo fan, so I ended up here. Now I’ve read Loretta, Candice Hern and Anne Gracie. Further, you have a link to Smart Bitches Trashy Books. They have little ads on their site, which I generally tune out. However, I recently spotted a flash ad for Janet Mullaney’s Rules of Gentility, which led me to her website and an excerpt. Now, I’m a potential reader.
    As for book trailers, I think it’s a double-edged sword. Yes, a good one might attract some potential readers, but if you have an ineffective, boring, or worse, annoying book trailer, you run the risk of turning off a potential reader. Also, my question is this. Are these trailers being shown on sites like You Tube, to which a younger, more visually oriented crowd is being marketed? I can see where that might work. An effective trailer could bring attention to your book or website. On the other hand, an ineffective one will probable just be ignored. But, I believe that having an unappealing book trailer on your website could actually hinder your efforts. If I’m already at your website, I’m interested. I say let the writing sell itself, put in an excerpt.
    Regarding the actual trailers you listed Jo, I watched three in random order. The first didn’t appeal to me in any way. The second one enticed me to look further into the book. During the third, my mind wandered about half way through despite the fact that I thought it was the best produced. If your actually interested in my opinion in depth, I would be happy to offer it.
    I’m truly surprised that authors are expected to do so much self-promotion. Do the publishers offer seminars on business and marketing? As a former accountant, I would say look at the cost vs. the benefits. Will I see any return on my investment? Is my $3000(?) best spent on a book trailer or a professionally designed website or some other marketing idea (flash ad on another site, print ad)? Also ask yourself, what is my goal? To attract a wider audience, entertain my current one, sell my current new title, achieve name recognition?
    It’s always been my opinion that just because you can do something doesn’t necessarily mean you should.
    Sincerly and long-windedly,
    Joyce

    Reply
  46. I judge a web page on how busy it is and most trailers are just TOO busy. The only book I read on the list is actually a series – The Becketts of Romney Marsh. I have several of them. It would have been nice to be able to open the trailer, just to see it. But I doubt any trailer would intrigue me – it’s the cover, title, notes on the back, as well as being part of a series that lures me. I have read many new authors through series. I agree with the others, I don’t like the “automatic” voices and flashing pictures. I do think the trailers are aimed at the younger generation, so I’m probably like Susan W. jld

    Reply
  47. I judge a web page on how busy it is and most trailers are just TOO busy. The only book I read on the list is actually a series – The Becketts of Romney Marsh. I have several of them. It would have been nice to be able to open the trailer, just to see it. But I doubt any trailer would intrigue me – it’s the cover, title, notes on the back, as well as being part of a series that lures me. I have read many new authors through series. I agree with the others, I don’t like the “automatic” voices and flashing pictures. I do think the trailers are aimed at the younger generation, so I’m probably like Susan W. jld

    Reply
  48. I judge a web page on how busy it is and most trailers are just TOO busy. The only book I read on the list is actually a series – The Becketts of Romney Marsh. I have several of them. It would have been nice to be able to open the trailer, just to see it. But I doubt any trailer would intrigue me – it’s the cover, title, notes on the back, as well as being part of a series that lures me. I have read many new authors through series. I agree with the others, I don’t like the “automatic” voices and flashing pictures. I do think the trailers are aimed at the younger generation, so I’m probably like Susan W. jld

    Reply
  49. I judge a web page on how busy it is and most trailers are just TOO busy. The only book I read on the list is actually a series – The Becketts of Romney Marsh. I have several of them. It would have been nice to be able to open the trailer, just to see it. But I doubt any trailer would intrigue me – it’s the cover, title, notes on the back, as well as being part of a series that lures me. I have read many new authors through series. I agree with the others, I don’t like the “automatic” voices and flashing pictures. I do think the trailers are aimed at the younger generation, so I’m probably like Susan W. jld

    Reply
  50. I judge a web page on how busy it is and most trailers are just TOO busy. The only book I read on the list is actually a series – The Becketts of Romney Marsh. I have several of them. It would have been nice to be able to open the trailer, just to see it. But I doubt any trailer would intrigue me – it’s the cover, title, notes on the back, as well as being part of a series that lures me. I have read many new authors through series. I agree with the others, I don’t like the “automatic” voices and flashing pictures. I do think the trailers are aimed at the younger generation, so I’m probably like Susan W. jld

    Reply
  51. Joyce, great comments.
    The issue of promo, what to do, how much to spend etc is a contant one for authors. Publishers often don’t do anything for new authors, and hardly any author gets the complete bag of tricks.
    Something that works to attract new-to-us readers is fabulous, but as you say, we have to be careful of the time to write the books.
    The big problem, however, is figuring out what works, and mostly even the publishers don’t know.
    I had a web page in 1996, which is early days for that, and for a long time many authors and even publishers were dubious. Most publishers were certainly very slow to use the internet at all well.
    My publisher does quite a bit for me on the business end. I do other things that amuse me, because I reckon I might as well get recreational therapy out of it.
    BTW, everyone, I meant to post this on the blog. You can get blog posts in your e-mail from feedblitz.com. But come here to comment!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  52. Joyce, great comments.
    The issue of promo, what to do, how much to spend etc is a contant one for authors. Publishers often don’t do anything for new authors, and hardly any author gets the complete bag of tricks.
    Something that works to attract new-to-us readers is fabulous, but as you say, we have to be careful of the time to write the books.
    The big problem, however, is figuring out what works, and mostly even the publishers don’t know.
    I had a web page in 1996, which is early days for that, and for a long time many authors and even publishers were dubious. Most publishers were certainly very slow to use the internet at all well.
    My publisher does quite a bit for me on the business end. I do other things that amuse me, because I reckon I might as well get recreational therapy out of it.
    BTW, everyone, I meant to post this on the blog. You can get blog posts in your e-mail from feedblitz.com. But come here to comment!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  53. Joyce, great comments.
    The issue of promo, what to do, how much to spend etc is a contant one for authors. Publishers often don’t do anything for new authors, and hardly any author gets the complete bag of tricks.
    Something that works to attract new-to-us readers is fabulous, but as you say, we have to be careful of the time to write the books.
    The big problem, however, is figuring out what works, and mostly even the publishers don’t know.
    I had a web page in 1996, which is early days for that, and for a long time many authors and even publishers were dubious. Most publishers were certainly very slow to use the internet at all well.
    My publisher does quite a bit for me on the business end. I do other things that amuse me, because I reckon I might as well get recreational therapy out of it.
    BTW, everyone, I meant to post this on the blog. You can get blog posts in your e-mail from feedblitz.com. But come here to comment!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  54. Joyce, great comments.
    The issue of promo, what to do, how much to spend etc is a contant one for authors. Publishers often don’t do anything for new authors, and hardly any author gets the complete bag of tricks.
    Something that works to attract new-to-us readers is fabulous, but as you say, we have to be careful of the time to write the books.
    The big problem, however, is figuring out what works, and mostly even the publishers don’t know.
    I had a web page in 1996, which is early days for that, and for a long time many authors and even publishers were dubious. Most publishers were certainly very slow to use the internet at all well.
    My publisher does quite a bit for me on the business end. I do other things that amuse me, because I reckon I might as well get recreational therapy out of it.
    BTW, everyone, I meant to post this on the blog. You can get blog posts in your e-mail from feedblitz.com. But come here to comment!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  55. Joyce, great comments.
    The issue of promo, what to do, how much to spend etc is a contant one for authors. Publishers often don’t do anything for new authors, and hardly any author gets the complete bag of tricks.
    Something that works to attract new-to-us readers is fabulous, but as you say, we have to be careful of the time to write the books.
    The big problem, however, is figuring out what works, and mostly even the publishers don’t know.
    I had a web page in 1996, which is early days for that, and for a long time many authors and even publishers were dubious. Most publishers were certainly very slow to use the internet at all well.
    My publisher does quite a bit for me on the business end. I do other things that amuse me, because I reckon I might as well get recreational therapy out of it.
    BTW, everyone, I meant to post this on the blog. You can get blog posts in your e-mail from feedblitz.com. But come here to comment!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  56. Jo said, “I had a web page in 1996, which is early days for that, and for a long time many authors and even publishers were dubious. Most publishers were certainly very slow to use the internet at all well.”
    You make a good point, Jo. I’m certainly not cutting edge, but there are a lot of people out there who are getting ideas and information that way. And I have to admit, it seems more efficient than browsing through a bookstore without a clue.
    As for the trailers you listed above, I went back and looked at the rest. I was even able to watch (with some success) the Beckets of Romney Marsh. It’s unfortunate that so many couldn’t see it. The music was extremely dynamic, which set it apart from the others. Also, if you get a chance to see it, it looks like cover model Andreas Schwarze(sp?) plays all the heroes in the series. Not a bad thing.
    I could see where having live actors might be captivating to some. But I agree with Susan W., I like to imagine how the characters look. Sometimes they don’t even resemble how the author described them.
    My favorite was Her Irish Warrior; loved her web page too. It was not long. I was enthralled by the images of the knight’s dirty hand and the castle. I have no idea what the words said. I think this could have worked nicely as a flash ad. Is that what you call those ads that have three or four pictures that continually change?
    Fascinating subject.

    Reply
  57. Jo said, “I had a web page in 1996, which is early days for that, and for a long time many authors and even publishers were dubious. Most publishers were certainly very slow to use the internet at all well.”
    You make a good point, Jo. I’m certainly not cutting edge, but there are a lot of people out there who are getting ideas and information that way. And I have to admit, it seems more efficient than browsing through a bookstore without a clue.
    As for the trailers you listed above, I went back and looked at the rest. I was even able to watch (with some success) the Beckets of Romney Marsh. It’s unfortunate that so many couldn’t see it. The music was extremely dynamic, which set it apart from the others. Also, if you get a chance to see it, it looks like cover model Andreas Schwarze(sp?) plays all the heroes in the series. Not a bad thing.
    I could see where having live actors might be captivating to some. But I agree with Susan W., I like to imagine how the characters look. Sometimes they don’t even resemble how the author described them.
    My favorite was Her Irish Warrior; loved her web page too. It was not long. I was enthralled by the images of the knight’s dirty hand and the castle. I have no idea what the words said. I think this could have worked nicely as a flash ad. Is that what you call those ads that have three or four pictures that continually change?
    Fascinating subject.

    Reply
  58. Jo said, “I had a web page in 1996, which is early days for that, and for a long time many authors and even publishers were dubious. Most publishers were certainly very slow to use the internet at all well.”
    You make a good point, Jo. I’m certainly not cutting edge, but there are a lot of people out there who are getting ideas and information that way. And I have to admit, it seems more efficient than browsing through a bookstore without a clue.
    As for the trailers you listed above, I went back and looked at the rest. I was even able to watch (with some success) the Beckets of Romney Marsh. It’s unfortunate that so many couldn’t see it. The music was extremely dynamic, which set it apart from the others. Also, if you get a chance to see it, it looks like cover model Andreas Schwarze(sp?) plays all the heroes in the series. Not a bad thing.
    I could see where having live actors might be captivating to some. But I agree with Susan W., I like to imagine how the characters look. Sometimes they don’t even resemble how the author described them.
    My favorite was Her Irish Warrior; loved her web page too. It was not long. I was enthralled by the images of the knight’s dirty hand and the castle. I have no idea what the words said. I think this could have worked nicely as a flash ad. Is that what you call those ads that have three or four pictures that continually change?
    Fascinating subject.

    Reply
  59. Jo said, “I had a web page in 1996, which is early days for that, and for a long time many authors and even publishers were dubious. Most publishers were certainly very slow to use the internet at all well.”
    You make a good point, Jo. I’m certainly not cutting edge, but there are a lot of people out there who are getting ideas and information that way. And I have to admit, it seems more efficient than browsing through a bookstore without a clue.
    As for the trailers you listed above, I went back and looked at the rest. I was even able to watch (with some success) the Beckets of Romney Marsh. It’s unfortunate that so many couldn’t see it. The music was extremely dynamic, which set it apart from the others. Also, if you get a chance to see it, it looks like cover model Andreas Schwarze(sp?) plays all the heroes in the series. Not a bad thing.
    I could see where having live actors might be captivating to some. But I agree with Susan W., I like to imagine how the characters look. Sometimes they don’t even resemble how the author described them.
    My favorite was Her Irish Warrior; loved her web page too. It was not long. I was enthralled by the images of the knight’s dirty hand and the castle. I have no idea what the words said. I think this could have worked nicely as a flash ad. Is that what you call those ads that have three or four pictures that continually change?
    Fascinating subject.

    Reply
  60. Jo said, “I had a web page in 1996, which is early days for that, and for a long time many authors and even publishers were dubious. Most publishers were certainly very slow to use the internet at all well.”
    You make a good point, Jo. I’m certainly not cutting edge, but there are a lot of people out there who are getting ideas and information that way. And I have to admit, it seems more efficient than browsing through a bookstore without a clue.
    As for the trailers you listed above, I went back and looked at the rest. I was even able to watch (with some success) the Beckets of Romney Marsh. It’s unfortunate that so many couldn’t see it. The music was extremely dynamic, which set it apart from the others. Also, if you get a chance to see it, it looks like cover model Andreas Schwarze(sp?) plays all the heroes in the series. Not a bad thing.
    I could see where having live actors might be captivating to some. But I agree with Susan W., I like to imagine how the characters look. Sometimes they don’t even resemble how the author described them.
    My favorite was Her Irish Warrior; loved her web page too. It was not long. I was enthralled by the images of the knight’s dirty hand and the castle. I have no idea what the words said. I think this could have worked nicely as a flash ad. Is that what you call those ads that have three or four pictures that continually change?
    Fascinating subject.

    Reply
  61. Unfortunately I have dial-up (I live in the country, no high-speed available), so I have yet to actually *see* a book trailer. They’re intriguing, but I’m dubious. Live actors and recreating scenes (particularly from historicals) could be very excitng, but only if it was done very well, with high production values, which sounds extremely expensive. And if you only show them on your website, you’re only reaching people who’ve already sought out your site anyway. I don’t think a trailer on someone’s site would convince me to a buy a book (an excerpt would be more likely to go that). If I saw a trailer somewhere else, it might send me to the author’s site for more information (all this is assuming I could actually watch trailers on my computer :-). FWIW I do have video clips me talking about my books on my website. It was the idea of the friends who designed and it was simple and easy to do (we filmed a bunch at once and then they edited them into brief clips I can post when I want).
    Great topic!

    Reply
  62. Unfortunately I have dial-up (I live in the country, no high-speed available), so I have yet to actually *see* a book trailer. They’re intriguing, but I’m dubious. Live actors and recreating scenes (particularly from historicals) could be very excitng, but only if it was done very well, with high production values, which sounds extremely expensive. And if you only show them on your website, you’re only reaching people who’ve already sought out your site anyway. I don’t think a trailer on someone’s site would convince me to a buy a book (an excerpt would be more likely to go that). If I saw a trailer somewhere else, it might send me to the author’s site for more information (all this is assuming I could actually watch trailers on my computer :-). FWIW I do have video clips me talking about my books on my website. It was the idea of the friends who designed and it was simple and easy to do (we filmed a bunch at once and then they edited them into brief clips I can post when I want).
    Great topic!

    Reply
  63. Unfortunately I have dial-up (I live in the country, no high-speed available), so I have yet to actually *see* a book trailer. They’re intriguing, but I’m dubious. Live actors and recreating scenes (particularly from historicals) could be very excitng, but only if it was done very well, with high production values, which sounds extremely expensive. And if you only show them on your website, you’re only reaching people who’ve already sought out your site anyway. I don’t think a trailer on someone’s site would convince me to a buy a book (an excerpt would be more likely to go that). If I saw a trailer somewhere else, it might send me to the author’s site for more information (all this is assuming I could actually watch trailers on my computer :-). FWIW I do have video clips me talking about my books on my website. It was the idea of the friends who designed and it was simple and easy to do (we filmed a bunch at once and then they edited them into brief clips I can post when I want).
    Great topic!

    Reply
  64. Unfortunately I have dial-up (I live in the country, no high-speed available), so I have yet to actually *see* a book trailer. They’re intriguing, but I’m dubious. Live actors and recreating scenes (particularly from historicals) could be very excitng, but only if it was done very well, with high production values, which sounds extremely expensive. And if you only show them on your website, you’re only reaching people who’ve already sought out your site anyway. I don’t think a trailer on someone’s site would convince me to a buy a book (an excerpt would be more likely to go that). If I saw a trailer somewhere else, it might send me to the author’s site for more information (all this is assuming I could actually watch trailers on my computer :-). FWIW I do have video clips me talking about my books on my website. It was the idea of the friends who designed and it was simple and easy to do (we filmed a bunch at once and then they edited them into brief clips I can post when I want).
    Great topic!

    Reply
  65. Unfortunately I have dial-up (I live in the country, no high-speed available), so I have yet to actually *see* a book trailer. They’re intriguing, but I’m dubious. Live actors and recreating scenes (particularly from historicals) could be very excitng, but only if it was done very well, with high production values, which sounds extremely expensive. And if you only show them on your website, you’re only reaching people who’ve already sought out your site anyway. I don’t think a trailer on someone’s site would convince me to a buy a book (an excerpt would be more likely to go that). If I saw a trailer somewhere else, it might send me to the author’s site for more information (all this is assuming I could actually watch trailers on my computer :-). FWIW I do have video clips me talking about my books on my website. It was the idea of the friends who designed and it was simple and easy to do (we filmed a bunch at once and then they edited them into brief clips I can post when I want).
    Great topic!

    Reply
  66. You know, these really didn’t grab me at all. They seemed like gussied up Power Point Presentations. Also the words seemed overly theatrical and I found myself rolling my eyes (kind of like I do at overly-wrought back cover copy, LOL).
    Which brings up the topic of back covers–we’ve talked about the throbbing heaving front covers of romances, but what about the back covers? Sometimes the words on the back are more melodramatic (and wrong) than the art on the front. . .

    Reply
  67. You know, these really didn’t grab me at all. They seemed like gussied up Power Point Presentations. Also the words seemed overly theatrical and I found myself rolling my eyes (kind of like I do at overly-wrought back cover copy, LOL).
    Which brings up the topic of back covers–we’ve talked about the throbbing heaving front covers of romances, but what about the back covers? Sometimes the words on the back are more melodramatic (and wrong) than the art on the front. . .

    Reply
  68. You know, these really didn’t grab me at all. They seemed like gussied up Power Point Presentations. Also the words seemed overly theatrical and I found myself rolling my eyes (kind of like I do at overly-wrought back cover copy, LOL).
    Which brings up the topic of back covers–we’ve talked about the throbbing heaving front covers of romances, but what about the back covers? Sometimes the words on the back are more melodramatic (and wrong) than the art on the front. . .

    Reply
  69. You know, these really didn’t grab me at all. They seemed like gussied up Power Point Presentations. Also the words seemed overly theatrical and I found myself rolling my eyes (kind of like I do at overly-wrought back cover copy, LOL).
    Which brings up the topic of back covers–we’ve talked about the throbbing heaving front covers of romances, but what about the back covers? Sometimes the words on the back are more melodramatic (and wrong) than the art on the front. . .

    Reply
  70. You know, these really didn’t grab me at all. They seemed like gussied up Power Point Presentations. Also the words seemed overly theatrical and I found myself rolling my eyes (kind of like I do at overly-wrought back cover copy, LOL).
    Which brings up the topic of back covers–we’ve talked about the throbbing heaving front covers of romances, but what about the back covers? Sometimes the words on the back are more melodramatic (and wrong) than the art on the front. . .

    Reply
  71. Jo, I watched some of the trailers you listed and loved some and hated others. Not sure how much impact it would have on my spending tho. There are some authors I buy regardless – I just have to know you have a book being released and I am at the bookstore with credit card in hand. Yes Jo – that means you!
    It might make a difference for those authors I have never read before.

    Reply
  72. Jo, I watched some of the trailers you listed and loved some and hated others. Not sure how much impact it would have on my spending tho. There are some authors I buy regardless – I just have to know you have a book being released and I am at the bookstore with credit card in hand. Yes Jo – that means you!
    It might make a difference for those authors I have never read before.

    Reply
  73. Jo, I watched some of the trailers you listed and loved some and hated others. Not sure how much impact it would have on my spending tho. There are some authors I buy regardless – I just have to know you have a book being released and I am at the bookstore with credit card in hand. Yes Jo – that means you!
    It might make a difference for those authors I have never read before.

    Reply
  74. Jo, I watched some of the trailers you listed and loved some and hated others. Not sure how much impact it would have on my spending tho. There are some authors I buy regardless – I just have to know you have a book being released and I am at the bookstore with credit card in hand. Yes Jo – that means you!
    It might make a difference for those authors I have never read before.

    Reply
  75. Jo, I watched some of the trailers you listed and loved some and hated others. Not sure how much impact it would have on my spending tho. There are some authors I buy regardless – I just have to know you have a book being released and I am at the bookstore with credit card in hand. Yes Jo – that means you!
    It might make a difference for those authors I have never read before.

    Reply
  76. Thanks, Jo! It’s true that Regency art options are a little more limited (especially when you consider copyright restrictions), but that just means you have to be more creative in your approach!
    Book trailers are becoming popular in all genres, I think. I know Borders has been featuring them on their site and in newsletters – if you could get one profiled there, it would definitely be worthwhile!
    I’m also interested to see how book trailers will evolve. Some are done in Flash, which offers a lot of possibilities for interactive content.

    Reply
  77. Thanks, Jo! It’s true that Regency art options are a little more limited (especially when you consider copyright restrictions), but that just means you have to be more creative in your approach!
    Book trailers are becoming popular in all genres, I think. I know Borders has been featuring them on their site and in newsletters – if you could get one profiled there, it would definitely be worthwhile!
    I’m also interested to see how book trailers will evolve. Some are done in Flash, which offers a lot of possibilities for interactive content.

    Reply
  78. Thanks, Jo! It’s true that Regency art options are a little more limited (especially when you consider copyright restrictions), but that just means you have to be more creative in your approach!
    Book trailers are becoming popular in all genres, I think. I know Borders has been featuring them on their site and in newsletters – if you could get one profiled there, it would definitely be worthwhile!
    I’m also interested to see how book trailers will evolve. Some are done in Flash, which offers a lot of possibilities for interactive content.

    Reply
  79. Thanks, Jo! It’s true that Regency art options are a little more limited (especially when you consider copyright restrictions), but that just means you have to be more creative in your approach!
    Book trailers are becoming popular in all genres, I think. I know Borders has been featuring them on their site and in newsletters – if you could get one profiled there, it would definitely be worthwhile!
    I’m also interested to see how book trailers will evolve. Some are done in Flash, which offers a lot of possibilities for interactive content.

    Reply
  80. Thanks, Jo! It’s true that Regency art options are a little more limited (especially when you consider copyright restrictions), but that just means you have to be more creative in your approach!
    Book trailers are becoming popular in all genres, I think. I know Borders has been featuring them on their site and in newsletters – if you could get one profiled there, it would definitely be worthwhile!
    I’m also interested to see how book trailers will evolve. Some are done in Flash, which offers a lot of possibilities for interactive content.

    Reply
  81. Accessibility is a real concern, I think, so perhaps putting them on somewhere like You Tube is best, because most people with a good connection can see them there if they want.
    And that addresses the other point. Putting them on our website only reaches people already interested. A more general site could catch the unwary… Oops! *G*
    I do see other developments here, though. Bookstores is one, if they’d run some.
    What about book signings? They can often be deadly, but if an author had a trailer running on a laptop it might draw some interest.
    Any other creative uses for this kind of visual?
    Jo

    Reply
  82. Accessibility is a real concern, I think, so perhaps putting them on somewhere like You Tube is best, because most people with a good connection can see them there if they want.
    And that addresses the other point. Putting them on our website only reaches people already interested. A more general site could catch the unwary… Oops! *G*
    I do see other developments here, though. Bookstores is one, if they’d run some.
    What about book signings? They can often be deadly, but if an author had a trailer running on a laptop it might draw some interest.
    Any other creative uses for this kind of visual?
    Jo

    Reply
  83. Accessibility is a real concern, I think, so perhaps putting them on somewhere like You Tube is best, because most people with a good connection can see them there if they want.
    And that addresses the other point. Putting them on our website only reaches people already interested. A more general site could catch the unwary… Oops! *G*
    I do see other developments here, though. Bookstores is one, if they’d run some.
    What about book signings? They can often be deadly, but if an author had a trailer running on a laptop it might draw some interest.
    Any other creative uses for this kind of visual?
    Jo

    Reply
  84. Accessibility is a real concern, I think, so perhaps putting them on somewhere like You Tube is best, because most people with a good connection can see them there if they want.
    And that addresses the other point. Putting them on our website only reaches people already interested. A more general site could catch the unwary… Oops! *G*
    I do see other developments here, though. Bookstores is one, if they’d run some.
    What about book signings? They can often be deadly, but if an author had a trailer running on a laptop it might draw some interest.
    Any other creative uses for this kind of visual?
    Jo

    Reply
  85. Accessibility is a real concern, I think, so perhaps putting them on somewhere like You Tube is best, because most people with a good connection can see them there if they want.
    And that addresses the other point. Putting them on our website only reaches people already interested. A more general site could catch the unwary… Oops! *G*
    I do see other developments here, though. Bookstores is one, if they’d run some.
    What about book signings? They can often be deadly, but if an author had a trailer running on a laptop it might draw some interest.
    Any other creative uses for this kind of visual?
    Jo

    Reply
  86. I don’t mind the trailers that do not show a face – just hints at one. But the ones with faces and especially acting in them . . . ruins it for me as I prefer using my imagination. I always think about how my favorite books could be turned in to a movie – but can never pick the right actor or actress to be what I picture in my imagination.

    Reply
  87. I don’t mind the trailers that do not show a face – just hints at one. But the ones with faces and especially acting in them . . . ruins it for me as I prefer using my imagination. I always think about how my favorite books could be turned in to a movie – but can never pick the right actor or actress to be what I picture in my imagination.

    Reply
  88. I don’t mind the trailers that do not show a face – just hints at one. But the ones with faces and especially acting in them . . . ruins it for me as I prefer using my imagination. I always think about how my favorite books could be turned in to a movie – but can never pick the right actor or actress to be what I picture in my imagination.

    Reply
  89. I don’t mind the trailers that do not show a face – just hints at one. But the ones with faces and especially acting in them . . . ruins it for me as I prefer using my imagination. I always think about how my favorite books could be turned in to a movie – but can never pick the right actor or actress to be what I picture in my imagination.

    Reply
  90. I don’t mind the trailers that do not show a face – just hints at one. But the ones with faces and especially acting in them . . . ruins it for me as I prefer using my imagination. I always think about how my favorite books could be turned in to a movie – but can never pick the right actor or actress to be what I picture in my imagination.

    Reply
  91. I’m not too keen on trailers. First of all, not everyone will have the right kind of computer crap to play them. The ones that I was able to watch I found way too dramatic and the one for Madeline Hunter’s book I couldn’t watch all the way through. And, I love her books and I’ve already purchased her new one, but I really rolled my eyes at the acting. I believe that one really as to be careful when translating a romance book’s written dialogue into vocalization, because it can very quickly become silly. Time-travel time here: think Barbara Cartland and those movies that were made from her books. It’s not just romance books that don’t translate well to the screen (big or small), maybe the secret is a really good screenplay or whatever they’re called.
    I think the best “techno” thing lately that has helped me find new authors is the different author blog sites, like this one. I check up on my auto-buy authors and stumble across other authors that sound interesting, so, I buy their books.

    Reply
  92. I’m not too keen on trailers. First of all, not everyone will have the right kind of computer crap to play them. The ones that I was able to watch I found way too dramatic and the one for Madeline Hunter’s book I couldn’t watch all the way through. And, I love her books and I’ve already purchased her new one, but I really rolled my eyes at the acting. I believe that one really as to be careful when translating a romance book’s written dialogue into vocalization, because it can very quickly become silly. Time-travel time here: think Barbara Cartland and those movies that were made from her books. It’s not just romance books that don’t translate well to the screen (big or small), maybe the secret is a really good screenplay or whatever they’re called.
    I think the best “techno” thing lately that has helped me find new authors is the different author blog sites, like this one. I check up on my auto-buy authors and stumble across other authors that sound interesting, so, I buy their books.

    Reply
  93. I’m not too keen on trailers. First of all, not everyone will have the right kind of computer crap to play them. The ones that I was able to watch I found way too dramatic and the one for Madeline Hunter’s book I couldn’t watch all the way through. And, I love her books and I’ve already purchased her new one, but I really rolled my eyes at the acting. I believe that one really as to be careful when translating a romance book’s written dialogue into vocalization, because it can very quickly become silly. Time-travel time here: think Barbara Cartland and those movies that were made from her books. It’s not just romance books that don’t translate well to the screen (big or small), maybe the secret is a really good screenplay or whatever they’re called.
    I think the best “techno” thing lately that has helped me find new authors is the different author blog sites, like this one. I check up on my auto-buy authors and stumble across other authors that sound interesting, so, I buy their books.

    Reply
  94. I’m not too keen on trailers. First of all, not everyone will have the right kind of computer crap to play them. The ones that I was able to watch I found way too dramatic and the one for Madeline Hunter’s book I couldn’t watch all the way through. And, I love her books and I’ve already purchased her new one, but I really rolled my eyes at the acting. I believe that one really as to be careful when translating a romance book’s written dialogue into vocalization, because it can very quickly become silly. Time-travel time here: think Barbara Cartland and those movies that were made from her books. It’s not just romance books that don’t translate well to the screen (big or small), maybe the secret is a really good screenplay or whatever they’re called.
    I think the best “techno” thing lately that has helped me find new authors is the different author blog sites, like this one. I check up on my auto-buy authors and stumble across other authors that sound interesting, so, I buy their books.

    Reply
  95. I’m not too keen on trailers. First of all, not everyone will have the right kind of computer crap to play them. The ones that I was able to watch I found way too dramatic and the one for Madeline Hunter’s book I couldn’t watch all the way through. And, I love her books and I’ve already purchased her new one, but I really rolled my eyes at the acting. I believe that one really as to be careful when translating a romance book’s written dialogue into vocalization, because it can very quickly become silly. Time-travel time here: think Barbara Cartland and those movies that were made from her books. It’s not just romance books that don’t translate well to the screen (big or small), maybe the secret is a really good screenplay or whatever they’re called.
    I think the best “techno” thing lately that has helped me find new authors is the different author blog sites, like this one. I check up on my auto-buy authors and stumble across other authors that sound interesting, so, I buy their books.

    Reply
  96. Disclaimer: I do have a B.S. in Accounting, but I’m not a CPA or tax accountant. I also have no more knowledge of the publishing industry than what I’ve learned on these boards. So, I’m in no way giving advice, merely suggestions.
    That being said, Jo asked about other ways book trailers can be used, and I’d like to offer up the following.
    For established authors, rather than creating a trailer for a new and untested release, why not create a trailer for a book on your backlist? One that you know has had mass appeal. And/or perhaps the first in a series that has had a popular following. Then if your trailer is successful in grabbing an audience, you’re giving an example of your best work.

    Reply
  97. Disclaimer: I do have a B.S. in Accounting, but I’m not a CPA or tax accountant. I also have no more knowledge of the publishing industry than what I’ve learned on these boards. So, I’m in no way giving advice, merely suggestions.
    That being said, Jo asked about other ways book trailers can be used, and I’d like to offer up the following.
    For established authors, rather than creating a trailer for a new and untested release, why not create a trailer for a book on your backlist? One that you know has had mass appeal. And/or perhaps the first in a series that has had a popular following. Then if your trailer is successful in grabbing an audience, you’re giving an example of your best work.

    Reply
  98. Disclaimer: I do have a B.S. in Accounting, but I’m not a CPA or tax accountant. I also have no more knowledge of the publishing industry than what I’ve learned on these boards. So, I’m in no way giving advice, merely suggestions.
    That being said, Jo asked about other ways book trailers can be used, and I’d like to offer up the following.
    For established authors, rather than creating a trailer for a new and untested release, why not create a trailer for a book on your backlist? One that you know has had mass appeal. And/or perhaps the first in a series that has had a popular following. Then if your trailer is successful in grabbing an audience, you’re giving an example of your best work.

    Reply
  99. Disclaimer: I do have a B.S. in Accounting, but I’m not a CPA or tax accountant. I also have no more knowledge of the publishing industry than what I’ve learned on these boards. So, I’m in no way giving advice, merely suggestions.
    That being said, Jo asked about other ways book trailers can be used, and I’d like to offer up the following.
    For established authors, rather than creating a trailer for a new and untested release, why not create a trailer for a book on your backlist? One that you know has had mass appeal. And/or perhaps the first in a series that has had a popular following. Then if your trailer is successful in grabbing an audience, you’re giving an example of your best work.

    Reply
  100. Disclaimer: I do have a B.S. in Accounting, but I’m not a CPA or tax accountant. I also have no more knowledge of the publishing industry than what I’ve learned on these boards. So, I’m in no way giving advice, merely suggestions.
    That being said, Jo asked about other ways book trailers can be used, and I’d like to offer up the following.
    For established authors, rather than creating a trailer for a new and untested release, why not create a trailer for a book on your backlist? One that you know has had mass appeal. And/or perhaps the first in a series that has had a popular following. Then if your trailer is successful in grabbing an audience, you’re giving an example of your best work.

    Reply
  101. Interesting suggestion, Jodell. One problem with backlist is it’s often out of print. For a while all mine except the old trads was, but now a number are out again. It’s never ending, though it a sort of good way. People keep buying the older books, which means new-to-me readers.
    Along tnat line, however, I’m thinking value-added. Locations used in a book or series, period pictures of relevance, that sort of thing. I do have photographs on my web page — the menu’s here http://members.shaw.ca/jobev/pictures.html — but perhaps in trailer form with more commentary would be interesting?
    Jo

    Reply
  102. Interesting suggestion, Jodell. One problem with backlist is it’s often out of print. For a while all mine except the old trads was, but now a number are out again. It’s never ending, though it a sort of good way. People keep buying the older books, which means new-to-me readers.
    Along tnat line, however, I’m thinking value-added. Locations used in a book or series, period pictures of relevance, that sort of thing. I do have photographs on my web page — the menu’s here http://members.shaw.ca/jobev/pictures.html — but perhaps in trailer form with more commentary would be interesting?
    Jo

    Reply
  103. Interesting suggestion, Jodell. One problem with backlist is it’s often out of print. For a while all mine except the old trads was, but now a number are out again. It’s never ending, though it a sort of good way. People keep buying the older books, which means new-to-me readers.
    Along tnat line, however, I’m thinking value-added. Locations used in a book or series, period pictures of relevance, that sort of thing. I do have photographs on my web page — the menu’s here http://members.shaw.ca/jobev/pictures.html — but perhaps in trailer form with more commentary would be interesting?
    Jo

    Reply
  104. Interesting suggestion, Jodell. One problem with backlist is it’s often out of print. For a while all mine except the old trads was, but now a number are out again. It’s never ending, though it a sort of good way. People keep buying the older books, which means new-to-me readers.
    Along tnat line, however, I’m thinking value-added. Locations used in a book or series, period pictures of relevance, that sort of thing. I do have photographs on my web page — the menu’s here http://members.shaw.ca/jobev/pictures.html — but perhaps in trailer form with more commentary would be interesting?
    Jo

    Reply
  105. Interesting suggestion, Jodell. One problem with backlist is it’s often out of print. For a while all mine except the old trads was, but now a number are out again. It’s never ending, though it a sort of good way. People keep buying the older books, which means new-to-me readers.
    Along tnat line, however, I’m thinking value-added. Locations used in a book or series, period pictures of relevance, that sort of thing. I do have photographs on my web page — the menu’s here http://members.shaw.ca/jobev/pictures.html — but perhaps in trailer form with more commentary would be interesting?
    Jo

    Reply
  106. Interesting discussion! I find trailers interesting, but as with other forms of promotion, the first few people who do it reap most of the benefits. For trailers, that would be Christine Feehan, who did a brilliant job making and promoting hers before anyone else thought of it.
    Being ever curious, I made a book trailer for the paperback release of The Marriage Spell this summer. Did it help? Hard to say–the book sold pretty well, better than the prior one, but it’s hard to say just why.
    Watching the links Jo posted, I realized that I enjoy looking at trailers if they’re well done, and historical trailers in particular tend to have lovely images. But I enjoyed them as the graphic designer I was for many years–none of them made me want to rush out and buy the book.
    A couple wouldn’t open, and Lindsey, while yours looked lovely, it kept coming to a halt for long intervals till I gave up. The only time that has happened when I tried to view a trailer.
    As to where they’re used–besides my website, mine was posted on a number of content sharing sites like YouTube and MySpace, as well as on COS Productions site. It was also picked up for the Borders site. Plus, the Ballantine publicist was excited by it and did something with it, though I was too busy to follow up and figure out what!
    Making a trailer was an interesting experience and it may have had some value, but I doubt I’ll do it again.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  107. Interesting discussion! I find trailers interesting, but as with other forms of promotion, the first few people who do it reap most of the benefits. For trailers, that would be Christine Feehan, who did a brilliant job making and promoting hers before anyone else thought of it.
    Being ever curious, I made a book trailer for the paperback release of The Marriage Spell this summer. Did it help? Hard to say–the book sold pretty well, better than the prior one, but it’s hard to say just why.
    Watching the links Jo posted, I realized that I enjoy looking at trailers if they’re well done, and historical trailers in particular tend to have lovely images. But I enjoyed them as the graphic designer I was for many years–none of them made me want to rush out and buy the book.
    A couple wouldn’t open, and Lindsey, while yours looked lovely, it kept coming to a halt for long intervals till I gave up. The only time that has happened when I tried to view a trailer.
    As to where they’re used–besides my website, mine was posted on a number of content sharing sites like YouTube and MySpace, as well as on COS Productions site. It was also picked up for the Borders site. Plus, the Ballantine publicist was excited by it and did something with it, though I was too busy to follow up and figure out what!
    Making a trailer was an interesting experience and it may have had some value, but I doubt I’ll do it again.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  108. Interesting discussion! I find trailers interesting, but as with other forms of promotion, the first few people who do it reap most of the benefits. For trailers, that would be Christine Feehan, who did a brilliant job making and promoting hers before anyone else thought of it.
    Being ever curious, I made a book trailer for the paperback release of The Marriage Spell this summer. Did it help? Hard to say–the book sold pretty well, better than the prior one, but it’s hard to say just why.
    Watching the links Jo posted, I realized that I enjoy looking at trailers if they’re well done, and historical trailers in particular tend to have lovely images. But I enjoyed them as the graphic designer I was for many years–none of them made me want to rush out and buy the book.
    A couple wouldn’t open, and Lindsey, while yours looked lovely, it kept coming to a halt for long intervals till I gave up. The only time that has happened when I tried to view a trailer.
    As to where they’re used–besides my website, mine was posted on a number of content sharing sites like YouTube and MySpace, as well as on COS Productions site. It was also picked up for the Borders site. Plus, the Ballantine publicist was excited by it and did something with it, though I was too busy to follow up and figure out what!
    Making a trailer was an interesting experience and it may have had some value, but I doubt I’ll do it again.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  109. Interesting discussion! I find trailers interesting, but as with other forms of promotion, the first few people who do it reap most of the benefits. For trailers, that would be Christine Feehan, who did a brilliant job making and promoting hers before anyone else thought of it.
    Being ever curious, I made a book trailer for the paperback release of The Marriage Spell this summer. Did it help? Hard to say–the book sold pretty well, better than the prior one, but it’s hard to say just why.
    Watching the links Jo posted, I realized that I enjoy looking at trailers if they’re well done, and historical trailers in particular tend to have lovely images. But I enjoyed them as the graphic designer I was for many years–none of them made me want to rush out and buy the book.
    A couple wouldn’t open, and Lindsey, while yours looked lovely, it kept coming to a halt for long intervals till I gave up. The only time that has happened when I tried to view a trailer.
    As to where they’re used–besides my website, mine was posted on a number of content sharing sites like YouTube and MySpace, as well as on COS Productions site. It was also picked up for the Borders site. Plus, the Ballantine publicist was excited by it and did something with it, though I was too busy to follow up and figure out what!
    Making a trailer was an interesting experience and it may have had some value, but I doubt I’ll do it again.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  110. Interesting discussion! I find trailers interesting, but as with other forms of promotion, the first few people who do it reap most of the benefits. For trailers, that would be Christine Feehan, who did a brilliant job making and promoting hers before anyone else thought of it.
    Being ever curious, I made a book trailer for the paperback release of The Marriage Spell this summer. Did it help? Hard to say–the book sold pretty well, better than the prior one, but it’s hard to say just why.
    Watching the links Jo posted, I realized that I enjoy looking at trailers if they’re well done, and historical trailers in particular tend to have lovely images. But I enjoyed them as the graphic designer I was for many years–none of them made me want to rush out and buy the book.
    A couple wouldn’t open, and Lindsey, while yours looked lovely, it kept coming to a halt for long intervals till I gave up. The only time that has happened when I tried to view a trailer.
    As to where they’re used–besides my website, mine was posted on a number of content sharing sites like YouTube and MySpace, as well as on COS Productions site. It was also picked up for the Borders site. Plus, the Ballantine publicist was excited by it and did something with it, though I was too busy to follow up and figure out what!
    Making a trailer was an interesting experience and it may have had some value, but I doubt I’ll do it again.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  111. Jodell, I’m not sure what you’re not understanding. 🙂 If you mean about backlist, you suggested doing trailers for older books, which is a very interesting idea. I was just saying that often older books are hard to find new, or even impossible.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  112. Jodell, I’m not sure what you’re not understanding. 🙂 If you mean about backlist, you suggested doing trailers for older books, which is a very interesting idea. I was just saying that often older books are hard to find new, or even impossible.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  113. Jodell, I’m not sure what you’re not understanding. 🙂 If you mean about backlist, you suggested doing trailers for older books, which is a very interesting idea. I was just saying that often older books are hard to find new, or even impossible.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  114. Jodell, I’m not sure what you’re not understanding. 🙂 If you mean about backlist, you suggested doing trailers for older books, which is a very interesting idea. I was just saying that often older books are hard to find new, or even impossible.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  115. Jodell, I’m not sure what you’re not understanding. 🙂 If you mean about backlist, you suggested doing trailers for older books, which is a very interesting idea. I was just saying that often older books are hard to find new, or even impossible.
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  116. Hi, Jo,
    It was interesting looking at the trailers – thank you for pulling so many together in one place.
    I had never looked at trailers before and did not know where they were used.
    If they are used solely on a web site of an author I read and whose web site I visit regularly, the trailer won’t make me purchase – I’m going to purchase her books anyway.
    If the trailer is on a group site, or a commentary site, it might provide more intrigue, because it appeals to more senses. I agree with the post-er who said that voiceovers add to the experience. The trailers that just showed flowing print tended to drag.
    I am sure that any trailer you approved would be creative and fun! So I’ll be interested to hear what you decide.

    Reply
  117. Hi, Jo,
    It was interesting looking at the trailers – thank you for pulling so many together in one place.
    I had never looked at trailers before and did not know where they were used.
    If they are used solely on a web site of an author I read and whose web site I visit regularly, the trailer won’t make me purchase – I’m going to purchase her books anyway.
    If the trailer is on a group site, or a commentary site, it might provide more intrigue, because it appeals to more senses. I agree with the post-er who said that voiceovers add to the experience. The trailers that just showed flowing print tended to drag.
    I am sure that any trailer you approved would be creative and fun! So I’ll be interested to hear what you decide.

    Reply
  118. Hi, Jo,
    It was interesting looking at the trailers – thank you for pulling so many together in one place.
    I had never looked at trailers before and did not know where they were used.
    If they are used solely on a web site of an author I read and whose web site I visit regularly, the trailer won’t make me purchase – I’m going to purchase her books anyway.
    If the trailer is on a group site, or a commentary site, it might provide more intrigue, because it appeals to more senses. I agree with the post-er who said that voiceovers add to the experience. The trailers that just showed flowing print tended to drag.
    I am sure that any trailer you approved would be creative and fun! So I’ll be interested to hear what you decide.

    Reply
  119. Hi, Jo,
    It was interesting looking at the trailers – thank you for pulling so many together in one place.
    I had never looked at trailers before and did not know where they were used.
    If they are used solely on a web site of an author I read and whose web site I visit regularly, the trailer won’t make me purchase – I’m going to purchase her books anyway.
    If the trailer is on a group site, or a commentary site, it might provide more intrigue, because it appeals to more senses. I agree with the post-er who said that voiceovers add to the experience. The trailers that just showed flowing print tended to drag.
    I am sure that any trailer you approved would be creative and fun! So I’ll be interested to hear what you decide.

    Reply
  120. Hi, Jo,
    It was interesting looking at the trailers – thank you for pulling so many together in one place.
    I had never looked at trailers before and did not know where they were used.
    If they are used solely on a web site of an author I read and whose web site I visit regularly, the trailer won’t make me purchase – I’m going to purchase her books anyway.
    If the trailer is on a group site, or a commentary site, it might provide more intrigue, because it appeals to more senses. I agree with the post-er who said that voiceovers add to the experience. The trailers that just showed flowing print tended to drag.
    I am sure that any trailer you approved would be creative and fun! So I’ll be interested to hear what you decide.

    Reply
  121. I’m sorry I didn’t make myself more clear. 🙂 What I meant was that I was unsure what you meant by value-added and whether you were asking for readers opinions on using photo images. And maybe more specifically if using photo images to illustrate specific scenes in a book would be appealing. If that was the question, I’m not sure I have an opinion yet. But like Lindsey said, not having regency images available due to copy rights, certainly will force a person to be more creative.
    Honestly, I’ve had a wonderful time seeing how different people will interpret a (print) book into a (visual) trailer. And I’ve had fun trying to determine what worked for me and what didn’t.
    If you decide to produce a trailer, I hope you’ll provide a link here. I think for now I’m going to leave YouTube and the like to the young and young at heart. (My 9 and 12 year olds tell me all the kids at school check out YouTube). Personally, I might go back to looking at books the old fashioned way–card catalog.
    Sincerely,
    Wilma Flintstone

    Reply
  122. I’m sorry I didn’t make myself more clear. 🙂 What I meant was that I was unsure what you meant by value-added and whether you were asking for readers opinions on using photo images. And maybe more specifically if using photo images to illustrate specific scenes in a book would be appealing. If that was the question, I’m not sure I have an opinion yet. But like Lindsey said, not having regency images available due to copy rights, certainly will force a person to be more creative.
    Honestly, I’ve had a wonderful time seeing how different people will interpret a (print) book into a (visual) trailer. And I’ve had fun trying to determine what worked for me and what didn’t.
    If you decide to produce a trailer, I hope you’ll provide a link here. I think for now I’m going to leave YouTube and the like to the young and young at heart. (My 9 and 12 year olds tell me all the kids at school check out YouTube). Personally, I might go back to looking at books the old fashioned way–card catalog.
    Sincerely,
    Wilma Flintstone

    Reply
  123. I’m sorry I didn’t make myself more clear. 🙂 What I meant was that I was unsure what you meant by value-added and whether you were asking for readers opinions on using photo images. And maybe more specifically if using photo images to illustrate specific scenes in a book would be appealing. If that was the question, I’m not sure I have an opinion yet. But like Lindsey said, not having regency images available due to copy rights, certainly will force a person to be more creative.
    Honestly, I’ve had a wonderful time seeing how different people will interpret a (print) book into a (visual) trailer. And I’ve had fun trying to determine what worked for me and what didn’t.
    If you decide to produce a trailer, I hope you’ll provide a link here. I think for now I’m going to leave YouTube and the like to the young and young at heart. (My 9 and 12 year olds tell me all the kids at school check out YouTube). Personally, I might go back to looking at books the old fashioned way–card catalog.
    Sincerely,
    Wilma Flintstone

    Reply
  124. I’m sorry I didn’t make myself more clear. 🙂 What I meant was that I was unsure what you meant by value-added and whether you were asking for readers opinions on using photo images. And maybe more specifically if using photo images to illustrate specific scenes in a book would be appealing. If that was the question, I’m not sure I have an opinion yet. But like Lindsey said, not having regency images available due to copy rights, certainly will force a person to be more creative.
    Honestly, I’ve had a wonderful time seeing how different people will interpret a (print) book into a (visual) trailer. And I’ve had fun trying to determine what worked for me and what didn’t.
    If you decide to produce a trailer, I hope you’ll provide a link here. I think for now I’m going to leave YouTube and the like to the young and young at heart. (My 9 and 12 year olds tell me all the kids at school check out YouTube). Personally, I might go back to looking at books the old fashioned way–card catalog.
    Sincerely,
    Wilma Flintstone

    Reply
  125. I’m sorry I didn’t make myself more clear. 🙂 What I meant was that I was unsure what you meant by value-added and whether you were asking for readers opinions on using photo images. And maybe more specifically if using photo images to illustrate specific scenes in a book would be appealing. If that was the question, I’m not sure I have an opinion yet. But like Lindsey said, not having regency images available due to copy rights, certainly will force a person to be more creative.
    Honestly, I’ve had a wonderful time seeing how different people will interpret a (print) book into a (visual) trailer. And I’ve had fun trying to determine what worked for me and what didn’t.
    If you decide to produce a trailer, I hope you’ll provide a link here. I think for now I’m going to leave YouTube and the like to the young and young at heart. (My 9 and 12 year olds tell me all the kids at school check out YouTube). Personally, I might go back to looking at books the old fashioned way–card catalog.
    Sincerely,
    Wilma Flintstone

    Reply
  126. I am soooooo not interested in book trailers. Books are a text medium, so using audio/visuals for advertising them doesn’t really tell me what the book is like to read. It might make me yearn for a film of the same story though…

    Reply
  127. I am soooooo not interested in book trailers. Books are a text medium, so using audio/visuals for advertising them doesn’t really tell me what the book is like to read. It might make me yearn for a film of the same story though…

    Reply
  128. I am soooooo not interested in book trailers. Books are a text medium, so using audio/visuals for advertising them doesn’t really tell me what the book is like to read. It might make me yearn for a film of the same story though…

    Reply
  129. I am soooooo not interested in book trailers. Books are a text medium, so using audio/visuals for advertising them doesn’t really tell me what the book is like to read. It might make me yearn for a film of the same story though…

    Reply
  130. I am soooooo not interested in book trailers. Books are a text medium, so using audio/visuals for advertising them doesn’t really tell me what the book is like to read. It might make me yearn for a film of the same story though…

    Reply

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