The Battle of Bladensburg

330px-Private_of_MarinesToday is Veterans Day in the US, Remembrance Day in the Commonwealth. We honor those who have served in the armed forces. It seems a good day to look at one battle of the Regency period. This is 'my Regency battlefield'. Unlike Waterloo and Austerlitz, it happened near to home.

When Americans think of the War of 1812 they rather vaguely think 'we won'.

Dolly_madison

Dolly Madison

They recognize some famous quotes. The Capital got burned. Boo! And there was Dolly Madison. But they have no idea What It Was All About. Historians still scratch their heads over this question.

British people, when this 'War of 1812' is mentioned, are apt to say, "What? Oh, that." For them the war in America was a little bagatelle of a campaign, fought while everybody was concerned with Napoleon.

This indecisive and fairly pointless war crosses my own life the day the British marched into Washington and burned the capitol building. On their way in, they fought in a hamlet called Bladensburg. My home town. I learned the history of this battle in a school perched on a hill where American scouts once waited for the British.

The way this all happened . . .

The British had been hanging about the Chesapeake Bay for many, many months harassing shipping. Now, in 1814, ships, guns, men, and munitions arrived, freed up by the defeat of Napoleon. What would the British do with all these goodies? They could attack Baltimore, which was a valuable commercial and military target. Or they could invade Washington, which would Make a Point.

Burning-of-the-white-houseThe British goal was to force a treaty, tidy up this American mess, and sail home to evolve into Victorians. They didn't so much want to conquer and hold land in the Americas, they having plenty of undeveloped land in Canada already.
So they went after Washington.

The American defense of Washington seems to have been based on a two-pronged strategy, namely, 'run around in panic' and 'everybody issue conflicting orders'.  The British chose a more traditional 'let's get lost' plan. Both sides wandered about for a day or two across territory I associate with shopping malls and tracts of suburban housing but which was then marshy and mosquito-infested woodland.  

Finally, the Americans under their hapless and inept general gathered near Bladensburg where a bridge and ford crossed the Eastern Branch of the Potomac.

Joshua-barney-circa-1800

Joshua Barney

British troops, considerably better trained after a decade of fighting Napoleon's finest, attacked. The American troops retreated in disorder . . . 

With one notable exception. Commodore Joshua Barney's sailors and marines stood their ground. They put up a gallant fight till they were alone in the field and running out of ammunition. They made an orderly retreat.

330px-Sir_Harry_Smith

Harry Smith

Harry Smith over there to the left, though he was considerably younger at that time ― (This is the same Harry Smith who served in Spain under Wellington. His remarkable memoir is free on the internet, here). ― describes this battle and what followed in detail.  His troops went on to burn the capital.

. . .we entered Washington for the barbarous purpose of destroying the city. Admiral Cockburn would have burnt the whole, but Ross would only consent to the burning of the public buildings.

I had no objection to burn arsenals, dockyards, frigates building, stores, barracks, etc., but well do I recollect that, fresh from the Duke's humane warfare in the South of France, we were horrified at the order to burn the elegant Houses of Parliament and the President's house.

In the latter, however, we found a supper all ready, which was sufficiently cooked without more fire, and which many of us speedily consumed, unaided by the fiery elements, and drank some very good wine also. I shall never forget the destructive majesty of the flames as the torches were applied to beds, curtains, etc. Our sailors were artists at the work.

Thus was fought the Battle of Bladensburg, which wrested from the Americans their capital Washington, and burnt its Capitol and other buildings …

Anacostia_RiverSo that's Bladensburg where I grew up and the battle that took place there. I come away honoring the men who fought on both sides. Could there be a better example of military restraint and professionalism than that shown by the career soldiers of the British Army?  Is there any higher standard of bravery than Barney's men who held their ground as the enemy advanced?

 Nobody, except some politicians back in England, wanted this battle. But the destruction that Smith deplored probably led to the swift ending of the War of 1812.

115 thoughts on “The Battle of Bladensburg”

  1. We had Prince Charles and Camilla at our Remembrance Day service in Canberra this year, but I couldn’t be bothered to go! I’ve been to see the Queen on a few of her visits, but I’m not much one for the royal family…
    This post is really fascinating. Military history is so complex, and I love it when someone else (other than me!) digs through all the information about battle to make a concise summary!

    Reply
  2. We had Prince Charles and Camilla at our Remembrance Day service in Canberra this year, but I couldn’t be bothered to go! I’ve been to see the Queen on a few of her visits, but I’m not much one for the royal family…
    This post is really fascinating. Military history is so complex, and I love it when someone else (other than me!) digs through all the information about battle to make a concise summary!

    Reply
  3. We had Prince Charles and Camilla at our Remembrance Day service in Canberra this year, but I couldn’t be bothered to go! I’ve been to see the Queen on a few of her visits, but I’m not much one for the royal family…
    This post is really fascinating. Military history is so complex, and I love it when someone else (other than me!) digs through all the information about battle to make a concise summary!

    Reply
  4. We had Prince Charles and Camilla at our Remembrance Day service in Canberra this year, but I couldn’t be bothered to go! I’ve been to see the Queen on a few of her visits, but I’m not much one for the royal family…
    This post is really fascinating. Military history is so complex, and I love it when someone else (other than me!) digs through all the information about battle to make a concise summary!

    Reply
  5. We had Prince Charles and Camilla at our Remembrance Day service in Canberra this year, but I couldn’t be bothered to go! I’ve been to see the Queen on a few of her visits, but I’m not much one for the royal family…
    This post is really fascinating. Military history is so complex, and I love it when someone else (other than me!) digs through all the information about battle to make a concise summary!

    Reply
  6. When we look at this battle, the American generals do not seem to have covered themselves with the glory of their strategy. And a human document, like the Harry Smith autobiography, makes this come to life on the page.
    When I lived and worked in London, I saw the Queen Mother once in a car as she went about her everyday life. It’s practical to separate the symbolic work of governing from the hands on practical work, but it’s hard on the family that has to do it.

    Reply
  7. When we look at this battle, the American generals do not seem to have covered themselves with the glory of their strategy. And a human document, like the Harry Smith autobiography, makes this come to life on the page.
    When I lived and worked in London, I saw the Queen Mother once in a car as she went about her everyday life. It’s practical to separate the symbolic work of governing from the hands on practical work, but it’s hard on the family that has to do it.

    Reply
  8. When we look at this battle, the American generals do not seem to have covered themselves with the glory of their strategy. And a human document, like the Harry Smith autobiography, makes this come to life on the page.
    When I lived and worked in London, I saw the Queen Mother once in a car as she went about her everyday life. It’s practical to separate the symbolic work of governing from the hands on practical work, but it’s hard on the family that has to do it.

    Reply
  9. When we look at this battle, the American generals do not seem to have covered themselves with the glory of their strategy. And a human document, like the Harry Smith autobiography, makes this come to life on the page.
    When I lived and worked in London, I saw the Queen Mother once in a car as she went about her everyday life. It’s practical to separate the symbolic work of governing from the hands on practical work, but it’s hard on the family that has to do it.

    Reply
  10. When we look at this battle, the American generals do not seem to have covered themselves with the glory of their strategy. And a human document, like the Harry Smith autobiography, makes this come to life on the page.
    When I lived and worked in London, I saw the Queen Mother once in a car as she went about her everyday life. It’s practical to separate the symbolic work of governing from the hands on practical work, but it’s hard on the family that has to do it.

    Reply
  11. A wry and wonderful take on the Battle of Bladensburg, Joanna. After that, of course, the Brits moved on to my Baltimore, where some very determined people stopped them. As the Mayhem Consultant says, if we hadn’t won the Battles of Baltimore and Fort McHenry, we’sd all by speaking Engligh. *G*

    Reply
  12. A wry and wonderful take on the Battle of Bladensburg, Joanna. After that, of course, the Brits moved on to my Baltimore, where some very determined people stopped them. As the Mayhem Consultant says, if we hadn’t won the Battles of Baltimore and Fort McHenry, we’sd all by speaking Engligh. *G*

    Reply
  13. A wry and wonderful take on the Battle of Bladensburg, Joanna. After that, of course, the Brits moved on to my Baltimore, where some very determined people stopped them. As the Mayhem Consultant says, if we hadn’t won the Battles of Baltimore and Fort McHenry, we’sd all by speaking Engligh. *G*

    Reply
  14. A wry and wonderful take on the Battle of Bladensburg, Joanna. After that, of course, the Brits moved on to my Baltimore, where some very determined people stopped them. As the Mayhem Consultant says, if we hadn’t won the Battles of Baltimore and Fort McHenry, we’sd all by speaking Engligh. *G*

    Reply
  15. A wry and wonderful take on the Battle of Bladensburg, Joanna. After that, of course, the Brits moved on to my Baltimore, where some very determined people stopped them. As the Mayhem Consultant says, if we hadn’t won the Battles of Baltimore and Fort McHenry, we’sd all by speaking Engligh. *G*

    Reply
  16. I love history! I’ve noticed many times that I get a mini history lesson by reading a blog post done by a Regency author. Not only did I learn about a battle I don’t recall from my history classes but I was able to laugh about it in spots.

    Reply
  17. I love history! I’ve noticed many times that I get a mini history lesson by reading a blog post done by a Regency author. Not only did I learn about a battle I don’t recall from my history classes but I was able to laugh about it in spots.

    Reply
  18. I love history! I’ve noticed many times that I get a mini history lesson by reading a blog post done by a Regency author. Not only did I learn about a battle I don’t recall from my history classes but I was able to laugh about it in spots.

    Reply
  19. I love history! I’ve noticed many times that I get a mini history lesson by reading a blog post done by a Regency author. Not only did I learn about a battle I don’t recall from my history classes but I was able to laugh about it in spots.

    Reply
  20. I love history! I’ve noticed many times that I get a mini history lesson by reading a blog post done by a Regency author. Not only did I learn about a battle I don’t recall from my history classes but I was able to laugh about it in spots.

    Reply
  21. I forgot to ask, can you recommend a book that would give the British perspective of the American Revolution and the War of 1812?

    Reply
  22. I forgot to ask, can you recommend a book that would give the British perspective of the American Revolution and the War of 1812?

    Reply
  23. I forgot to ask, can you recommend a book that would give the British perspective of the American Revolution and the War of 1812?

    Reply
  24. I forgot to ask, can you recommend a book that would give the British perspective of the American Revolution and the War of 1812?

    Reply
  25. I forgot to ask, can you recommend a book that would give the British perspective of the American Revolution and the War of 1812?

    Reply
  26. Do you know, that autobiography of Harry Smith might be a good place to start. I link to it above.
    Only the very last section of the work deals with the American campaign, but it’s very interesting.

    Reply
  27. Do you know, that autobiography of Harry Smith might be a good place to start. I link to it above.
    Only the very last section of the work deals with the American campaign, but it’s very interesting.

    Reply
  28. Do you know, that autobiography of Harry Smith might be a good place to start. I link to it above.
    Only the very last section of the work deals with the American campaign, but it’s very interesting.

    Reply
  29. Do you know, that autobiography of Harry Smith might be a good place to start. I link to it above.
    Only the very last section of the work deals with the American campaign, but it’s very interesting.

    Reply
  30. Do you know, that autobiography of Harry Smith might be a good place to start. I link to it above.
    Only the very last section of the work deals with the American campaign, but it’s very interesting.

    Reply
  31. Thank you Joanne I’ll read it. I don’t have home internet service right now so it will be done in bits and pieces until it’s all done.

    Reply
  32. Thank you Joanne I’ll read it. I don’t have home internet service right now so it will be done in bits and pieces until it’s all done.

    Reply
  33. Thank you Joanne I’ll read it. I don’t have home internet service right now so it will be done in bits and pieces until it’s all done.

    Reply
  34. Thank you Joanne I’ll read it. I don’t have home internet service right now so it will be done in bits and pieces until it’s all done.

    Reply
  35. Thank you Joanne I’ll read it. I don’t have home internet service right now so it will be done in bits and pieces until it’s all done.

    Reply
  36. Well, I had no idea that Harry Smith, so beloved by romance readers because of Heyer’s book, was with the troops who burned the White House! Although reluctantly, it seems. I do remember the story of Dolly Madison saving the Stuart portrait of George Washington.

    Reply
  37. Well, I had no idea that Harry Smith, so beloved by romance readers because of Heyer’s book, was with the troops who burned the White House! Although reluctantly, it seems. I do remember the story of Dolly Madison saving the Stuart portrait of George Washington.

    Reply
  38. Well, I had no idea that Harry Smith, so beloved by romance readers because of Heyer’s book, was with the troops who burned the White House! Although reluctantly, it seems. I do remember the story of Dolly Madison saving the Stuart portrait of George Washington.

    Reply
  39. Well, I had no idea that Harry Smith, so beloved by romance readers because of Heyer’s book, was with the troops who burned the White House! Although reluctantly, it seems. I do remember the story of Dolly Madison saving the Stuart portrait of George Washington.

    Reply
  40. Well, I had no idea that Harry Smith, so beloved by romance readers because of Heyer’s book, was with the troops who burned the White House! Although reluctantly, it seems. I do remember the story of Dolly Madison saving the Stuart portrait of George Washington.

    Reply
  41. Hi Laura and Karin —
    I admit I was surprised myself when I read the whole autobiography and discovered Smith’s men were charged with burning the capital. It’s toward the end of his book, which is mostly about the Spanish campaign.
    He was also at the Battle of New Orleans where he and his men surrendered to the Americans. The colonials didn’t seem to have any idea what to do with these British prisoners. Smith was more used to dealing with the experienced and courteous French.

    Reply
  42. Hi Laura and Karin —
    I admit I was surprised myself when I read the whole autobiography and discovered Smith’s men were charged with burning the capital. It’s toward the end of his book, which is mostly about the Spanish campaign.
    He was also at the Battle of New Orleans where he and his men surrendered to the Americans. The colonials didn’t seem to have any idea what to do with these British prisoners. Smith was more used to dealing with the experienced and courteous French.

    Reply
  43. Hi Laura and Karin —
    I admit I was surprised myself when I read the whole autobiography and discovered Smith’s men were charged with burning the capital. It’s toward the end of his book, which is mostly about the Spanish campaign.
    He was also at the Battle of New Orleans where he and his men surrendered to the Americans. The colonials didn’t seem to have any idea what to do with these British prisoners. Smith was more used to dealing with the experienced and courteous French.

    Reply
  44. Hi Laura and Karin —
    I admit I was surprised myself when I read the whole autobiography and discovered Smith’s men were charged with burning the capital. It’s toward the end of his book, which is mostly about the Spanish campaign.
    He was also at the Battle of New Orleans where he and his men surrendered to the Americans. The colonials didn’t seem to have any idea what to do with these British prisoners. Smith was more used to dealing with the experienced and courteous French.

    Reply
  45. Hi Laura and Karin —
    I admit I was surprised myself when I read the whole autobiography and discovered Smith’s men were charged with burning the capital. It’s toward the end of his book, which is mostly about the Spanish campaign.
    He was also at the Battle of New Orleans where he and his men surrendered to the Americans. The colonials didn’t seem to have any idea what to do with these British prisoners. Smith was more used to dealing with the experienced and courteous French.

    Reply
  46. Of course, if I have my dates correct, the Americans then went on to burn York (now Toronto) in Canada, then the capital. Also burned Niagara, I think. Very few buildings left from before that war in either city. But the guerrilla warfare fought alongside Wellington in the Peninsula by the Spanish and Portuguese against the French is a direct ancestor of the terrorist attacks in Paris of this year. Only the professional armies observed “rules of war”.

    Reply
  47. Of course, if I have my dates correct, the Americans then went on to burn York (now Toronto) in Canada, then the capital. Also burned Niagara, I think. Very few buildings left from before that war in either city. But the guerrilla warfare fought alongside Wellington in the Peninsula by the Spanish and Portuguese against the French is a direct ancestor of the terrorist attacks in Paris of this year. Only the professional armies observed “rules of war”.

    Reply
  48. Of course, if I have my dates correct, the Americans then went on to burn York (now Toronto) in Canada, then the capital. Also burned Niagara, I think. Very few buildings left from before that war in either city. But the guerrilla warfare fought alongside Wellington in the Peninsula by the Spanish and Portuguese against the French is a direct ancestor of the terrorist attacks in Paris of this year. Only the professional armies observed “rules of war”.

    Reply
  49. Of course, if I have my dates correct, the Americans then went on to burn York (now Toronto) in Canada, then the capital. Also burned Niagara, I think. Very few buildings left from before that war in either city. But the guerrilla warfare fought alongside Wellington in the Peninsula by the Spanish and Portuguese against the French is a direct ancestor of the terrorist attacks in Paris of this year. Only the professional armies observed “rules of war”.

    Reply
  50. Of course, if I have my dates correct, the Americans then went on to burn York (now Toronto) in Canada, then the capital. Also burned Niagara, I think. Very few buildings left from before that war in either city. But the guerrilla warfare fought alongside Wellington in the Peninsula by the Spanish and Portuguese against the French is a direct ancestor of the terrorist attacks in Paris of this year. Only the professional armies observed “rules of war”.

    Reply
  51. One of those difficult questions about the history of warfare.
    My folks had a fishing camp up in Maine, a few miles from Calais,the little town on the border. The old local story there in Calais is that during the War of 1812, the British Military Inspector showed up in the town on the Canadian side, St Andrews.
    “Where the devil is all your powder?” says the Inspector.
    “Oh. We lent it to the folks over in Calais to celebrate their Fourth of July. Don’t worry. They’ll send the same amount back when they get resupplied.”
    True story? Or an invention of later generations? I dunnoh.

    Reply
  52. One of those difficult questions about the history of warfare.
    My folks had a fishing camp up in Maine, a few miles from Calais,the little town on the border. The old local story there in Calais is that during the War of 1812, the British Military Inspector showed up in the town on the Canadian side, St Andrews.
    “Where the devil is all your powder?” says the Inspector.
    “Oh. We lent it to the folks over in Calais to celebrate their Fourth of July. Don’t worry. They’ll send the same amount back when they get resupplied.”
    True story? Or an invention of later generations? I dunnoh.

    Reply
  53. One of those difficult questions about the history of warfare.
    My folks had a fishing camp up in Maine, a few miles from Calais,the little town on the border. The old local story there in Calais is that during the War of 1812, the British Military Inspector showed up in the town on the Canadian side, St Andrews.
    “Where the devil is all your powder?” says the Inspector.
    “Oh. We lent it to the folks over in Calais to celebrate their Fourth of July. Don’t worry. They’ll send the same amount back when they get resupplied.”
    True story? Or an invention of later generations? I dunnoh.

    Reply
  54. One of those difficult questions about the history of warfare.
    My folks had a fishing camp up in Maine, a few miles from Calais,the little town on the border. The old local story there in Calais is that during the War of 1812, the British Military Inspector showed up in the town on the Canadian side, St Andrews.
    “Where the devil is all your powder?” says the Inspector.
    “Oh. We lent it to the folks over in Calais to celebrate their Fourth of July. Don’t worry. They’ll send the same amount back when they get resupplied.”
    True story? Or an invention of later generations? I dunnoh.

    Reply
  55. One of those difficult questions about the history of warfare.
    My folks had a fishing camp up in Maine, a few miles from Calais,the little town on the border. The old local story there in Calais is that during the War of 1812, the British Military Inspector showed up in the town on the Canadian side, St Andrews.
    “Where the devil is all your powder?” says the Inspector.
    “Oh. We lent it to the folks over in Calais to celebrate their Fourth of July. Don’t worry. They’ll send the same amount back when they get resupplied.”
    True story? Or an invention of later generations? I dunnoh.

    Reply
  56. Very interesting Joanne. I had never heard of the Battle of Bladensburg. In fact never heard of Bladensburg, but being Australian I will claim ignorance in this case. I did know about the American War of 1812, but most books concentrate on the Napoleonic Wars in Europe. Am I right in thinking that the American War of 1812 was in some way connected with Napoleon, or at least a French born general or someone??? American history is a bit neglected over here, unless it is the Civil War, or the War of Independence – what I would call the major stuff.
    Here on the 11th of November, Armistice Day everything stops for a two minutes silence. Some of the war memorials have been designed for the sun to shine on a stone or whatever at 11.00 am. Unfortunately, now we have daylight saving/summer time and so all the monuments are one hour out.
    Sir Harry Smith was a very interesting character as he rose from the ranks to become a General, and even though some of his promotions were by purchase, he didn’t have money/family behind him. Interesting chap.

    Reply
  57. Very interesting Joanne. I had never heard of the Battle of Bladensburg. In fact never heard of Bladensburg, but being Australian I will claim ignorance in this case. I did know about the American War of 1812, but most books concentrate on the Napoleonic Wars in Europe. Am I right in thinking that the American War of 1812 was in some way connected with Napoleon, or at least a French born general or someone??? American history is a bit neglected over here, unless it is the Civil War, or the War of Independence – what I would call the major stuff.
    Here on the 11th of November, Armistice Day everything stops for a two minutes silence. Some of the war memorials have been designed for the sun to shine on a stone or whatever at 11.00 am. Unfortunately, now we have daylight saving/summer time and so all the monuments are one hour out.
    Sir Harry Smith was a very interesting character as he rose from the ranks to become a General, and even though some of his promotions were by purchase, he didn’t have money/family behind him. Interesting chap.

    Reply
  58. Very interesting Joanne. I had never heard of the Battle of Bladensburg. In fact never heard of Bladensburg, but being Australian I will claim ignorance in this case. I did know about the American War of 1812, but most books concentrate on the Napoleonic Wars in Europe. Am I right in thinking that the American War of 1812 was in some way connected with Napoleon, or at least a French born general or someone??? American history is a bit neglected over here, unless it is the Civil War, or the War of Independence – what I would call the major stuff.
    Here on the 11th of November, Armistice Day everything stops for a two minutes silence. Some of the war memorials have been designed for the sun to shine on a stone or whatever at 11.00 am. Unfortunately, now we have daylight saving/summer time and so all the monuments are one hour out.
    Sir Harry Smith was a very interesting character as he rose from the ranks to become a General, and even though some of his promotions were by purchase, he didn’t have money/family behind him. Interesting chap.

    Reply
  59. Very interesting Joanne. I had never heard of the Battle of Bladensburg. In fact never heard of Bladensburg, but being Australian I will claim ignorance in this case. I did know about the American War of 1812, but most books concentrate on the Napoleonic Wars in Europe. Am I right in thinking that the American War of 1812 was in some way connected with Napoleon, or at least a French born general or someone??? American history is a bit neglected over here, unless it is the Civil War, or the War of Independence – what I would call the major stuff.
    Here on the 11th of November, Armistice Day everything stops for a two minutes silence. Some of the war memorials have been designed for the sun to shine on a stone or whatever at 11.00 am. Unfortunately, now we have daylight saving/summer time and so all the monuments are one hour out.
    Sir Harry Smith was a very interesting character as he rose from the ranks to become a General, and even though some of his promotions were by purchase, he didn’t have money/family behind him. Interesting chap.

    Reply
  60. Very interesting Joanne. I had never heard of the Battle of Bladensburg. In fact never heard of Bladensburg, but being Australian I will claim ignorance in this case. I did know about the American War of 1812, but most books concentrate on the Napoleonic Wars in Europe. Am I right in thinking that the American War of 1812 was in some way connected with Napoleon, or at least a French born general or someone??? American history is a bit neglected over here, unless it is the Civil War, or the War of Independence – what I would call the major stuff.
    Here on the 11th of November, Armistice Day everything stops for a two minutes silence. Some of the war memorials have been designed for the sun to shine on a stone or whatever at 11.00 am. Unfortunately, now we have daylight saving/summer time and so all the monuments are one hour out.
    Sir Harry Smith was a very interesting character as he rose from the ranks to become a General, and even though some of his promotions were by purchase, he didn’t have money/family behind him. Interesting chap.

    Reply
  61. The American War of 1812 wasn’t important in the great scheme of things.
    It’s not clear why the Americans declared war. One explanation is the Napoleonic Wars were winding down and the US wanted to bite off a chunk of Canada while Britain’s attention was still elsewhere.
    Other issues . . . the US did not like British support for an independent Amerindians nation between Canada and the US. They didn’t like the blockade Britain had enforced on French ports for years. And they were annoyed at the British navy custom of kidnapping sailors off passing merchant vessels — British, American and orhers.
    For two and half years the British patrolled the coast of the US. A little fighting went on here and there.
    When Napoleon fell America and Britain signed the Treaty of Ghent. None of the issues that had led America to declare war were addressed. America said, “We’re not at war with you any more.” The British said, “Well. Okay then.” And it was over.

    Reply
  62. The American War of 1812 wasn’t important in the great scheme of things.
    It’s not clear why the Americans declared war. One explanation is the Napoleonic Wars were winding down and the US wanted to bite off a chunk of Canada while Britain’s attention was still elsewhere.
    Other issues . . . the US did not like British support for an independent Amerindians nation between Canada and the US. They didn’t like the blockade Britain had enforced on French ports for years. And they were annoyed at the British navy custom of kidnapping sailors off passing merchant vessels — British, American and orhers.
    For two and half years the British patrolled the coast of the US. A little fighting went on here and there.
    When Napoleon fell America and Britain signed the Treaty of Ghent. None of the issues that had led America to declare war were addressed. America said, “We’re not at war with you any more.” The British said, “Well. Okay then.” And it was over.

    Reply
  63. The American War of 1812 wasn’t important in the great scheme of things.
    It’s not clear why the Americans declared war. One explanation is the Napoleonic Wars were winding down and the US wanted to bite off a chunk of Canada while Britain’s attention was still elsewhere.
    Other issues . . . the US did not like British support for an independent Amerindians nation between Canada and the US. They didn’t like the blockade Britain had enforced on French ports for years. And they were annoyed at the British navy custom of kidnapping sailors off passing merchant vessels — British, American and orhers.
    For two and half years the British patrolled the coast of the US. A little fighting went on here and there.
    When Napoleon fell America and Britain signed the Treaty of Ghent. None of the issues that had led America to declare war were addressed. America said, “We’re not at war with you any more.” The British said, “Well. Okay then.” And it was over.

    Reply
  64. The American War of 1812 wasn’t important in the great scheme of things.
    It’s not clear why the Americans declared war. One explanation is the Napoleonic Wars were winding down and the US wanted to bite off a chunk of Canada while Britain’s attention was still elsewhere.
    Other issues . . . the US did not like British support for an independent Amerindians nation between Canada and the US. They didn’t like the blockade Britain had enforced on French ports for years. And they were annoyed at the British navy custom of kidnapping sailors off passing merchant vessels — British, American and orhers.
    For two and half years the British patrolled the coast of the US. A little fighting went on here and there.
    When Napoleon fell America and Britain signed the Treaty of Ghent. None of the issues that had led America to declare war were addressed. America said, “We’re not at war with you any more.” The British said, “Well. Okay then.” And it was over.

    Reply
  65. The American War of 1812 wasn’t important in the great scheme of things.
    It’s not clear why the Americans declared war. One explanation is the Napoleonic Wars were winding down and the US wanted to bite off a chunk of Canada while Britain’s attention was still elsewhere.
    Other issues . . . the US did not like British support for an independent Amerindians nation between Canada and the US. They didn’t like the blockade Britain had enforced on French ports for years. And they were annoyed at the British navy custom of kidnapping sailors off passing merchant vessels — British, American and orhers.
    For two and half years the British patrolled the coast of the US. A little fighting went on here and there.
    When Napoleon fell America and Britain signed the Treaty of Ghent. None of the issues that had led America to declare war were addressed. America said, “We’re not at war with you any more.” The British said, “Well. Okay then.” And it was over.

    Reply
  66. Love it! Probably likely, because so many of the Canadian settlers at that time were American-born.
    There’s a theory that the War of 1812 turned those settlers into patriotic Canadians!

    Reply
  67. Love it! Probably likely, because so many of the Canadian settlers at that time were American-born.
    There’s a theory that the War of 1812 turned those settlers into patriotic Canadians!

    Reply
  68. Love it! Probably likely, because so many of the Canadian settlers at that time were American-born.
    There’s a theory that the War of 1812 turned those settlers into patriotic Canadians!

    Reply
  69. Love it! Probably likely, because so many of the Canadian settlers at that time were American-born.
    There’s a theory that the War of 1812 turned those settlers into patriotic Canadians!

    Reply
  70. Love it! Probably likely, because so many of the Canadian settlers at that time were American-born.
    There’s a theory that the War of 1812 turned those settlers into patriotic Canadians!

    Reply

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