Blathering Part II

I know, I know, I never shut up.  And behind the scenes, I’m worse.

Tal suggested that we answer questions as a post, and we’ve been asked to answer writing questions previously.  Since a lot of us are currently under the deadline gun (lovely to be under contract but murder to accomplish when we all want to be playing in the sun), why don’t we give this a try? 

I make no promises.  What I’ll do is collect questions from wenchlings and others passing through here, post them behind the scenes so all the wenches can play with them as they like, and we’ll see if we can’t organize an answer post soon.  Let’s play!  Ask away, but let’s stick to topics we might know something about—like history and writing.  If you wander off into actually having a life…  you’ll get lots of giggles but not much sense.  Mmiscredsmiley

21 thoughts on “Blathering Part II”

  1. Some perhaps not so common questions:
    1) Why don’t characters in historicals ever have to go to the loo? Even have an emergency urge to go to the loo? Especially while bouncing around in those carriages all day.
    2) Why don’t women in historicals get PMS and chew holes in everyone around them?
    3) Did women in the early 1800s shave their legs, and if not, why are they always smooth when the heroes are exploring their bodies in the throes of passion? Did they shave under their arms or use some kind of deodorant (baking soda?)?
    4) How hard is it not to accidentally put in something that they wouldn’t have had or known then? Do you find yourself frantically scouring reference books (or googling), muttering, “Just when was the telegraph available in the wilds of Hampshire?”
    5) Do you ever feel like screaming “GO AWAY!” at the 3,546th fan who asks about your “process” or “where do you get your ideas”? Or even one who thinks you should know things like whether women in the 1800s shaved their legs?
    Just curious…

    Reply
  2. Some perhaps not so common questions:
    1) Why don’t characters in historicals ever have to go to the loo? Even have an emergency urge to go to the loo? Especially while bouncing around in those carriages all day.
    2) Why don’t women in historicals get PMS and chew holes in everyone around them?
    3) Did women in the early 1800s shave their legs, and if not, why are they always smooth when the heroes are exploring their bodies in the throes of passion? Did they shave under their arms or use some kind of deodorant (baking soda?)?
    4) How hard is it not to accidentally put in something that they wouldn’t have had or known then? Do you find yourself frantically scouring reference books (or googling), muttering, “Just when was the telegraph available in the wilds of Hampshire?”
    5) Do you ever feel like screaming “GO AWAY!” at the 3,546th fan who asks about your “process” or “where do you get your ideas”? Or even one who thinks you should know things like whether women in the 1800s shaved their legs?
    Just curious…

    Reply
  3. Some perhaps not so common questions:
    1) Why don’t characters in historicals ever have to go to the loo? Even have an emergency urge to go to the loo? Especially while bouncing around in those carriages all day.
    2) Why don’t women in historicals get PMS and chew holes in everyone around them?
    3) Did women in the early 1800s shave their legs, and if not, why are they always smooth when the heroes are exploring their bodies in the throes of passion? Did they shave under their arms or use some kind of deodorant (baking soda?)?
    4) How hard is it not to accidentally put in something that they wouldn’t have had or known then? Do you find yourself frantically scouring reference books (or googling), muttering, “Just when was the telegraph available in the wilds of Hampshire?”
    5) Do you ever feel like screaming “GO AWAY!” at the 3,546th fan who asks about your “process” or “where do you get your ideas”? Or even one who thinks you should know things like whether women in the 1800s shaved their legs?
    Just curious…

    Reply
  4. Ok, you asked for it – here goes – all my questions – in no particular order:
    1. If you had to pick one of your books as the hardest (or easiest) to write, which one was it and why?
    2. When you are writing your books, do you see the action happening as if in a movie? (I ask, because when I am reading a book, I watch it happen in my head like a movie)
    3. When you are writing, do you listen to music and if so, what?
    4. What is the weirdest question that you have been asked at a book signing.
    5. What is your absolute favourite book – that you did not write?
    Thanks for answering!

    Reply
  5. Ok, you asked for it – here goes – all my questions – in no particular order:
    1. If you had to pick one of your books as the hardest (or easiest) to write, which one was it and why?
    2. When you are writing your books, do you see the action happening as if in a movie? (I ask, because when I am reading a book, I watch it happen in my head like a movie)
    3. When you are writing, do you listen to music and if so, what?
    4. What is the weirdest question that you have been asked at a book signing.
    5. What is your absolute favourite book – that you did not write?
    Thanks for answering!

    Reply
  6. Ok, you asked for it – here goes – all my questions – in no particular order:
    1. If you had to pick one of your books as the hardest (or easiest) to write, which one was it and why?
    2. When you are writing your books, do you see the action happening as if in a movie? (I ask, because when I am reading a book, I watch it happen in my head like a movie)
    3. When you are writing, do you listen to music and if so, what?
    4. What is the weirdest question that you have been asked at a book signing.
    5. What is your absolute favourite book – that you did not write?
    Thanks for answering!

    Reply
  7. There is a really good question that Elizabeth Lowell just brough up on Running with Quills–villains: Are they necessary? Should they be totally evil, or have redeeming characteristics? Should they in fact be redeemed or, as C.S. Lewis recommended, “soundly killed at the end”?

    Reply
  8. There is a really good question that Elizabeth Lowell just brough up on Running with Quills–villains: Are they necessary? Should they be totally evil, or have redeeming characteristics? Should they in fact be redeemed or, as C.S. Lewis recommended, “soundly killed at the end”?

    Reply
  9. There is a really good question that Elizabeth Lowell just brough up on Running with Quills–villains: Are they necessary? Should they be totally evil, or have redeeming characteristics? Should they in fact be redeemed or, as C.S. Lewis recommended, “soundly killed at the end”?

    Reply
  10. these are all excellent questions! I do love the intelligence of our wenchlings. Keep them coming. I’m gathering them and as we have time, we’ll pull together answers and see if we can organize a post.

    Reply
  11. these are all excellent questions! I do love the intelligence of our wenchlings. Keep them coming. I’m gathering them and as we have time, we’ll pull together answers and see if we can organize a post.

    Reply
  12. these are all excellent questions! I do love the intelligence of our wenchlings. Keep them coming. I’m gathering them and as we have time, we’ll pull together answers and see if we can organize a post.

    Reply
  13. 1. What romance novels do you recommend to new readers and why?
    2. Who are your favourite romance heroes/heroines?
    3. What really distinguishes romance fiction from any other fiction – or does anything?

    Reply
  14. 1. What romance novels do you recommend to new readers and why?
    2. Who are your favourite romance heroes/heroines?
    3. What really distinguishes romance fiction from any other fiction – or does anything?

    Reply
  15. 1. What romance novels do you recommend to new readers and why?
    2. Who are your favourite romance heroes/heroines?
    3. What really distinguishes romance fiction from any other fiction – or does anything?

    Reply
  16. Ooooh, this if fun… and maybe a little dangerous. Although I appear as the littlest wenchling, I am actually the Queen of Questions. Dumb ones that is.
    So, here goes… in the order in which they came to my brain.
    1. How about a free thinking list of the funniest purple prose you’ve ever read (or written).
    2. Your thoughts on the direction of the Romance market. What is ‘hot’ right now. Why? What do you think will be ‘hot’ in the near future?
    3. (Here’s a dumb one) Why are some books released in hardback and some in paperback? (I so wanted DUCHESS and MAGIC MAN in hardback)
    4. Heroes… what makes a good one and why don’t they ever seem to have morning breath?
    5. What is the best kind of publicity a publisher can give to a book? Are publishers doing less now? Why?
    6. (Another dumb one) How does one’s work land on the NYT Best selling list? It would seem beneficial to be on the list. Are there draw backs?
    7. Villains… is it possible to redeem one in another book? (like in a series)

    Reply
  17. Ooooh, this if fun… and maybe a little dangerous. Although I appear as the littlest wenchling, I am actually the Queen of Questions. Dumb ones that is.
    So, here goes… in the order in which they came to my brain.
    1. How about a free thinking list of the funniest purple prose you’ve ever read (or written).
    2. Your thoughts on the direction of the Romance market. What is ‘hot’ right now. Why? What do you think will be ‘hot’ in the near future?
    3. (Here’s a dumb one) Why are some books released in hardback and some in paperback? (I so wanted DUCHESS and MAGIC MAN in hardback)
    4. Heroes… what makes a good one and why don’t they ever seem to have morning breath?
    5. What is the best kind of publicity a publisher can give to a book? Are publishers doing less now? Why?
    6. (Another dumb one) How does one’s work land on the NYT Best selling list? It would seem beneficial to be on the list. Are there draw backs?
    7. Villains… is it possible to redeem one in another book? (like in a series)

    Reply
  18. Ooooh, this if fun… and maybe a little dangerous. Although I appear as the littlest wenchling, I am actually the Queen of Questions. Dumb ones that is.
    So, here goes… in the order in which they came to my brain.
    1. How about a free thinking list of the funniest purple prose you’ve ever read (or written).
    2. Your thoughts on the direction of the Romance market. What is ‘hot’ right now. Why? What do you think will be ‘hot’ in the near future?
    3. (Here’s a dumb one) Why are some books released in hardback and some in paperback? (I so wanted DUCHESS and MAGIC MAN in hardback)
    4. Heroes… what makes a good one and why don’t they ever seem to have morning breath?
    5. What is the best kind of publicity a publisher can give to a book? Are publishers doing less now? Why?
    6. (Another dumb one) How does one’s work land on the NYT Best selling list? It would seem beneficial to be on the list. Are there draw backs?
    7. Villains… is it possible to redeem one in another book? (like in a series)

    Reply
  19. I’ll throw some questions out there.
    Why are there fewer historical romances published now? What is the future of historical romance?
    The next may be off topic. I’ve gotten the impression that some of you are huge fantasy fans. I can count the number of fantasy authors I’ve read on one hand. However, I just discovered the fantasy novels of Lois McMaster Bujold and am LOVING them. As a fantasy neophyte who has read and LOVED tons of historical romances/fiction, I would love to know if you have any fantasy recommendations.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  20. I’ll throw some questions out there.
    Why are there fewer historical romances published now? What is the future of historical romance?
    The next may be off topic. I’ve gotten the impression that some of you are huge fantasy fans. I can count the number of fantasy authors I’ve read on one hand. However, I just discovered the fantasy novels of Lois McMaster Bujold and am LOVING them. As a fantasy neophyte who has read and LOVED tons of historical romances/fiction, I would love to know if you have any fantasy recommendations.
    -Michelle

    Reply
  21. I’ll throw some questions out there.
    Why are there fewer historical romances published now? What is the future of historical romance?
    The next may be off topic. I’ve gotten the impression that some of you are huge fantasy fans. I can count the number of fantasy authors I’ve read on one hand. However, I just discovered the fantasy novels of Lois McMaster Bujold and am LOVING them. As a fantasy neophyte who has read and LOVED tons of historical romances/fiction, I would love to know if you have any fantasy recommendations.
    -Michelle

    Reply

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