Blame the Spanish

ReadModernLadyTableCityGIG
In recognition of Martin Luther King Day, I thought I’d dip briefly into African-English history. As is all of human history, the story is complex and depends on who does the telling.

According to several sources, the Romans were first to introduce Africans to England. Since Romans made slaves of conquered populations, those early blacks could have been slaves, but as did many countries of that time, they could have http://tinyurl.com/9p4yzfalso
promoted them to soldiers. Whether the descendants of these Romans were still about in the 16th century is unknown, but our next record of Africans in England was when Catherine of Aragon traveled to London with African attendants.  African trumpeters served Henry VII and Henry VIII, probably as novelties since kings are easily bored.  The first recorded African living in London was a man named Cornelius in 1593.

Although serfdom and slavery were not new to Europe, the Spanish can probably be blamed—because they were the first to try everything in 15th-16th century adventuring—for introducing black slaves.  http://tinyurl.com/74yobp
Columbus brought 500 Caribbean blacks to Spain in 1494.  Seven years later, the native Caribbean population had already been severely decimated by European diseases, and the first African slaves were imported as labor to the West Indies plantations.

But just because the Spanish were first doesn’t mean the English and ultimately, Americans, weren’t equally guilty for the growth of the “nefarious trade.”  They were just slower to catch on to the profits that could be made in free labor and selling human lives.  An English privateer named James Hawkins in 1562 apparently was the first Englishman to benefit from the trade after he captured a Portuguese ship carrying Africans to Brazil.  He traded them in Hispaniola for ginger, pearls, and sugar, and his huge profit opened the eyes of England to the lucrative commerce, so that eventually even Queen Elizabeth invested in his ships.  (Hawkins introduced tobacco to England in 1565, so his vices were many!)  http://tinyurl.com/9j6olp

I’m not sure whether to blame sugar or tea, but our first global economy can be blamed for the rapid expansion of the slave trade.  Tea became a popular drink in England by the 1550’s, and sugar to sweeten the tea and to preserve fruit was grown in the Caribbean.  The more sugar demand increased, the more slaves were needed to produce it.  Maize from Brazil was introduced to Africa about the same time, providing a steady food crop that fueled population growth in African coastal states.  Population growth meant more wars, more kings selling captured soldiers, more slaves—and we all know the story from there.

Prejudice against those different from themselves allowed Englishmen to believe Africans were an http://tinyurl.com/a96z5o
inferior race. But the gradual increase of blacks living in England as free sailors, servants to sea captains and colonial officials, or in other capacities, provided the white population with better insights into the people they were selling. The number of blacks in London by 1760 had grown to 10-15,000.  The first rumblings of protest over the treatment of slaves came around 1763 when a badly beaten slave was nursed back to health, then kidnapped and sold.  By 1772, any slave who made it to England was declared to be free. Still greed and profit prevented Great Britain from outlawing the slave trade until 1823.

I think we all have a basic understanding of history, but what I find baffling is why—after all these centuries—so many of us can still view other human beings as lesser creatures simply because of the color of their skin, the shape of their nose, their gender, or their religion. We are about to inaugurate our first black president. Will it take us another four hundred years to get past our self-centeredness to realize that it is the integrity of a person’s character that matters more than how they differ from ourselves? 

To start the new year on a note of harmony, what do you see as the best means of educating people on our differences, so ultimately, one hopes, fear and hatred can be replaced by understanding? What are your hopes for the future at this historic moment?

Mystic warrior
And to end on a lighter note…  My books tend to have prejudice as an underlying theme and my next one, MYSTIC WARRIOR, is no exception, but really, the fact that my hero looks red on the cover doesn’t mean people hate him because of his skin tones!

35 thoughts on “Blame the Spanish”

  1. To continue the ligher note with a comment on the “Mystic” covers. I notice the cover heroes are wearing fewer and fewer clothes as time goes by. “Mystic Guardian” has the hero in shirt and tie. “Mystic Rider” has the hero with a sash across his chest and “Mystic Warrior” has the hero completely shirtless. And we see less of their faces as the covers progress. The wave of the future? **grins**

    Reply
  2. To continue the ligher note with a comment on the “Mystic” covers. I notice the cover heroes are wearing fewer and fewer clothes as time goes by. “Mystic Guardian” has the hero in shirt and tie. “Mystic Rider” has the hero with a sash across his chest and “Mystic Warrior” has the hero completely shirtless. And we see less of their faces as the covers progress. The wave of the future? **grins**

    Reply
  3. To continue the ligher note with a comment on the “Mystic” covers. I notice the cover heroes are wearing fewer and fewer clothes as time goes by. “Mystic Guardian” has the hero in shirt and tie. “Mystic Rider” has the hero with a sash across his chest and “Mystic Warrior” has the hero completely shirtless. And we see less of their faces as the covers progress. The wave of the future? **grins**

    Reply
  4. To continue the ligher note with a comment on the “Mystic” covers. I notice the cover heroes are wearing fewer and fewer clothes as time goes by. “Mystic Guardian” has the hero in shirt and tie. “Mystic Rider” has the hero with a sash across his chest and “Mystic Warrior” has the hero completely shirtless. And we see less of their faces as the covers progress. The wave of the future? **grins**

    Reply
  5. To continue the ligher note with a comment on the “Mystic” covers. I notice the cover heroes are wearing fewer and fewer clothes as time goes by. “Mystic Guardian” has the hero in shirt and tie. “Mystic Rider” has the hero with a sash across his chest and “Mystic Warrior” has the hero completely shirtless. And we see less of their faces as the covers progress. The wave of the future? **grins**

    Reply
  6. The “trick” as we’ve experienced it it NOT to educate people about our differences but rather to educate them about our sameness.
    We chose private schools for our children for a variety of reasons. We always chose schools with diverse populations ethnically. My children, who grew up with kids from various backgrounds, now see skin color as about as important as hair color- just another part of what someone looks like but having nothing to do with who they are.
    I now teach at an ethnically diverse inner city Catholic high school. Our students may arrive as freshmen coming from individual grade schools and neighborhoods that were homogenous, but by the time they graduate they have spent so much time with kids from other backgrounds that they also learn to judge people and not color.
    I find the strongest prejudices among young people still come from those who have not had a chance to have routine experiences with those who are “different”. My brother and his wife refused to consider sending their children to the school where I teach because of the ethnic differences- and now their young adult children, educated in schools chosen because they were “white” schools, are carrying on another generation of their parents’ prejudices.
    How these ideas can be changed in non-diverse areas of the country- which is most of the country outside of the larger cities- I don’t know.
    While I am thrilled that our country has elected it’s first African-American president, as soon as people stop concentrating on that aspect and see him simply as “the President”, the faster things will improve.

    Reply
  7. The “trick” as we’ve experienced it it NOT to educate people about our differences but rather to educate them about our sameness.
    We chose private schools for our children for a variety of reasons. We always chose schools with diverse populations ethnically. My children, who grew up with kids from various backgrounds, now see skin color as about as important as hair color- just another part of what someone looks like but having nothing to do with who they are.
    I now teach at an ethnically diverse inner city Catholic high school. Our students may arrive as freshmen coming from individual grade schools and neighborhoods that were homogenous, but by the time they graduate they have spent so much time with kids from other backgrounds that they also learn to judge people and not color.
    I find the strongest prejudices among young people still come from those who have not had a chance to have routine experiences with those who are “different”. My brother and his wife refused to consider sending their children to the school where I teach because of the ethnic differences- and now their young adult children, educated in schools chosen because they were “white” schools, are carrying on another generation of their parents’ prejudices.
    How these ideas can be changed in non-diverse areas of the country- which is most of the country outside of the larger cities- I don’t know.
    While I am thrilled that our country has elected it’s first African-American president, as soon as people stop concentrating on that aspect and see him simply as “the President”, the faster things will improve.

    Reply
  8. The “trick” as we’ve experienced it it NOT to educate people about our differences but rather to educate them about our sameness.
    We chose private schools for our children for a variety of reasons. We always chose schools with diverse populations ethnically. My children, who grew up with kids from various backgrounds, now see skin color as about as important as hair color- just another part of what someone looks like but having nothing to do with who they are.
    I now teach at an ethnically diverse inner city Catholic high school. Our students may arrive as freshmen coming from individual grade schools and neighborhoods that were homogenous, but by the time they graduate they have spent so much time with kids from other backgrounds that they also learn to judge people and not color.
    I find the strongest prejudices among young people still come from those who have not had a chance to have routine experiences with those who are “different”. My brother and his wife refused to consider sending their children to the school where I teach because of the ethnic differences- and now their young adult children, educated in schools chosen because they were “white” schools, are carrying on another generation of their parents’ prejudices.
    How these ideas can be changed in non-diverse areas of the country- which is most of the country outside of the larger cities- I don’t know.
    While I am thrilled that our country has elected it’s first African-American president, as soon as people stop concentrating on that aspect and see him simply as “the President”, the faster things will improve.

    Reply
  9. The “trick” as we’ve experienced it it NOT to educate people about our differences but rather to educate them about our sameness.
    We chose private schools for our children for a variety of reasons. We always chose schools with diverse populations ethnically. My children, who grew up with kids from various backgrounds, now see skin color as about as important as hair color- just another part of what someone looks like but having nothing to do with who they are.
    I now teach at an ethnically diverse inner city Catholic high school. Our students may arrive as freshmen coming from individual grade schools and neighborhoods that were homogenous, but by the time they graduate they have spent so much time with kids from other backgrounds that they also learn to judge people and not color.
    I find the strongest prejudices among young people still come from those who have not had a chance to have routine experiences with those who are “different”. My brother and his wife refused to consider sending their children to the school where I teach because of the ethnic differences- and now their young adult children, educated in schools chosen because they were “white” schools, are carrying on another generation of their parents’ prejudices.
    How these ideas can be changed in non-diverse areas of the country- which is most of the country outside of the larger cities- I don’t know.
    While I am thrilled that our country has elected it’s first African-American president, as soon as people stop concentrating on that aspect and see him simply as “the President”, the faster things will improve.

    Reply
  10. The “trick” as we’ve experienced it it NOT to educate people about our differences but rather to educate them about our sameness.
    We chose private schools for our children for a variety of reasons. We always chose schools with diverse populations ethnically. My children, who grew up with kids from various backgrounds, now see skin color as about as important as hair color- just another part of what someone looks like but having nothing to do with who they are.
    I now teach at an ethnically diverse inner city Catholic high school. Our students may arrive as freshmen coming from individual grade schools and neighborhoods that were homogenous, but by the time they graduate they have spent so much time with kids from other backgrounds that they also learn to judge people and not color.
    I find the strongest prejudices among young people still come from those who have not had a chance to have routine experiences with those who are “different”. My brother and his wife refused to consider sending their children to the school where I teach because of the ethnic differences- and now their young adult children, educated in schools chosen because they were “white” schools, are carrying on another generation of their parents’ prejudices.
    How these ideas can be changed in non-diverse areas of the country- which is most of the country outside of the larger cities- I don’t know.
    While I am thrilled that our country has elected it’s first African-American president, as soon as people stop concentrating on that aspect and see him simply as “the President”, the faster things will improve.

    Reply
  11. This is an incredibly powerful topic, one I’ve dealt with in several of my stories. My last book, A Distant Magic, was literally built around the 18th century British abolition movement, which is an amazing story.
    LadyDoc, I think the country has already made the leap you’re hoping for. Obama didn’t win because he was mixed race, but because he convinced a majority of American voters that he was the best man for the job. Which is another amazing story.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  12. This is an incredibly powerful topic, one I’ve dealt with in several of my stories. My last book, A Distant Magic, was literally built around the 18th century British abolition movement, which is an amazing story.
    LadyDoc, I think the country has already made the leap you’re hoping for. Obama didn’t win because he was mixed race, but because he convinced a majority of American voters that he was the best man for the job. Which is another amazing story.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  13. This is an incredibly powerful topic, one I’ve dealt with in several of my stories. My last book, A Distant Magic, was literally built around the 18th century British abolition movement, which is an amazing story.
    LadyDoc, I think the country has already made the leap you’re hoping for. Obama didn’t win because he was mixed race, but because he convinced a majority of American voters that he was the best man for the job. Which is another amazing story.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  14. This is an incredibly powerful topic, one I’ve dealt with in several of my stories. My last book, A Distant Magic, was literally built around the 18th century British abolition movement, which is an amazing story.
    LadyDoc, I think the country has already made the leap you’re hoping for. Obama didn’t win because he was mixed race, but because he convinced a majority of American voters that he was the best man for the job. Which is another amazing story.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  15. This is an incredibly powerful topic, one I’ve dealt with in several of my stories. My last book, A Distant Magic, was literally built around the 18th century British abolition movement, which is an amazing story.
    LadyDoc, I think the country has already made the leap you’re hoping for. Obama didn’t win because he was mixed race, but because he convinced a majority of American voters that he was the best man for the job. Which is another amazing story.
    Mary Jo

    Reply
  16. Linda, LOL! I hadn’t noticed but you’re right. Of course, the art department is also very good and realized the hero of the first book was a very proper diplomat, the hero of the second was a leader who disdained proper attire, and the hero of the third is a Vulcan god. “G” I’m sure they recognized that, right?
    LadyDoc, I’m currently living in an area that identifies people by what high school they graduated from–an indicator of wealth and status as well as race and religion. So even if we can overcome physical prejudices, we have a long way to get past other differences. But you’re right that diversity is the key, and that must start with our neighborhoods, IMO. I have no idea how we can make that happen.
    And MJ, you know I adored DISTANT MAGIC! Hmmm, maybe the time is getting closer when they’ll let me write another Civil War book…

    Reply
  17. Linda, LOL! I hadn’t noticed but you’re right. Of course, the art department is also very good and realized the hero of the first book was a very proper diplomat, the hero of the second was a leader who disdained proper attire, and the hero of the third is a Vulcan god. “G” I’m sure they recognized that, right?
    LadyDoc, I’m currently living in an area that identifies people by what high school they graduated from–an indicator of wealth and status as well as race and religion. So even if we can overcome physical prejudices, we have a long way to get past other differences. But you’re right that diversity is the key, and that must start with our neighborhoods, IMO. I have no idea how we can make that happen.
    And MJ, you know I adored DISTANT MAGIC! Hmmm, maybe the time is getting closer when they’ll let me write another Civil War book…

    Reply
  18. Linda, LOL! I hadn’t noticed but you’re right. Of course, the art department is also very good and realized the hero of the first book was a very proper diplomat, the hero of the second was a leader who disdained proper attire, and the hero of the third is a Vulcan god. “G” I’m sure they recognized that, right?
    LadyDoc, I’m currently living in an area that identifies people by what high school they graduated from–an indicator of wealth and status as well as race and religion. So even if we can overcome physical prejudices, we have a long way to get past other differences. But you’re right that diversity is the key, and that must start with our neighborhoods, IMO. I have no idea how we can make that happen.
    And MJ, you know I adored DISTANT MAGIC! Hmmm, maybe the time is getting closer when they’ll let me write another Civil War book…

    Reply
  19. Linda, LOL! I hadn’t noticed but you’re right. Of course, the art department is also very good and realized the hero of the first book was a very proper diplomat, the hero of the second was a leader who disdained proper attire, and the hero of the third is a Vulcan god. “G” I’m sure they recognized that, right?
    LadyDoc, I’m currently living in an area that identifies people by what high school they graduated from–an indicator of wealth and status as well as race and religion. So even if we can overcome physical prejudices, we have a long way to get past other differences. But you’re right that diversity is the key, and that must start with our neighborhoods, IMO. I have no idea how we can make that happen.
    And MJ, you know I adored DISTANT MAGIC! Hmmm, maybe the time is getting closer when they’ll let me write another Civil War book…

    Reply
  20. Linda, LOL! I hadn’t noticed but you’re right. Of course, the art department is also very good and realized the hero of the first book was a very proper diplomat, the hero of the second was a leader who disdained proper attire, and the hero of the third is a Vulcan god. “G” I’m sure they recognized that, right?
    LadyDoc, I’m currently living in an area that identifies people by what high school they graduated from–an indicator of wealth and status as well as race and religion. So even if we can overcome physical prejudices, we have a long way to get past other differences. But you’re right that diversity is the key, and that must start with our neighborhoods, IMO. I have no idea how we can make that happen.
    And MJ, you know I adored DISTANT MAGIC! Hmmm, maybe the time is getting closer when they’ll let me write another Civil War book…

    Reply
  21. >I find the strongest prejudices among young people still come from those who have not had a chance to have routine experiences with those who are “different”.< I couldn't agree more, LadyDoc. When we chose the primary school our children went to (in Tasmania, Australia that is Kinder thro' to Grade 6) our two priorities were convenience and reputation. By chance, over the years our kids attended this school, it became one of the most ethnically diverse schools in town. One year in my eldest son's class of 24 kids there were children from 9 different nationalities, from every continent of the globe. Many, but not all, were refugees from various conflicts. One child was dropped off at school by a mother wearing a burqua. They even had a young Tibetan monk attending for two terms. And you know it's not just the sharing of a room and desks it's the soccer and the cricket and the sports carnivals, where the kids are cheering each other on for being on the same 'side'. Team spirit that is a whole different sense of 'us & them' that includes rather than precludes. Having these experineces in their formative years has made my kides extremely tolerant and I am so grateful for that. And I think more and more kids worldwide are experiencing this, sadly because so many global conflicts have created a huge spread of diverse ethnicity mostly in the form of refugees.Funnily enough, down here in Tasmania (little island way south at the bottom of Australia) we have a very large African refugee population from just about every African nation with problems. Every time I read the story of one of these people I am humbled to the core. As far as I am concerned every one of them has earned the right to a safe and 'better' life and if that be in my town, in my street, in the house next door to me, then so be it. Frankly, if there is any question of 'superiority', I would say they win hands down every time, because I honestly do not think I could match the courage and quiet dignity of these people if I were put in their place.

    Reply
  22. >I find the strongest prejudices among young people still come from those who have not had a chance to have routine experiences with those who are “different”.< I couldn't agree more, LadyDoc. When we chose the primary school our children went to (in Tasmania, Australia that is Kinder thro' to Grade 6) our two priorities were convenience and reputation. By chance, over the years our kids attended this school, it became one of the most ethnically diverse schools in town. One year in my eldest son's class of 24 kids there were children from 9 different nationalities, from every continent of the globe. Many, but not all, were refugees from various conflicts. One child was dropped off at school by a mother wearing a burqua. They even had a young Tibetan monk attending for two terms. And you know it's not just the sharing of a room and desks it's the soccer and the cricket and the sports carnivals, where the kids are cheering each other on for being on the same 'side'. Team spirit that is a whole different sense of 'us & them' that includes rather than precludes. Having these experineces in their formative years has made my kides extremely tolerant and I am so grateful for that. And I think more and more kids worldwide are experiencing this, sadly because so many global conflicts have created a huge spread of diverse ethnicity mostly in the form of refugees.Funnily enough, down here in Tasmania (little island way south at the bottom of Australia) we have a very large African refugee population from just about every African nation with problems. Every time I read the story of one of these people I am humbled to the core. As far as I am concerned every one of them has earned the right to a safe and 'better' life and if that be in my town, in my street, in the house next door to me, then so be it. Frankly, if there is any question of 'superiority', I would say they win hands down every time, because I honestly do not think I could match the courage and quiet dignity of these people if I were put in their place.

    Reply
  23. >I find the strongest prejudices among young people still come from those who have not had a chance to have routine experiences with those who are “different”.< I couldn't agree more, LadyDoc. When we chose the primary school our children went to (in Tasmania, Australia that is Kinder thro' to Grade 6) our two priorities were convenience and reputation. By chance, over the years our kids attended this school, it became one of the most ethnically diverse schools in town. One year in my eldest son's class of 24 kids there were children from 9 different nationalities, from every continent of the globe. Many, but not all, were refugees from various conflicts. One child was dropped off at school by a mother wearing a burqua. They even had a young Tibetan monk attending for two terms. And you know it's not just the sharing of a room and desks it's the soccer and the cricket and the sports carnivals, where the kids are cheering each other on for being on the same 'side'. Team spirit that is a whole different sense of 'us & them' that includes rather than precludes. Having these experineces in their formative years has made my kides extremely tolerant and I am so grateful for that. And I think more and more kids worldwide are experiencing this, sadly because so many global conflicts have created a huge spread of diverse ethnicity mostly in the form of refugees.Funnily enough, down here in Tasmania (little island way south at the bottom of Australia) we have a very large African refugee population from just about every African nation with problems. Every time I read the story of one of these people I am humbled to the core. As far as I am concerned every one of them has earned the right to a safe and 'better' life and if that be in my town, in my street, in the house next door to me, then so be it. Frankly, if there is any question of 'superiority', I would say they win hands down every time, because I honestly do not think I could match the courage and quiet dignity of these people if I were put in their place.

    Reply
  24. >I find the strongest prejudices among young people still come from those who have not had a chance to have routine experiences with those who are “different”.< I couldn't agree more, LadyDoc. When we chose the primary school our children went to (in Tasmania, Australia that is Kinder thro' to Grade 6) our two priorities were convenience and reputation. By chance, over the years our kids attended this school, it became one of the most ethnically diverse schools in town. One year in my eldest son's class of 24 kids there were children from 9 different nationalities, from every continent of the globe. Many, but not all, were refugees from various conflicts. One child was dropped off at school by a mother wearing a burqua. They even had a young Tibetan monk attending for two terms. And you know it's not just the sharing of a room and desks it's the soccer and the cricket and the sports carnivals, where the kids are cheering each other on for being on the same 'side'. Team spirit that is a whole different sense of 'us & them' that includes rather than precludes. Having these experineces in their formative years has made my kides extremely tolerant and I am so grateful for that. And I think more and more kids worldwide are experiencing this, sadly because so many global conflicts have created a huge spread of diverse ethnicity mostly in the form of refugees.Funnily enough, down here in Tasmania (little island way south at the bottom of Australia) we have a very large African refugee population from just about every African nation with problems. Every time I read the story of one of these people I am humbled to the core. As far as I am concerned every one of them has earned the right to a safe and 'better' life and if that be in my town, in my street, in the house next door to me, then so be it. Frankly, if there is any question of 'superiority', I would say they win hands down every time, because I honestly do not think I could match the courage and quiet dignity of these people if I were put in their place.

    Reply
  25. >I find the strongest prejudices among young people still come from those who have not had a chance to have routine experiences with those who are “different”.< I couldn't agree more, LadyDoc. When we chose the primary school our children went to (in Tasmania, Australia that is Kinder thro' to Grade 6) our two priorities were convenience and reputation. By chance, over the years our kids attended this school, it became one of the most ethnically diverse schools in town. One year in my eldest son's class of 24 kids there were children from 9 different nationalities, from every continent of the globe. Many, but not all, were refugees from various conflicts. One child was dropped off at school by a mother wearing a burqua. They even had a young Tibetan monk attending for two terms. And you know it's not just the sharing of a room and desks it's the soccer and the cricket and the sports carnivals, where the kids are cheering each other on for being on the same 'side'. Team spirit that is a whole different sense of 'us & them' that includes rather than precludes. Having these experineces in their formative years has made my kides extremely tolerant and I am so grateful for that. And I think more and more kids worldwide are experiencing this, sadly because so many global conflicts have created a huge spread of diverse ethnicity mostly in the form of refugees.Funnily enough, down here in Tasmania (little island way south at the bottom of Australia) we have a very large African refugee population from just about every African nation with problems. Every time I read the story of one of these people I am humbled to the core. As far as I am concerned every one of them has earned the right to a safe and 'better' life and if that be in my town, in my street, in the house next door to me, then so be it. Frankly, if there is any question of 'superiority', I would say they win hands down every time, because I honestly do not think I could match the courage and quiet dignity of these people if I were put in their place.

    Reply
  26. Good afternoon. Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.
    I am from Samoa and know bad English, please tell me right I wrote the following sentence: “The money was a 16-by-28-foot asset that earned a number efficient, next pips, and withdraw and system construction concepts, fully not as going legal index laws, analyst stock picks.”
    Thank 😛 Vanya.

    Reply
  27. Good afternoon. Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.
    I am from Samoa and know bad English, please tell me right I wrote the following sentence: “The money was a 16-by-28-foot asset that earned a number efficient, next pips, and withdraw and system construction concepts, fully not as going legal index laws, analyst stock picks.”
    Thank 😛 Vanya.

    Reply
  28. Good afternoon. Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.
    I am from Samoa and know bad English, please tell me right I wrote the following sentence: “The money was a 16-by-28-foot asset that earned a number efficient, next pips, and withdraw and system construction concepts, fully not as going legal index laws, analyst stock picks.”
    Thank 😛 Vanya.

    Reply
  29. Good afternoon. Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.
    I am from Samoa and know bad English, please tell me right I wrote the following sentence: “The money was a 16-by-28-foot asset that earned a number efficient, next pips, and withdraw and system construction concepts, fully not as going legal index laws, analyst stock picks.”
    Thank 😛 Vanya.

    Reply
  30. Good afternoon. Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.
    I am from Samoa and know bad English, please tell me right I wrote the following sentence: “The money was a 16-by-28-foot asset that earned a number efficient, next pips, and withdraw and system construction concepts, fully not as going legal index laws, analyst stock picks.”
    Thank 😛 Vanya.

    Reply

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