Blogging into the mist

Jo blogging here. Hmmm. In England “Joe Blogs” is a term for everyman. I’ll have to think about the ramifications of that. As we’ve been talking toys, I thought I’d image this post with our resident not-quite-3cbksmall
people, CBKs. Cabbage Patch Kids. One day I’ll blog about how we, with only boys, because CBK people. There are four but this is a picture of two — Charlie and Ernie, welcoming Billy, who’d been liberated from a box in the attic in Florida. He’s being awarded his cloak of power, but he came with the whirligig, which we thought cute.

That’s Charlie in the middle. He’s our original, acquired in 1983 during CBK mania. One day I’ll tell you the story.

After being home from the conference for two days I’ve caught up with e-mail and a number of other things to do, but been whammied by an urgent request for a title for my next book. It doesn’t come out until September 2007, for heaven’s sake! I’ve only written about half of it. But I’m trying. The problem is that it would be nice to use “rogue” in the title, because then there’d be three flow-through books, all with Rogue in the title, and I never manage to do that.

Flow-through. I came up with that the other day and I like it. There are linked series of many sorts, and my Company of Rogues is really a “world.” And one in which I mean to keep playing, even though Dare getting hitched means the Rogues themselves are taken care of. (Coming in September. Which means late this month. To Rescue A Rogue. It’s not too soon to order a copy on line or from your favourite bookstore!) But links come in many forms, and these three do flow one from the other. In The Rogue’s Return, Simon St. Bride returns to England from Canada thrilled to hear that his closest friend, Dare Debenham, is alive, not dead at Waterloo as thought. When he lands, he hurries to see Dare, who is still weak from wounds and ill-treatment, and also addicted to the opium he was given for his wounds. We briefly meet Mara St. Bride, Simon’s sister, then pick up in the next book with Mara in a pickle from which Dare, who is like a brother to her (ha!) rescues her. Mara’s an active sort, and decides that letting Dare set his own pace of recovery is a mistake and plunges in to drag him back into society. I’m sure it’s not a spoiler to say that she succeeds and that in the process they discover they’re in love etc etc.

But I didn’t have a third book in mind until a walk-on at the end of the book became a complete person called Viscount Darien. “You can’t be Lord Darien” I told him. Who’s in charge here, anyway? “This book is about Lord Darius. A Lord Darien in the next would be ridiculous.”

(If you want an easy guide to titles, there’s one here on my web site.

“That,” he said, “is your problem,” and went on to perform the bit part I’d assigned to some central casting military officer.

Who’s in charge here anyway? Ultimately the characters, so I told myself it wasn’t too bad — he’s very sexy in a dark and dangerous way I don’t often get — because Dare’s title is a courtesy one. He’s a duke’s son, thus Lord Darius Debenham. Darien is a real title, Viscount Darien, so he’s Lord Darien, full stop. (Which is what we English call a period. So much more assertive, don’t you think? Let any unruly sentence try to run on over a full stop, I say.)

But then as Darien strolled out of the Yeovil ball he said — perhaps trying to immitate James Bond, but then how would a Regency gentleman know? Hmmm. There is Hawkings’ time theory…. “The name’s Kahvay. Canem Kahvay.”

When I did a Huh? he gave one of those cynical heroic smiles and said, “Think about it. Family motto is Beware,” and disappeared into the night.

Beware. In Latin, beware is cave pronounced kahvay. Cave Canem, Beware of the dog. I race out of Yeovil House after him and shout, “You can’t be called dog!”

Lightly his voice floats back out of the dark. “That’s what I thought. Blame the Rogues.”

So the title for the next book could well be The Man Who Hated the Rogues, but I know that’ll never work. And I didn’t mean to blog about this at all, but blog thoughts are what blog thoughts are, so there it is. But I will post a conference pic. Not one of mine because I took all of mine, but a good shot taken by Lori of the wonderfully fun and friendly Tony and Lori, who write together as Tori Carrington.
Click here for picture. They have oodles of pictures up there and lots of other good stuff on their site.

That’s Tony in the middle — very Greek and dashing — with me on the left, Anne Stuart next, , Maggie Shayne on Tony’s other side, and Brenda Hiatt next to her. We’re out in the hall of the Ritz escaping the heat of the Harlequin party.

So I sort of flowed through this blog.

Cheers,

Jo

33 thoughts on “Blogging into the mist”

  1. Hey, Jo! Great seeing you in Atlanta, even if it was only for a minute and a half. LOL!
    I love the sound of Darien already, and I’m just dying for Dare’s story (always had a soft spot for that Rogue *GRIN*). His whole name will feel very familiar to all us poor hippie kids whose parents thought “funny” names wouldn’t scar us for life.

    Reply
  2. Hey, Jo! Great seeing you in Atlanta, even if it was only for a minute and a half. LOL!
    I love the sound of Darien already, and I’m just dying for Dare’s story (always had a soft spot for that Rogue *GRIN*). His whole name will feel very familiar to all us poor hippie kids whose parents thought “funny” names wouldn’t scar us for life.

    Reply
  3. Hey, Jo! Great seeing you in Atlanta, even if it was only for a minute and a half. LOL!
    I love the sound of Darien already, and I’m just dying for Dare’s story (always had a soft spot for that Rogue *GRIN*). His whole name will feel very familiar to all us poor hippie kids whose parents thought “funny” names wouldn’t scar us for life.

    Reply
  4. What an interesting blog, Jo, it gives an insight into flowing through ideas and allowing the characters to take over the story, which comes in handy at times!
    I love the names you’ve come up with, and I wouldn’t mind the repetitions, especially if the characters are naming themselves –how could anyone argue with that! Saves hours spent flipping through the name books….
    Nice to see the photo from the conference, always fun to see Krissie, Brenda, and Maggie, and you look great!! Now I wish I went, looks like you all had a great time.
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  5. What an interesting blog, Jo, it gives an insight into flowing through ideas and allowing the characters to take over the story, which comes in handy at times!
    I love the names you’ve come up with, and I wouldn’t mind the repetitions, especially if the characters are naming themselves –how could anyone argue with that! Saves hours spent flipping through the name books….
    Nice to see the photo from the conference, always fun to see Krissie, Brenda, and Maggie, and you look great!! Now I wish I went, looks like you all had a great time.
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  6. What an interesting blog, Jo, it gives an insight into flowing through ideas and allowing the characters to take over the story, which comes in handy at times!
    I love the names you’ve come up with, and I wouldn’t mind the repetitions, especially if the characters are naming themselves –how could anyone argue with that! Saves hours spent flipping through the name books….
    Nice to see the photo from the conference, always fun to see Krissie, Brenda, and Maggie, and you look great!! Now I wish I went, looks like you all had a great time.
    ~Susan Sarah

    Reply
  7. The great title hunt! These are one of the crazies they don’t tell us about when we start writing. 🙂 But Darien sounds completely lovely, canine teeth and all. TOO ROGUISH BY HALF? Nahhh…..
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  8. The great title hunt! These are one of the crazies they don’t tell us about when we start writing. 🙂 But Darien sounds completely lovely, canine teeth and all. TOO ROGUISH BY HALF? Nahhh…..
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  9. The great title hunt! These are one of the crazies they don’t tell us about when we start writing. 🙂 But Darien sounds completely lovely, canine teeth and all. TOO ROGUISH BY HALF? Nahhh…..
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  10. Please note the second pronunciation listed, which I believe is the preferred British one:
    DARIUS
    Gender: Masculine
    Usage: English, Lithuanian
    Pronounced: DER-ee-us, de-RIE-us [key]
    Roman form of Δαρειος (Dareios), which was the Greek form of the Persian name Dârayavahush, which was composed of the elements dâraya “to possess” and vahu “good”. Several ancient kings of Persia bore this name, including Darius the Great who invaded Greece but was defeated in the Battle of Marathon.
    Your hero is more likely to be nicknamed “Dry” than “Dare.”
    In my long-lost youth, back in the last century, I was very fond of this historical romance of my grandfather’s:
    D’Ri and I
    by Irving Bacheller
    A TALE of DARING DEEDS in the SECOND WAR with the BRITISH.
    Being the Memoirs of Colonel Ramon Bell, U.S.A.
    author of “Eben Holden.”
    1901
    It’s even online, if anyone cares to read it:
    http://arthurwendover.com/arthurs/bacheller/drii10.html
    And perhaps your hero was trying to say “Kane McAveigh?”

    Reply
  11. Please note the second pronunciation listed, which I believe is the preferred British one:
    DARIUS
    Gender: Masculine
    Usage: English, Lithuanian
    Pronounced: DER-ee-us, de-RIE-us [key]
    Roman form of Δαρειος (Dareios), which was the Greek form of the Persian name Dârayavahush, which was composed of the elements dâraya “to possess” and vahu “good”. Several ancient kings of Persia bore this name, including Darius the Great who invaded Greece but was defeated in the Battle of Marathon.
    Your hero is more likely to be nicknamed “Dry” than “Dare.”
    In my long-lost youth, back in the last century, I was very fond of this historical romance of my grandfather’s:
    D’Ri and I
    by Irving Bacheller
    A TALE of DARING DEEDS in the SECOND WAR with the BRITISH.
    Being the Memoirs of Colonel Ramon Bell, U.S.A.
    author of “Eben Holden.”
    1901
    It’s even online, if anyone cares to read it:
    http://arthurwendover.com/arthurs/bacheller/drii10.html
    And perhaps your hero was trying to say “Kane McAveigh?”

    Reply
  12. Please note the second pronunciation listed, which I believe is the preferred British one:
    DARIUS
    Gender: Masculine
    Usage: English, Lithuanian
    Pronounced: DER-ee-us, de-RIE-us [key]
    Roman form of Δαρειος (Dareios), which was the Greek form of the Persian name Dârayavahush, which was composed of the elements dâraya “to possess” and vahu “good”. Several ancient kings of Persia bore this name, including Darius the Great who invaded Greece but was defeated in the Battle of Marathon.
    Your hero is more likely to be nicknamed “Dry” than “Dare.”
    In my long-lost youth, back in the last century, I was very fond of this historical romance of my grandfather’s:
    D’Ri and I
    by Irving Bacheller
    A TALE of DARING DEEDS in the SECOND WAR with the BRITISH.
    Being the Memoirs of Colonel Ramon Bell, U.S.A.
    author of “Eben Holden.”
    1901
    It’s even online, if anyone cares to read it:
    http://arthurwendover.com/arthurs/bacheller/drii10.html
    And perhaps your hero was trying to say “Kane McAveigh?”

    Reply
  13. Ah yes, Tal, but the English are so idiosyncratic about names, so he is DARE-ius and Dare and has been now for about 30 years of my life.
    Just as with Darien’s family name. Which gave me a surprising amount of trouble, because I wanted to spell it out phonetically as kar-vay and people would ask where the R was. In my English mind, I didn’t really hear that R but they did.
    Then there was the time I had some rhymes and my editor said, “But Jo, they don’t rhyme.” I’ll try to dig out my original rhymes. Accents are fascinating.
    Jo

    Reply
  14. Ah yes, Tal, but the English are so idiosyncratic about names, so he is DARE-ius and Dare and has been now for about 30 years of my life.
    Just as with Darien’s family name. Which gave me a surprising amount of trouble, because I wanted to spell it out phonetically as kar-vay and people would ask where the R was. In my English mind, I didn’t really hear that R but they did.
    Then there was the time I had some rhymes and my editor said, “But Jo, they don’t rhyme.” I’ll try to dig out my original rhymes. Accents are fascinating.
    Jo

    Reply
  15. Ah yes, Tal, but the English are so idiosyncratic about names, so he is DARE-ius and Dare and has been now for about 30 years of my life.
    Just as with Darien’s family name. Which gave me a surprising amount of trouble, because I wanted to spell it out phonetically as kar-vay and people would ask where the R was. In my English mind, I didn’t really hear that R but they did.
    Then there was the time I had some rhymes and my editor said, “But Jo, they don’t rhyme.” I’ll try to dig out my original rhymes. Accents are fascinating.
    Jo

    Reply
  16. Jo, did you see (sometime last century) the PBS series THE STORY OF ENGLISH with Robert MacNeil? It had samples of all sorts of spoken English from Anglo-Saxon to present-day creoles. Fascinating info on where the various American accents originated. I have it on either VHS or DVD (can’t recall); and there’s a companion book.

    Reply
  17. Jo, did you see (sometime last century) the PBS series THE STORY OF ENGLISH with Robert MacNeil? It had samples of all sorts of spoken English from Anglo-Saxon to present-day creoles. Fascinating info on where the various American accents originated. I have it on either VHS or DVD (can’t recall); and there’s a companion book.

    Reply
  18. Jo, did you see (sometime last century) the PBS series THE STORY OF ENGLISH with Robert MacNeil? It had samples of all sorts of spoken English from Anglo-Saxon to present-day creoles. Fascinating info on where the various American accents originated. I have it on either VHS or DVD (can’t recall); and there’s a companion book.

    Reply
  19. Yes, that is a great collection, Tonda. Regional accents are very specific in England, and were more so it the past. With an ear for it you can spot a person’s origins, even complex ones, from their accent.
    Sort of “grew up near Chester, but spent a lot of time recently somewhere east of Sheffield.”
    I remembered another strange pronunciation in my books, but not one many pick up on. In My Lady Notorious, the hero is Cynric. (All the Mallorens have those Anglo-Saxon names.) It should be pronounced Kinric, but I couldn’t resist the “sin” connection, so he’s “sinric.”
    In a land where Towcester is “toaster” and Mainwaring is “mannering” anything is possible!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  20. Yes, that is a great collection, Tonda. Regional accents are very specific in England, and were more so it the past. With an ear for it you can spot a person’s origins, even complex ones, from their accent.
    Sort of “grew up near Chester, but spent a lot of time recently somewhere east of Sheffield.”
    I remembered another strange pronunciation in my books, but not one many pick up on. In My Lady Notorious, the hero is Cynric. (All the Mallorens have those Anglo-Saxon names.) It should be pronounced Kinric, but I couldn’t resist the “sin” connection, so he’s “sinric.”
    In a land where Towcester is “toaster” and Mainwaring is “mannering” anything is possible!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  21. Yes, that is a great collection, Tonda. Regional accents are very specific in England, and were more so it the past. With an ear for it you can spot a person’s origins, even complex ones, from their accent.
    Sort of “grew up near Chester, but spent a lot of time recently somewhere east of Sheffield.”
    I remembered another strange pronunciation in my books, but not one many pick up on. In My Lady Notorious, the hero is Cynric. (All the Mallorens have those Anglo-Saxon names.) It should be pronounced Kinric, but I couldn’t resist the “sin” connection, so he’s “sinric.”
    In a land where Towcester is “toaster” and Mainwaring is “mannering” anything is possible!
    Jo 🙂

    Reply
  22. English name pronunciation makes me insane, but as long as the author includes the pronunciation and the explanation, I’m quite happy. And Americans will say Sin-rick for Cynric every time. The still say Selt for Celt.
    I adore the way the next hero showed up. He sounds like a deep dark part of your soul and I can’t wait to see what he’s really like. You can’t always be British proper and light!

    Reply
  23. English name pronunciation makes me insane, but as long as the author includes the pronunciation and the explanation, I’m quite happy. And Americans will say Sin-rick for Cynric every time. The still say Selt for Celt.
    I adore the way the next hero showed up. He sounds like a deep dark part of your soul and I can’t wait to see what he’s really like. You can’t always be British proper and light!

    Reply
  24. English name pronunciation makes me insane, but as long as the author includes the pronunciation and the explanation, I’m quite happy. And Americans will say Sin-rick for Cynric every time. The still say Selt for Celt.
    I adore the way the next hero showed up. He sounds like a deep dark part of your soul and I can’t wait to see what he’s really like. You can’t always be British proper and light!

    Reply
  25. I tend to switch between British and American pronunciations as context dictates. E.g. my nephew in the National Guard is a loo-tenant, but officers of the same rank in my stories are lef-tenants. I grew up near Birming-ham and have visited Birming-em. Etc.

    Reply
  26. I tend to switch between British and American pronunciations as context dictates. E.g. my nephew in the National Guard is a loo-tenant, but officers of the same rank in my stories are lef-tenants. I grew up near Birming-ham and have visited Birming-em. Etc.

    Reply
  27. I tend to switch between British and American pronunciations as context dictates. E.g. my nephew in the National Guard is a loo-tenant, but officers of the same rank in my stories are lef-tenants. I grew up near Birming-ham and have visited Birming-em. Etc.

    Reply

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