Blond Attrition

Edith_layton2

Edith here!

Okay, Gentle Readers – a test.

What do the following actors and musicians, here and gone, have in common??

Brad Pitt
Orlando Bloom
Viggo Mortenson
Van Johnson
Laurence Olivier

Images

Owen Wilson
Robert Redford
Richard Widmark
Heath Ledger
Robert Mitchum
Burt Lancaster
Kirk Douglas
Jon Voigt
James Cagney
Roger Moore
Daniel Craig
Jude Law
Peter O’Toole
William Holden
Woody Harrelson
Sting
Alan Jackson
Rod Stewart

Ready?
They all are – or at least, were for a movie or album or two: Blond!

Legolas

And what’s wrong with that?
I love the look of blond men.
My father was blond before he lost his hair. My dh had silvery wings at his temples when I met him, and turned entirely silver haired soon after (and no, it wasn’t because he married me, as he claimed). My new boy baby grandchildren are respectively, blonde and red.

And yet whenever I write a blond, dark gold, or silver haired hero – he turns up dark haired on the bookcover.
And whenever I ask why (this has been at different publishers) I am told that the art department doesn’t like blond men. And that the Sales Department says they don’t sell a book!

They didn’t sell books about famously hot and fair haired literary heroes?

The fantastic albino, Prince Elric, and his series, by Michael Moorcock
The immortal beloved Francis Lymond of the Lymond Chronicles, by Dorothey Dunnett.

Huh?

Fabio didn’t sell books?
That gorgeous trio of pig-farmer cover models didn’t sell books?

Well, yes, that was then and this is now.

But I’m tired of writing emails assuring readers that it wasn’t my fault.
And I wonder if I should give up blond heroes?
I fought like a tiger but had blond heroes on five of my bookcovers! And a redhead (boy, was that a fight)! on another.

But these days? No.
They say that naturally blond people will become extinct in a few hundred years. They are already in the minority in America, and fading fast.

Wilson

Is it that blond is considered feminine? The list of blonde heroines is too long to put here. Not to mention the many movie actresses and pop singers. In fact, a dark haired female beauty is in trouble these days. (Interesting fact: Brunettes were all the rage in Regency England! I guess they thought the classic fair English Beauty was too commonplace?)

And now, a unique contest here for you:

Tell me please, your opinion.
What hair color do you prefer in a hero? Does it matter?

And most importantly, does a blond man on the cover of a romance make you reach for another book? If so, why? Or why not?

And since I’m speaking of the here and gone, the winner will receive any one book from my backlist (if I still have it, so it would be a choice of two, please).

And my eternal thanks.

Ready to go for it? Then, tell me do. Blondes may have more fun, but what is it about blond heroes that you may shun?

230 thoughts on “Blond Attrition”

  1. I can only speak for myself, but I sure don’t have a problem with any hero’s hair color. . . just not something I ever really thought about. Never thought it was something I should think about. LOL πŸ™‚
    But while you put his name on the list, you didn’t mention the story behind Daniel Craig’s last movie there. . . πŸ™‚ People complained about Bond having blong hair — I just kept thinking why are all these people insane? Sure didn’t seem to make him any less Bond — though maybe with the shirtless beach scene, no one noticed his scalp. LOL πŸ˜‰
    Lois

    Reply
  2. I can only speak for myself, but I sure don’t have a problem with any hero’s hair color. . . just not something I ever really thought about. Never thought it was something I should think about. LOL πŸ™‚
    But while you put his name on the list, you didn’t mention the story behind Daniel Craig’s last movie there. . . πŸ™‚ People complained about Bond having blong hair — I just kept thinking why are all these people insane? Sure didn’t seem to make him any less Bond — though maybe with the shirtless beach scene, no one noticed his scalp. LOL πŸ˜‰
    Lois

    Reply
  3. I can only speak for myself, but I sure don’t have a problem with any hero’s hair color. . . just not something I ever really thought about. Never thought it was something I should think about. LOL πŸ™‚
    But while you put his name on the list, you didn’t mention the story behind Daniel Craig’s last movie there. . . πŸ™‚ People complained about Bond having blong hair — I just kept thinking why are all these people insane? Sure didn’t seem to make him any less Bond — though maybe with the shirtless beach scene, no one noticed his scalp. LOL πŸ˜‰
    Lois

    Reply
  4. I can only speak for myself, but I sure don’t have a problem with any hero’s hair color. . . just not something I ever really thought about. Never thought it was something I should think about. LOL πŸ™‚
    But while you put his name on the list, you didn’t mention the story behind Daniel Craig’s last movie there. . . πŸ™‚ People complained about Bond having blong hair — I just kept thinking why are all these people insane? Sure didn’t seem to make him any less Bond — though maybe with the shirtless beach scene, no one noticed his scalp. LOL πŸ˜‰
    Lois

    Reply
  5. I can only speak for myself, but I sure don’t have a problem with any hero’s hair color. . . just not something I ever really thought about. Never thought it was something I should think about. LOL πŸ™‚
    But while you put his name on the list, you didn’t mention the story behind Daniel Craig’s last movie there. . . πŸ™‚ People complained about Bond having blong hair — I just kept thinking why are all these people insane? Sure didn’t seem to make him any less Bond — though maybe with the shirtless beach scene, no one noticed his scalp. LOL πŸ˜‰
    Lois

    Reply
  6. Edith! What a great subject! And one that several of my author friends have also had to deal with every time they see their new cover art for the first time.
    I wonder if we as readers, aren’t drawn to the kind of man we married. Mine is 6’5″, 290+ and has a 56 inch chest. I like my heroes big, strong and a little dominant. His hair is almost black, his eyes are obsidian…so I gravitate more to that I think.
    However, that said, I think we pick up a book based, not only on the hero’s picture but also on the overall feel of the cover. Look at all the covers who have no hero at all on them, who sometimes don’t even have the heroine on them. Out of the 17 bookcovers shown next to your post, 6 of them have no human on the front and yet, they convey the story’s atmosphere which is, ultimately, what I think the cover should really do.
    And it’s not just the hero who gets the raw deal! I have a book that is a favorite of mine, with the hero and heroine on the cover in a very seductive pose. But if you read the book, then look back at the cover, the hero must be having an affair with the female on the cover and not the heroine because the female has long blond straight hair and the heroine’s hair is fairly short, almost black and very curly. But I never thought twice about it until recently when someone else pointed it out.
    Maybe it’s just me, I don’t know. But I want the hero I read about to overwhelm the story with his presence, be he blond, red haired or brunette. I might reach for the book because the cover is enticing, but I’ll buy it because of the author and the blurb on the back before I buy it on cover alone.
    I know, I’ve rambled, but you know? Give me a big, bad, albino hero any day over a tall, dark, wuss of a character who is supposed to be the hero but whose writer has failed miserably in creating a great persona.
    πŸ™‚

    Reply
  7. Edith! What a great subject! And one that several of my author friends have also had to deal with every time they see their new cover art for the first time.
    I wonder if we as readers, aren’t drawn to the kind of man we married. Mine is 6’5″, 290+ and has a 56 inch chest. I like my heroes big, strong and a little dominant. His hair is almost black, his eyes are obsidian…so I gravitate more to that I think.
    However, that said, I think we pick up a book based, not only on the hero’s picture but also on the overall feel of the cover. Look at all the covers who have no hero at all on them, who sometimes don’t even have the heroine on them. Out of the 17 bookcovers shown next to your post, 6 of them have no human on the front and yet, they convey the story’s atmosphere which is, ultimately, what I think the cover should really do.
    And it’s not just the hero who gets the raw deal! I have a book that is a favorite of mine, with the hero and heroine on the cover in a very seductive pose. But if you read the book, then look back at the cover, the hero must be having an affair with the female on the cover and not the heroine because the female has long blond straight hair and the heroine’s hair is fairly short, almost black and very curly. But I never thought twice about it until recently when someone else pointed it out.
    Maybe it’s just me, I don’t know. But I want the hero I read about to overwhelm the story with his presence, be he blond, red haired or brunette. I might reach for the book because the cover is enticing, but I’ll buy it because of the author and the blurb on the back before I buy it on cover alone.
    I know, I’ve rambled, but you know? Give me a big, bad, albino hero any day over a tall, dark, wuss of a character who is supposed to be the hero but whose writer has failed miserably in creating a great persona.
    πŸ™‚

    Reply
  8. Edith! What a great subject! And one that several of my author friends have also had to deal with every time they see their new cover art for the first time.
    I wonder if we as readers, aren’t drawn to the kind of man we married. Mine is 6’5″, 290+ and has a 56 inch chest. I like my heroes big, strong and a little dominant. His hair is almost black, his eyes are obsidian…so I gravitate more to that I think.
    However, that said, I think we pick up a book based, not only on the hero’s picture but also on the overall feel of the cover. Look at all the covers who have no hero at all on them, who sometimes don’t even have the heroine on them. Out of the 17 bookcovers shown next to your post, 6 of them have no human on the front and yet, they convey the story’s atmosphere which is, ultimately, what I think the cover should really do.
    And it’s not just the hero who gets the raw deal! I have a book that is a favorite of mine, with the hero and heroine on the cover in a very seductive pose. But if you read the book, then look back at the cover, the hero must be having an affair with the female on the cover and not the heroine because the female has long blond straight hair and the heroine’s hair is fairly short, almost black and very curly. But I never thought twice about it until recently when someone else pointed it out.
    Maybe it’s just me, I don’t know. But I want the hero I read about to overwhelm the story with his presence, be he blond, red haired or brunette. I might reach for the book because the cover is enticing, but I’ll buy it because of the author and the blurb on the back before I buy it on cover alone.
    I know, I’ve rambled, but you know? Give me a big, bad, albino hero any day over a tall, dark, wuss of a character who is supposed to be the hero but whose writer has failed miserably in creating a great persona.
    πŸ™‚

    Reply
  9. Edith! What a great subject! And one that several of my author friends have also had to deal with every time they see their new cover art for the first time.
    I wonder if we as readers, aren’t drawn to the kind of man we married. Mine is 6’5″, 290+ and has a 56 inch chest. I like my heroes big, strong and a little dominant. His hair is almost black, his eyes are obsidian…so I gravitate more to that I think.
    However, that said, I think we pick up a book based, not only on the hero’s picture but also on the overall feel of the cover. Look at all the covers who have no hero at all on them, who sometimes don’t even have the heroine on them. Out of the 17 bookcovers shown next to your post, 6 of them have no human on the front and yet, they convey the story’s atmosphere which is, ultimately, what I think the cover should really do.
    And it’s not just the hero who gets the raw deal! I have a book that is a favorite of mine, with the hero and heroine on the cover in a very seductive pose. But if you read the book, then look back at the cover, the hero must be having an affair with the female on the cover and not the heroine because the female has long blond straight hair and the heroine’s hair is fairly short, almost black and very curly. But I never thought twice about it until recently when someone else pointed it out.
    Maybe it’s just me, I don’t know. But I want the hero I read about to overwhelm the story with his presence, be he blond, red haired or brunette. I might reach for the book because the cover is enticing, but I’ll buy it because of the author and the blurb on the back before I buy it on cover alone.
    I know, I’ve rambled, but you know? Give me a big, bad, albino hero any day over a tall, dark, wuss of a character who is supposed to be the hero but whose writer has failed miserably in creating a great persona.
    πŸ™‚

    Reply
  10. Edith! What a great subject! And one that several of my author friends have also had to deal with every time they see their new cover art for the first time.
    I wonder if we as readers, aren’t drawn to the kind of man we married. Mine is 6’5″, 290+ and has a 56 inch chest. I like my heroes big, strong and a little dominant. His hair is almost black, his eyes are obsidian…so I gravitate more to that I think.
    However, that said, I think we pick up a book based, not only on the hero’s picture but also on the overall feel of the cover. Look at all the covers who have no hero at all on them, who sometimes don’t even have the heroine on them. Out of the 17 bookcovers shown next to your post, 6 of them have no human on the front and yet, they convey the story’s atmosphere which is, ultimately, what I think the cover should really do.
    And it’s not just the hero who gets the raw deal! I have a book that is a favorite of mine, with the hero and heroine on the cover in a very seductive pose. But if you read the book, then look back at the cover, the hero must be having an affair with the female on the cover and not the heroine because the female has long blond straight hair and the heroine’s hair is fairly short, almost black and very curly. But I never thought twice about it until recently when someone else pointed it out.
    Maybe it’s just me, I don’t know. But I want the hero I read about to overwhelm the story with his presence, be he blond, red haired or brunette. I might reach for the book because the cover is enticing, but I’ll buy it because of the author and the blurb on the back before I buy it on cover alone.
    I know, I’ve rambled, but you know? Give me a big, bad, albino hero any day over a tall, dark, wuss of a character who is supposed to be the hero but whose writer has failed miserably in creating a great persona.
    πŸ™‚

    Reply
  11. I totally ignore covers.
    I think most of us know from experience that the people on the cover have almost nothing to do with the characters in the book 95% of the time. *sigh* But yeah, I spend a lot of time emailing to readers to explain/apologize that the hot men on my covers look nothing like the hot men inside said cover.
    LORD SIN
    cover = short haired, rather slender
    character = tall, long curly hair, big guy
    LORD SCANDAL (this one is a dozy)
    cover = blonde (!) with visible chest-hair (!!!)
    character = black hair, smooth golden skin (he’s half Turkish)
    One of my friends actually rewrote the description of her hero during her copyedits because the cover she got was so very, very β€œwrong”. And we’re still debating just who is on the cover of one of my godmother’s books (it’s a family saga from the 80s, but the couple resembles NO ONE in the novel, LOL).

    Reply
  12. I totally ignore covers.
    I think most of us know from experience that the people on the cover have almost nothing to do with the characters in the book 95% of the time. *sigh* But yeah, I spend a lot of time emailing to readers to explain/apologize that the hot men on my covers look nothing like the hot men inside said cover.
    LORD SIN
    cover = short haired, rather slender
    character = tall, long curly hair, big guy
    LORD SCANDAL (this one is a dozy)
    cover = blonde (!) with visible chest-hair (!!!)
    character = black hair, smooth golden skin (he’s half Turkish)
    One of my friends actually rewrote the description of her hero during her copyedits because the cover she got was so very, very β€œwrong”. And we’re still debating just who is on the cover of one of my godmother’s books (it’s a family saga from the 80s, but the couple resembles NO ONE in the novel, LOL).

    Reply
  13. I totally ignore covers.
    I think most of us know from experience that the people on the cover have almost nothing to do with the characters in the book 95% of the time. *sigh* But yeah, I spend a lot of time emailing to readers to explain/apologize that the hot men on my covers look nothing like the hot men inside said cover.
    LORD SIN
    cover = short haired, rather slender
    character = tall, long curly hair, big guy
    LORD SCANDAL (this one is a dozy)
    cover = blonde (!) with visible chest-hair (!!!)
    character = black hair, smooth golden skin (he’s half Turkish)
    One of my friends actually rewrote the description of her hero during her copyedits because the cover she got was so very, very β€œwrong”. And we’re still debating just who is on the cover of one of my godmother’s books (it’s a family saga from the 80s, but the couple resembles NO ONE in the novel, LOL).

    Reply
  14. I totally ignore covers.
    I think most of us know from experience that the people on the cover have almost nothing to do with the characters in the book 95% of the time. *sigh* But yeah, I spend a lot of time emailing to readers to explain/apologize that the hot men on my covers look nothing like the hot men inside said cover.
    LORD SIN
    cover = short haired, rather slender
    character = tall, long curly hair, big guy
    LORD SCANDAL (this one is a dozy)
    cover = blonde (!) with visible chest-hair (!!!)
    character = black hair, smooth golden skin (he’s half Turkish)
    One of my friends actually rewrote the description of her hero during her copyedits because the cover she got was so very, very β€œwrong”. And we’re still debating just who is on the cover of one of my godmother’s books (it’s a family saga from the 80s, but the couple resembles NO ONE in the novel, LOL).

    Reply
  15. I totally ignore covers.
    I think most of us know from experience that the people on the cover have almost nothing to do with the characters in the book 95% of the time. *sigh* But yeah, I spend a lot of time emailing to readers to explain/apologize that the hot men on my covers look nothing like the hot men inside said cover.
    LORD SIN
    cover = short haired, rather slender
    character = tall, long curly hair, big guy
    LORD SCANDAL (this one is a dozy)
    cover = blonde (!) with visible chest-hair (!!!)
    character = black hair, smooth golden skin (he’s half Turkish)
    One of my friends actually rewrote the description of her hero during her copyedits because the cover she got was so very, very β€œwrong”. And we’re still debating just who is on the cover of one of my godmother’s books (it’s a family saga from the 80s, but the couple resembles NO ONE in the novel, LOL).

    Reply
  16. ::shrugs:: I’ve just always liked brown hair and dark brown eyes! I suppose it’s as simple as your liking blonds. We like what we like, and that’s that.
    I loved Dorothy Dunnett’s Game of Kings, but I have to admit that it startled me every time she referred to his “yellow head.” When I read, the hero gets morphed into my husband (6′, tall, dark, and handsome) so every time a reference to a hero’s blond hair comes up, my head throws it out the window. Kind of like my inner reader thinks the author screwed up… the hero CAN’T have blond hair, because he looks like my husband, of course! πŸ™‚
    But as for covers… I actually prefer covers without any people on them. At least not prominently. I like the cover to reflect the setting and atmosphere of the book. That’s what give me the best feel for whether I’ll like it or not. And since I write and like to read “sweet” that means no half-naked people.

    Reply
  17. ::shrugs:: I’ve just always liked brown hair and dark brown eyes! I suppose it’s as simple as your liking blonds. We like what we like, and that’s that.
    I loved Dorothy Dunnett’s Game of Kings, but I have to admit that it startled me every time she referred to his “yellow head.” When I read, the hero gets morphed into my husband (6′, tall, dark, and handsome) so every time a reference to a hero’s blond hair comes up, my head throws it out the window. Kind of like my inner reader thinks the author screwed up… the hero CAN’T have blond hair, because he looks like my husband, of course! πŸ™‚
    But as for covers… I actually prefer covers without any people on them. At least not prominently. I like the cover to reflect the setting and atmosphere of the book. That’s what give me the best feel for whether I’ll like it or not. And since I write and like to read “sweet” that means no half-naked people.

    Reply
  18. ::shrugs:: I’ve just always liked brown hair and dark brown eyes! I suppose it’s as simple as your liking blonds. We like what we like, and that’s that.
    I loved Dorothy Dunnett’s Game of Kings, but I have to admit that it startled me every time she referred to his “yellow head.” When I read, the hero gets morphed into my husband (6′, tall, dark, and handsome) so every time a reference to a hero’s blond hair comes up, my head throws it out the window. Kind of like my inner reader thinks the author screwed up… the hero CAN’T have blond hair, because he looks like my husband, of course! πŸ™‚
    But as for covers… I actually prefer covers without any people on them. At least not prominently. I like the cover to reflect the setting and atmosphere of the book. That’s what give me the best feel for whether I’ll like it or not. And since I write and like to read “sweet” that means no half-naked people.

    Reply
  19. ::shrugs:: I’ve just always liked brown hair and dark brown eyes! I suppose it’s as simple as your liking blonds. We like what we like, and that’s that.
    I loved Dorothy Dunnett’s Game of Kings, but I have to admit that it startled me every time she referred to his “yellow head.” When I read, the hero gets morphed into my husband (6′, tall, dark, and handsome) so every time a reference to a hero’s blond hair comes up, my head throws it out the window. Kind of like my inner reader thinks the author screwed up… the hero CAN’T have blond hair, because he looks like my husband, of course! πŸ™‚
    But as for covers… I actually prefer covers without any people on them. At least not prominently. I like the cover to reflect the setting and atmosphere of the book. That’s what give me the best feel for whether I’ll like it or not. And since I write and like to read “sweet” that means no half-naked people.

    Reply
  20. ::shrugs:: I’ve just always liked brown hair and dark brown eyes! I suppose it’s as simple as your liking blonds. We like what we like, and that’s that.
    I loved Dorothy Dunnett’s Game of Kings, but I have to admit that it startled me every time she referred to his “yellow head.” When I read, the hero gets morphed into my husband (6′, tall, dark, and handsome) so every time a reference to a hero’s blond hair comes up, my head throws it out the window. Kind of like my inner reader thinks the author screwed up… the hero CAN’T have blond hair, because he looks like my husband, of course! πŸ™‚
    But as for covers… I actually prefer covers without any people on them. At least not prominently. I like the cover to reflect the setting and atmosphere of the book. That’s what give me the best feel for whether I’ll like it or not. And since I write and like to read “sweet” that means no half-naked people.

    Reply
  21. Why is it always dark haired men? Perhaps the issue lies in not what the “Readership” will buy, but what the editor (or whoever makes the decisions prefers).
    My personal thought is that it is more a case of contrasts. Dark hair and eyes will show up much better in contrast to the skin tones. I don’t know how many of the women are blonde, but again, perhaps they want a contrast to the colour of the woman’s hair.
    As for the possibility of natural blonde becoming extinct, recessive genes have a way of expressing themselves. So three or four generations from now, a couple with dark haired and dark eyes will produce a little blondie. I come from a family of 8 kids. My dad was blondish, and I am the only child to be blonde into adulthood.
    Interestingly enough, I think that people are so accustomed to the sight of dyed blonde hair that they don’t actually recognize natural blonde. Someone once asked me what colour of hair I had. I desperately wanted to say “natural”, I just told her blonde. It’s just not the fake, bright yellow blonde with the dark roots so many have…

    Reply
  22. Why is it always dark haired men? Perhaps the issue lies in not what the “Readership” will buy, but what the editor (or whoever makes the decisions prefers).
    My personal thought is that it is more a case of contrasts. Dark hair and eyes will show up much better in contrast to the skin tones. I don’t know how many of the women are blonde, but again, perhaps they want a contrast to the colour of the woman’s hair.
    As for the possibility of natural blonde becoming extinct, recessive genes have a way of expressing themselves. So three or four generations from now, a couple with dark haired and dark eyes will produce a little blondie. I come from a family of 8 kids. My dad was blondish, and I am the only child to be blonde into adulthood.
    Interestingly enough, I think that people are so accustomed to the sight of dyed blonde hair that they don’t actually recognize natural blonde. Someone once asked me what colour of hair I had. I desperately wanted to say “natural”, I just told her blonde. It’s just not the fake, bright yellow blonde with the dark roots so many have…

    Reply
  23. Why is it always dark haired men? Perhaps the issue lies in not what the “Readership” will buy, but what the editor (or whoever makes the decisions prefers).
    My personal thought is that it is more a case of contrasts. Dark hair and eyes will show up much better in contrast to the skin tones. I don’t know how many of the women are blonde, but again, perhaps they want a contrast to the colour of the woman’s hair.
    As for the possibility of natural blonde becoming extinct, recessive genes have a way of expressing themselves. So three or four generations from now, a couple with dark haired and dark eyes will produce a little blondie. I come from a family of 8 kids. My dad was blondish, and I am the only child to be blonde into adulthood.
    Interestingly enough, I think that people are so accustomed to the sight of dyed blonde hair that they don’t actually recognize natural blonde. Someone once asked me what colour of hair I had. I desperately wanted to say “natural”, I just told her blonde. It’s just not the fake, bright yellow blonde with the dark roots so many have…

    Reply
  24. Why is it always dark haired men? Perhaps the issue lies in not what the “Readership” will buy, but what the editor (or whoever makes the decisions prefers).
    My personal thought is that it is more a case of contrasts. Dark hair and eyes will show up much better in contrast to the skin tones. I don’t know how many of the women are blonde, but again, perhaps they want a contrast to the colour of the woman’s hair.
    As for the possibility of natural blonde becoming extinct, recessive genes have a way of expressing themselves. So three or four generations from now, a couple with dark haired and dark eyes will produce a little blondie. I come from a family of 8 kids. My dad was blondish, and I am the only child to be blonde into adulthood.
    Interestingly enough, I think that people are so accustomed to the sight of dyed blonde hair that they don’t actually recognize natural blonde. Someone once asked me what colour of hair I had. I desperately wanted to say “natural”, I just told her blonde. It’s just not the fake, bright yellow blonde with the dark roots so many have…

    Reply
  25. Why is it always dark haired men? Perhaps the issue lies in not what the “Readership” will buy, but what the editor (or whoever makes the decisions prefers).
    My personal thought is that it is more a case of contrasts. Dark hair and eyes will show up much better in contrast to the skin tones. I don’t know how many of the women are blonde, but again, perhaps they want a contrast to the colour of the woman’s hair.
    As for the possibility of natural blonde becoming extinct, recessive genes have a way of expressing themselves. So three or four generations from now, a couple with dark haired and dark eyes will produce a little blondie. I come from a family of 8 kids. My dad was blondish, and I am the only child to be blonde into adulthood.
    Interestingly enough, I think that people are so accustomed to the sight of dyed blonde hair that they don’t actually recognize natural blonde. Someone once asked me what colour of hair I had. I desperately wanted to say “natural”, I just told her blonde. It’s just not the fake, bright yellow blonde with the dark roots so many have…

    Reply
  26. Previously I was a natural blond. Only one of my four children is blond.I married tall, dark and handsome, but I dated my share of blonds. My hero-before-last has golden hair, because he’s a source of light and just so damned angelic. Like me. *g*
    Covers continue to stupefy me on so many levels—I mean, do the artists even read the authors’ notes? I don’t care what color hair the hero OR the heroine have, although red-headed heroes are few and far between. Some contemps I’ve read are actually featuring bald (i.e., shaved) guys. So there’s the solution.

    Reply
  27. Previously I was a natural blond. Only one of my four children is blond.I married tall, dark and handsome, but I dated my share of blonds. My hero-before-last has golden hair, because he’s a source of light and just so damned angelic. Like me. *g*
    Covers continue to stupefy me on so many levels—I mean, do the artists even read the authors’ notes? I don’t care what color hair the hero OR the heroine have, although red-headed heroes are few and far between. Some contemps I’ve read are actually featuring bald (i.e., shaved) guys. So there’s the solution.

    Reply
  28. Previously I was a natural blond. Only one of my four children is blond.I married tall, dark and handsome, but I dated my share of blonds. My hero-before-last has golden hair, because he’s a source of light and just so damned angelic. Like me. *g*
    Covers continue to stupefy me on so many levels—I mean, do the artists even read the authors’ notes? I don’t care what color hair the hero OR the heroine have, although red-headed heroes are few and far between. Some contemps I’ve read are actually featuring bald (i.e., shaved) guys. So there’s the solution.

    Reply
  29. Previously I was a natural blond. Only one of my four children is blond.I married tall, dark and handsome, but I dated my share of blonds. My hero-before-last has golden hair, because he’s a source of light and just so damned angelic. Like me. *g*
    Covers continue to stupefy me on so many levels—I mean, do the artists even read the authors’ notes? I don’t care what color hair the hero OR the heroine have, although red-headed heroes are few and far between. Some contemps I’ve read are actually featuring bald (i.e., shaved) guys. So there’s the solution.

    Reply
  30. Previously I was a natural blond. Only one of my four children is blond.I married tall, dark and handsome, but I dated my share of blonds. My hero-before-last has golden hair, because he’s a source of light and just so damned angelic. Like me. *g*
    Covers continue to stupefy me on so many levels—I mean, do the artists even read the authors’ notes? I don’t care what color hair the hero OR the heroine have, although red-headed heroes are few and far between. Some contemps I’ve read are actually featuring bald (i.e., shaved) guys. So there’s the solution.

    Reply
  31. I love blond-haired men! My husband’s hair is light brown, so maybe I’m prejudiced.
    But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is? At this point, dark-haired men are boring.
    I loved your blond hero in “Alas, My Love”. And I also noticed the dark-haired heroes on your covers and wondered why.

    Reply
  32. I love blond-haired men! My husband’s hair is light brown, so maybe I’m prejudiced.
    But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is? At this point, dark-haired men are boring.
    I loved your blond hero in “Alas, My Love”. And I also noticed the dark-haired heroes on your covers and wondered why.

    Reply
  33. I love blond-haired men! My husband’s hair is light brown, so maybe I’m prejudiced.
    But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is? At this point, dark-haired men are boring.
    I loved your blond hero in “Alas, My Love”. And I also noticed the dark-haired heroes on your covers and wondered why.

    Reply
  34. I love blond-haired men! My husband’s hair is light brown, so maybe I’m prejudiced.
    But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is? At this point, dark-haired men are boring.
    I loved your blond hero in “Alas, My Love”. And I also noticed the dark-haired heroes on your covers and wondered why.

    Reply
  35. I love blond-haired men! My husband’s hair is light brown, so maybe I’m prejudiced.
    But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is? At this point, dark-haired men are boring.
    I loved your blond hero in “Alas, My Love”. And I also noticed the dark-haired heroes on your covers and wondered why.

    Reply
  36. I may be attracted to a book because of its cover color – usually I like intense red, blue, or green – but I never buy based on the hero’s hair color, or the picture on the cover, for that matter. The blurb on the back gets me to open the book, and then the first few pages hook me (or not).
    But I can’t get myself to write a blond hero. Current heroine is black-haired, so I wanted a lighter-haired hero for contrast, but no can do. The lightest I can go for is medium brown, and even that’s uncomfortable. Makes me uneasy, somehow… just doesn’t feel right. I like heroes to have dark eyes, too.

    Reply
  37. I may be attracted to a book because of its cover color – usually I like intense red, blue, or green – but I never buy based on the hero’s hair color, or the picture on the cover, for that matter. The blurb on the back gets me to open the book, and then the first few pages hook me (or not).
    But I can’t get myself to write a blond hero. Current heroine is black-haired, so I wanted a lighter-haired hero for contrast, but no can do. The lightest I can go for is medium brown, and even that’s uncomfortable. Makes me uneasy, somehow… just doesn’t feel right. I like heroes to have dark eyes, too.

    Reply
  38. I may be attracted to a book because of its cover color – usually I like intense red, blue, or green – but I never buy based on the hero’s hair color, or the picture on the cover, for that matter. The blurb on the back gets me to open the book, and then the first few pages hook me (or not).
    But I can’t get myself to write a blond hero. Current heroine is black-haired, so I wanted a lighter-haired hero for contrast, but no can do. The lightest I can go for is medium brown, and even that’s uncomfortable. Makes me uneasy, somehow… just doesn’t feel right. I like heroes to have dark eyes, too.

    Reply
  39. I may be attracted to a book because of its cover color – usually I like intense red, blue, or green – but I never buy based on the hero’s hair color, or the picture on the cover, for that matter. The blurb on the back gets me to open the book, and then the first few pages hook me (or not).
    But I can’t get myself to write a blond hero. Current heroine is black-haired, so I wanted a lighter-haired hero for contrast, but no can do. The lightest I can go for is medium brown, and even that’s uncomfortable. Makes me uneasy, somehow… just doesn’t feel right. I like heroes to have dark eyes, too.

    Reply
  40. I may be attracted to a book because of its cover color – usually I like intense red, blue, or green – but I never buy based on the hero’s hair color, or the picture on the cover, for that matter. The blurb on the back gets me to open the book, and then the first few pages hook me (or not).
    But I can’t get myself to write a blond hero. Current heroine is black-haired, so I wanted a lighter-haired hero for contrast, but no can do. The lightest I can go for is medium brown, and even that’s uncomfortable. Makes me uneasy, somehow… just doesn’t feel right. I like heroes to have dark eyes, too.

    Reply
  41. “But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is?”
    Too funny. But I think it’s a fairly common combo in Britain, where so many of our novels are set (at least that’s been my experience). Much like green eyes are supposed to be the rarest colour, yet in my circle of friends, green happens to predominate (all kinds of shades, from cat-eye yellow green to dark forest green with navy rings).

    Reply
  42. “But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is?”
    Too funny. But I think it’s a fairly common combo in Britain, where so many of our novels are set (at least that’s been my experience). Much like green eyes are supposed to be the rarest colour, yet in my circle of friends, green happens to predominate (all kinds of shades, from cat-eye yellow green to dark forest green with navy rings).

    Reply
  43. “But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is?”
    Too funny. But I think it’s a fairly common combo in Britain, where so many of our novels are set (at least that’s been my experience). Much like green eyes are supposed to be the rarest colour, yet in my circle of friends, green happens to predominate (all kinds of shades, from cat-eye yellow green to dark forest green with navy rings).

    Reply
  44. “But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is?”
    Too funny. But I think it’s a fairly common combo in Britain, where so many of our novels are set (at least that’s been my experience). Much like green eyes are supposed to be the rarest colour, yet in my circle of friends, green happens to predominate (all kinds of shades, from cat-eye yellow green to dark forest green with navy rings).

    Reply
  45. “But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is?”
    Too funny. But I think it’s a fairly common combo in Britain, where so many of our novels are set (at least that’s been my experience). Much like green eyes are supposed to be the rarest colour, yet in my circle of friends, green happens to predominate (all kinds of shades, from cat-eye yellow green to dark forest green with navy rings).

    Reply
  46. Interesting question and it has had me thinking all afternoon. I personally am drawn to dark hair on men – but mostly it is their height (I heart tall men!!!) that I notice first. I guess on a general level, if I think of blonde men I think young and unreliable, flighty types…. this is a total stereo type thought… trying to think in very general trends like a publisher would. Maybe that’s why? Who knows? Whereas the tall, dark haired type is more likely to be a silent hero with hidden depths and inner angst that we must delve into!! Yeah – that’s it, TOTALLY. LOL

    Reply
  47. Interesting question and it has had me thinking all afternoon. I personally am drawn to dark hair on men – but mostly it is their height (I heart tall men!!!) that I notice first. I guess on a general level, if I think of blonde men I think young and unreliable, flighty types…. this is a total stereo type thought… trying to think in very general trends like a publisher would. Maybe that’s why? Who knows? Whereas the tall, dark haired type is more likely to be a silent hero with hidden depths and inner angst that we must delve into!! Yeah – that’s it, TOTALLY. LOL

    Reply
  48. Interesting question and it has had me thinking all afternoon. I personally am drawn to dark hair on men – but mostly it is their height (I heart tall men!!!) that I notice first. I guess on a general level, if I think of blonde men I think young and unreliable, flighty types…. this is a total stereo type thought… trying to think in very general trends like a publisher would. Maybe that’s why? Who knows? Whereas the tall, dark haired type is more likely to be a silent hero with hidden depths and inner angst that we must delve into!! Yeah – that’s it, TOTALLY. LOL

    Reply
  49. Interesting question and it has had me thinking all afternoon. I personally am drawn to dark hair on men – but mostly it is their height (I heart tall men!!!) that I notice first. I guess on a general level, if I think of blonde men I think young and unreliable, flighty types…. this is a total stereo type thought… trying to think in very general trends like a publisher would. Maybe that’s why? Who knows? Whereas the tall, dark haired type is more likely to be a silent hero with hidden depths and inner angst that we must delve into!! Yeah – that’s it, TOTALLY. LOL

    Reply
  50. Interesting question and it has had me thinking all afternoon. I personally am drawn to dark hair on men – but mostly it is their height (I heart tall men!!!) that I notice first. I guess on a general level, if I think of blonde men I think young and unreliable, flighty types…. this is a total stereo type thought… trying to think in very general trends like a publisher would. Maybe that’s why? Who knows? Whereas the tall, dark haired type is more likely to be a silent hero with hidden depths and inner angst that we must delve into!! Yeah – that’s it, TOTALLY. LOL

    Reply
  51. I have no preference and even find it a bit odd when readers are so biased against one or the other. One of my sons is blonde and blue-eyed and the other two have dark hair and hazel eyes, so in my Real Life I love all kinds of coloring. And if I think of the actors who make me weak in the knees — Sean Bean, Simon Baker, Clive Owen, Gregory Peck, among others — their coloring varies as well. Not to mention all those attractive men from other parts of the world who are unlikely to make it to the covers of European historicals, such as Djimon Honsou or Jet Li.
    Once again I’m flummoxed by the Gods That Be/Romance Covers Division (GTB/RCD) and their pronouncements from On High. I personally don’t generally care for very long hair on men, and it certainly wasn’t accurate for men in the Regency ton, yet so many covers show men with shoulder length (and longer) hair. I don’t care for shirt-open-to-waist-even-though-hero-is-standing-on-a-windy-hilltop covers either, yet they are too numerous to count. If I buy one of these books the GTB/RCD say I like those covers, when in reality it’s the author, a positive review, or good word of mouth that got me to buy the book. I’m still waiting for a semi-controlled experiment where they put the same book with 2 different covers out and see which sells more.

    Reply
  52. I have no preference and even find it a bit odd when readers are so biased against one or the other. One of my sons is blonde and blue-eyed and the other two have dark hair and hazel eyes, so in my Real Life I love all kinds of coloring. And if I think of the actors who make me weak in the knees — Sean Bean, Simon Baker, Clive Owen, Gregory Peck, among others — their coloring varies as well. Not to mention all those attractive men from other parts of the world who are unlikely to make it to the covers of European historicals, such as Djimon Honsou or Jet Li.
    Once again I’m flummoxed by the Gods That Be/Romance Covers Division (GTB/RCD) and their pronouncements from On High. I personally don’t generally care for very long hair on men, and it certainly wasn’t accurate for men in the Regency ton, yet so many covers show men with shoulder length (and longer) hair. I don’t care for shirt-open-to-waist-even-though-hero-is-standing-on-a-windy-hilltop covers either, yet they are too numerous to count. If I buy one of these books the GTB/RCD say I like those covers, when in reality it’s the author, a positive review, or good word of mouth that got me to buy the book. I’m still waiting for a semi-controlled experiment where they put the same book with 2 different covers out and see which sells more.

    Reply
  53. I have no preference and even find it a bit odd when readers are so biased against one or the other. One of my sons is blonde and blue-eyed and the other two have dark hair and hazel eyes, so in my Real Life I love all kinds of coloring. And if I think of the actors who make me weak in the knees — Sean Bean, Simon Baker, Clive Owen, Gregory Peck, among others — their coloring varies as well. Not to mention all those attractive men from other parts of the world who are unlikely to make it to the covers of European historicals, such as Djimon Honsou or Jet Li.
    Once again I’m flummoxed by the Gods That Be/Romance Covers Division (GTB/RCD) and their pronouncements from On High. I personally don’t generally care for very long hair on men, and it certainly wasn’t accurate for men in the Regency ton, yet so many covers show men with shoulder length (and longer) hair. I don’t care for shirt-open-to-waist-even-though-hero-is-standing-on-a-windy-hilltop covers either, yet they are too numerous to count. If I buy one of these books the GTB/RCD say I like those covers, when in reality it’s the author, a positive review, or good word of mouth that got me to buy the book. I’m still waiting for a semi-controlled experiment where they put the same book with 2 different covers out and see which sells more.

    Reply
  54. I have no preference and even find it a bit odd when readers are so biased against one or the other. One of my sons is blonde and blue-eyed and the other two have dark hair and hazel eyes, so in my Real Life I love all kinds of coloring. And if I think of the actors who make me weak in the knees — Sean Bean, Simon Baker, Clive Owen, Gregory Peck, among others — their coloring varies as well. Not to mention all those attractive men from other parts of the world who are unlikely to make it to the covers of European historicals, such as Djimon Honsou or Jet Li.
    Once again I’m flummoxed by the Gods That Be/Romance Covers Division (GTB/RCD) and their pronouncements from On High. I personally don’t generally care for very long hair on men, and it certainly wasn’t accurate for men in the Regency ton, yet so many covers show men with shoulder length (and longer) hair. I don’t care for shirt-open-to-waist-even-though-hero-is-standing-on-a-windy-hilltop covers either, yet they are too numerous to count. If I buy one of these books the GTB/RCD say I like those covers, when in reality it’s the author, a positive review, or good word of mouth that got me to buy the book. I’m still waiting for a semi-controlled experiment where they put the same book with 2 different covers out and see which sells more.

    Reply
  55. I have no preference and even find it a bit odd when readers are so biased against one or the other. One of my sons is blonde and blue-eyed and the other two have dark hair and hazel eyes, so in my Real Life I love all kinds of coloring. And if I think of the actors who make me weak in the knees — Sean Bean, Simon Baker, Clive Owen, Gregory Peck, among others — their coloring varies as well. Not to mention all those attractive men from other parts of the world who are unlikely to make it to the covers of European historicals, such as Djimon Honsou or Jet Li.
    Once again I’m flummoxed by the Gods That Be/Romance Covers Division (GTB/RCD) and their pronouncements from On High. I personally don’t generally care for very long hair on men, and it certainly wasn’t accurate for men in the Regency ton, yet so many covers show men with shoulder length (and longer) hair. I don’t care for shirt-open-to-waist-even-though-hero-is-standing-on-a-windy-hilltop covers either, yet they are too numerous to count. If I buy one of these books the GTB/RCD say I like those covers, when in reality it’s the author, a positive review, or good word of mouth that got me to buy the book. I’m still waiting for a semi-controlled experiment where they put the same book with 2 different covers out and see which sells more.

    Reply
  56. If you say hero the first thing I think of is tall dark and handsome but that would be boring if the heroes in every romance I read had the same exact physical characteristics so I like all different types of heroes. It always makes me stop the story and check the cover when I realize that the man on the cover does not look anything like the hero in the story.

    Reply
  57. If you say hero the first thing I think of is tall dark and handsome but that would be boring if the heroes in every romance I read had the same exact physical characteristics so I like all different types of heroes. It always makes me stop the story and check the cover when I realize that the man on the cover does not look anything like the hero in the story.

    Reply
  58. If you say hero the first thing I think of is tall dark and handsome but that would be boring if the heroes in every romance I read had the same exact physical characteristics so I like all different types of heroes. It always makes me stop the story and check the cover when I realize that the man on the cover does not look anything like the hero in the story.

    Reply
  59. If you say hero the first thing I think of is tall dark and handsome but that would be boring if the heroes in every romance I read had the same exact physical characteristics so I like all different types of heroes. It always makes me stop the story and check the cover when I realize that the man on the cover does not look anything like the hero in the story.

    Reply
  60. If you say hero the first thing I think of is tall dark and handsome but that would be boring if the heroes in every romance I read had the same exact physical characteristics so I like all different types of heroes. It always makes me stop the story and check the cover when I realize that the man on the cover does not look anything like the hero in the story.

    Reply
  61. I think the preference for dark men may go back to the invention of the Byronic hero, who was usually dark in order to suggest his diabolical tendencies or doomed fate. D.H. Lawrence wrote an interesting article on dark and blonde heroines, pointing out that the blonde usually got the guy and the brunette suffered a tragic fate. (Remember all those B Western movies where the blonde schoolmarm and the brunette (or redheaded) saloon girl were both in love with the hero? And the latter usually flung herself in front of him and took the villain’s bullet? She died in his arms and the blonde got him!)
    I personally fancy blond heroes, especially Francis Crawford, and Gurt Jan Ridd (if he only had a brain!). They tend to be the steady, protective types, which I actually prefer to the dashing and difficult rakes.
    And Edith, you’ve written some of my favorite blond heroes!

    Reply
  62. I think the preference for dark men may go back to the invention of the Byronic hero, who was usually dark in order to suggest his diabolical tendencies or doomed fate. D.H. Lawrence wrote an interesting article on dark and blonde heroines, pointing out that the blonde usually got the guy and the brunette suffered a tragic fate. (Remember all those B Western movies where the blonde schoolmarm and the brunette (or redheaded) saloon girl were both in love with the hero? And the latter usually flung herself in front of him and took the villain’s bullet? She died in his arms and the blonde got him!)
    I personally fancy blond heroes, especially Francis Crawford, and Gurt Jan Ridd (if he only had a brain!). They tend to be the steady, protective types, which I actually prefer to the dashing and difficult rakes.
    And Edith, you’ve written some of my favorite blond heroes!

    Reply
  63. I think the preference for dark men may go back to the invention of the Byronic hero, who was usually dark in order to suggest his diabolical tendencies or doomed fate. D.H. Lawrence wrote an interesting article on dark and blonde heroines, pointing out that the blonde usually got the guy and the brunette suffered a tragic fate. (Remember all those B Western movies where the blonde schoolmarm and the brunette (or redheaded) saloon girl were both in love with the hero? And the latter usually flung herself in front of him and took the villain’s bullet? She died in his arms and the blonde got him!)
    I personally fancy blond heroes, especially Francis Crawford, and Gurt Jan Ridd (if he only had a brain!). They tend to be the steady, protective types, which I actually prefer to the dashing and difficult rakes.
    And Edith, you’ve written some of my favorite blond heroes!

    Reply
  64. I think the preference for dark men may go back to the invention of the Byronic hero, who was usually dark in order to suggest his diabolical tendencies or doomed fate. D.H. Lawrence wrote an interesting article on dark and blonde heroines, pointing out that the blonde usually got the guy and the brunette suffered a tragic fate. (Remember all those B Western movies where the blonde schoolmarm and the brunette (or redheaded) saloon girl were both in love with the hero? And the latter usually flung herself in front of him and took the villain’s bullet? She died in his arms and the blonde got him!)
    I personally fancy blond heroes, especially Francis Crawford, and Gurt Jan Ridd (if he only had a brain!). They tend to be the steady, protective types, which I actually prefer to the dashing and difficult rakes.
    And Edith, you’ve written some of my favorite blond heroes!

    Reply
  65. I think the preference for dark men may go back to the invention of the Byronic hero, who was usually dark in order to suggest his diabolical tendencies or doomed fate. D.H. Lawrence wrote an interesting article on dark and blonde heroines, pointing out that the blonde usually got the guy and the brunette suffered a tragic fate. (Remember all those B Western movies where the blonde schoolmarm and the brunette (or redheaded) saloon girl were both in love with the hero? And the latter usually flung herself in front of him and took the villain’s bullet? She died in his arms and the blonde got him!)
    I personally fancy blond heroes, especially Francis Crawford, and Gurt Jan Ridd (if he only had a brain!). They tend to be the steady, protective types, which I actually prefer to the dashing and difficult rakes.
    And Edith, you’ve written some of my favorite blond heroes!

    Reply
  66. You know, I’m reading through all these responses and I find it all very interesting. Especially the comment on the stereotypical ‘flighty’ blond, but I gotta tell you. I have a saying that applies completely to my younger daughter and no longer hold with the blond as being stereotypical anything because…
    Blond isn’t a hair color, it’s a state of mind. πŸ™‚
    My DD2 is dark blond/light brown, (more the brown, the blond only shows up after she’s been in the sun) but she asked me this year if Easter would be on a Sunday again…yup, brown hair, 19 years old…and that’s one of the least silly questions she’s asked me!
    *sigh*
    Anyway, my current hero has auburn hair…wonder if that would really fly.

    Reply
  67. You know, I’m reading through all these responses and I find it all very interesting. Especially the comment on the stereotypical ‘flighty’ blond, but I gotta tell you. I have a saying that applies completely to my younger daughter and no longer hold with the blond as being stereotypical anything because…
    Blond isn’t a hair color, it’s a state of mind. πŸ™‚
    My DD2 is dark blond/light brown, (more the brown, the blond only shows up after she’s been in the sun) but she asked me this year if Easter would be on a Sunday again…yup, brown hair, 19 years old…and that’s one of the least silly questions she’s asked me!
    *sigh*
    Anyway, my current hero has auburn hair…wonder if that would really fly.

    Reply
  68. You know, I’m reading through all these responses and I find it all very interesting. Especially the comment on the stereotypical ‘flighty’ blond, but I gotta tell you. I have a saying that applies completely to my younger daughter and no longer hold with the blond as being stereotypical anything because…
    Blond isn’t a hair color, it’s a state of mind. πŸ™‚
    My DD2 is dark blond/light brown, (more the brown, the blond only shows up after she’s been in the sun) but she asked me this year if Easter would be on a Sunday again…yup, brown hair, 19 years old…and that’s one of the least silly questions she’s asked me!
    *sigh*
    Anyway, my current hero has auburn hair…wonder if that would really fly.

    Reply
  69. You know, I’m reading through all these responses and I find it all very interesting. Especially the comment on the stereotypical ‘flighty’ blond, but I gotta tell you. I have a saying that applies completely to my younger daughter and no longer hold with the blond as being stereotypical anything because…
    Blond isn’t a hair color, it’s a state of mind. πŸ™‚
    My DD2 is dark blond/light brown, (more the brown, the blond only shows up after she’s been in the sun) but she asked me this year if Easter would be on a Sunday again…yup, brown hair, 19 years old…and that’s one of the least silly questions she’s asked me!
    *sigh*
    Anyway, my current hero has auburn hair…wonder if that would really fly.

    Reply
  70. You know, I’m reading through all these responses and I find it all very interesting. Especially the comment on the stereotypical ‘flighty’ blond, but I gotta tell you. I have a saying that applies completely to my younger daughter and no longer hold with the blond as being stereotypical anything because…
    Blond isn’t a hair color, it’s a state of mind. πŸ™‚
    My DD2 is dark blond/light brown, (more the brown, the blond only shows up after she’s been in the sun) but she asked me this year if Easter would be on a Sunday again…yup, brown hair, 19 years old…and that’s one of the least silly questions she’s asked me!
    *sigh*
    Anyway, my current hero has auburn hair…wonder if that would really fly.

    Reply
  71. Edith, I ADORE blond heroes. I love YOUR blond heroes. And my own, of course.
    There are a lot of blonds in England, so for me, a blond British hero is perfectly sensible. Not to mention gorgeous. I’m writing one now, and I have to say I’ve only done one blond hero who could be considered flighty. Though he wasn’t really flighty, except on the surface, but it was a charming surface. πŸ™‚
    I even have the original stepback painting for Silk and Secrets and the Totally Gorgeous hero looks rather like Peter O’Toole in Lawrence of Arabia. Hard to improve on that!
    Actually, black hair and blue eyes are pretty rare. Dark brown hair and blue eyes is a good Celtic look, but true black? Not so likely.
    I’m find with people on the covers, but I’d like them to resemble my characters, and I far prefer them to look tender and character rather than having the hero giving the heroine a field Pap test. (A phrase I stole from another writer. πŸ™‚
    Mary Jo, who intends to keep writing her share of edgy blond heroes. Maybe more than her share.

    Reply
  72. Edith, I ADORE blond heroes. I love YOUR blond heroes. And my own, of course.
    There are a lot of blonds in England, so for me, a blond British hero is perfectly sensible. Not to mention gorgeous. I’m writing one now, and I have to say I’ve only done one blond hero who could be considered flighty. Though he wasn’t really flighty, except on the surface, but it was a charming surface. πŸ™‚
    I even have the original stepback painting for Silk and Secrets and the Totally Gorgeous hero looks rather like Peter O’Toole in Lawrence of Arabia. Hard to improve on that!
    Actually, black hair and blue eyes are pretty rare. Dark brown hair and blue eyes is a good Celtic look, but true black? Not so likely.
    I’m find with people on the covers, but I’d like them to resemble my characters, and I far prefer them to look tender and character rather than having the hero giving the heroine a field Pap test. (A phrase I stole from another writer. πŸ™‚
    Mary Jo, who intends to keep writing her share of edgy blond heroes. Maybe more than her share.

    Reply
  73. Edith, I ADORE blond heroes. I love YOUR blond heroes. And my own, of course.
    There are a lot of blonds in England, so for me, a blond British hero is perfectly sensible. Not to mention gorgeous. I’m writing one now, and I have to say I’ve only done one blond hero who could be considered flighty. Though he wasn’t really flighty, except on the surface, but it was a charming surface. πŸ™‚
    I even have the original stepback painting for Silk and Secrets and the Totally Gorgeous hero looks rather like Peter O’Toole in Lawrence of Arabia. Hard to improve on that!
    Actually, black hair and blue eyes are pretty rare. Dark brown hair and blue eyes is a good Celtic look, but true black? Not so likely.
    I’m find with people on the covers, but I’d like them to resemble my characters, and I far prefer them to look tender and character rather than having the hero giving the heroine a field Pap test. (A phrase I stole from another writer. πŸ™‚
    Mary Jo, who intends to keep writing her share of edgy blond heroes. Maybe more than her share.

    Reply
  74. Edith, I ADORE blond heroes. I love YOUR blond heroes. And my own, of course.
    There are a lot of blonds in England, so for me, a blond British hero is perfectly sensible. Not to mention gorgeous. I’m writing one now, and I have to say I’ve only done one blond hero who could be considered flighty. Though he wasn’t really flighty, except on the surface, but it was a charming surface. πŸ™‚
    I even have the original stepback painting for Silk and Secrets and the Totally Gorgeous hero looks rather like Peter O’Toole in Lawrence of Arabia. Hard to improve on that!
    Actually, black hair and blue eyes are pretty rare. Dark brown hair and blue eyes is a good Celtic look, but true black? Not so likely.
    I’m find with people on the covers, but I’d like them to resemble my characters, and I far prefer them to look tender and character rather than having the hero giving the heroine a field Pap test. (A phrase I stole from another writer. πŸ™‚
    Mary Jo, who intends to keep writing her share of edgy blond heroes. Maybe more than her share.

    Reply
  75. Edith, I ADORE blond heroes. I love YOUR blond heroes. And my own, of course.
    There are a lot of blonds in England, so for me, a blond British hero is perfectly sensible. Not to mention gorgeous. I’m writing one now, and I have to say I’ve only done one blond hero who could be considered flighty. Though he wasn’t really flighty, except on the surface, but it was a charming surface. πŸ™‚
    I even have the original stepback painting for Silk and Secrets and the Totally Gorgeous hero looks rather like Peter O’Toole in Lawrence of Arabia. Hard to improve on that!
    Actually, black hair and blue eyes are pretty rare. Dark brown hair and blue eyes is a good Celtic look, but true black? Not so likely.
    I’m find with people on the covers, but I’d like them to resemble my characters, and I far prefer them to look tender and character rather than having the hero giving the heroine a field Pap test. (A phrase I stole from another writer. πŸ™‚
    Mary Jo, who intends to keep writing her share of edgy blond heroes. Maybe more than her share.

    Reply
  76. Personally I love dark headed men. Blond haired men seem too pretty boyish. Black or dark brown seems more masculine.

    Reply
  77. Personally I love dark headed men. Blond haired men seem too pretty boyish. Black or dark brown seems more masculine.

    Reply
  78. Personally I love dark headed men. Blond haired men seem too pretty boyish. Black or dark brown seems more masculine.

    Reply
  79. Personally I love dark headed men. Blond haired men seem too pretty boyish. Black or dark brown seems more masculine.

    Reply
  80. Personally I love dark headed men. Blond haired men seem too pretty boyish. Black or dark brown seems more masculine.

    Reply
  81. Edith, you left Sean Bean off the list, and he’s the hottest blond there is!
    However, I have to admit that for me he’s the exception that proves the rule. Well, and James Marsters as Spike, but I’m not sure it counts if it’s such an obvious bleach job. But generally I’m all about dark-haired men. It doesn’t impact my reading preferences, though, and I can think of many blond heroes I love–Lord Peter Wimsey, Joscelin Verreuil from the Kushiel series, etc.
    “But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is?”
    “Too funny. But I think it’s a fairly common combo in Britain, where so many of our novels are set (at least that’s been my experience).”
    FWIW, in my WIP it seems like almost every time I need a real historical figure to play a role, when I look up his or her portrait, they have brown hair and blue or gray eyes. It’s typical English coloring IME, though true black hair is rarer.

    Reply
  82. Edith, you left Sean Bean off the list, and he’s the hottest blond there is!
    However, I have to admit that for me he’s the exception that proves the rule. Well, and James Marsters as Spike, but I’m not sure it counts if it’s such an obvious bleach job. But generally I’m all about dark-haired men. It doesn’t impact my reading preferences, though, and I can think of many blond heroes I love–Lord Peter Wimsey, Joscelin Verreuil from the Kushiel series, etc.
    “But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is?”
    “Too funny. But I think it’s a fairly common combo in Britain, where so many of our novels are set (at least that’s been my experience).”
    FWIW, in my WIP it seems like almost every time I need a real historical figure to play a role, when I look up his or her portrait, they have brown hair and blue or gray eyes. It’s typical English coloring IME, though true black hair is rarer.

    Reply
  83. Edith, you left Sean Bean off the list, and he’s the hottest blond there is!
    However, I have to admit that for me he’s the exception that proves the rule. Well, and James Marsters as Spike, but I’m not sure it counts if it’s such an obvious bleach job. But generally I’m all about dark-haired men. It doesn’t impact my reading preferences, though, and I can think of many blond heroes I love–Lord Peter Wimsey, Joscelin Verreuil from the Kushiel series, etc.
    “But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is?”
    “Too funny. But I think it’s a fairly common combo in Britain, where so many of our novels are set (at least that’s been my experience).”
    FWIW, in my WIP it seems like almost every time I need a real historical figure to play a role, when I look up his or her portrait, they have brown hair and blue or gray eyes. It’s typical English coloring IME, though true black hair is rarer.

    Reply
  84. Edith, you left Sean Bean off the list, and he’s the hottest blond there is!
    However, I have to admit that for me he’s the exception that proves the rule. Well, and James Marsters as Spike, but I’m not sure it counts if it’s such an obvious bleach job. But generally I’m all about dark-haired men. It doesn’t impact my reading preferences, though, and I can think of many blond heroes I love–Lord Peter Wimsey, Joscelin Verreuil from the Kushiel series, etc.
    “But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is?”
    “Too funny. But I think it’s a fairly common combo in Britain, where so many of our novels are set (at least that’s been my experience).”
    FWIW, in my WIP it seems like almost every time I need a real historical figure to play a role, when I look up his or her portrait, they have brown hair and blue or gray eyes. It’s typical English coloring IME, though true black hair is rarer.

    Reply
  85. Edith, you left Sean Bean off the list, and he’s the hottest blond there is!
    However, I have to admit that for me he’s the exception that proves the rule. Well, and James Marsters as Spike, but I’m not sure it counts if it’s such an obvious bleach job. But generally I’m all about dark-haired men. It doesn’t impact my reading preferences, though, and I can think of many blond heroes I love–Lord Peter Wimsey, Joscelin Verreuil from the Kushiel series, etc.
    “But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is?”
    “Too funny. But I think it’s a fairly common combo in Britain, where so many of our novels are set (at least that’s been my experience).”
    FWIW, in my WIP it seems like almost every time I need a real historical figure to play a role, when I look up his or her portrait, they have brown hair and blue or gray eyes. It’s typical English coloring IME, though true black hair is rarer.

    Reply
  86. I started seeing hordes of black haired blue eyed heroes right after Remington Steele premiered. I have no objection to them πŸ™‚
    I don’t give a flying leap what color anybody’s hair is. I care what’s inside someone’s head, not what’s on top of it.

    Reply
  87. I started seeing hordes of black haired blue eyed heroes right after Remington Steele premiered. I have no objection to them πŸ™‚
    I don’t give a flying leap what color anybody’s hair is. I care what’s inside someone’s head, not what’s on top of it.

    Reply
  88. I started seeing hordes of black haired blue eyed heroes right after Remington Steele premiered. I have no objection to them πŸ™‚
    I don’t give a flying leap what color anybody’s hair is. I care what’s inside someone’s head, not what’s on top of it.

    Reply
  89. I started seeing hordes of black haired blue eyed heroes right after Remington Steele premiered. I have no objection to them πŸ™‚
    I don’t give a flying leap what color anybody’s hair is. I care what’s inside someone’s head, not what’s on top of it.

    Reply
  90. I started seeing hordes of black haired blue eyed heroes right after Remington Steele premiered. I have no objection to them πŸ™‚
    I don’t give a flying leap what color anybody’s hair is. I care what’s inside someone’s head, not what’s on top of it.

    Reply
  91. Talpianna wrote:
    “D.H. Lawrence wrote an interesting article on dark and blonde heroines, pointing out that the blonde usually got the guy and the brunette suffered a tragic fate. (Remember all those B Western movies where the blonde schoolmarm and the brunette (or redheaded) saloon girl were both in love with the hero? And the latter usually flung herself in front of him and took the villain’s bullet? She died in his arms and the blonde got him!)”
    Shades of Sir Walter Scott and Ivanhoe. How I hated that blonde Rowena. I was cheering for Rebecca all the way through that book back when I was ten years old.

    Reply
  92. Talpianna wrote:
    “D.H. Lawrence wrote an interesting article on dark and blonde heroines, pointing out that the blonde usually got the guy and the brunette suffered a tragic fate. (Remember all those B Western movies where the blonde schoolmarm and the brunette (or redheaded) saloon girl were both in love with the hero? And the latter usually flung herself in front of him and took the villain’s bullet? She died in his arms and the blonde got him!)”
    Shades of Sir Walter Scott and Ivanhoe. How I hated that blonde Rowena. I was cheering for Rebecca all the way through that book back when I was ten years old.

    Reply
  93. Talpianna wrote:
    “D.H. Lawrence wrote an interesting article on dark and blonde heroines, pointing out that the blonde usually got the guy and the brunette suffered a tragic fate. (Remember all those B Western movies where the blonde schoolmarm and the brunette (or redheaded) saloon girl were both in love with the hero? And the latter usually flung herself in front of him and took the villain’s bullet? She died in his arms and the blonde got him!)”
    Shades of Sir Walter Scott and Ivanhoe. How I hated that blonde Rowena. I was cheering for Rebecca all the way through that book back when I was ten years old.

    Reply
  94. Talpianna wrote:
    “D.H. Lawrence wrote an interesting article on dark and blonde heroines, pointing out that the blonde usually got the guy and the brunette suffered a tragic fate. (Remember all those B Western movies where the blonde schoolmarm and the brunette (or redheaded) saloon girl were both in love with the hero? And the latter usually flung herself in front of him and took the villain’s bullet? She died in his arms and the blonde got him!)”
    Shades of Sir Walter Scott and Ivanhoe. How I hated that blonde Rowena. I was cheering for Rebecca all the way through that book back when I was ten years old.

    Reply
  95. Talpianna wrote:
    “D.H. Lawrence wrote an interesting article on dark and blonde heroines, pointing out that the blonde usually got the guy and the brunette suffered a tragic fate. (Remember all those B Western movies where the blonde schoolmarm and the brunette (or redheaded) saloon girl were both in love with the hero? And the latter usually flung herself in front of him and took the villain’s bullet? She died in his arms and the blonde got him!)”
    Shades of Sir Walter Scott and Ivanhoe. How I hated that blonde Rowena. I was cheering for Rebecca all the way through that book back when I was ten years old.

    Reply
  96. Piper said…”Perhaps the issue lies in not what the “Readership” will buy, but what the editor (or whoever makes the decisions prefers).”
    I am with Piper on this. After entering 17 contests in 6 months, and landing on the same editors’ desks more than once and receiving different results, I am convinced there is no “right or wrong” just what “feels good in the moment.”
    The “dark coloring” of my current hero is driven by history. But his 1/2 brother and best friend (heroes in the next two books) are red and blonde respectively. Who knows what hair color cover artists will be insisting on then. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  97. Piper said…”Perhaps the issue lies in not what the “Readership” will buy, but what the editor (or whoever makes the decisions prefers).”
    I am with Piper on this. After entering 17 contests in 6 months, and landing on the same editors’ desks more than once and receiving different results, I am convinced there is no “right or wrong” just what “feels good in the moment.”
    The “dark coloring” of my current hero is driven by history. But his 1/2 brother and best friend (heroes in the next two books) are red and blonde respectively. Who knows what hair color cover artists will be insisting on then. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  98. Piper said…”Perhaps the issue lies in not what the “Readership” will buy, but what the editor (or whoever makes the decisions prefers).”
    I am with Piper on this. After entering 17 contests in 6 months, and landing on the same editors’ desks more than once and receiving different results, I am convinced there is no “right or wrong” just what “feels good in the moment.”
    The “dark coloring” of my current hero is driven by history. But his 1/2 brother and best friend (heroes in the next two books) are red and blonde respectively. Who knows what hair color cover artists will be insisting on then. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  99. Piper said…”Perhaps the issue lies in not what the “Readership” will buy, but what the editor (or whoever makes the decisions prefers).”
    I am with Piper on this. After entering 17 contests in 6 months, and landing on the same editors’ desks more than once and receiving different results, I am convinced there is no “right or wrong” just what “feels good in the moment.”
    The “dark coloring” of my current hero is driven by history. But his 1/2 brother and best friend (heroes in the next two books) are red and blonde respectively. Who knows what hair color cover artists will be insisting on then. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  100. Piper said…”Perhaps the issue lies in not what the “Readership” will buy, but what the editor (or whoever makes the decisions prefers).”
    I am with Piper on this. After entering 17 contests in 6 months, and landing on the same editors’ desks more than once and receiving different results, I am convinced there is no “right or wrong” just what “feels good in the moment.”
    The “dark coloring” of my current hero is driven by history. But his 1/2 brother and best friend (heroes in the next two books) are red and blonde respectively. Who knows what hair color cover artists will be insisting on then. πŸ™‚

    Reply
  101. Blond heroes make me think very honorable, heroic men who have a touch of innocense. Same thing with red-headed heroes.
    Hmm…lol, I think those characteristics come from my most memorable exposure to blond and red-haired heroes (James in Judith Ivory’s Sleeping Beauty and of course, Jamie from the Outlander series).
    And the Regency era wasn’t alone in their obsession with brunettes. Blonde hair wasn’t considered an acceptable hair color until the 1920s or so–influenced by Hollywood no doubt, since blonde shows up better in B&W (proof: I had no clue Katharine Hepburn and Myrna Loy were redheads because they look dark-haired in b&W, while Jean Harlow and Madeleine Carroll stand out with their platinum hair).

    Reply
  102. Blond heroes make me think very honorable, heroic men who have a touch of innocense. Same thing with red-headed heroes.
    Hmm…lol, I think those characteristics come from my most memorable exposure to blond and red-haired heroes (James in Judith Ivory’s Sleeping Beauty and of course, Jamie from the Outlander series).
    And the Regency era wasn’t alone in their obsession with brunettes. Blonde hair wasn’t considered an acceptable hair color until the 1920s or so–influenced by Hollywood no doubt, since blonde shows up better in B&W (proof: I had no clue Katharine Hepburn and Myrna Loy were redheads because they look dark-haired in b&W, while Jean Harlow and Madeleine Carroll stand out with their platinum hair).

    Reply
  103. Blond heroes make me think very honorable, heroic men who have a touch of innocense. Same thing with red-headed heroes.
    Hmm…lol, I think those characteristics come from my most memorable exposure to blond and red-haired heroes (James in Judith Ivory’s Sleeping Beauty and of course, Jamie from the Outlander series).
    And the Regency era wasn’t alone in their obsession with brunettes. Blonde hair wasn’t considered an acceptable hair color until the 1920s or so–influenced by Hollywood no doubt, since blonde shows up better in B&W (proof: I had no clue Katharine Hepburn and Myrna Loy were redheads because they look dark-haired in b&W, while Jean Harlow and Madeleine Carroll stand out with their platinum hair).

    Reply
  104. Blond heroes make me think very honorable, heroic men who have a touch of innocense. Same thing with red-headed heroes.
    Hmm…lol, I think those characteristics come from my most memorable exposure to blond and red-haired heroes (James in Judith Ivory’s Sleeping Beauty and of course, Jamie from the Outlander series).
    And the Regency era wasn’t alone in their obsession with brunettes. Blonde hair wasn’t considered an acceptable hair color until the 1920s or so–influenced by Hollywood no doubt, since blonde shows up better in B&W (proof: I had no clue Katharine Hepburn and Myrna Loy were redheads because they look dark-haired in b&W, while Jean Harlow and Madeleine Carroll stand out with their platinum hair).

    Reply
  105. Blond heroes make me think very honorable, heroic men who have a touch of innocense. Same thing with red-headed heroes.
    Hmm…lol, I think those characteristics come from my most memorable exposure to blond and red-haired heroes (James in Judith Ivory’s Sleeping Beauty and of course, Jamie from the Outlander series).
    And the Regency era wasn’t alone in their obsession with brunettes. Blonde hair wasn’t considered an acceptable hair color until the 1920s or so–influenced by Hollywood no doubt, since blonde shows up better in B&W (proof: I had no clue Katharine Hepburn and Myrna Loy were redheads because they look dark-haired in b&W, while Jean Harlow and Madeleine Carroll stand out with their platinum hair).

    Reply
  106. I absolutely adore blond heroes. They’re my favorite heroes…and yes, I adore Owen Wilson and Orlando Bloom as Legolas…the guy on Jo Beverley’s A MOST UNSUITABLE MAN takes my breath away! I had to buy two copies of that book just for the cover! πŸ™‚ Perhaps blonds are considered tortured enough or ‘dark’ enough for hero material…but give me a blond over a brunette any day!

    Reply
  107. I absolutely adore blond heroes. They’re my favorite heroes…and yes, I adore Owen Wilson and Orlando Bloom as Legolas…the guy on Jo Beverley’s A MOST UNSUITABLE MAN takes my breath away! I had to buy two copies of that book just for the cover! πŸ™‚ Perhaps blonds are considered tortured enough or ‘dark’ enough for hero material…but give me a blond over a brunette any day!

    Reply
  108. I absolutely adore blond heroes. They’re my favorite heroes…and yes, I adore Owen Wilson and Orlando Bloom as Legolas…the guy on Jo Beverley’s A MOST UNSUITABLE MAN takes my breath away! I had to buy two copies of that book just for the cover! πŸ™‚ Perhaps blonds are considered tortured enough or ‘dark’ enough for hero material…but give me a blond over a brunette any day!

    Reply
  109. I absolutely adore blond heroes. They’re my favorite heroes…and yes, I adore Owen Wilson and Orlando Bloom as Legolas…the guy on Jo Beverley’s A MOST UNSUITABLE MAN takes my breath away! I had to buy two copies of that book just for the cover! πŸ™‚ Perhaps blonds are considered tortured enough or ‘dark’ enough for hero material…but give me a blond over a brunette any day!

    Reply
  110. I absolutely adore blond heroes. They’re my favorite heroes…and yes, I adore Owen Wilson and Orlando Bloom as Legolas…the guy on Jo Beverley’s A MOST UNSUITABLE MAN takes my breath away! I had to buy two copies of that book just for the cover! πŸ™‚ Perhaps blonds are considered tortured enough or ‘dark’ enough for hero material…but give me a blond over a brunette any day!

    Reply
  111. Mary Jo, I can’t wait to read about your newest blond hero! I hope they put his picture on the cover, even though I prefer covers that do NOT have people on them.

    Reply
  112. Mary Jo, I can’t wait to read about your newest blond hero! I hope they put his picture on the cover, even though I prefer covers that do NOT have people on them.

    Reply
  113. Mary Jo, I can’t wait to read about your newest blond hero! I hope they put his picture on the cover, even though I prefer covers that do NOT have people on them.

    Reply
  114. Mary Jo, I can’t wait to read about your newest blond hero! I hope they put his picture on the cover, even though I prefer covers that do NOT have people on them.

    Reply
  115. Mary Jo, I can’t wait to read about your newest blond hero! I hope they put his picture on the cover, even though I prefer covers that do NOT have people on them.

    Reply
  116. I’m echoing Susan here: Sean Bean and James Marsters as Spike. However, the only man on the original list I find remotely sexy is Daniel Craig. In general, I don’t care for blond heroes at all and do the mental switcheroo. Funny thing is, my husband is 6’3″ and very, very blond. He’s also kind, supportive and a what I’d call a Beta Leader–the kind of natural leader who isn’t a jerk. In novels, though, while I enjoy the beta heroes immensely and find them emotionally satisfying reads, I must admit that it is the tall. dark and dangerous heroes that I find sexy. A blond on the cover will completely throw me. I put off reading Dunnett for years because I found the Lymond covers so distasteful. Of course, when I got around to it, I loved Lymond.
    And Jamie Frasier is the only red-haired hero I have ever found sexy, but it is in spite of his hair.
    I think it is just personal preference, but certainly the “Surfer Dude” stereotype and all the died-blonde hair can affect perception. A true, natural blond is very different than what is usually described. Most blondes are closer to a light brown without the enhancements, but you’d never know it these days.

    Reply
  117. I’m echoing Susan here: Sean Bean and James Marsters as Spike. However, the only man on the original list I find remotely sexy is Daniel Craig. In general, I don’t care for blond heroes at all and do the mental switcheroo. Funny thing is, my husband is 6’3″ and very, very blond. He’s also kind, supportive and a what I’d call a Beta Leader–the kind of natural leader who isn’t a jerk. In novels, though, while I enjoy the beta heroes immensely and find them emotionally satisfying reads, I must admit that it is the tall. dark and dangerous heroes that I find sexy. A blond on the cover will completely throw me. I put off reading Dunnett for years because I found the Lymond covers so distasteful. Of course, when I got around to it, I loved Lymond.
    And Jamie Frasier is the only red-haired hero I have ever found sexy, but it is in spite of his hair.
    I think it is just personal preference, but certainly the “Surfer Dude” stereotype and all the died-blonde hair can affect perception. A true, natural blond is very different than what is usually described. Most blondes are closer to a light brown without the enhancements, but you’d never know it these days.

    Reply
  118. I’m echoing Susan here: Sean Bean and James Marsters as Spike. However, the only man on the original list I find remotely sexy is Daniel Craig. In general, I don’t care for blond heroes at all and do the mental switcheroo. Funny thing is, my husband is 6’3″ and very, very blond. He’s also kind, supportive and a what I’d call a Beta Leader–the kind of natural leader who isn’t a jerk. In novels, though, while I enjoy the beta heroes immensely and find them emotionally satisfying reads, I must admit that it is the tall. dark and dangerous heroes that I find sexy. A blond on the cover will completely throw me. I put off reading Dunnett for years because I found the Lymond covers so distasteful. Of course, when I got around to it, I loved Lymond.
    And Jamie Frasier is the only red-haired hero I have ever found sexy, but it is in spite of his hair.
    I think it is just personal preference, but certainly the “Surfer Dude” stereotype and all the died-blonde hair can affect perception. A true, natural blond is very different than what is usually described. Most blondes are closer to a light brown without the enhancements, but you’d never know it these days.

    Reply
  119. I’m echoing Susan here: Sean Bean and James Marsters as Spike. However, the only man on the original list I find remotely sexy is Daniel Craig. In general, I don’t care for blond heroes at all and do the mental switcheroo. Funny thing is, my husband is 6’3″ and very, very blond. He’s also kind, supportive and a what I’d call a Beta Leader–the kind of natural leader who isn’t a jerk. In novels, though, while I enjoy the beta heroes immensely and find them emotionally satisfying reads, I must admit that it is the tall. dark and dangerous heroes that I find sexy. A blond on the cover will completely throw me. I put off reading Dunnett for years because I found the Lymond covers so distasteful. Of course, when I got around to it, I loved Lymond.
    And Jamie Frasier is the only red-haired hero I have ever found sexy, but it is in spite of his hair.
    I think it is just personal preference, but certainly the “Surfer Dude” stereotype and all the died-blonde hair can affect perception. A true, natural blond is very different than what is usually described. Most blondes are closer to a light brown without the enhancements, but you’d never know it these days.

    Reply
  120. I’m echoing Susan here: Sean Bean and James Marsters as Spike. However, the only man on the original list I find remotely sexy is Daniel Craig. In general, I don’t care for blond heroes at all and do the mental switcheroo. Funny thing is, my husband is 6’3″ and very, very blond. He’s also kind, supportive and a what I’d call a Beta Leader–the kind of natural leader who isn’t a jerk. In novels, though, while I enjoy the beta heroes immensely and find them emotionally satisfying reads, I must admit that it is the tall. dark and dangerous heroes that I find sexy. A blond on the cover will completely throw me. I put off reading Dunnett for years because I found the Lymond covers so distasteful. Of course, when I got around to it, I loved Lymond.
    And Jamie Frasier is the only red-haired hero I have ever found sexy, but it is in spite of his hair.
    I think it is just personal preference, but certainly the “Surfer Dude” stereotype and all the died-blonde hair can affect perception. A true, natural blond is very different than what is usually described. Most blondes are closer to a light brown without the enhancements, but you’d never know it these days.

    Reply
  121. Okay, I looked at the list again and must amend my earlier statement. Young Robert Redford in “The Way We Were” is unbearably hot.

    Reply
  122. Okay, I looked at the list again and must amend my earlier statement. Young Robert Redford in “The Way We Were” is unbearably hot.

    Reply
  123. Okay, I looked at the list again and must amend my earlier statement. Young Robert Redford in “The Way We Were” is unbearably hot.

    Reply
  124. Okay, I looked at the list again and must amend my earlier statement. Young Robert Redford in “The Way We Were” is unbearably hot.

    Reply
  125. Okay, I looked at the list again and must amend my earlier statement. Young Robert Redford in “The Way We Were” is unbearably hot.

    Reply
  126. Mary Joo – Hooray for your furtheriing the cause of edgy blond heroes!
    And Gentle Readers – I am bemused by your preferences . Seems that so far – TDH heroes have the lead. I wonder if it differs from country to country?
    My first ever book had a triangle – a TFH and a depraved blond warring for the affections of the Heroine. The blond won. No wonder it took me two years to get it published!

    Reply
  127. Mary Joo – Hooray for your furtheriing the cause of edgy blond heroes!
    And Gentle Readers – I am bemused by your preferences . Seems that so far – TDH heroes have the lead. I wonder if it differs from country to country?
    My first ever book had a triangle – a TFH and a depraved blond warring for the affections of the Heroine. The blond won. No wonder it took me two years to get it published!

    Reply
  128. Mary Joo – Hooray for your furtheriing the cause of edgy blond heroes!
    And Gentle Readers – I am bemused by your preferences . Seems that so far – TDH heroes have the lead. I wonder if it differs from country to country?
    My first ever book had a triangle – a TFH and a depraved blond warring for the affections of the Heroine. The blond won. No wonder it took me two years to get it published!

    Reply
  129. Mary Joo – Hooray for your furtheriing the cause of edgy blond heroes!
    And Gentle Readers – I am bemused by your preferences . Seems that so far – TDH heroes have the lead. I wonder if it differs from country to country?
    My first ever book had a triangle – a TFH and a depraved blond warring for the affections of the Heroine. The blond won. No wonder it took me two years to get it published!

    Reply
  130. Mary Joo – Hooray for your furtheriing the cause of edgy blond heroes!
    And Gentle Readers – I am bemused by your preferences . Seems that so far – TDH heroes have the lead. I wonder if it differs from country to country?
    My first ever book had a triangle – a TFH and a depraved blond warring for the affections of the Heroine. The blond won. No wonder it took me two years to get it published!

    Reply
  131. WEll, a TFH would certainly explain why it took two years to get published! You don’t often find a fat hero in a book. Nor many bald men.
    I can’t speak for anyone else, but when I try to analyze what the hero or heroine looks like, I can’t honestly say that I have a picture in my mind. I will have to think on it. Maybe the women all end up looking like me, and the men – hmm, I don’t know who they resemble. Someone gorgeous with a nice little bottom, I’m fairly certain.

    Reply
  132. WEll, a TFH would certainly explain why it took two years to get published! You don’t often find a fat hero in a book. Nor many bald men.
    I can’t speak for anyone else, but when I try to analyze what the hero or heroine looks like, I can’t honestly say that I have a picture in my mind. I will have to think on it. Maybe the women all end up looking like me, and the men – hmm, I don’t know who they resemble. Someone gorgeous with a nice little bottom, I’m fairly certain.

    Reply
  133. WEll, a TFH would certainly explain why it took two years to get published! You don’t often find a fat hero in a book. Nor many bald men.
    I can’t speak for anyone else, but when I try to analyze what the hero or heroine looks like, I can’t honestly say that I have a picture in my mind. I will have to think on it. Maybe the women all end up looking like me, and the men – hmm, I don’t know who they resemble. Someone gorgeous with a nice little bottom, I’m fairly certain.

    Reply
  134. WEll, a TFH would certainly explain why it took two years to get published! You don’t often find a fat hero in a book. Nor many bald men.
    I can’t speak for anyone else, but when I try to analyze what the hero or heroine looks like, I can’t honestly say that I have a picture in my mind. I will have to think on it. Maybe the women all end up looking like me, and the men – hmm, I don’t know who they resemble. Someone gorgeous with a nice little bottom, I’m fairly certain.

    Reply
  135. WEll, a TFH would certainly explain why it took two years to get published! You don’t often find a fat hero in a book. Nor many bald men.
    I can’t speak for anyone else, but when I try to analyze what the hero or heroine looks like, I can’t honestly say that I have a picture in my mind. I will have to think on it. Maybe the women all end up looking like me, and the men – hmm, I don’t know who they resemble. Someone gorgeous with a nice little bottom, I’m fairly certain.

    Reply
  136. I love dark haired heroes. I absolutely loved Viggo in Lord of the Rings, whereas Orlando seemed too pretty with his blond locks. On the other hand, if we are talking about the original hunk, Fabio, I wish he’d dye his hair blond again. And while I’m at it, I like long haired heroes. I also thought Oded Fahr from “The Mummy” was pretty hot, dark and brooding.

    Reply
  137. I love dark haired heroes. I absolutely loved Viggo in Lord of the Rings, whereas Orlando seemed too pretty with his blond locks. On the other hand, if we are talking about the original hunk, Fabio, I wish he’d dye his hair blond again. And while I’m at it, I like long haired heroes. I also thought Oded Fahr from “The Mummy” was pretty hot, dark and brooding.

    Reply
  138. I love dark haired heroes. I absolutely loved Viggo in Lord of the Rings, whereas Orlando seemed too pretty with his blond locks. On the other hand, if we are talking about the original hunk, Fabio, I wish he’d dye his hair blond again. And while I’m at it, I like long haired heroes. I also thought Oded Fahr from “The Mummy” was pretty hot, dark and brooding.

    Reply
  139. I love dark haired heroes. I absolutely loved Viggo in Lord of the Rings, whereas Orlando seemed too pretty with his blond locks. On the other hand, if we are talking about the original hunk, Fabio, I wish he’d dye his hair blond again. And while I’m at it, I like long haired heroes. I also thought Oded Fahr from “The Mummy” was pretty hot, dark and brooding.

    Reply
  140. I love dark haired heroes. I absolutely loved Viggo in Lord of the Rings, whereas Orlando seemed too pretty with his blond locks. On the other hand, if we are talking about the original hunk, Fabio, I wish he’d dye his hair blond again. And while I’m at it, I like long haired heroes. I also thought Oded Fahr from “The Mummy” was pretty hot, dark and brooding.

    Reply
  141. I read a very raunchy romance (I will not name it; it is embarrassing) in high school and decided I would marry a dark haired blue-eyed man. I did, but his coloring really wasn’t attracted me at first. It was his blue mustang. What has kept us together for almost 30 years is his honor and solidity. He grounds me and I lighten him up. As for books, I mostly ignore covers. I look for an author’s name, recommendation or read the blurb. “Never judge a book by its cover.” Best to all in your quest for image accuracy.
    p.s. I am blonde.

    Reply
  142. I read a very raunchy romance (I will not name it; it is embarrassing) in high school and decided I would marry a dark haired blue-eyed man. I did, but his coloring really wasn’t attracted me at first. It was his blue mustang. What has kept us together for almost 30 years is his honor and solidity. He grounds me and I lighten him up. As for books, I mostly ignore covers. I look for an author’s name, recommendation or read the blurb. “Never judge a book by its cover.” Best to all in your quest for image accuracy.
    p.s. I am blonde.

    Reply
  143. I read a very raunchy romance (I will not name it; it is embarrassing) in high school and decided I would marry a dark haired blue-eyed man. I did, but his coloring really wasn’t attracted me at first. It was his blue mustang. What has kept us together for almost 30 years is his honor and solidity. He grounds me and I lighten him up. As for books, I mostly ignore covers. I look for an author’s name, recommendation or read the blurb. “Never judge a book by its cover.” Best to all in your quest for image accuracy.
    p.s. I am blonde.

    Reply
  144. I read a very raunchy romance (I will not name it; it is embarrassing) in high school and decided I would marry a dark haired blue-eyed man. I did, but his coloring really wasn’t attracted me at first. It was his blue mustang. What has kept us together for almost 30 years is his honor and solidity. He grounds me and I lighten him up. As for books, I mostly ignore covers. I look for an author’s name, recommendation or read the blurb. “Never judge a book by its cover.” Best to all in your quest for image accuracy.
    p.s. I am blonde.

    Reply
  145. I read a very raunchy romance (I will not name it; it is embarrassing) in high school and decided I would marry a dark haired blue-eyed man. I did, but his coloring really wasn’t attracted me at first. It was his blue mustang. What has kept us together for almost 30 years is his honor and solidity. He grounds me and I lighten him up. As for books, I mostly ignore covers. I look for an author’s name, recommendation or read the blurb. “Never judge a book by its cover.” Best to all in your quest for image accuracy.
    p.s. I am blonde.

    Reply
  146. Edith, you are having entirely too *much* fun with this! πŸ˜†
    I often, when a new book is released, look at it on Amazon UK as well as here because so many times, the cover is completely different there than it is here and sometimes even carries a different title! And I wonder that they don’t seem to ‘get it’, more often than cover artists here.
    One of my friends agonized over her cover art. Her hero was blond, hair touching his collar, blue eyes (a Drop Dead Hunky Hero!) and after four tries, even sending a picture she used to keep her hero in mind, the cover artist still insisted on giving him dark brown, short hair and brown eyes. She finally gave up but she too thought about changing her description of her hero to match the cover.
    It’s almost as if you’re going to have a TDH, whether you want him or not. Which is too bad…

    Reply
  147. Edith, you are having entirely too *much* fun with this! πŸ˜†
    I often, when a new book is released, look at it on Amazon UK as well as here because so many times, the cover is completely different there than it is here and sometimes even carries a different title! And I wonder that they don’t seem to ‘get it’, more often than cover artists here.
    One of my friends agonized over her cover art. Her hero was blond, hair touching his collar, blue eyes (a Drop Dead Hunky Hero!) and after four tries, even sending a picture she used to keep her hero in mind, the cover artist still insisted on giving him dark brown, short hair and brown eyes. She finally gave up but she too thought about changing her description of her hero to match the cover.
    It’s almost as if you’re going to have a TDH, whether you want him or not. Which is too bad…

    Reply
  148. Edith, you are having entirely too *much* fun with this! πŸ˜†
    I often, when a new book is released, look at it on Amazon UK as well as here because so many times, the cover is completely different there than it is here and sometimes even carries a different title! And I wonder that they don’t seem to ‘get it’, more often than cover artists here.
    One of my friends agonized over her cover art. Her hero was blond, hair touching his collar, blue eyes (a Drop Dead Hunky Hero!) and after four tries, even sending a picture she used to keep her hero in mind, the cover artist still insisted on giving him dark brown, short hair and brown eyes. She finally gave up but she too thought about changing her description of her hero to match the cover.
    It’s almost as if you’re going to have a TDH, whether you want him or not. Which is too bad…

    Reply
  149. Edith, you are having entirely too *much* fun with this! πŸ˜†
    I often, when a new book is released, look at it on Amazon UK as well as here because so many times, the cover is completely different there than it is here and sometimes even carries a different title! And I wonder that they don’t seem to ‘get it’, more often than cover artists here.
    One of my friends agonized over her cover art. Her hero was blond, hair touching his collar, blue eyes (a Drop Dead Hunky Hero!) and after four tries, even sending a picture she used to keep her hero in mind, the cover artist still insisted on giving him dark brown, short hair and brown eyes. She finally gave up but she too thought about changing her description of her hero to match the cover.
    It’s almost as if you’re going to have a TDH, whether you want him or not. Which is too bad…

    Reply
  150. Edith, you are having entirely too *much* fun with this! πŸ˜†
    I often, when a new book is released, look at it on Amazon UK as well as here because so many times, the cover is completely different there than it is here and sometimes even carries a different title! And I wonder that they don’t seem to ‘get it’, more often than cover artists here.
    One of my friends agonized over her cover art. Her hero was blond, hair touching his collar, blue eyes (a Drop Dead Hunky Hero!) and after four tries, even sending a picture she used to keep her hero in mind, the cover artist still insisted on giving him dark brown, short hair and brown eyes. She finally gave up but she too thought about changing her description of her hero to match the cover.
    It’s almost as if you’re going to have a TDH, whether you want him or not. Which is too bad…

    Reply
  151. “But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is?”
    Does really, really, dark brunette count? My hair is (was) very dark brown, and I have blue eyes. My mom was also dark brunette, but people often mistook it for black until they got up close. Unlike me, however, Mom had brown eyes. My sister is blonde with brown eyes.
    My hair is still dark brown. My roots, though . . . Well, let’s not go there. *g*

    Reply
  152. “But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is?”
    Does really, really, dark brunette count? My hair is (was) very dark brown, and I have blue eyes. My mom was also dark brunette, but people often mistook it for black until they got up close. Unlike me, however, Mom had brown eyes. My sister is blonde with brown eyes.
    My hair is still dark brown. My roots, though . . . Well, let’s not go there. *g*

    Reply
  153. “But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is?”
    Does really, really, dark brunette count? My hair is (was) very dark brown, and I have blue eyes. My mom was also dark brunette, but people often mistook it for black until they got up close. Unlike me, however, Mom had brown eyes. My sister is blonde with brown eyes.
    My hair is still dark brown. My roots, though . . . Well, let’s not go there. *g*

    Reply
  154. “But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is?”
    Does really, really, dark brunette count? My hair is (was) very dark brown, and I have blue eyes. My mom was also dark brunette, but people often mistook it for black until they got up close. Unlike me, however, Mom had brown eyes. My sister is blonde with brown eyes.
    My hair is still dark brown. My roots, though . . . Well, let’s not go there. *g*

    Reply
  155. “But I’m so tired of reading about black-haired, blue-eyed men. Do you know how rare that combination is?”
    Does really, really, dark brunette count? My hair is (was) very dark brown, and I have blue eyes. My mom was also dark brunette, but people often mistook it for black until they got up close. Unlike me, however, Mom had brown eyes. My sister is blonde with brown eyes.
    My hair is still dark brown. My roots, though . . . Well, let’s not go there. *g*

    Reply
  156. Sherrie, I like that combination. πŸ™‚ and I won’t tell about your roots…mine are probably right behind yours! πŸ˜†
    I was always a strawberry blond, with dark, dark brown eyes. Until I had my hysterectomy (yes, I know, TMI, but I do have a point πŸ˜› ) at which time it turned a mousy, dishwater color and made me look pallid and sickly! So…every six weeks I touch up the roots now and voila! I’m a strawberry blond once again! πŸ˜€

    Reply
  157. Sherrie, I like that combination. πŸ™‚ and I won’t tell about your roots…mine are probably right behind yours! πŸ˜†
    I was always a strawberry blond, with dark, dark brown eyes. Until I had my hysterectomy (yes, I know, TMI, but I do have a point πŸ˜› ) at which time it turned a mousy, dishwater color and made me look pallid and sickly! So…every six weeks I touch up the roots now and voila! I’m a strawberry blond once again! πŸ˜€

    Reply
  158. Sherrie, I like that combination. πŸ™‚ and I won’t tell about your roots…mine are probably right behind yours! πŸ˜†
    I was always a strawberry blond, with dark, dark brown eyes. Until I had my hysterectomy (yes, I know, TMI, but I do have a point πŸ˜› ) at which time it turned a mousy, dishwater color and made me look pallid and sickly! So…every six weeks I touch up the roots now and voila! I’m a strawberry blond once again! πŸ˜€

    Reply
  159. Sherrie, I like that combination. πŸ™‚ and I won’t tell about your roots…mine are probably right behind yours! πŸ˜†
    I was always a strawberry blond, with dark, dark brown eyes. Until I had my hysterectomy (yes, I know, TMI, but I do have a point πŸ˜› ) at which time it turned a mousy, dishwater color and made me look pallid and sickly! So…every six weeks I touch up the roots now and voila! I’m a strawberry blond once again! πŸ˜€

    Reply
  160. Sherrie, I like that combination. πŸ™‚ and I won’t tell about your roots…mine are probably right behind yours! πŸ˜†
    I was always a strawberry blond, with dark, dark brown eyes. Until I had my hysterectomy (yes, I know, TMI, but I do have a point πŸ˜› ) at which time it turned a mousy, dishwater color and made me look pallid and sickly! So…every six weeks I touch up the roots now and voila! I’m a strawberry blond once again! πŸ˜€

    Reply
  161. In the Golden Age of pulp fiction, the covers came first. In fact, authors were often given a cover and told to write a story to match.
    Ed Emshwiller (February 16, 1925-July 27, 1990) was a visual artist notable for illustrations of many science fiction magazine covers and for his pioneering computer-generated movies. He usually signed his work as Emsh but sometimes used the signatures Ed Emsh and Emsler.
    One author received a cover of his showing a picture of a spaceship (perhaps like this one):
    http://tinyurl.com/5k2mre
    The customary “EMSH” signature was sketched onto the ship. So the author wrote into the story the amazing “EMSH drive” that propelled the ship…

    Reply
  162. In the Golden Age of pulp fiction, the covers came first. In fact, authors were often given a cover and told to write a story to match.
    Ed Emshwiller (February 16, 1925-July 27, 1990) was a visual artist notable for illustrations of many science fiction magazine covers and for his pioneering computer-generated movies. He usually signed his work as Emsh but sometimes used the signatures Ed Emsh and Emsler.
    One author received a cover of his showing a picture of a spaceship (perhaps like this one):
    http://tinyurl.com/5k2mre
    The customary “EMSH” signature was sketched onto the ship. So the author wrote into the story the amazing “EMSH drive” that propelled the ship…

    Reply
  163. In the Golden Age of pulp fiction, the covers came first. In fact, authors were often given a cover and told to write a story to match.
    Ed Emshwiller (February 16, 1925-July 27, 1990) was a visual artist notable for illustrations of many science fiction magazine covers and for his pioneering computer-generated movies. He usually signed his work as Emsh but sometimes used the signatures Ed Emsh and Emsler.
    One author received a cover of his showing a picture of a spaceship (perhaps like this one):
    http://tinyurl.com/5k2mre
    The customary “EMSH” signature was sketched onto the ship. So the author wrote into the story the amazing “EMSH drive” that propelled the ship…

    Reply
  164. In the Golden Age of pulp fiction, the covers came first. In fact, authors were often given a cover and told to write a story to match.
    Ed Emshwiller (February 16, 1925-July 27, 1990) was a visual artist notable for illustrations of many science fiction magazine covers and for his pioneering computer-generated movies. He usually signed his work as Emsh but sometimes used the signatures Ed Emsh and Emsler.
    One author received a cover of his showing a picture of a spaceship (perhaps like this one):
    http://tinyurl.com/5k2mre
    The customary “EMSH” signature was sketched onto the ship. So the author wrote into the story the amazing “EMSH drive” that propelled the ship…

    Reply
  165. In the Golden Age of pulp fiction, the covers came first. In fact, authors were often given a cover and told to write a story to match.
    Ed Emshwiller (February 16, 1925-July 27, 1990) was a visual artist notable for illustrations of many science fiction magazine covers and for his pioneering computer-generated movies. He usually signed his work as Emsh but sometimes used the signatures Ed Emsh and Emsler.
    One author received a cover of his showing a picture of a spaceship (perhaps like this one):
    http://tinyurl.com/5k2mre
    The customary “EMSH” signature was sketched onto the ship. So the author wrote into the story the amazing “EMSH drive” that propelled the ship…

    Reply
  166. “Tell me please, your opinion.
    What hair color do you prefer in a hero? Does it matter?
    And most importantly, does a blond man on the cover of a romance make you reach for another book? If so, why? Or why not?”
    When I was younger I preferred the tall, dark, handsome and smooth-chested hero. Too many years of Saturday cartoons, I guess. πŸ™‚ As an adult I like men with dark, light, red or no hair. A sense of humor, strength of character and intelligence count for more than what’s on the top of his head.
    So to answer your other question, a blond man on the cover will not make me reach for another book. An overly-alpha male will make me avoid a book, but not his appearance.

    Reply
  167. “Tell me please, your opinion.
    What hair color do you prefer in a hero? Does it matter?
    And most importantly, does a blond man on the cover of a romance make you reach for another book? If so, why? Or why not?”
    When I was younger I preferred the tall, dark, handsome and smooth-chested hero. Too many years of Saturday cartoons, I guess. πŸ™‚ As an adult I like men with dark, light, red or no hair. A sense of humor, strength of character and intelligence count for more than what’s on the top of his head.
    So to answer your other question, a blond man on the cover will not make me reach for another book. An overly-alpha male will make me avoid a book, but not his appearance.

    Reply
  168. “Tell me please, your opinion.
    What hair color do you prefer in a hero? Does it matter?
    And most importantly, does a blond man on the cover of a romance make you reach for another book? If so, why? Or why not?”
    When I was younger I preferred the tall, dark, handsome and smooth-chested hero. Too many years of Saturday cartoons, I guess. πŸ™‚ As an adult I like men with dark, light, red or no hair. A sense of humor, strength of character and intelligence count for more than what’s on the top of his head.
    So to answer your other question, a blond man on the cover will not make me reach for another book. An overly-alpha male will make me avoid a book, but not his appearance.

    Reply
  169. “Tell me please, your opinion.
    What hair color do you prefer in a hero? Does it matter?
    And most importantly, does a blond man on the cover of a romance make you reach for another book? If so, why? Or why not?”
    When I was younger I preferred the tall, dark, handsome and smooth-chested hero. Too many years of Saturday cartoons, I guess. πŸ™‚ As an adult I like men with dark, light, red or no hair. A sense of humor, strength of character and intelligence count for more than what’s on the top of his head.
    So to answer your other question, a blond man on the cover will not make me reach for another book. An overly-alpha male will make me avoid a book, but not his appearance.

    Reply
  170. “Tell me please, your opinion.
    What hair color do you prefer in a hero? Does it matter?
    And most importantly, does a blond man on the cover of a romance make you reach for another book? If so, why? Or why not?”
    When I was younger I preferred the tall, dark, handsome and smooth-chested hero. Too many years of Saturday cartoons, I guess. πŸ™‚ As an adult I like men with dark, light, red or no hair. A sense of humor, strength of character and intelligence count for more than what’s on the top of his head.
    So to answer your other question, a blond man on the cover will not make me reach for another book. An overly-alpha male will make me avoid a book, but not his appearance.

    Reply
  171. My first love was a black Irishman — blue eyes and curly black hair. My husband (and presumably last love!) is a blonde, blue-eyed honey. So maybe its the blue eyes that get to me.
    When it comes to books, however, it is the name of the author that I look for first, then the back story, then a random paragraph or two, to get a feel for the quality of writing. I look at the artwork mostly to see whether the figures are dressed in Regency clothing. If they are not dressed, that does make it hard to tell the era.

    Reply
  172. My first love was a black Irishman — blue eyes and curly black hair. My husband (and presumably last love!) is a blonde, blue-eyed honey. So maybe its the blue eyes that get to me.
    When it comes to books, however, it is the name of the author that I look for first, then the back story, then a random paragraph or two, to get a feel for the quality of writing. I look at the artwork mostly to see whether the figures are dressed in Regency clothing. If they are not dressed, that does make it hard to tell the era.

    Reply
  173. My first love was a black Irishman — blue eyes and curly black hair. My husband (and presumably last love!) is a blonde, blue-eyed honey. So maybe its the blue eyes that get to me.
    When it comes to books, however, it is the name of the author that I look for first, then the back story, then a random paragraph or two, to get a feel for the quality of writing. I look at the artwork mostly to see whether the figures are dressed in Regency clothing. If they are not dressed, that does make it hard to tell the era.

    Reply
  174. My first love was a black Irishman — blue eyes and curly black hair. My husband (and presumably last love!) is a blonde, blue-eyed honey. So maybe its the blue eyes that get to me.
    When it comes to books, however, it is the name of the author that I look for first, then the back story, then a random paragraph or two, to get a feel for the quality of writing. I look at the artwork mostly to see whether the figures are dressed in Regency clothing. If they are not dressed, that does make it hard to tell the era.

    Reply
  175. My first love was a black Irishman — blue eyes and curly black hair. My husband (and presumably last love!) is a blonde, blue-eyed honey. So maybe its the blue eyes that get to me.
    When it comes to books, however, it is the name of the author that I look for first, then the back story, then a random paragraph or two, to get a feel for the quality of writing. I look at the artwork mostly to see whether the figures are dressed in Regency clothing. If they are not dressed, that does make it hard to tell the era.

    Reply
  176. I have to agree with the others that its annoying when the cover and hero are completely opposite.
    I like guys that are very tall, dark and have blue eyes. However, my two all time favorite heroes (Johanna Lindsey – Gentle Rogue – James Mallory & Lisa Kleypas – Devil in Winter – Sebastian) are blond (go figure).
    I usually buy a book after I’ve read it or if I really love the author. I’ve only bought a book once because the cover was great (the book turned out so so)
    Although I like dark I would still prefer a blond guy to a book with only a women on the cover (a lot of those seem to be popping up lately as if we don’t see enough women in everything grr). Hey as long as he’s cute red works too πŸ™‚
    btw completely off topic but a while back I remember reading on this blog about a hero who is balding and pudgy… if anyone knows the book I’d really appreciate it… it sounded fun πŸ™‚

    Reply
  177. I have to agree with the others that its annoying when the cover and hero are completely opposite.
    I like guys that are very tall, dark and have blue eyes. However, my two all time favorite heroes (Johanna Lindsey – Gentle Rogue – James Mallory & Lisa Kleypas – Devil in Winter – Sebastian) are blond (go figure).
    I usually buy a book after I’ve read it or if I really love the author. I’ve only bought a book once because the cover was great (the book turned out so so)
    Although I like dark I would still prefer a blond guy to a book with only a women on the cover (a lot of those seem to be popping up lately as if we don’t see enough women in everything grr). Hey as long as he’s cute red works too πŸ™‚
    btw completely off topic but a while back I remember reading on this blog about a hero who is balding and pudgy… if anyone knows the book I’d really appreciate it… it sounded fun πŸ™‚

    Reply
  178. I have to agree with the others that its annoying when the cover and hero are completely opposite.
    I like guys that are very tall, dark and have blue eyes. However, my two all time favorite heroes (Johanna Lindsey – Gentle Rogue – James Mallory & Lisa Kleypas – Devil in Winter – Sebastian) are blond (go figure).
    I usually buy a book after I’ve read it or if I really love the author. I’ve only bought a book once because the cover was great (the book turned out so so)
    Although I like dark I would still prefer a blond guy to a book with only a women on the cover (a lot of those seem to be popping up lately as if we don’t see enough women in everything grr). Hey as long as he’s cute red works too πŸ™‚
    btw completely off topic but a while back I remember reading on this blog about a hero who is balding and pudgy… if anyone knows the book I’d really appreciate it… it sounded fun πŸ™‚

    Reply
  179. I have to agree with the others that its annoying when the cover and hero are completely opposite.
    I like guys that are very tall, dark and have blue eyes. However, my two all time favorite heroes (Johanna Lindsey – Gentle Rogue – James Mallory & Lisa Kleypas – Devil in Winter – Sebastian) are blond (go figure).
    I usually buy a book after I’ve read it or if I really love the author. I’ve only bought a book once because the cover was great (the book turned out so so)
    Although I like dark I would still prefer a blond guy to a book with only a women on the cover (a lot of those seem to be popping up lately as if we don’t see enough women in everything grr). Hey as long as he’s cute red works too πŸ™‚
    btw completely off topic but a while back I remember reading on this blog about a hero who is balding and pudgy… if anyone knows the book I’d really appreciate it… it sounded fun πŸ™‚

    Reply
  180. I have to agree with the others that its annoying when the cover and hero are completely opposite.
    I like guys that are very tall, dark and have blue eyes. However, my two all time favorite heroes (Johanna Lindsey – Gentle Rogue – James Mallory & Lisa Kleypas – Devil in Winter – Sebastian) are blond (go figure).
    I usually buy a book after I’ve read it or if I really love the author. I’ve only bought a book once because the cover was great (the book turned out so so)
    Although I like dark I would still prefer a blond guy to a book with only a women on the cover (a lot of those seem to be popping up lately as if we don’t see enough women in everything grr). Hey as long as he’s cute red works too πŸ™‚
    btw completely off topic but a while back I remember reading on this blog about a hero who is balding and pudgy… if anyone knows the book I’d really appreciate it… it sounded fun πŸ™‚

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