Book clubs

1valchloesmall Anne here, pondering book clubs.  
Years ago a friend invited me to join her book club. I refused. Nicely, but firmly. 

"Too much like my work," I said, attempting diplomacy. At the time I was teaching English and English Literature and the thought of reading and discussing worthy books that other people chose — in my own time! — was not my idea of fun. In those days any time I had for free reading was precious and I wanted it to be entirely untrammeled, unregulated and with no need to justify my choices to anyone.

"But it's great. It makes me read," my friend said. "I have to read books that I otherwise wouldn't. It's good for me."

I shuddered. Spare me books that are good for me. Too Victorian-era for words. Besides, I don't need anything to make me read. I read constantly and always have. To me reading is a joy, not an ought-to-do. 

"It's fun," my friend persisted. "We all meet at each other's places and bring food. You'll make new friends." Bookclub

"Sorry I just don't have the time," I lied.

And for years I've maintained that position. That original book club has continued to flourish and once a month my friend reads her book (or not) and happily heads off to the meeting. It's a social occasion as much as anything and over the years strangers have become good friends. And I've met some of them socially and they're lovely. But I'm not sorry I refused the invitation.

I can't claim to be entirely outside the bounds of book clubs. I've been a member of an on-line Georgette Heyer reading group for more than ten years. But I've read and reread all the Heyers so often it doesn't really count. I join in the discussion if I feel like it and remain silent a good part of the time. 

WomenReading I'm not saying I don't enjoy discussions about books. I love books and love talking about them with other people. It's the organizing of it I recoil from. Oh, I know if you're in a group you need to be practical, but for me planning to read in advance takes the joy out of it. I usually have several books on the go at any one time, and a teetering to-be-read pile standing by to tempt me to stray if the mood strikes for something different. 

Most people assume the book club is a fairly modern phenomenon, and in some ways it is. Certainly book clubs are more popular now than ever, nourished by the internet, but it's by no means a new thing.

According to Lisa Rufle,  the origin of the bookclub can be can be traced back as early as the 1720s.  And K.A. Manley writing about the Sedbergh Book Club (1728—1928) here said: "Country book clubs…mark a transition between the informal lending of books among friends and neighbours and the desire to instiutionalize and formalize such a practice." He (she?) adds: "Reading is a personal and intense experience, but the book club added a social and sociable, dimension."Woman-reading

The earliest documented book club existed in Meppershall, Bedfordshire in 1704 and contained twelve gentlemen who subscribed one pound annually and divided the books among themselves at the end of each year. Since this is the first documented book club, it's very likely that others existed in earlier times, but as Manley points out, "the idea of a group of men meeting in private to discuss the latest productions of the printing presses would have been considered subversive, and, in the previous century, heretical."

In the Regency era, circulating libraries were extremely popular, and formal and informal gatherings of readers to discuss the latest offerings became common. 

Rachel Jacobsohn, author of The Reading Group Handbook, wrote about a reading group comprised of " white glove-wearing, hat-wearing, tea-drinking, elitist old white women" from the late 1800s. This exclusive group was restricted to members who inherited a place among the coveted club. These early book clubs were formed for a mix of educational and social purposes, and were exclusive, open only to the educated, moneyed classes. (Pic: Olathe Ladies Reading Circle, now celebrating its 125th anniversary.)

About.LadiesReadingCircle2 However I would argue that there was another kind of book club, where ordinary unprivileged people gathered to share and discuss a story. These were people who could not read, who came together so that an educated reader could read aloud to them.  

The stories of Charles Dickens are a case in point. They were serialized, and as each new episode was released, unlettered folk would gather to hear it read,  perhaps as they were working, perhaps in a tavern, or in someone's home. Being read aloud to was a common pastime then, for all walks of life, and you can be sure the listeners would discuss each episode thoroughly afterward.Dickens_dream_600

Dickens, knowing this widespread practice, wrote with that in mind, honing his writing to sound well to the ear, to conjure up images that would be taken up by listeners, by using punctuation and spelling to assist the reader to grasp the accents and expressions of the characters, and  by using life-like dialogue to bring alive the characters to a greater extent than many writers before him. It certainly expanded his fame far beyond an audience of educated readers.

HU042465 It wasn't only fiction that was spread this way. The Mechanics Institute Movement was begun in 1799 when Dr George Birkbeck conducted a series of free lectures for the working men of Glasgow. (In those days "mechanic" meant any man who worked with his hands — ie an artisan or tradesman. The movement spread throughout the British Empire, as well as the USA, and part of the program was the reading and discussion of books, ideas and technical matters in groups, for literacy was still an uncommon skill for working people. (Pic: Cigar Makers Being Read To in a Cuban cigar factory. Ca. 1900-1910.)


So book clubs have a long, varied and honorable history. I can appreciate their benefits, in the past and now, but I've never been tempted to join one — until recently. 

Books4club I can't quite believe it, but not only have I joined a book club, I actually seem to have started it. It came about when a small group of authors I communicate on line with decided we'd like to push our reading boundaries a little, and discuss some books as writers, not just readers. So there it is; I now belong to a book club and have to eat my words as well as read them.

So do you belong to a book club? If so, tell us about it.  Is it organized formally or informally? Is it internet based or face to face. What do you like about it?
Or are you still going it alone, reading as the whim takes you, unregulated, untrammeled and free?

135 thoughts on “Book clubs”

  1. Nope not a member. I like reading what I like reading. It always seems to me that book clubs want to read “deep” “meaningful” “insightful” books that members can feel superior about having read. Books that they can search for the symbolism in, and discuss the “theme”. What a way to ruin a good book. I prefer to read books for enjoyment, and escapism, not because I want to be improved.

    Reply
  2. Nope not a member. I like reading what I like reading. It always seems to me that book clubs want to read “deep” “meaningful” “insightful” books that members can feel superior about having read. Books that they can search for the symbolism in, and discuss the “theme”. What a way to ruin a good book. I prefer to read books for enjoyment, and escapism, not because I want to be improved.

    Reply
  3. Nope not a member. I like reading what I like reading. It always seems to me that book clubs want to read “deep” “meaningful” “insightful” books that members can feel superior about having read. Books that they can search for the symbolism in, and discuss the “theme”. What a way to ruin a good book. I prefer to read books for enjoyment, and escapism, not because I want to be improved.

    Reply
  4. Nope not a member. I like reading what I like reading. It always seems to me that book clubs want to read “deep” “meaningful” “insightful” books that members can feel superior about having read. Books that they can search for the symbolism in, and discuss the “theme”. What a way to ruin a good book. I prefer to read books for enjoyment, and escapism, not because I want to be improved.

    Reply
  5. Nope not a member. I like reading what I like reading. It always seems to me that book clubs want to read “deep” “meaningful” “insightful” books that members can feel superior about having read. Books that they can search for the symbolism in, and discuss the “theme”. What a way to ruin a good book. I prefer to read books for enjoyment, and escapism, not because I want to be improved.

    Reply
  6. How fascinating, Anne! I’d never thought about how reading groups would be a natural adjunct to all the self-improvement groups that were founded in the industrial age, but it’s a perfect fit. And I like that image of books being read to people as they work. Much more fun that listening to radio with too many commercials.
    I’m not a member of any book club. But I do discuss books with other writers. Don’t we all???
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  7. How fascinating, Anne! I’d never thought about how reading groups would be a natural adjunct to all the self-improvement groups that were founded in the industrial age, but it’s a perfect fit. And I like that image of books being read to people as they work. Much more fun that listening to radio with too many commercials.
    I’m not a member of any book club. But I do discuss books with other writers. Don’t we all???
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  8. How fascinating, Anne! I’d never thought about how reading groups would be a natural adjunct to all the self-improvement groups that were founded in the industrial age, but it’s a perfect fit. And I like that image of books being read to people as they work. Much more fun that listening to radio with too many commercials.
    I’m not a member of any book club. But I do discuss books with other writers. Don’t we all???
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  9. How fascinating, Anne! I’d never thought about how reading groups would be a natural adjunct to all the self-improvement groups that were founded in the industrial age, but it’s a perfect fit. And I like that image of books being read to people as they work. Much more fun that listening to radio with too many commercials.
    I’m not a member of any book club. But I do discuss books with other writers. Don’t we all???
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  10. How fascinating, Anne! I’d never thought about how reading groups would be a natural adjunct to all the self-improvement groups that were founded in the industrial age, but it’s a perfect fit. And I like that image of books being read to people as they work. Much more fun that listening to radio with too many commercials.
    I’m not a member of any book club. But I do discuss books with other writers. Don’t we all???
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  11. I’m a member of a book club, and I like it for precisely the reason given to Anne by her friend: it makes me read books that otherwise I’d ignore. I’m usually narrow in my tastes, preferring historical romances, and the book club has introduced me to some wonderful books far out of my usual comfort zone.
    I’d definitely not pick up a non-fiction book on my own, but I was introduced to the wonderful “Team of Rivals” because it was a book club choice. For some reason I found the title of “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society” too cute and therefore offputting and wasn’t happy when it was last month’s book. I was, therefore, completely surprised to pick up the book and read it at one go because I was so immersed in the characters and events. These are only two recent examples, but I give them as reasons why I’m happy to be in a book group. I don’t view the choices as medicine (except occasionally, and I have been known to skip some books) but rather look at them as I do travel: a chance to go beyond my usual and experience new people and new worlds. And we never, ever pick books to feel superior.

    Reply
  12. I’m a member of a book club, and I like it for precisely the reason given to Anne by her friend: it makes me read books that otherwise I’d ignore. I’m usually narrow in my tastes, preferring historical romances, and the book club has introduced me to some wonderful books far out of my usual comfort zone.
    I’d definitely not pick up a non-fiction book on my own, but I was introduced to the wonderful “Team of Rivals” because it was a book club choice. For some reason I found the title of “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society” too cute and therefore offputting and wasn’t happy when it was last month’s book. I was, therefore, completely surprised to pick up the book and read it at one go because I was so immersed in the characters and events. These are only two recent examples, but I give them as reasons why I’m happy to be in a book group. I don’t view the choices as medicine (except occasionally, and I have been known to skip some books) but rather look at them as I do travel: a chance to go beyond my usual and experience new people and new worlds. And we never, ever pick books to feel superior.

    Reply
  13. I’m a member of a book club, and I like it for precisely the reason given to Anne by her friend: it makes me read books that otherwise I’d ignore. I’m usually narrow in my tastes, preferring historical romances, and the book club has introduced me to some wonderful books far out of my usual comfort zone.
    I’d definitely not pick up a non-fiction book on my own, but I was introduced to the wonderful “Team of Rivals” because it was a book club choice. For some reason I found the title of “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society” too cute and therefore offputting and wasn’t happy when it was last month’s book. I was, therefore, completely surprised to pick up the book and read it at one go because I was so immersed in the characters and events. These are only two recent examples, but I give them as reasons why I’m happy to be in a book group. I don’t view the choices as medicine (except occasionally, and I have been known to skip some books) but rather look at them as I do travel: a chance to go beyond my usual and experience new people and new worlds. And we never, ever pick books to feel superior.

    Reply
  14. I’m a member of a book club, and I like it for precisely the reason given to Anne by her friend: it makes me read books that otherwise I’d ignore. I’m usually narrow in my tastes, preferring historical romances, and the book club has introduced me to some wonderful books far out of my usual comfort zone.
    I’d definitely not pick up a non-fiction book on my own, but I was introduced to the wonderful “Team of Rivals” because it was a book club choice. For some reason I found the title of “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society” too cute and therefore offputting and wasn’t happy when it was last month’s book. I was, therefore, completely surprised to pick up the book and read it at one go because I was so immersed in the characters and events. These are only two recent examples, but I give them as reasons why I’m happy to be in a book group. I don’t view the choices as medicine (except occasionally, and I have been known to skip some books) but rather look at them as I do travel: a chance to go beyond my usual and experience new people and new worlds. And we never, ever pick books to feel superior.

    Reply
  15. I’m a member of a book club, and I like it for precisely the reason given to Anne by her friend: it makes me read books that otherwise I’d ignore. I’m usually narrow in my tastes, preferring historical romances, and the book club has introduced me to some wonderful books far out of my usual comfort zone.
    I’d definitely not pick up a non-fiction book on my own, but I was introduced to the wonderful “Team of Rivals” because it was a book club choice. For some reason I found the title of “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society” too cute and therefore offputting and wasn’t happy when it was last month’s book. I was, therefore, completely surprised to pick up the book and read it at one go because I was so immersed in the characters and events. These are only two recent examples, but I give them as reasons why I’m happy to be in a book group. I don’t view the choices as medicine (except occasionally, and I have been known to skip some books) but rather look at them as I do travel: a chance to go beyond my usual and experience new people and new worlds. And we never, ever pick books to feel superior.

    Reply
  16. Nope, not a book club member. I have to have an interest in the book in order to pick it up. If I *must* read it, then it becomes too much like high school and it’s a DNF for me. I’ll discuss with others a book we’ve all enjoyed all day long. But if I’m forced to read one, it will remain untouched.

    Reply
  17. Nope, not a book club member. I have to have an interest in the book in order to pick it up. If I *must* read it, then it becomes too much like high school and it’s a DNF for me. I’ll discuss with others a book we’ve all enjoyed all day long. But if I’m forced to read one, it will remain untouched.

    Reply
  18. Nope, not a book club member. I have to have an interest in the book in order to pick it up. If I *must* read it, then it becomes too much like high school and it’s a DNF for me. I’ll discuss with others a book we’ve all enjoyed all day long. But if I’m forced to read one, it will remain untouched.

    Reply
  19. Nope, not a book club member. I have to have an interest in the book in order to pick it up. If I *must* read it, then it becomes too much like high school and it’s a DNF for me. I’ll discuss with others a book we’ve all enjoyed all day long. But if I’m forced to read one, it will remain untouched.

    Reply
  20. Nope, not a book club member. I have to have an interest in the book in order to pick it up. If I *must* read it, then it becomes too much like high school and it’s a DNF for me. I’ll discuss with others a book we’ve all enjoyed all day long. But if I’m forced to read one, it will remain untouched.

    Reply
  21. Not a member of a club, unless you count the several writers blogs that I follow.
    Glad to see that you like the Fragonard painting of “A Young Girl Reading” It’s one of my favorites…have a copy hanging near one of my bookcases.

    Reply
  22. Not a member of a club, unless you count the several writers blogs that I follow.
    Glad to see that you like the Fragonard painting of “A Young Girl Reading” It’s one of my favorites…have a copy hanging near one of my bookcases.

    Reply
  23. Not a member of a club, unless you count the several writers blogs that I follow.
    Glad to see that you like the Fragonard painting of “A Young Girl Reading” It’s one of my favorites…have a copy hanging near one of my bookcases.

    Reply
  24. Not a member of a club, unless you count the several writers blogs that I follow.
    Glad to see that you like the Fragonard painting of “A Young Girl Reading” It’s one of my favorites…have a copy hanging near one of my bookcases.

    Reply
  25. Not a member of a club, unless you count the several writers blogs that I follow.
    Glad to see that you like the Fragonard painting of “A Young Girl Reading” It’s one of my favorites…have a copy hanging near one of my bookcases.

    Reply
  26. Piper, that’s almost exactly how I felt about book clubs. A way to ruin a good book. LOL.
    Mary Jo, yes, I’ve always loved the thought of people gathering to be read to. When I was a teacher of adult literacy I used to run a class called “book club” where we’d read books aloud, and people came even if they could read only a word or two. They loved it, loved the stories, and we never discussed the books for deep and meaningful significance, only understanding and enjoyment. That class was standing room only.

    Reply
  27. Piper, that’s almost exactly how I felt about book clubs. A way to ruin a good book. LOL.
    Mary Jo, yes, I’ve always loved the thought of people gathering to be read to. When I was a teacher of adult literacy I used to run a class called “book club” where we’d read books aloud, and people came even if they could read only a word or two. They loved it, loved the stories, and we never discussed the books for deep and meaningful significance, only understanding and enjoyment. That class was standing room only.

    Reply
  28. Piper, that’s almost exactly how I felt about book clubs. A way to ruin a good book. LOL.
    Mary Jo, yes, I’ve always loved the thought of people gathering to be read to. When I was a teacher of adult literacy I used to run a class called “book club” where we’d read books aloud, and people came even if they could read only a word or two. They loved it, loved the stories, and we never discussed the books for deep and meaningful significance, only understanding and enjoyment. That class was standing room only.

    Reply
  29. Piper, that’s almost exactly how I felt about book clubs. A way to ruin a good book. LOL.
    Mary Jo, yes, I’ve always loved the thought of people gathering to be read to. When I was a teacher of adult literacy I used to run a class called “book club” where we’d read books aloud, and people came even if they could read only a word or two. They loved it, loved the stories, and we never discussed the books for deep and meaningful significance, only understanding and enjoyment. That class was standing room only.

    Reply
  30. Piper, that’s almost exactly how I felt about book clubs. A way to ruin a good book. LOL.
    Mary Jo, yes, I’ve always loved the thought of people gathering to be read to. When I was a teacher of adult literacy I used to run a class called “book club” where we’d read books aloud, and people came even if they could read only a word or two. They loved it, loved the stories, and we never discussed the books for deep and meaningful significance, only understanding and enjoyment. That class was standing room only.

    Reply
  31. Susan/DC that’s exactly why my friends and I have started a group — to push us out of our “comfort zone” with reading. And to get us to read books we might not choose to. And no, not at all about feeling superior — in our case , our first choice of book is a paranormal romance with shape-shifters. As I said, out of our comfort zone. LOL.
    BTW I loved The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society — it’s such a warm and fascinating book, full of wonderful characters. A fabulous story.

    Reply
  32. Susan/DC that’s exactly why my friends and I have started a group — to push us out of our “comfort zone” with reading. And to get us to read books we might not choose to. And no, not at all about feeling superior — in our case , our first choice of book is a paranormal romance with shape-shifters. As I said, out of our comfort zone. LOL.
    BTW I loved The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society — it’s such a warm and fascinating book, full of wonderful characters. A fabulous story.

    Reply
  33. Susan/DC that’s exactly why my friends and I have started a group — to push us out of our “comfort zone” with reading. And to get us to read books we might not choose to. And no, not at all about feeling superior — in our case , our first choice of book is a paranormal romance with shape-shifters. As I said, out of our comfort zone. LOL.
    BTW I loved The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society — it’s such a warm and fascinating book, full of wonderful characters. A fabulous story.

    Reply
  34. Susan/DC that’s exactly why my friends and I have started a group — to push us out of our “comfort zone” with reading. And to get us to read books we might not choose to. And no, not at all about feeling superior — in our case , our first choice of book is a paranormal romance with shape-shifters. As I said, out of our comfort zone. LOL.
    BTW I loved The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society — it’s such a warm and fascinating book, full of wonderful characters. A fabulous story.

    Reply
  35. Susan/DC that’s exactly why my friends and I have started a group — to push us out of our “comfort zone” with reading. And to get us to read books we might not choose to. And no, not at all about feeling superior — in our case , our first choice of book is a paranormal romance with shape-shifters. As I said, out of our comfort zone. LOL.
    BTW I loved The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society — it’s such a warm and fascinating book, full of wonderful characters. A fabulous story.

    Reply
  36. Louis, I love so many of Fragonards works. Years ago, when I was a newbie author, I met another newbie who had the most beautiful cover that she’d been allowed to choose herself. She chose a Fragonard painting — I can’t remember which, perhaps “Confessions of Love.” It was beautiful and lush and I had my first experience of cover envy.
    Theo, that’s how I feel. If it’s forced, it’s not fun. With this club we’ve just formed, I hope it never gets to feeling forced. I suspect if it does, it’ll crumble.

    Reply
  37. Louis, I love so many of Fragonards works. Years ago, when I was a newbie author, I met another newbie who had the most beautiful cover that she’d been allowed to choose herself. She chose a Fragonard painting — I can’t remember which, perhaps “Confessions of Love.” It was beautiful and lush and I had my first experience of cover envy.
    Theo, that’s how I feel. If it’s forced, it’s not fun. With this club we’ve just formed, I hope it never gets to feeling forced. I suspect if it does, it’ll crumble.

    Reply
  38. Louis, I love so many of Fragonards works. Years ago, when I was a newbie author, I met another newbie who had the most beautiful cover that she’d been allowed to choose herself. She chose a Fragonard painting — I can’t remember which, perhaps “Confessions of Love.” It was beautiful and lush and I had my first experience of cover envy.
    Theo, that’s how I feel. If it’s forced, it’s not fun. With this club we’ve just formed, I hope it never gets to feeling forced. I suspect if it does, it’ll crumble.

    Reply
  39. Louis, I love so many of Fragonards works. Years ago, when I was a newbie author, I met another newbie who had the most beautiful cover that she’d been allowed to choose herself. She chose a Fragonard painting — I can’t remember which, perhaps “Confessions of Love.” It was beautiful and lush and I had my first experience of cover envy.
    Theo, that’s how I feel. If it’s forced, it’s not fun. With this club we’ve just formed, I hope it never gets to feeling forced. I suspect if it does, it’ll crumble.

    Reply
  40. Louis, I love so many of Fragonards works. Years ago, when I was a newbie author, I met another newbie who had the most beautiful cover that she’d been allowed to choose herself. She chose a Fragonard painting — I can’t remember which, perhaps “Confessions of Love.” It was beautiful and lush and I had my first experience of cover envy.
    Theo, that’s how I feel. If it’s forced, it’s not fun. With this club we’ve just formed, I hope it never gets to feeling forced. I suspect if it does, it’ll crumble.

    Reply
  41. I steer clear of book clubs for two reasons.
    First, if I really like a book, I don’t necessarily want to discuss it, I just want to savor it.
    If I really dislike a book, I do want to discuss it. I want to tear it apart, demolish it, consign it to outer darkness…. Well, you get the idea. This is unlikely to endear me to the other members of the book club, some of whom may have like the book in question.
    So I will continue to be a solitary reader and a good neighbor.

    Reply
  42. I steer clear of book clubs for two reasons.
    First, if I really like a book, I don’t necessarily want to discuss it, I just want to savor it.
    If I really dislike a book, I do want to discuss it. I want to tear it apart, demolish it, consign it to outer darkness…. Well, you get the idea. This is unlikely to endear me to the other members of the book club, some of whom may have like the book in question.
    So I will continue to be a solitary reader and a good neighbor.

    Reply
  43. I steer clear of book clubs for two reasons.
    First, if I really like a book, I don’t necessarily want to discuss it, I just want to savor it.
    If I really dislike a book, I do want to discuss it. I want to tear it apart, demolish it, consign it to outer darkness…. Well, you get the idea. This is unlikely to endear me to the other members of the book club, some of whom may have like the book in question.
    So I will continue to be a solitary reader and a good neighbor.

    Reply
  44. I steer clear of book clubs for two reasons.
    First, if I really like a book, I don’t necessarily want to discuss it, I just want to savor it.
    If I really dislike a book, I do want to discuss it. I want to tear it apart, demolish it, consign it to outer darkness…. Well, you get the idea. This is unlikely to endear me to the other members of the book club, some of whom may have like the book in question.
    So I will continue to be a solitary reader and a good neighbor.

    Reply
  45. I steer clear of book clubs for two reasons.
    First, if I really like a book, I don’t necessarily want to discuss it, I just want to savor it.
    If I really dislike a book, I do want to discuss it. I want to tear it apart, demolish it, consign it to outer darkness…. Well, you get the idea. This is unlikely to endear me to the other members of the book club, some of whom may have like the book in question.
    So I will continue to be a solitary reader and a good neighbor.

    Reply
  46. LOL Jane, I can see how your savor-in-silence or publicly shred approach might not go down well in a group.
    I loved the quote from Manley, that “reading is an intense and personal experience” and sometimes you want to share that experience and other times to hug it to yourself and savor it.
    But it could become difficult in groups, when people respond so differently to a book. I suppose the long term book clubs survive because they’re flexible and sensitive to each other’s needs.

    Reply
  47. LOL Jane, I can see how your savor-in-silence or publicly shred approach might not go down well in a group.
    I loved the quote from Manley, that “reading is an intense and personal experience” and sometimes you want to share that experience and other times to hug it to yourself and savor it.
    But it could become difficult in groups, when people respond so differently to a book. I suppose the long term book clubs survive because they’re flexible and sensitive to each other’s needs.

    Reply
  48. LOL Jane, I can see how your savor-in-silence or publicly shred approach might not go down well in a group.
    I loved the quote from Manley, that “reading is an intense and personal experience” and sometimes you want to share that experience and other times to hug it to yourself and savor it.
    But it could become difficult in groups, when people respond so differently to a book. I suppose the long term book clubs survive because they’re flexible and sensitive to each other’s needs.

    Reply
  49. LOL Jane, I can see how your savor-in-silence or publicly shred approach might not go down well in a group.
    I loved the quote from Manley, that “reading is an intense and personal experience” and sometimes you want to share that experience and other times to hug it to yourself and savor it.
    But it could become difficult in groups, when people respond so differently to a book. I suppose the long term book clubs survive because they’re flexible and sensitive to each other’s needs.

    Reply
  50. LOL Jane, I can see how your savor-in-silence or publicly shred approach might not go down well in a group.
    I loved the quote from Manley, that “reading is an intense and personal experience” and sometimes you want to share that experience and other times to hug it to yourself and savor it.
    But it could become difficult in groups, when people respond so differently to a book. I suppose the long term book clubs survive because they’re flexible and sensitive to each other’s needs.

    Reply
  51. I organized a romance book club in my library because that is what I like to read. Book clubs in general had little interest for me for many of the reasons already stated. I wanted to create a club where romance readers could come together and not feel like they had to apologize for what they like to read. We usually discuss one particular book and then another author. Last month we read Jude’s Law by Lori Foster and then we discussed Amanda Quick in general. It is a lot of fun reading and discussing romance with other romance lovers and we do introduce each other to authors we wouldn’t otherwise read.

    Reply
  52. I organized a romance book club in my library because that is what I like to read. Book clubs in general had little interest for me for many of the reasons already stated. I wanted to create a club where romance readers could come together and not feel like they had to apologize for what they like to read. We usually discuss one particular book and then another author. Last month we read Jude’s Law by Lori Foster and then we discussed Amanda Quick in general. It is a lot of fun reading and discussing romance with other romance lovers and we do introduce each other to authors we wouldn’t otherwise read.

    Reply
  53. I organized a romance book club in my library because that is what I like to read. Book clubs in general had little interest for me for many of the reasons already stated. I wanted to create a club where romance readers could come together and not feel like they had to apologize for what they like to read. We usually discuss one particular book and then another author. Last month we read Jude’s Law by Lori Foster and then we discussed Amanda Quick in general. It is a lot of fun reading and discussing romance with other romance lovers and we do introduce each other to authors we wouldn’t otherwise read.

    Reply
  54. I organized a romance book club in my library because that is what I like to read. Book clubs in general had little interest for me for many of the reasons already stated. I wanted to create a club where romance readers could come together and not feel like they had to apologize for what they like to read. We usually discuss one particular book and then another author. Last month we read Jude’s Law by Lori Foster and then we discussed Amanda Quick in general. It is a lot of fun reading and discussing romance with other romance lovers and we do introduce each other to authors we wouldn’t otherwise read.

    Reply
  55. I organized a romance book club in my library because that is what I like to read. Book clubs in general had little interest for me for many of the reasons already stated. I wanted to create a club where romance readers could come together and not feel like they had to apologize for what they like to read. We usually discuss one particular book and then another author. Last month we read Jude’s Law by Lori Foster and then we discussed Amanda Quick in general. It is a lot of fun reading and discussing romance with other romance lovers and we do introduce each other to authors we wouldn’t otherwise read.

    Reply
  56. Beth, this sounds like a lovely club. I went to one like that in Brisbane once, and it was fantastic — I initially met a bunch of strangers but left feeling as though I’d passed the evening with friends, all because of our shared reading tastes.
    That was a first for me, but since then, one of our local bookstores started a monthly group called Heart, who meet to read at the store (after business hours) and discuss romance books and others suggested by the group.
    It’s a great idea, I think, and great business, too, as I know when I’ve gone there, I spend the 20 minutes or so before the store closes browsing shelves and picking up still more books to buy, as the other members say, “Have you read this? It’s fantastic.” More stores should think about this.

    Reply
  57. Beth, this sounds like a lovely club. I went to one like that in Brisbane once, and it was fantastic — I initially met a bunch of strangers but left feeling as though I’d passed the evening with friends, all because of our shared reading tastes.
    That was a first for me, but since then, one of our local bookstores started a monthly group called Heart, who meet to read at the store (after business hours) and discuss romance books and others suggested by the group.
    It’s a great idea, I think, and great business, too, as I know when I’ve gone there, I spend the 20 minutes or so before the store closes browsing shelves and picking up still more books to buy, as the other members say, “Have you read this? It’s fantastic.” More stores should think about this.

    Reply
  58. Beth, this sounds like a lovely club. I went to one like that in Brisbane once, and it was fantastic — I initially met a bunch of strangers but left feeling as though I’d passed the evening with friends, all because of our shared reading tastes.
    That was a first for me, but since then, one of our local bookstores started a monthly group called Heart, who meet to read at the store (after business hours) and discuss romance books and others suggested by the group.
    It’s a great idea, I think, and great business, too, as I know when I’ve gone there, I spend the 20 minutes or so before the store closes browsing shelves and picking up still more books to buy, as the other members say, “Have you read this? It’s fantastic.” More stores should think about this.

    Reply
  59. Beth, this sounds like a lovely club. I went to one like that in Brisbane once, and it was fantastic — I initially met a bunch of strangers but left feeling as though I’d passed the evening with friends, all because of our shared reading tastes.
    That was a first for me, but since then, one of our local bookstores started a monthly group called Heart, who meet to read at the store (after business hours) and discuss romance books and others suggested by the group.
    It’s a great idea, I think, and great business, too, as I know when I’ve gone there, I spend the 20 minutes or so before the store closes browsing shelves and picking up still more books to buy, as the other members say, “Have you read this? It’s fantastic.” More stores should think about this.

    Reply
  60. Beth, this sounds like a lovely club. I went to one like that in Brisbane once, and it was fantastic — I initially met a bunch of strangers but left feeling as though I’d passed the evening with friends, all because of our shared reading tastes.
    That was a first for me, but since then, one of our local bookstores started a monthly group called Heart, who meet to read at the store (after business hours) and discuss romance books and others suggested by the group.
    It’s a great idea, I think, and great business, too, as I know when I’ve gone there, I spend the 20 minutes or so before the store closes browsing shelves and picking up still more books to buy, as the other members say, “Have you read this? It’s fantastic.” More stores should think about this.

    Reply
  61. Perhaps book clubs have also changed form over the years. Anne, having been to a Brraddicts meeting in Brisbane you would know that we aren’t a standard ‘book club’. In fact, would we be more of a readers group?
    We simply go along to our meetings, (sometimes with a general theme, sometimes without) & discuss what we have read recently. Our motto is ‘Friends dont let friends read bad books,’ and that’s literally what we are about: what did you like, what did you hate, who do you auto buy, what new author have you found recently?
    I’m happy to be corrected, but at the moment I consider myself part of a book club / group – just a different kind! I don’t think I could belong to the kind that you are talking about – I read for pleasure only, and it’s usually on the fly, so I doubt I’d be able to keep up with a readers group! Heck, I can’t keep up with the Heyerlist reading schedule – I gave up years ago!

    Reply
  62. Perhaps book clubs have also changed form over the years. Anne, having been to a Brraddicts meeting in Brisbane you would know that we aren’t a standard ‘book club’. In fact, would we be more of a readers group?
    We simply go along to our meetings, (sometimes with a general theme, sometimes without) & discuss what we have read recently. Our motto is ‘Friends dont let friends read bad books,’ and that’s literally what we are about: what did you like, what did you hate, who do you auto buy, what new author have you found recently?
    I’m happy to be corrected, but at the moment I consider myself part of a book club / group – just a different kind! I don’t think I could belong to the kind that you are talking about – I read for pleasure only, and it’s usually on the fly, so I doubt I’d be able to keep up with a readers group! Heck, I can’t keep up with the Heyerlist reading schedule – I gave up years ago!

    Reply
  63. Perhaps book clubs have also changed form over the years. Anne, having been to a Brraddicts meeting in Brisbane you would know that we aren’t a standard ‘book club’. In fact, would we be more of a readers group?
    We simply go along to our meetings, (sometimes with a general theme, sometimes without) & discuss what we have read recently. Our motto is ‘Friends dont let friends read bad books,’ and that’s literally what we are about: what did you like, what did you hate, who do you auto buy, what new author have you found recently?
    I’m happy to be corrected, but at the moment I consider myself part of a book club / group – just a different kind! I don’t think I could belong to the kind that you are talking about – I read for pleasure only, and it’s usually on the fly, so I doubt I’d be able to keep up with a readers group! Heck, I can’t keep up with the Heyerlist reading schedule – I gave up years ago!

    Reply
  64. Perhaps book clubs have also changed form over the years. Anne, having been to a Brraddicts meeting in Brisbane you would know that we aren’t a standard ‘book club’. In fact, would we be more of a readers group?
    We simply go along to our meetings, (sometimes with a general theme, sometimes without) & discuss what we have read recently. Our motto is ‘Friends dont let friends read bad books,’ and that’s literally what we are about: what did you like, what did you hate, who do you auto buy, what new author have you found recently?
    I’m happy to be corrected, but at the moment I consider myself part of a book club / group – just a different kind! I don’t think I could belong to the kind that you are talking about – I read for pleasure only, and it’s usually on the fly, so I doubt I’d be able to keep up with a readers group! Heck, I can’t keep up with the Heyerlist reading schedule – I gave up years ago!

    Reply
  65. Perhaps book clubs have also changed form over the years. Anne, having been to a Brraddicts meeting in Brisbane you would know that we aren’t a standard ‘book club’. In fact, would we be more of a readers group?
    We simply go along to our meetings, (sometimes with a general theme, sometimes without) & discuss what we have read recently. Our motto is ‘Friends dont let friends read bad books,’ and that’s literally what we are about: what did you like, what did you hate, who do you auto buy, what new author have you found recently?
    I’m happy to be corrected, but at the moment I consider myself part of a book club / group – just a different kind! I don’t think I could belong to the kind that you are talking about – I read for pleasure only, and it’s usually on the fly, so I doubt I’d be able to keep up with a readers group! Heck, I can’t keep up with the Heyerlist reading schedule – I gave up years ago!

    Reply
  66. I must be a book club slut. When I lived in the Blue Mountains I belonged to two. One was serious and literary, where we met at each other’s place had nourishing vegetarian soup and no alcohol and did some fairly serious discussions. It fulfilled some part of my need for analysis (it was a lo more fun than it sounds!) The second group was a women’s group and met at the local pub. We spent five minutes discussing the book and the rest of the time gossiping and taking about sex. It was fantastic.

    Reply
  67. I must be a book club slut. When I lived in the Blue Mountains I belonged to two. One was serious and literary, where we met at each other’s place had nourishing vegetarian soup and no alcohol and did some fairly serious discussions. It fulfilled some part of my need for analysis (it was a lo more fun than it sounds!) The second group was a women’s group and met at the local pub. We spent five minutes discussing the book and the rest of the time gossiping and taking about sex. It was fantastic.

    Reply
  68. I must be a book club slut. When I lived in the Blue Mountains I belonged to two. One was serious and literary, where we met at each other’s place had nourishing vegetarian soup and no alcohol and did some fairly serious discussions. It fulfilled some part of my need for analysis (it was a lo more fun than it sounds!) The second group was a women’s group and met at the local pub. We spent five minutes discussing the book and the rest of the time gossiping and taking about sex. It was fantastic.

    Reply
  69. I must be a book club slut. When I lived in the Blue Mountains I belonged to two. One was serious and literary, where we met at each other’s place had nourishing vegetarian soup and no alcohol and did some fairly serious discussions. It fulfilled some part of my need for analysis (it was a lo more fun than it sounds!) The second group was a women’s group and met at the local pub. We spent five minutes discussing the book and the rest of the time gossiping and taking about sex. It was fantastic.

    Reply
  70. I must be a book club slut. When I lived in the Blue Mountains I belonged to two. One was serious and literary, where we met at each other’s place had nourishing vegetarian soup and no alcohol and did some fairly serious discussions. It fulfilled some part of my need for analysis (it was a lo more fun than it sounds!) The second group was a women’s group and met at the local pub. We spent five minutes discussing the book and the rest of the time gossiping and taking about sex. It was fantastic.

    Reply
  71. I don’t think I could ever belong to a book club. I love to read, but I hate being told what to read, so I can’t see it working out.
    I didn’t even really enjoy most of the literature classes I took in college because of the overanalyzation of the books. I like to get sucked into a book, not have the air sucked out of it by noticing the symbolism of a character’s hat or delving into the author’s biography and learning how it informed the book. I’m a writer (though unpublished) and I always felt like pointing out that an imagination goes a long way and sometimes a hat is just a hat.
    I love to discuss books with friends. We give each other books, in a “You’d like this” or “You have to read this” kind of way and off we go.

    Reply
  72. I don’t think I could ever belong to a book club. I love to read, but I hate being told what to read, so I can’t see it working out.
    I didn’t even really enjoy most of the literature classes I took in college because of the overanalyzation of the books. I like to get sucked into a book, not have the air sucked out of it by noticing the symbolism of a character’s hat or delving into the author’s biography and learning how it informed the book. I’m a writer (though unpublished) and I always felt like pointing out that an imagination goes a long way and sometimes a hat is just a hat.
    I love to discuss books with friends. We give each other books, in a “You’d like this” or “You have to read this” kind of way and off we go.

    Reply
  73. I don’t think I could ever belong to a book club. I love to read, but I hate being told what to read, so I can’t see it working out.
    I didn’t even really enjoy most of the literature classes I took in college because of the overanalyzation of the books. I like to get sucked into a book, not have the air sucked out of it by noticing the symbolism of a character’s hat or delving into the author’s biography and learning how it informed the book. I’m a writer (though unpublished) and I always felt like pointing out that an imagination goes a long way and sometimes a hat is just a hat.
    I love to discuss books with friends. We give each other books, in a “You’d like this” or “You have to read this” kind of way and off we go.

    Reply
  74. I don’t think I could ever belong to a book club. I love to read, but I hate being told what to read, so I can’t see it working out.
    I didn’t even really enjoy most of the literature classes I took in college because of the overanalyzation of the books. I like to get sucked into a book, not have the air sucked out of it by noticing the symbolism of a character’s hat or delving into the author’s biography and learning how it informed the book. I’m a writer (though unpublished) and I always felt like pointing out that an imagination goes a long way and sometimes a hat is just a hat.
    I love to discuss books with friends. We give each other books, in a “You’d like this” or “You have to read this” kind of way and off we go.

    Reply
  75. I don’t think I could ever belong to a book club. I love to read, but I hate being told what to read, so I can’t see it working out.
    I didn’t even really enjoy most of the literature classes I took in college because of the overanalyzation of the books. I like to get sucked into a book, not have the air sucked out of it by noticing the symbolism of a character’s hat or delving into the author’s biography and learning how it informed the book. I’m a writer (though unpublished) and I always felt like pointing out that an imagination goes a long way and sometimes a hat is just a hat.
    I love to discuss books with friends. We give each other books, in a “You’d like this” or “You have to read this” kind of way and off we go.

    Reply
  76. Debbie Jay, your Brraddicts group (Brisbane romance reding addicts) was the one I was talking about that I had such a lovely time at! 🙂
    Thanks for dropping by.
    Kezia, you certainly seem to have struck a couple of wildly different book groups in a relatively small community. LOL.
    Did anyone ever watch the TV show called The Book Group? And then there’s the Jane Austen Book CLub.

    Reply
  77. Debbie Jay, your Brraddicts group (Brisbane romance reding addicts) was the one I was talking about that I had such a lovely time at! 🙂
    Thanks for dropping by.
    Kezia, you certainly seem to have struck a couple of wildly different book groups in a relatively small community. LOL.
    Did anyone ever watch the TV show called The Book Group? And then there’s the Jane Austen Book CLub.

    Reply
  78. Debbie Jay, your Brraddicts group (Brisbane romance reding addicts) was the one I was talking about that I had such a lovely time at! 🙂
    Thanks for dropping by.
    Kezia, you certainly seem to have struck a couple of wildly different book groups in a relatively small community. LOL.
    Did anyone ever watch the TV show called The Book Group? And then there’s the Jane Austen Book CLub.

    Reply
  79. Debbie Jay, your Brraddicts group (Brisbane romance reding addicts) was the one I was talking about that I had such a lovely time at! 🙂
    Thanks for dropping by.
    Kezia, you certainly seem to have struck a couple of wildly different book groups in a relatively small community. LOL.
    Did anyone ever watch the TV show called The Book Group? And then there’s the Jane Austen Book CLub.

    Reply
  80. Debbie Jay, your Brraddicts group (Brisbane romance reding addicts) was the one I was talking about that I had such a lovely time at! 🙂
    Thanks for dropping by.
    Kezia, you certainly seem to have struck a couple of wildly different book groups in a relatively small community. LOL.
    Did anyone ever watch the TV show called The Book Group? And then there’s the Jane Austen Book CLub.

    Reply
  81. Sorry, Keziah, I left off your h.
    Annrei I think overanalyzing can ruin a book for some people and I think that’s one reason why I’m wary of the more formal and organized kind of book clubs. Some people love it, others don’t.
    As a teacher I was always concerned to get students to enjoy the book first, and analyze it afterward. Not sure how well I succeeded.
    LOL about the symbolism of the hat notion. It’s an area I find interesting. As a student of English literature and as a teacher, I was very aware of symbols, themes, etc. But now, as a writer, I don’t consciously try for them. (I think if you do, there’s a danger in overdoing it anyway.) And if I ever reread my own books (which is almost never after they’ve been published) I don’t usually notice any kind of motifs, symbols, themes, etc. But other people — clever readers — have pointed out to me that I do — and they’re right, which I find fascinating.

    Reply
  82. Sorry, Keziah, I left off your h.
    Annrei I think overanalyzing can ruin a book for some people and I think that’s one reason why I’m wary of the more formal and organized kind of book clubs. Some people love it, others don’t.
    As a teacher I was always concerned to get students to enjoy the book first, and analyze it afterward. Not sure how well I succeeded.
    LOL about the symbolism of the hat notion. It’s an area I find interesting. As a student of English literature and as a teacher, I was very aware of symbols, themes, etc. But now, as a writer, I don’t consciously try for them. (I think if you do, there’s a danger in overdoing it anyway.) And if I ever reread my own books (which is almost never after they’ve been published) I don’t usually notice any kind of motifs, symbols, themes, etc. But other people — clever readers — have pointed out to me that I do — and they’re right, which I find fascinating.

    Reply
  83. Sorry, Keziah, I left off your h.
    Annrei I think overanalyzing can ruin a book for some people and I think that’s one reason why I’m wary of the more formal and organized kind of book clubs. Some people love it, others don’t.
    As a teacher I was always concerned to get students to enjoy the book first, and analyze it afterward. Not sure how well I succeeded.
    LOL about the symbolism of the hat notion. It’s an area I find interesting. As a student of English literature and as a teacher, I was very aware of symbols, themes, etc. But now, as a writer, I don’t consciously try for them. (I think if you do, there’s a danger in overdoing it anyway.) And if I ever reread my own books (which is almost never after they’ve been published) I don’t usually notice any kind of motifs, symbols, themes, etc. But other people — clever readers — have pointed out to me that I do — and they’re right, which I find fascinating.

    Reply
  84. Sorry, Keziah, I left off your h.
    Annrei I think overanalyzing can ruin a book for some people and I think that’s one reason why I’m wary of the more formal and organized kind of book clubs. Some people love it, others don’t.
    As a teacher I was always concerned to get students to enjoy the book first, and analyze it afterward. Not sure how well I succeeded.
    LOL about the symbolism of the hat notion. It’s an area I find interesting. As a student of English literature and as a teacher, I was very aware of symbols, themes, etc. But now, as a writer, I don’t consciously try for them. (I think if you do, there’s a danger in overdoing it anyway.) And if I ever reread my own books (which is almost never after they’ve been published) I don’t usually notice any kind of motifs, symbols, themes, etc. But other people — clever readers — have pointed out to me that I do — and they’re right, which I find fascinating.

    Reply
  85. Sorry, Keziah, I left off your h.
    Annrei I think overanalyzing can ruin a book for some people and I think that’s one reason why I’m wary of the more formal and organized kind of book clubs. Some people love it, others don’t.
    As a teacher I was always concerned to get students to enjoy the book first, and analyze it afterward. Not sure how well I succeeded.
    LOL about the symbolism of the hat notion. It’s an area I find interesting. As a student of English literature and as a teacher, I was very aware of symbols, themes, etc. But now, as a writer, I don’t consciously try for them. (I think if you do, there’s a danger in overdoing it anyway.) And if I ever reread my own books (which is almost never after they’ve been published) I don’t usually notice any kind of motifs, symbols, themes, etc. But other people — clever readers — have pointed out to me that I do — and they’re right, which I find fascinating.

    Reply
  86. Along with another staff member, I run an after-school teen girls’ book club sponsored by the non-profit group Mainely Girls. They provide 15 free copies of topical YA books for us to read each month (I only pay for return postage).
    Since I work in a high school library, the group keeps me abreast with current titles, and our discussions are been absolutely fabulous. There’s something very open and honest about our girls that I’m not sure I’d find in a conventional book club (we do have several other adult staff members join us, too).
    Since we meet during my after-school library program, I’m still ‘on the job,’ which is the only way I have time right now to belong to a club. This is our fourth year, and I think we all would say it’s been a success.

    Reply
  87. Along with another staff member, I run an after-school teen girls’ book club sponsored by the non-profit group Mainely Girls. They provide 15 free copies of topical YA books for us to read each month (I only pay for return postage).
    Since I work in a high school library, the group keeps me abreast with current titles, and our discussions are been absolutely fabulous. There’s something very open and honest about our girls that I’m not sure I’d find in a conventional book club (we do have several other adult staff members join us, too).
    Since we meet during my after-school library program, I’m still ‘on the job,’ which is the only way I have time right now to belong to a club. This is our fourth year, and I think we all would say it’s been a success.

    Reply
  88. Along with another staff member, I run an after-school teen girls’ book club sponsored by the non-profit group Mainely Girls. They provide 15 free copies of topical YA books for us to read each month (I only pay for return postage).
    Since I work in a high school library, the group keeps me abreast with current titles, and our discussions are been absolutely fabulous. There’s something very open and honest about our girls that I’m not sure I’d find in a conventional book club (we do have several other adult staff members join us, too).
    Since we meet during my after-school library program, I’m still ‘on the job,’ which is the only way I have time right now to belong to a club. This is our fourth year, and I think we all would say it’s been a success.

    Reply
  89. Along with another staff member, I run an after-school teen girls’ book club sponsored by the non-profit group Mainely Girls. They provide 15 free copies of topical YA books for us to read each month (I only pay for return postage).
    Since I work in a high school library, the group keeps me abreast with current titles, and our discussions are been absolutely fabulous. There’s something very open and honest about our girls that I’m not sure I’d find in a conventional book club (we do have several other adult staff members join us, too).
    Since we meet during my after-school library program, I’m still ‘on the job,’ which is the only way I have time right now to belong to a club. This is our fourth year, and I think we all would say it’s been a success.

    Reply
  90. Along with another staff member, I run an after-school teen girls’ book club sponsored by the non-profit group Mainely Girls. They provide 15 free copies of topical YA books for us to read each month (I only pay for return postage).
    Since I work in a high school library, the group keeps me abreast with current titles, and our discussions are been absolutely fabulous. There’s something very open and honest about our girls that I’m not sure I’d find in a conventional book club (we do have several other adult staff members join us, too).
    Since we meet during my after-school library program, I’m still ‘on the job,’ which is the only way I have time right now to belong to a club. This is our fourth year, and I think we all would say it’s been a success.

    Reply
  91. I don’t belong to a book club, and I doubt I ever will. When I’m reading for pleasure, I dislike the idea of reading what someone else tells me to. I’m also not much of a “group” person, and the idea of another meeting in my life makes me cringe.
    Anne, I see you’ve learned the code–whenever anyone says “I don’t have the time” what they’re really saying is “I don’t want to”. **grins**

    Reply
  92. I don’t belong to a book club, and I doubt I ever will. When I’m reading for pleasure, I dislike the idea of reading what someone else tells me to. I’m also not much of a “group” person, and the idea of another meeting in my life makes me cringe.
    Anne, I see you’ve learned the code–whenever anyone says “I don’t have the time” what they’re really saying is “I don’t want to”. **grins**

    Reply
  93. I don’t belong to a book club, and I doubt I ever will. When I’m reading for pleasure, I dislike the idea of reading what someone else tells me to. I’m also not much of a “group” person, and the idea of another meeting in my life makes me cringe.
    Anne, I see you’ve learned the code–whenever anyone says “I don’t have the time” what they’re really saying is “I don’t want to”. **grins**

    Reply
  94. I don’t belong to a book club, and I doubt I ever will. When I’m reading for pleasure, I dislike the idea of reading what someone else tells me to. I’m also not much of a “group” person, and the idea of another meeting in my life makes me cringe.
    Anne, I see you’ve learned the code–whenever anyone says “I don’t have the time” what they’re really saying is “I don’t want to”. **grins**

    Reply
  95. I don’t belong to a book club, and I doubt I ever will. When I’m reading for pleasure, I dislike the idea of reading what someone else tells me to. I’m also not much of a “group” person, and the idea of another meeting in my life makes me cringe.
    Anne, I see you’ve learned the code–whenever anyone says “I don’t have the time” what they’re really saying is “I don’t want to”. **grins**

    Reply
  96. Maggie, I think it’s wonderful to run a club for young girls. The teen years are difficult and exciting, as they teeter on the brink of adulthood and the insights are often so fresh. It’s also a time of enormous insecurity, so it’s brilliant for them to have an adult to talk things over with, as I’m sure happens in these discussion.
    Well done you!
    Yes, Linda, there comes a time when the mere word “meeting” can chill the blood! LOL. I’ll be interested to see how our on-line group goes — we’re all very individual and will be coming in at different times. But looking at a book from a writers angle and discussing it with other writers might be fun. Or not. Time will tell. 🙂

    Reply
  97. Maggie, I think it’s wonderful to run a club for young girls. The teen years are difficult and exciting, as they teeter on the brink of adulthood and the insights are often so fresh. It’s also a time of enormous insecurity, so it’s brilliant for them to have an adult to talk things over with, as I’m sure happens in these discussion.
    Well done you!
    Yes, Linda, there comes a time when the mere word “meeting” can chill the blood! LOL. I’ll be interested to see how our on-line group goes — we’re all very individual and will be coming in at different times. But looking at a book from a writers angle and discussing it with other writers might be fun. Or not. Time will tell. 🙂

    Reply
  98. Maggie, I think it’s wonderful to run a club for young girls. The teen years are difficult and exciting, as they teeter on the brink of adulthood and the insights are often so fresh. It’s also a time of enormous insecurity, so it’s brilliant for them to have an adult to talk things over with, as I’m sure happens in these discussion.
    Well done you!
    Yes, Linda, there comes a time when the mere word “meeting” can chill the blood! LOL. I’ll be interested to see how our on-line group goes — we’re all very individual and will be coming in at different times. But looking at a book from a writers angle and discussing it with other writers might be fun. Or not. Time will tell. 🙂

    Reply
  99. Maggie, I think it’s wonderful to run a club for young girls. The teen years are difficult and exciting, as they teeter on the brink of adulthood and the insights are often so fresh. It’s also a time of enormous insecurity, so it’s brilliant for them to have an adult to talk things over with, as I’m sure happens in these discussion.
    Well done you!
    Yes, Linda, there comes a time when the mere word “meeting” can chill the blood! LOL. I’ll be interested to see how our on-line group goes — we’re all very individual and will be coming in at different times. But looking at a book from a writers angle and discussing it with other writers might be fun. Or not. Time will tell. 🙂

    Reply
  100. Maggie, I think it’s wonderful to run a club for young girls. The teen years are difficult and exciting, as they teeter on the brink of adulthood and the insights are often so fresh. It’s also a time of enormous insecurity, so it’s brilliant for them to have an adult to talk things over with, as I’m sure happens in these discussion.
    Well done you!
    Yes, Linda, there comes a time when the mere word “meeting” can chill the blood! LOL. I’ll be interested to see how our on-line group goes — we’re all very individual and will be coming in at different times. But looking at a book from a writers angle and discussing it with other writers might be fun. Or not. Time will tell. 🙂

    Reply
  101. I have also shied away from book clubs. I hate it when someone has a completely different take on a book. I also won’t see a movie of a favourite book – although the BBCs Austen’s have mostly been great. My visual images of characters and places are what I want to carry with me, not someone elses.

    Reply
  102. I have also shied away from book clubs. I hate it when someone has a completely different take on a book. I also won’t see a movie of a favourite book – although the BBCs Austen’s have mostly been great. My visual images of characters and places are what I want to carry with me, not someone elses.

    Reply
  103. I have also shied away from book clubs. I hate it when someone has a completely different take on a book. I also won’t see a movie of a favourite book – although the BBCs Austen’s have mostly been great. My visual images of characters and places are what I want to carry with me, not someone elses.

    Reply
  104. I have also shied away from book clubs. I hate it when someone has a completely different take on a book. I also won’t see a movie of a favourite book – although the BBCs Austen’s have mostly been great. My visual images of characters and places are what I want to carry with me, not someone elses.

    Reply
  105. I have also shied away from book clubs. I hate it when someone has a completely different take on a book. I also won’t see a movie of a favourite book – although the BBCs Austen’s have mostly been great. My visual images of characters and places are what I want to carry with me, not someone elses.

    Reply
  106. Anne, I’m totally like you. reading for me is a treat— I don’t need any structure to make me read. And as for choices, I have piles of TRBs, inspired by reviews I read, the recommendations of friends, new books by favorite authors, and sheer whimsy . . . to name justa few sources. I like to jump around genres, and while I love to discuss books and ideas, I do it enough spontaneously that I just don’t feel the need for a formal “club” at the moment.

    Reply
  107. Anne, I’m totally like you. reading for me is a treat— I don’t need any structure to make me read. And as for choices, I have piles of TRBs, inspired by reviews I read, the recommendations of friends, new books by favorite authors, and sheer whimsy . . . to name justa few sources. I like to jump around genres, and while I love to discuss books and ideas, I do it enough spontaneously that I just don’t feel the need for a formal “club” at the moment.

    Reply
  108. Anne, I’m totally like you. reading for me is a treat— I don’t need any structure to make me read. And as for choices, I have piles of TRBs, inspired by reviews I read, the recommendations of friends, new books by favorite authors, and sheer whimsy . . . to name justa few sources. I like to jump around genres, and while I love to discuss books and ideas, I do it enough spontaneously that I just don’t feel the need for a formal “club” at the moment.

    Reply
  109. Anne, I’m totally like you. reading for me is a treat— I don’t need any structure to make me read. And as for choices, I have piles of TRBs, inspired by reviews I read, the recommendations of friends, new books by favorite authors, and sheer whimsy . . . to name justa few sources. I like to jump around genres, and while I love to discuss books and ideas, I do it enough spontaneously that I just don’t feel the need for a formal “club” at the moment.

    Reply
  110. Anne, I’m totally like you. reading for me is a treat— I don’t need any structure to make me read. And as for choices, I have piles of TRBs, inspired by reviews I read, the recommendations of friends, new books by favorite authors, and sheer whimsy . . . to name justa few sources. I like to jump around genres, and while I love to discuss books and ideas, I do it enough spontaneously that I just don’t feel the need for a formal “club” at the moment.

    Reply
  111. Do not yet belong to a book club. I have so many books I’m working on, there is no time. Having said that, I’m in the process of working on the start up of 2 book clubs at our library. There are two clubs in the little town, they buy 12 books the beginning of the year and trade every month. As far as I know they do not discuss the books. We have had requests to start a club at the library, so we have started a sign-up and will have an organizational meeting next month. Teens have also requested a book club, so we’ll see if we can organize one next month during Teen Read Week. We hope to have everyone read the same book each month so we can discuss it. Unless they are books I’ve read, I’ll have 2 more added to my must read list.
    As it is now, my TBR shelf is full of books I want to read for me and those I’m reading for work. I like to preview the books I’m ordering for the kids and read what I can. We do Book To Movie parties when movies are released. I still need to read New Moon. I’m not sure how involved I’ll end up being, but will probably be reading along with them to start off.

    Reply
  112. Do not yet belong to a book club. I have so many books I’m working on, there is no time. Having said that, I’m in the process of working on the start up of 2 book clubs at our library. There are two clubs in the little town, they buy 12 books the beginning of the year and trade every month. As far as I know they do not discuss the books. We have had requests to start a club at the library, so we have started a sign-up and will have an organizational meeting next month. Teens have also requested a book club, so we’ll see if we can organize one next month during Teen Read Week. We hope to have everyone read the same book each month so we can discuss it. Unless they are books I’ve read, I’ll have 2 more added to my must read list.
    As it is now, my TBR shelf is full of books I want to read for me and those I’m reading for work. I like to preview the books I’m ordering for the kids and read what I can. We do Book To Movie parties when movies are released. I still need to read New Moon. I’m not sure how involved I’ll end up being, but will probably be reading along with them to start off.

    Reply
  113. Do not yet belong to a book club. I have so many books I’m working on, there is no time. Having said that, I’m in the process of working on the start up of 2 book clubs at our library. There are two clubs in the little town, they buy 12 books the beginning of the year and trade every month. As far as I know they do not discuss the books. We have had requests to start a club at the library, so we have started a sign-up and will have an organizational meeting next month. Teens have also requested a book club, so we’ll see if we can organize one next month during Teen Read Week. We hope to have everyone read the same book each month so we can discuss it. Unless they are books I’ve read, I’ll have 2 more added to my must read list.
    As it is now, my TBR shelf is full of books I want to read for me and those I’m reading for work. I like to preview the books I’m ordering for the kids and read what I can. We do Book To Movie parties when movies are released. I still need to read New Moon. I’m not sure how involved I’ll end up being, but will probably be reading along with them to start off.

    Reply
  114. Do not yet belong to a book club. I have so many books I’m working on, there is no time. Having said that, I’m in the process of working on the start up of 2 book clubs at our library. There are two clubs in the little town, they buy 12 books the beginning of the year and trade every month. As far as I know they do not discuss the books. We have had requests to start a club at the library, so we have started a sign-up and will have an organizational meeting next month. Teens have also requested a book club, so we’ll see if we can organize one next month during Teen Read Week. We hope to have everyone read the same book each month so we can discuss it. Unless they are books I’ve read, I’ll have 2 more added to my must read list.
    As it is now, my TBR shelf is full of books I want to read for me and those I’m reading for work. I like to preview the books I’m ordering for the kids and read what I can. We do Book To Movie parties when movies are released. I still need to read New Moon. I’m not sure how involved I’ll end up being, but will probably be reading along with them to start off.

    Reply
  115. Do not yet belong to a book club. I have so many books I’m working on, there is no time. Having said that, I’m in the process of working on the start up of 2 book clubs at our library. There are two clubs in the little town, they buy 12 books the beginning of the year and trade every month. As far as I know they do not discuss the books. We have had requests to start a club at the library, so we have started a sign-up and will have an organizational meeting next month. Teens have also requested a book club, so we’ll see if we can organize one next month during Teen Read Week. We hope to have everyone read the same book each month so we can discuss it. Unless they are books I’ve read, I’ll have 2 more added to my must read list.
    As it is now, my TBR shelf is full of books I want to read for me and those I’m reading for work. I like to preview the books I’m ordering for the kids and read what I can. We do Book To Movie parties when movies are released. I still need to read New Moon. I’m not sure how involved I’ll end up being, but will probably be reading along with them to start off.

    Reply
  116. I do not belong to a “book club” but really miss the book club at my former school. The librarian would close the library to students one lunch period each month (they could still come before or after school or during class), bring in food and we would discuss whatever we were reading. It was lovely and much better than normal teacher lounge conversations which normally revolved around which parents/students were driving us mad.
    With as much as I read people are surprised I am not an English major. I prefer to savor books, enjoy them and share them, rather than disect them. I had English teachers that actually kill a desire to read (though that would take a thermonuclear device in my case). The online book club I almost joined fell into this type. So I voraciously read on my own and talk up the Word Wenches and any other author I enjoy to any who will listen.
    To Patricia, my daughter was a Twilight fan until it got popular. The movies really killed it for her (don’t mention Pattinson to her), but really enjoys both Harry Potter books and movies. Strange how a movie can either make some want to read the book or turn them off.

    Reply
  117. I do not belong to a “book club” but really miss the book club at my former school. The librarian would close the library to students one lunch period each month (they could still come before or after school or during class), bring in food and we would discuss whatever we were reading. It was lovely and much better than normal teacher lounge conversations which normally revolved around which parents/students were driving us mad.
    With as much as I read people are surprised I am not an English major. I prefer to savor books, enjoy them and share them, rather than disect them. I had English teachers that actually kill a desire to read (though that would take a thermonuclear device in my case). The online book club I almost joined fell into this type. So I voraciously read on my own and talk up the Word Wenches and any other author I enjoy to any who will listen.
    To Patricia, my daughter was a Twilight fan until it got popular. The movies really killed it for her (don’t mention Pattinson to her), but really enjoys both Harry Potter books and movies. Strange how a movie can either make some want to read the book or turn them off.

    Reply
  118. I do not belong to a “book club” but really miss the book club at my former school. The librarian would close the library to students one lunch period each month (they could still come before or after school or during class), bring in food and we would discuss whatever we were reading. It was lovely and much better than normal teacher lounge conversations which normally revolved around which parents/students were driving us mad.
    With as much as I read people are surprised I am not an English major. I prefer to savor books, enjoy them and share them, rather than disect them. I had English teachers that actually kill a desire to read (though that would take a thermonuclear device in my case). The online book club I almost joined fell into this type. So I voraciously read on my own and talk up the Word Wenches and any other author I enjoy to any who will listen.
    To Patricia, my daughter was a Twilight fan until it got popular. The movies really killed it for her (don’t mention Pattinson to her), but really enjoys both Harry Potter books and movies. Strange how a movie can either make some want to read the book or turn them off.

    Reply
  119. I do not belong to a “book club” but really miss the book club at my former school. The librarian would close the library to students one lunch period each month (they could still come before or after school or during class), bring in food and we would discuss whatever we were reading. It was lovely and much better than normal teacher lounge conversations which normally revolved around which parents/students were driving us mad.
    With as much as I read people are surprised I am not an English major. I prefer to savor books, enjoy them and share them, rather than disect them. I had English teachers that actually kill a desire to read (though that would take a thermonuclear device in my case). The online book club I almost joined fell into this type. So I voraciously read on my own and talk up the Word Wenches and any other author I enjoy to any who will listen.
    To Patricia, my daughter was a Twilight fan until it got popular. The movies really killed it for her (don’t mention Pattinson to her), but really enjoys both Harry Potter books and movies. Strange how a movie can either make some want to read the book or turn them off.

    Reply
  120. I do not belong to a “book club” but really miss the book club at my former school. The librarian would close the library to students one lunch period each month (they could still come before or after school or during class), bring in food and we would discuss whatever we were reading. It was lovely and much better than normal teacher lounge conversations which normally revolved around which parents/students were driving us mad.
    With as much as I read people are surprised I am not an English major. I prefer to savor books, enjoy them and share them, rather than disect them. I had English teachers that actually kill a desire to read (though that would take a thermonuclear device in my case). The online book club I almost joined fell into this type. So I voraciously read on my own and talk up the Word Wenches and any other author I enjoy to any who will listen.
    To Patricia, my daughter was a Twilight fan until it got popular. The movies really killed it for her (don’t mention Pattinson to her), but really enjoys both Harry Potter books and movies. Strange how a movie can either make some want to read the book or turn them off.

    Reply

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