Beach books

Sunglasses_barbiesm Like a few other Wenches, I have a book due VERY SOON.  Last year, in a similar situation, I skipped my summer vacation.  I am not sure what happened or how many people I attempted to maim or disable at that time (I did not break the refrigerator!  It broke itself!) but my husband must remember events vividly because this year he insisted I take the vacation.  He offered to pack my bags.  He did not offer to come along.

Thus, in a couple of weeks, I’ll be on Cape Cod.  I’m not the best beach person, what with the tendency to break out in a rash when a sunbeam touches my skin.  But I slather on 180 SPF sunscreen, put on a sun hat the size of Manitoba, and tuck under one or two or three contiguous umbrellas.

Iced_tea With a large thermos of iced tea and my books.

Some authors have organized their writing life very well.  It allows them to sit back and read–just for the sheer pleasure of it–several books a week.  As has been mentioned before, I am not one of these people.  My reading-for-fun gets squeezed into a half hour here and there.  Most of my reading is for work.  At present, for instance, books about Venice cover all horizontal and several vertical spaces in my office.  The deadline crunch has become serious enough to change all read-for-fun time to read-for-work.  While research is fun, too, it’s the fun of my job, which, all in all, is a fine one.  Mermaidsatbrightonawkjpgi But it isn’t the magnificent escape of reading on the beach, with no responsibilities beyond slathering on sunscreen every few hours and, depending on water temperatures, running in and out of the ocean, and, late in the day, running away screaming from the EVIL FANGED FLIES.  Yes, they bite.  Hard.

Dunes_2 During this annual beach vacation, I usually read one or two books a day.  I could probably squeeze in a few more were it not necessary to slather on sunscreen, run in and out of the ocean, escape flies, etc.  Fortunately, the Cape is in New England.  This means it will probably rain at least once.  We’ll stay indoors.  All the time usually spent slathering and running can be devoted to reading.

My rule is, this vacation must be a total escape.  Nothing remotely to do with the WIP is allowed to tag along.  As noted above, even the spouse stays home.  The books going with me will, therefore, be well out of my genre:  murder mysteries, mainly, some alternate reality, and some books that seem not to fit in any particular category.  Full_moon For instance, how would you classify P.G. Wodehouse?  And what’s a week at the beach without him?  And does it matter at all whether I’ve already read the book?

Laughter and murder get about equal time, and sometimes in the same book.  There will be at least one of Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum books (I save them for the beach, so I’m now a couple of books behind).  An Anne Perry, from the Inspector Monk series.  And I’ll be trying some new authors, including Donna Leon, who writes mysteries set in…Venice.  OK, perhaps something remotely to do with the WIP will find its way into my luggage.

To_say_nothing_of_the_dog In the alternate reality realm, I just read my first  Connie Willis, TO SAY NOTHING OF THE DOG–and if I’d known how much fun it was going to be, I would have saved it for the beach.  However, she did remind me of a book I’ve always meant to read, Jerome K. Jerome’s THREE MEN IN A BOAT, so that’s coming instead.  A Flashman may accompany me.  And I’m still not through Patrick O’Brian’s Aubrey/Maturin series, although, being Regency-set, Captain Jack & the Doctor may not be escape enough.

Bikini_barbieWhat about you?  How do you choose your vacation reading?  What’s your idea of the perfect beach read?  If you were packing up for a weeklong getaway (and didn’t have to worry about weight allowances), what books would you take along?

145 thoughts on “Beach books”

  1. Oh, I envy you. I used to take beach vacations all the time, but my husband is more of a lake/pool person. No pesky sand for him.
    As I’ve mentioned here before, most of the books I take on vacation fall apart by the pool between the heat, sunscreen, sweat and rum drinks, so I take books that I know I don’t want to keep—except I broke my rule and took Pat’s and Miranda’s with me this summer. Only Miranda’s made it home in one piece.:( I deliberately go for at least one non-romance plus some type of paranormal, a genre I don’t usually read as a first choice. Like you, I read at least a book a day.I get nervous thinking I might run out, so there are always a couple of extras in my bag.

    Reply
  2. Oh, I envy you. I used to take beach vacations all the time, but my husband is more of a lake/pool person. No pesky sand for him.
    As I’ve mentioned here before, most of the books I take on vacation fall apart by the pool between the heat, sunscreen, sweat and rum drinks, so I take books that I know I don’t want to keep—except I broke my rule and took Pat’s and Miranda’s with me this summer. Only Miranda’s made it home in one piece.:( I deliberately go for at least one non-romance plus some type of paranormal, a genre I don’t usually read as a first choice. Like you, I read at least a book a day.I get nervous thinking I might run out, so there are always a couple of extras in my bag.

    Reply
  3. Oh, I envy you. I used to take beach vacations all the time, but my husband is more of a lake/pool person. No pesky sand for him.
    As I’ve mentioned here before, most of the books I take on vacation fall apart by the pool between the heat, sunscreen, sweat and rum drinks, so I take books that I know I don’t want to keep—except I broke my rule and took Pat’s and Miranda’s with me this summer. Only Miranda’s made it home in one piece.:( I deliberately go for at least one non-romance plus some type of paranormal, a genre I don’t usually read as a first choice. Like you, I read at least a book a day.I get nervous thinking I might run out, so there are always a couple of extras in my bag.

    Reply
  4. Oh, I envy you. I used to take beach vacations all the time, but my husband is more of a lake/pool person. No pesky sand for him.
    As I’ve mentioned here before, most of the books I take on vacation fall apart by the pool between the heat, sunscreen, sweat and rum drinks, so I take books that I know I don’t want to keep—except I broke my rule and took Pat’s and Miranda’s with me this summer. Only Miranda’s made it home in one piece.:( I deliberately go for at least one non-romance plus some type of paranormal, a genre I don’t usually read as a first choice. Like you, I read at least a book a day.I get nervous thinking I might run out, so there are always a couple of extras in my bag.

    Reply
  5. Oh, I envy you. I used to take beach vacations all the time, but my husband is more of a lake/pool person. No pesky sand for him.
    As I’ve mentioned here before, most of the books I take on vacation fall apart by the pool between the heat, sunscreen, sweat and rum drinks, so I take books that I know I don’t want to keep—except I broke my rule and took Pat’s and Miranda’s with me this summer. Only Miranda’s made it home in one piece.:( I deliberately go for at least one non-romance plus some type of paranormal, a genre I don’t usually read as a first choice. Like you, I read at least a book a day.I get nervous thinking I might run out, so there are always a couple of extras in my bag.

    Reply
  6. I think they invented beaches so people could read, didn’t they? I used to spend a week or so in Greece or some other mediterranean beach and it always amazed me how little reading was going on around me. Not in my family. When I joined the family holiday it was my job to pack books so nobody would run out of reading materials. That usually ment fixing up an entire box. Then I’d bring some of my required reading for my classes, which my parents/brother would sometimes nick, too. There was always a lot of competition going on! As for what books to take, I have always taken at least a few “heavy” books. Long, deep, difficult. Where but on the beach do you have time to read Ulyssees, or the autobiography of Goethe (which is highly recomended, by the way!)? Usually I would read a “literary” novel, then something purely entertaining, then another literary novel, and so forth. Sometimes I would also take long sagas, so I could read them in one go. I read the Lord of the Ring on a Greek beach, together with my Dad – we were forever nicking the first volume from each other, until I finally overtook him and was able to read the other two in peace!

    Reply
  7. I think they invented beaches so people could read, didn’t they? I used to spend a week or so in Greece or some other mediterranean beach and it always amazed me how little reading was going on around me. Not in my family. When I joined the family holiday it was my job to pack books so nobody would run out of reading materials. That usually ment fixing up an entire box. Then I’d bring some of my required reading for my classes, which my parents/brother would sometimes nick, too. There was always a lot of competition going on! As for what books to take, I have always taken at least a few “heavy” books. Long, deep, difficult. Where but on the beach do you have time to read Ulyssees, or the autobiography of Goethe (which is highly recomended, by the way!)? Usually I would read a “literary” novel, then something purely entertaining, then another literary novel, and so forth. Sometimes I would also take long sagas, so I could read them in one go. I read the Lord of the Ring on a Greek beach, together with my Dad – we were forever nicking the first volume from each other, until I finally overtook him and was able to read the other two in peace!

    Reply
  8. I think they invented beaches so people could read, didn’t they? I used to spend a week or so in Greece or some other mediterranean beach and it always amazed me how little reading was going on around me. Not in my family. When I joined the family holiday it was my job to pack books so nobody would run out of reading materials. That usually ment fixing up an entire box. Then I’d bring some of my required reading for my classes, which my parents/brother would sometimes nick, too. There was always a lot of competition going on! As for what books to take, I have always taken at least a few “heavy” books. Long, deep, difficult. Where but on the beach do you have time to read Ulyssees, or the autobiography of Goethe (which is highly recomended, by the way!)? Usually I would read a “literary” novel, then something purely entertaining, then another literary novel, and so forth. Sometimes I would also take long sagas, so I could read them in one go. I read the Lord of the Ring on a Greek beach, together with my Dad – we were forever nicking the first volume from each other, until I finally overtook him and was able to read the other two in peace!

    Reply
  9. I think they invented beaches so people could read, didn’t they? I used to spend a week or so in Greece or some other mediterranean beach and it always amazed me how little reading was going on around me. Not in my family. When I joined the family holiday it was my job to pack books so nobody would run out of reading materials. That usually ment fixing up an entire box. Then I’d bring some of my required reading for my classes, which my parents/brother would sometimes nick, too. There was always a lot of competition going on! As for what books to take, I have always taken at least a few “heavy” books. Long, deep, difficult. Where but on the beach do you have time to read Ulyssees, or the autobiography of Goethe (which is highly recomended, by the way!)? Usually I would read a “literary” novel, then something purely entertaining, then another literary novel, and so forth. Sometimes I would also take long sagas, so I could read them in one go. I read the Lord of the Ring on a Greek beach, together with my Dad – we were forever nicking the first volume from each other, until I finally overtook him and was able to read the other two in peace!

    Reply
  10. I think they invented beaches so people could read, didn’t they? I used to spend a week or so in Greece or some other mediterranean beach and it always amazed me how little reading was going on around me. Not in my family. When I joined the family holiday it was my job to pack books so nobody would run out of reading materials. That usually ment fixing up an entire box. Then I’d bring some of my required reading for my classes, which my parents/brother would sometimes nick, too. There was always a lot of competition going on! As for what books to take, I have always taken at least a few “heavy” books. Long, deep, difficult. Where but on the beach do you have time to read Ulyssees, or the autobiography of Goethe (which is highly recomended, by the way!)? Usually I would read a “literary” novel, then something purely entertaining, then another literary novel, and so forth. Sometimes I would also take long sagas, so I could read them in one go. I read the Lord of the Ring on a Greek beach, together with my Dad – we were forever nicking the first volume from each other, until I finally overtook him and was able to read the other two in peace!

    Reply
  11. My vacations are always to visit relatives so I don’t get long periods of reading time. It sounds like I need to carve out a “real” vacation next year. I have several sagas/intense books that I’ve been putting off because I know I won’t be able to stop reading them (The Black Jewels trilogy, Dorothy Dunnett, etc.).
    When I house-sit for my sister, not a vacation just going to work from a different house, I always bring a box of books so I’ll have plenty of variety to choose from. I feel silly doing it because I’ll only get to a few of them, but I’d feel a lot worse if I were stuck with nothing to read.

    Reply
  12. My vacations are always to visit relatives so I don’t get long periods of reading time. It sounds like I need to carve out a “real” vacation next year. I have several sagas/intense books that I’ve been putting off because I know I won’t be able to stop reading them (The Black Jewels trilogy, Dorothy Dunnett, etc.).
    When I house-sit for my sister, not a vacation just going to work from a different house, I always bring a box of books so I’ll have plenty of variety to choose from. I feel silly doing it because I’ll only get to a few of them, but I’d feel a lot worse if I were stuck with nothing to read.

    Reply
  13. My vacations are always to visit relatives so I don’t get long periods of reading time. It sounds like I need to carve out a “real” vacation next year. I have several sagas/intense books that I’ve been putting off because I know I won’t be able to stop reading them (The Black Jewels trilogy, Dorothy Dunnett, etc.).
    When I house-sit for my sister, not a vacation just going to work from a different house, I always bring a box of books so I’ll have plenty of variety to choose from. I feel silly doing it because I’ll only get to a few of them, but I’d feel a lot worse if I were stuck with nothing to read.

    Reply
  14. My vacations are always to visit relatives so I don’t get long periods of reading time. It sounds like I need to carve out a “real” vacation next year. I have several sagas/intense books that I’ve been putting off because I know I won’t be able to stop reading them (The Black Jewels trilogy, Dorothy Dunnett, etc.).
    When I house-sit for my sister, not a vacation just going to work from a different house, I always bring a box of books so I’ll have plenty of variety to choose from. I feel silly doing it because I’ll only get to a few of them, but I’d feel a lot worse if I were stuck with nothing to read.

    Reply
  15. My vacations are always to visit relatives so I don’t get long periods of reading time. It sounds like I need to carve out a “real” vacation next year. I have several sagas/intense books that I’ve been putting off because I know I won’t be able to stop reading them (The Black Jewels trilogy, Dorothy Dunnett, etc.).
    When I house-sit for my sister, not a vacation just going to work from a different house, I always bring a box of books so I’ll have plenty of variety to choose from. I feel silly doing it because I’ll only get to a few of them, but I’d feel a lot worse if I were stuck with nothing to read.

    Reply
  16. On my last vacation to France I took NOT QUITE A LADY by someone. . .oh! Loretta Chase! (smile), Naomi Novik’s BLACK POWDER WAR, and Barbara Metzger’s THE HOURGLASS.
    On the plane my seatmate (an acquaintance) was reading THE LION’s DAUGHTER. I lent her my copy of LORD OF SCOUNDRELS, and she loved it so much she then bought a copy for herself.
    I must say that any vacationer who takes a Loretta Chase novel on vacation is getting two wonderful experiences for the price of one.

    Reply
  17. On my last vacation to France I took NOT QUITE A LADY by someone. . .oh! Loretta Chase! (smile), Naomi Novik’s BLACK POWDER WAR, and Barbara Metzger’s THE HOURGLASS.
    On the plane my seatmate (an acquaintance) was reading THE LION’s DAUGHTER. I lent her my copy of LORD OF SCOUNDRELS, and she loved it so much she then bought a copy for herself.
    I must say that any vacationer who takes a Loretta Chase novel on vacation is getting two wonderful experiences for the price of one.

    Reply
  18. On my last vacation to France I took NOT QUITE A LADY by someone. . .oh! Loretta Chase! (smile), Naomi Novik’s BLACK POWDER WAR, and Barbara Metzger’s THE HOURGLASS.
    On the plane my seatmate (an acquaintance) was reading THE LION’s DAUGHTER. I lent her my copy of LORD OF SCOUNDRELS, and she loved it so much she then bought a copy for herself.
    I must say that any vacationer who takes a Loretta Chase novel on vacation is getting two wonderful experiences for the price of one.

    Reply
  19. On my last vacation to France I took NOT QUITE A LADY by someone. . .oh! Loretta Chase! (smile), Naomi Novik’s BLACK POWDER WAR, and Barbara Metzger’s THE HOURGLASS.
    On the plane my seatmate (an acquaintance) was reading THE LION’s DAUGHTER. I lent her my copy of LORD OF SCOUNDRELS, and she loved it so much she then bought a copy for herself.
    I must say that any vacationer who takes a Loretta Chase novel on vacation is getting two wonderful experiences for the price of one.

    Reply
  20. On my last vacation to France I took NOT QUITE A LADY by someone. . .oh! Loretta Chase! (smile), Naomi Novik’s BLACK POWDER WAR, and Barbara Metzger’s THE HOURGLASS.
    On the plane my seatmate (an acquaintance) was reading THE LION’s DAUGHTER. I lent her my copy of LORD OF SCOUNDRELS, and she loved it so much she then bought a copy for herself.
    I must say that any vacationer who takes a Loretta Chase novel on vacation is getting two wonderful experiences for the price of one.

    Reply
  21. If you have a book due,SOON, can WE get to read it SOON?>>> I know I’m nosy, sorry some fans can;t get enough, 2 books for 2007… What a dream!!!!!

    Reply
  22. If you have a book due,SOON, can WE get to read it SOON?>>> I know I’m nosy, sorry some fans can;t get enough, 2 books for 2007… What a dream!!!!!

    Reply
  23. If you have a book due,SOON, can WE get to read it SOON?>>> I know I’m nosy, sorry some fans can;t get enough, 2 books for 2007… What a dream!!!!!

    Reply
  24. If you have a book due,SOON, can WE get to read it SOON?>>> I know I’m nosy, sorry some fans can;t get enough, 2 books for 2007… What a dream!!!!!

    Reply
  25. If you have a book due,SOON, can WE get to read it SOON?>>> I know I’m nosy, sorry some fans can;t get enough, 2 books for 2007… What a dream!!!!!

    Reply
  26. Oh, lucky you, to have just discovered Connie Willis; she’s FABULOUS.
    When I vacation (never at the beach, though I keep telling myself to TRY a lying-around-relaxing kind of vacation some time), I have often taken a wide selection of books and brought all the serious ones home unread. My IDEAL would be to have new books by all my favorite authors available, but alas, I’m a grasshopper, so I read each one as it comes out rather than save them in a careful ant-ly way.
    If you are loving P.G. Wodehouse and Connie Willis, I’ll bet you would also get a kick out of Louise Rennison’s books about Georgia Nicholson. She usually manages at least a couple of moments per book that have me laughing so hard I can’t breathe. With reading like that, you hardly even need the vacation!

    Reply
  27. Oh, lucky you, to have just discovered Connie Willis; she’s FABULOUS.
    When I vacation (never at the beach, though I keep telling myself to TRY a lying-around-relaxing kind of vacation some time), I have often taken a wide selection of books and brought all the serious ones home unread. My IDEAL would be to have new books by all my favorite authors available, but alas, I’m a grasshopper, so I read each one as it comes out rather than save them in a careful ant-ly way.
    If you are loving P.G. Wodehouse and Connie Willis, I’ll bet you would also get a kick out of Louise Rennison’s books about Georgia Nicholson. She usually manages at least a couple of moments per book that have me laughing so hard I can’t breathe. With reading like that, you hardly even need the vacation!

    Reply
  28. Oh, lucky you, to have just discovered Connie Willis; she’s FABULOUS.
    When I vacation (never at the beach, though I keep telling myself to TRY a lying-around-relaxing kind of vacation some time), I have often taken a wide selection of books and brought all the serious ones home unread. My IDEAL would be to have new books by all my favorite authors available, but alas, I’m a grasshopper, so I read each one as it comes out rather than save them in a careful ant-ly way.
    If you are loving P.G. Wodehouse and Connie Willis, I’ll bet you would also get a kick out of Louise Rennison’s books about Georgia Nicholson. She usually manages at least a couple of moments per book that have me laughing so hard I can’t breathe. With reading like that, you hardly even need the vacation!

    Reply
  29. Oh, lucky you, to have just discovered Connie Willis; she’s FABULOUS.
    When I vacation (never at the beach, though I keep telling myself to TRY a lying-around-relaxing kind of vacation some time), I have often taken a wide selection of books and brought all the serious ones home unread. My IDEAL would be to have new books by all my favorite authors available, but alas, I’m a grasshopper, so I read each one as it comes out rather than save them in a careful ant-ly way.
    If you are loving P.G. Wodehouse and Connie Willis, I’ll bet you would also get a kick out of Louise Rennison’s books about Georgia Nicholson. She usually manages at least a couple of moments per book that have me laughing so hard I can’t breathe. With reading like that, you hardly even need the vacation!

    Reply
  30. Oh, lucky you, to have just discovered Connie Willis; she’s FABULOUS.
    When I vacation (never at the beach, though I keep telling myself to TRY a lying-around-relaxing kind of vacation some time), I have often taken a wide selection of books and brought all the serious ones home unread. My IDEAL would be to have new books by all my favorite authors available, but alas, I’m a grasshopper, so I read each one as it comes out rather than save them in a careful ant-ly way.
    If you are loving P.G. Wodehouse and Connie Willis, I’ll bet you would also get a kick out of Louise Rennison’s books about Georgia Nicholson. She usually manages at least a couple of moments per book that have me laughing so hard I can’t breathe. With reading like that, you hardly even need the vacation!

    Reply
  31. Maggie, my spouse is a lake and mountain guy. He’s not a big fan of ocean & sand, and the charms of Cape Cod totally elude him. Happily, my siblings are of my way of thinking.
    LizA, it amazes me, too, when I look about me at the beach, how little reading is going on. But then, there are a great many families, and it’s hard to read a book while trying to keep an eye on your kids. I only wish the radios could be banned, along with the long, loud cellphone conversations.
    Mary K, visiting relatives is truly a bad time for book reading. I’d definitely recommend you try to carve out a reading vacation, even if it’s a long holiday weekend.
    Awww, RevMelinda. Thank you for taking me to France, and for sharing me with your friends.
    Tal, the new book is scheduled for June 2008. Thank you for wanting more! Two new books in one year is my dream, too. One day I’ll make it come true, I’m determined.
    Elaine McCarthy, thank you for the recommendation! That seems to be the way I discover the best stuff. Louise Rennison sounds like my cup of tea. Or do I mean my glass of iced tea?

    Reply
  32. Maggie, my spouse is a lake and mountain guy. He’s not a big fan of ocean & sand, and the charms of Cape Cod totally elude him. Happily, my siblings are of my way of thinking.
    LizA, it amazes me, too, when I look about me at the beach, how little reading is going on. But then, there are a great many families, and it’s hard to read a book while trying to keep an eye on your kids. I only wish the radios could be banned, along with the long, loud cellphone conversations.
    Mary K, visiting relatives is truly a bad time for book reading. I’d definitely recommend you try to carve out a reading vacation, even if it’s a long holiday weekend.
    Awww, RevMelinda. Thank you for taking me to France, and for sharing me with your friends.
    Tal, the new book is scheduled for June 2008. Thank you for wanting more! Two new books in one year is my dream, too. One day I’ll make it come true, I’m determined.
    Elaine McCarthy, thank you for the recommendation! That seems to be the way I discover the best stuff. Louise Rennison sounds like my cup of tea. Or do I mean my glass of iced tea?

    Reply
  33. Maggie, my spouse is a lake and mountain guy. He’s not a big fan of ocean & sand, and the charms of Cape Cod totally elude him. Happily, my siblings are of my way of thinking.
    LizA, it amazes me, too, when I look about me at the beach, how little reading is going on. But then, there are a great many families, and it’s hard to read a book while trying to keep an eye on your kids. I only wish the radios could be banned, along with the long, loud cellphone conversations.
    Mary K, visiting relatives is truly a bad time for book reading. I’d definitely recommend you try to carve out a reading vacation, even if it’s a long holiday weekend.
    Awww, RevMelinda. Thank you for taking me to France, and for sharing me with your friends.
    Tal, the new book is scheduled for June 2008. Thank you for wanting more! Two new books in one year is my dream, too. One day I’ll make it come true, I’m determined.
    Elaine McCarthy, thank you for the recommendation! That seems to be the way I discover the best stuff. Louise Rennison sounds like my cup of tea. Or do I mean my glass of iced tea?

    Reply
  34. Maggie, my spouse is a lake and mountain guy. He’s not a big fan of ocean & sand, and the charms of Cape Cod totally elude him. Happily, my siblings are of my way of thinking.
    LizA, it amazes me, too, when I look about me at the beach, how little reading is going on. But then, there are a great many families, and it’s hard to read a book while trying to keep an eye on your kids. I only wish the radios could be banned, along with the long, loud cellphone conversations.
    Mary K, visiting relatives is truly a bad time for book reading. I’d definitely recommend you try to carve out a reading vacation, even if it’s a long holiday weekend.
    Awww, RevMelinda. Thank you for taking me to France, and for sharing me with your friends.
    Tal, the new book is scheduled for June 2008. Thank you for wanting more! Two new books in one year is my dream, too. One day I’ll make it come true, I’m determined.
    Elaine McCarthy, thank you for the recommendation! That seems to be the way I discover the best stuff. Louise Rennison sounds like my cup of tea. Or do I mean my glass of iced tea?

    Reply
  35. Maggie, my spouse is a lake and mountain guy. He’s not a big fan of ocean & sand, and the charms of Cape Cod totally elude him. Happily, my siblings are of my way of thinking.
    LizA, it amazes me, too, when I look about me at the beach, how little reading is going on. But then, there are a great many families, and it’s hard to read a book while trying to keep an eye on your kids. I only wish the radios could be banned, along with the long, loud cellphone conversations.
    Mary K, visiting relatives is truly a bad time for book reading. I’d definitely recommend you try to carve out a reading vacation, even if it’s a long holiday weekend.
    Awww, RevMelinda. Thank you for taking me to France, and for sharing me with your friends.
    Tal, the new book is scheduled for June 2008. Thank you for wanting more! Two new books in one year is my dream, too. One day I’ll make it come true, I’m determined.
    Elaine McCarthy, thank you for the recommendation! That seems to be the way I discover the best stuff. Louise Rennison sounds like my cup of tea. Or do I mean my glass of iced tea?

    Reply
  36. Beach and books – is there a more perfect vacation? I generally pack paperbacks, because I can carry more that way, but some of my favorites have been discovered in hotels or rental houses. That’s how I first met Flashman and long, long ago, John Dickson Carr.
    I usually take along something reasonably long that will be a bit slower going – Scott or Trollope or Dumas – lest I run out of reading matter. However, I once got a really bad sunburn reading Clarissa Harlowe. I hadn’t expected to much like it, but I was so engrossed I forgot about sunscreen or even getting into the shade.

    Reply
  37. Beach and books – is there a more perfect vacation? I generally pack paperbacks, because I can carry more that way, but some of my favorites have been discovered in hotels or rental houses. That’s how I first met Flashman and long, long ago, John Dickson Carr.
    I usually take along something reasonably long that will be a bit slower going – Scott or Trollope or Dumas – lest I run out of reading matter. However, I once got a really bad sunburn reading Clarissa Harlowe. I hadn’t expected to much like it, but I was so engrossed I forgot about sunscreen or even getting into the shade.

    Reply
  38. Beach and books – is there a more perfect vacation? I generally pack paperbacks, because I can carry more that way, but some of my favorites have been discovered in hotels or rental houses. That’s how I first met Flashman and long, long ago, John Dickson Carr.
    I usually take along something reasonably long that will be a bit slower going – Scott or Trollope or Dumas – lest I run out of reading matter. However, I once got a really bad sunburn reading Clarissa Harlowe. I hadn’t expected to much like it, but I was so engrossed I forgot about sunscreen or even getting into the shade.

    Reply
  39. Beach and books – is there a more perfect vacation? I generally pack paperbacks, because I can carry more that way, but some of my favorites have been discovered in hotels or rental houses. That’s how I first met Flashman and long, long ago, John Dickson Carr.
    I usually take along something reasonably long that will be a bit slower going – Scott or Trollope or Dumas – lest I run out of reading matter. However, I once got a really bad sunburn reading Clarissa Harlowe. I hadn’t expected to much like it, but I was so engrossed I forgot about sunscreen or even getting into the shade.

    Reply
  40. Beach and books – is there a more perfect vacation? I generally pack paperbacks, because I can carry more that way, but some of my favorites have been discovered in hotels or rental houses. That’s how I first met Flashman and long, long ago, John Dickson Carr.
    I usually take along something reasonably long that will be a bit slower going – Scott or Trollope or Dumas – lest I run out of reading matter. However, I once got a really bad sunburn reading Clarissa Harlowe. I hadn’t expected to much like it, but I was so engrossed I forgot about sunscreen or even getting into the shade.

    Reply
  41. Almost forgot. On a family vacation, incuding spouse and teenage children, we all read (or reread) Gone With the Wind. Just about the perfect vacation book.

    Reply
  42. Almost forgot. On a family vacation, incuding spouse and teenage children, we all read (or reread) Gone With the Wind. Just about the perfect vacation book.

    Reply
  43. Almost forgot. On a family vacation, incuding spouse and teenage children, we all read (or reread) Gone With the Wind. Just about the perfect vacation book.

    Reply
  44. Almost forgot. On a family vacation, incuding spouse and teenage children, we all read (or reread) Gone With the Wind. Just about the perfect vacation book.

    Reply
  45. Almost forgot. On a family vacation, incuding spouse and teenage children, we all read (or reread) Gone With the Wind. Just about the perfect vacation book.

    Reply
  46. Loretta, I’ve copied your list of beach reads, since many of them are authors I’ve always meant to read but never got around to.
    As far as the perfect beach reads go — anything by Loretta Chase! I just finished a marathon reading orgy of your books, and I think I’ve now read everything you ever wrote. Since I only have time to read in bed, my progress was slow. Now that I’m finished, I am rereading my favorites of yours because I want to study them from a writing standpoint.
    I’m a freelance editor used to reading slowly to catch typos, clarity and logic issues, grammar mistakes, etc. That, more than anything else, has turned me into a slow reader. Habits are hard to break. I used to devour books at the speed of light. When I’m reading for pleasure, I have found that the slower pace allows me to savor the story. It’s like the difference between a long, languid afternoon of lovemaking vs. a quicky bent over the washing machine. (Both have their benefits, of course) *eg*

    Reply
  47. Loretta, I’ve copied your list of beach reads, since many of them are authors I’ve always meant to read but never got around to.
    As far as the perfect beach reads go — anything by Loretta Chase! I just finished a marathon reading orgy of your books, and I think I’ve now read everything you ever wrote. Since I only have time to read in bed, my progress was slow. Now that I’m finished, I am rereading my favorites of yours because I want to study them from a writing standpoint.
    I’m a freelance editor used to reading slowly to catch typos, clarity and logic issues, grammar mistakes, etc. That, more than anything else, has turned me into a slow reader. Habits are hard to break. I used to devour books at the speed of light. When I’m reading for pleasure, I have found that the slower pace allows me to savor the story. It’s like the difference between a long, languid afternoon of lovemaking vs. a quicky bent over the washing machine. (Both have their benefits, of course) *eg*

    Reply
  48. Loretta, I’ve copied your list of beach reads, since many of them are authors I’ve always meant to read but never got around to.
    As far as the perfect beach reads go — anything by Loretta Chase! I just finished a marathon reading orgy of your books, and I think I’ve now read everything you ever wrote. Since I only have time to read in bed, my progress was slow. Now that I’m finished, I am rereading my favorites of yours because I want to study them from a writing standpoint.
    I’m a freelance editor used to reading slowly to catch typos, clarity and logic issues, grammar mistakes, etc. That, more than anything else, has turned me into a slow reader. Habits are hard to break. I used to devour books at the speed of light. When I’m reading for pleasure, I have found that the slower pace allows me to savor the story. It’s like the difference between a long, languid afternoon of lovemaking vs. a quicky bent over the washing machine. (Both have their benefits, of course) *eg*

    Reply
  49. Loretta, I’ve copied your list of beach reads, since many of them are authors I’ve always meant to read but never got around to.
    As far as the perfect beach reads go — anything by Loretta Chase! I just finished a marathon reading orgy of your books, and I think I’ve now read everything you ever wrote. Since I only have time to read in bed, my progress was slow. Now that I’m finished, I am rereading my favorites of yours because I want to study them from a writing standpoint.
    I’m a freelance editor used to reading slowly to catch typos, clarity and logic issues, grammar mistakes, etc. That, more than anything else, has turned me into a slow reader. Habits are hard to break. I used to devour books at the speed of light. When I’m reading for pleasure, I have found that the slower pace allows me to savor the story. It’s like the difference between a long, languid afternoon of lovemaking vs. a quicky bent over the washing machine. (Both have their benefits, of course) *eg*

    Reply
  50. Loretta, I’ve copied your list of beach reads, since many of them are authors I’ve always meant to read but never got around to.
    As far as the perfect beach reads go — anything by Loretta Chase! I just finished a marathon reading orgy of your books, and I think I’ve now read everything you ever wrote. Since I only have time to read in bed, my progress was slow. Now that I’m finished, I am rereading my favorites of yours because I want to study them from a writing standpoint.
    I’m a freelance editor used to reading slowly to catch typos, clarity and logic issues, grammar mistakes, etc. That, more than anything else, has turned me into a slow reader. Habits are hard to break. I used to devour books at the speed of light. When I’m reading for pleasure, I have found that the slower pace allows me to savor the story. It’s like the difference between a long, languid afternoon of lovemaking vs. a quicky bent over the washing machine. (Both have their benefits, of course) *eg*

    Reply
  51. When I travel the weight of books is usually equal to or even greater than the weight of everything else I pack — and it’s the books (plus my toothbrush) that come on the plane with me to ensure they don’t get lost. I’m clearly like a lot of others, in that I like to bring books that may be considered “light” entertainment as well as one or two “weightier” tomes that I haven’t had time to read during the rest of the all-too-busy year. I like mysteries and recently read two wonderful ones by a new to me author, Arianna Franklin (at least, new to me in that personna as I’d read her Diana Norman books). Brought two of the Eva Ibbotson reprints with me to Buenos Aires, as well as “Not Quite a Lady”, and books by Linda Howard, Dennis Lehane, David Sedaris, and Mary Stewart. I leave the non-keepers behind for those who come after me in the B&B or wherever I stayed. For example, the Lehane involved the murder (among others) of a college student, and as the mother of two college students I couldn’t bring myself to finish it, much less lug it back. OTOH, I the ending of Alexander McCall Smith’s third Isabel Dalhousie mystery, “The Right Attitude to Rain”, lifted my spirits, so that one came home. I’m happy to report that the Ibbotsons and NQAL also managed to return home safe and sound.

    Reply
  52. When I travel the weight of books is usually equal to or even greater than the weight of everything else I pack — and it’s the books (plus my toothbrush) that come on the plane with me to ensure they don’t get lost. I’m clearly like a lot of others, in that I like to bring books that may be considered “light” entertainment as well as one or two “weightier” tomes that I haven’t had time to read during the rest of the all-too-busy year. I like mysteries and recently read two wonderful ones by a new to me author, Arianna Franklin (at least, new to me in that personna as I’d read her Diana Norman books). Brought two of the Eva Ibbotson reprints with me to Buenos Aires, as well as “Not Quite a Lady”, and books by Linda Howard, Dennis Lehane, David Sedaris, and Mary Stewart. I leave the non-keepers behind for those who come after me in the B&B or wherever I stayed. For example, the Lehane involved the murder (among others) of a college student, and as the mother of two college students I couldn’t bring myself to finish it, much less lug it back. OTOH, I the ending of Alexander McCall Smith’s third Isabel Dalhousie mystery, “The Right Attitude to Rain”, lifted my spirits, so that one came home. I’m happy to report that the Ibbotsons and NQAL also managed to return home safe and sound.

    Reply
  53. When I travel the weight of books is usually equal to or even greater than the weight of everything else I pack — and it’s the books (plus my toothbrush) that come on the plane with me to ensure they don’t get lost. I’m clearly like a lot of others, in that I like to bring books that may be considered “light” entertainment as well as one or two “weightier” tomes that I haven’t had time to read during the rest of the all-too-busy year. I like mysteries and recently read two wonderful ones by a new to me author, Arianna Franklin (at least, new to me in that personna as I’d read her Diana Norman books). Brought two of the Eva Ibbotson reprints with me to Buenos Aires, as well as “Not Quite a Lady”, and books by Linda Howard, Dennis Lehane, David Sedaris, and Mary Stewart. I leave the non-keepers behind for those who come after me in the B&B or wherever I stayed. For example, the Lehane involved the murder (among others) of a college student, and as the mother of two college students I couldn’t bring myself to finish it, much less lug it back. OTOH, I the ending of Alexander McCall Smith’s third Isabel Dalhousie mystery, “The Right Attitude to Rain”, lifted my spirits, so that one came home. I’m happy to report that the Ibbotsons and NQAL also managed to return home safe and sound.

    Reply
  54. When I travel the weight of books is usually equal to or even greater than the weight of everything else I pack — and it’s the books (plus my toothbrush) that come on the plane with me to ensure they don’t get lost. I’m clearly like a lot of others, in that I like to bring books that may be considered “light” entertainment as well as one or two “weightier” tomes that I haven’t had time to read during the rest of the all-too-busy year. I like mysteries and recently read two wonderful ones by a new to me author, Arianna Franklin (at least, new to me in that personna as I’d read her Diana Norman books). Brought two of the Eva Ibbotson reprints with me to Buenos Aires, as well as “Not Quite a Lady”, and books by Linda Howard, Dennis Lehane, David Sedaris, and Mary Stewart. I leave the non-keepers behind for those who come after me in the B&B or wherever I stayed. For example, the Lehane involved the murder (among others) of a college student, and as the mother of two college students I couldn’t bring myself to finish it, much less lug it back. OTOH, I the ending of Alexander McCall Smith’s third Isabel Dalhousie mystery, “The Right Attitude to Rain”, lifted my spirits, so that one came home. I’m happy to report that the Ibbotsons and NQAL also managed to return home safe and sound.

    Reply
  55. When I travel the weight of books is usually equal to or even greater than the weight of everything else I pack — and it’s the books (plus my toothbrush) that come on the plane with me to ensure they don’t get lost. I’m clearly like a lot of others, in that I like to bring books that may be considered “light” entertainment as well as one or two “weightier” tomes that I haven’t had time to read during the rest of the all-too-busy year. I like mysteries and recently read two wonderful ones by a new to me author, Arianna Franklin (at least, new to me in that personna as I’d read her Diana Norman books). Brought two of the Eva Ibbotson reprints with me to Buenos Aires, as well as “Not Quite a Lady”, and books by Linda Howard, Dennis Lehane, David Sedaris, and Mary Stewart. I leave the non-keepers behind for those who come after me in the B&B or wherever I stayed. For example, the Lehane involved the murder (among others) of a college student, and as the mother of two college students I couldn’t bring myself to finish it, much less lug it back. OTOH, I the ending of Alexander McCall Smith’s third Isabel Dalhousie mystery, “The Right Attitude to Rain”, lifted my spirits, so that one came home. I’m happy to report that the Ibbotsons and NQAL also managed to return home safe and sound.

    Reply
  56. I’m bringing all romance to Lake Shasta next week.
    Jo’s Lady Beware
    Candice Hern’s Lady Be Bad
    Barbara Freethy’s Taken
    Colette Gale’s Unmasqued
    & Shana Abe’s The Dream Thief
    Have fun on Cape Cod! East Coast beaches are a whole different experience than here at the Pacific. (I like my beaches too.) East Coast beaches even smell differently. I love sea grass, and you guys have better lighthouses. 🙂

    Reply
  57. I’m bringing all romance to Lake Shasta next week.
    Jo’s Lady Beware
    Candice Hern’s Lady Be Bad
    Barbara Freethy’s Taken
    Colette Gale’s Unmasqued
    & Shana Abe’s The Dream Thief
    Have fun on Cape Cod! East Coast beaches are a whole different experience than here at the Pacific. (I like my beaches too.) East Coast beaches even smell differently. I love sea grass, and you guys have better lighthouses. 🙂

    Reply
  58. I’m bringing all romance to Lake Shasta next week.
    Jo’s Lady Beware
    Candice Hern’s Lady Be Bad
    Barbara Freethy’s Taken
    Colette Gale’s Unmasqued
    & Shana Abe’s The Dream Thief
    Have fun on Cape Cod! East Coast beaches are a whole different experience than here at the Pacific. (I like my beaches too.) East Coast beaches even smell differently. I love sea grass, and you guys have better lighthouses. 🙂

    Reply
  59. I’m bringing all romance to Lake Shasta next week.
    Jo’s Lady Beware
    Candice Hern’s Lady Be Bad
    Barbara Freethy’s Taken
    Colette Gale’s Unmasqued
    & Shana Abe’s The Dream Thief
    Have fun on Cape Cod! East Coast beaches are a whole different experience than here at the Pacific. (I like my beaches too.) East Coast beaches even smell differently. I love sea grass, and you guys have better lighthouses. 🙂

    Reply
  60. I’m bringing all romance to Lake Shasta next week.
    Jo’s Lady Beware
    Candice Hern’s Lady Be Bad
    Barbara Freethy’s Taken
    Colette Gale’s Unmasqued
    & Shana Abe’s The Dream Thief
    Have fun on Cape Cod! East Coast beaches are a whole different experience than here at the Pacific. (I like my beaches too.) East Coast beaches even smell differently. I love sea grass, and you guys have better lighthouses. 🙂

    Reply
  61. Ariana Franklin = Diana Norman? Thanks!
    And Connie Willis! — I wallowed in Doomsday Book…
    Beach reads: You’d have to drag me kicking and screaming to a beach unless it was somewhere up north, and reasonably cool. Pacific Northwest, if I had my druthers. Beach or no, though, I’d bring something by Diana Norman (probably The Pirate Queen); one of the Dresden Files books by Jim Butcher (#6, I think), or perhaps the first of his new series, which I’ve heard is excellent; a couple of historical romances and the latest by Jennifer Crusie; a few old favorites — a Sayers or Allingham, say, or Arthur Ransome’s The Picts and the Martyrs; and one non-fiction book.
    No more than that, though — bookstore browsing is a feature of every vacation.

    Reply
  62. Ariana Franklin = Diana Norman? Thanks!
    And Connie Willis! — I wallowed in Doomsday Book…
    Beach reads: You’d have to drag me kicking and screaming to a beach unless it was somewhere up north, and reasonably cool. Pacific Northwest, if I had my druthers. Beach or no, though, I’d bring something by Diana Norman (probably The Pirate Queen); one of the Dresden Files books by Jim Butcher (#6, I think), or perhaps the first of his new series, which I’ve heard is excellent; a couple of historical romances and the latest by Jennifer Crusie; a few old favorites — a Sayers or Allingham, say, or Arthur Ransome’s The Picts and the Martyrs; and one non-fiction book.
    No more than that, though — bookstore browsing is a feature of every vacation.

    Reply
  63. Ariana Franklin = Diana Norman? Thanks!
    And Connie Willis! — I wallowed in Doomsday Book…
    Beach reads: You’d have to drag me kicking and screaming to a beach unless it was somewhere up north, and reasonably cool. Pacific Northwest, if I had my druthers. Beach or no, though, I’d bring something by Diana Norman (probably The Pirate Queen); one of the Dresden Files books by Jim Butcher (#6, I think), or perhaps the first of his new series, which I’ve heard is excellent; a couple of historical romances and the latest by Jennifer Crusie; a few old favorites — a Sayers or Allingham, say, or Arthur Ransome’s The Picts and the Martyrs; and one non-fiction book.
    No more than that, though — bookstore browsing is a feature of every vacation.

    Reply
  64. Ariana Franklin = Diana Norman? Thanks!
    And Connie Willis! — I wallowed in Doomsday Book…
    Beach reads: You’d have to drag me kicking and screaming to a beach unless it was somewhere up north, and reasonably cool. Pacific Northwest, if I had my druthers. Beach or no, though, I’d bring something by Diana Norman (probably The Pirate Queen); one of the Dresden Files books by Jim Butcher (#6, I think), or perhaps the first of his new series, which I’ve heard is excellent; a couple of historical romances and the latest by Jennifer Crusie; a few old favorites — a Sayers or Allingham, say, or Arthur Ransome’s The Picts and the Martyrs; and one non-fiction book.
    No more than that, though — bookstore browsing is a feature of every vacation.

    Reply
  65. Ariana Franklin = Diana Norman? Thanks!
    And Connie Willis! — I wallowed in Doomsday Book…
    Beach reads: You’d have to drag me kicking and screaming to a beach unless it was somewhere up north, and reasonably cool. Pacific Northwest, if I had my druthers. Beach or no, though, I’d bring something by Diana Norman (probably The Pirate Queen); one of the Dresden Files books by Jim Butcher (#6, I think), or perhaps the first of his new series, which I’ve heard is excellent; a couple of historical romances and the latest by Jennifer Crusie; a few old favorites — a Sayers or Allingham, say, or Arthur Ransome’s The Picts and the Martyrs; and one non-fiction book.
    No more than that, though — bookstore browsing is a feature of every vacation.

    Reply
  66. My husband always laughs at the sheer number of books I take with me on any vacation or trip to see family. My rule is a book per day. I know I won’t read them all, but that way I have a variety to choose from, whatever my mood happens to be.
    The toughest part is choosing which books go in my carry-on luggage. We have a 3-year-old, so a lot of our carry-on space goes to feeding and amusing her, and we also take the laptop and my husband’s spiffy big digital camera rather than risking checking them. So I have room for two books, tops. Those MUST be books by authors I trust to give me a good read, lest I be trapped at 30,000 feet with nothing but a badly written book, SkyMall, and an airline magazine. For the past year or two Jennifer Crusie and Bernard Cornwell have been my go-to airplane authors, but as of my Birmingham-Seattle flight yesterday I’ve caught up on Crusie’s backlist. I’ve got a few more Cornwells to get to, but the end is in sight there, too. (I haven’t had the self-discipline to read their books ONLY when I fly.)
    So. I need another author or two with a nice fat backlist. And I’m pretty much caught up on all the Wenchly books. (As for the usual recommendations I get when people hear I’m a Sharpe fan, I’ve already read Aubrey/Maturin, and I tried Flashman and they didn’t work for me.)

    Reply
  67. My husband always laughs at the sheer number of books I take with me on any vacation or trip to see family. My rule is a book per day. I know I won’t read them all, but that way I have a variety to choose from, whatever my mood happens to be.
    The toughest part is choosing which books go in my carry-on luggage. We have a 3-year-old, so a lot of our carry-on space goes to feeding and amusing her, and we also take the laptop and my husband’s spiffy big digital camera rather than risking checking them. So I have room for two books, tops. Those MUST be books by authors I trust to give me a good read, lest I be trapped at 30,000 feet with nothing but a badly written book, SkyMall, and an airline magazine. For the past year or two Jennifer Crusie and Bernard Cornwell have been my go-to airplane authors, but as of my Birmingham-Seattle flight yesterday I’ve caught up on Crusie’s backlist. I’ve got a few more Cornwells to get to, but the end is in sight there, too. (I haven’t had the self-discipline to read their books ONLY when I fly.)
    So. I need another author or two with a nice fat backlist. And I’m pretty much caught up on all the Wenchly books. (As for the usual recommendations I get when people hear I’m a Sharpe fan, I’ve already read Aubrey/Maturin, and I tried Flashman and they didn’t work for me.)

    Reply
  68. My husband always laughs at the sheer number of books I take with me on any vacation or trip to see family. My rule is a book per day. I know I won’t read them all, but that way I have a variety to choose from, whatever my mood happens to be.
    The toughest part is choosing which books go in my carry-on luggage. We have a 3-year-old, so a lot of our carry-on space goes to feeding and amusing her, and we also take the laptop and my husband’s spiffy big digital camera rather than risking checking them. So I have room for two books, tops. Those MUST be books by authors I trust to give me a good read, lest I be trapped at 30,000 feet with nothing but a badly written book, SkyMall, and an airline magazine. For the past year or two Jennifer Crusie and Bernard Cornwell have been my go-to airplane authors, but as of my Birmingham-Seattle flight yesterday I’ve caught up on Crusie’s backlist. I’ve got a few more Cornwells to get to, but the end is in sight there, too. (I haven’t had the self-discipline to read their books ONLY when I fly.)
    So. I need another author or two with a nice fat backlist. And I’m pretty much caught up on all the Wenchly books. (As for the usual recommendations I get when people hear I’m a Sharpe fan, I’ve already read Aubrey/Maturin, and I tried Flashman and they didn’t work for me.)

    Reply
  69. My husband always laughs at the sheer number of books I take with me on any vacation or trip to see family. My rule is a book per day. I know I won’t read them all, but that way I have a variety to choose from, whatever my mood happens to be.
    The toughest part is choosing which books go in my carry-on luggage. We have a 3-year-old, so a lot of our carry-on space goes to feeding and amusing her, and we also take the laptop and my husband’s spiffy big digital camera rather than risking checking them. So I have room for two books, tops. Those MUST be books by authors I trust to give me a good read, lest I be trapped at 30,000 feet with nothing but a badly written book, SkyMall, and an airline magazine. For the past year or two Jennifer Crusie and Bernard Cornwell have been my go-to airplane authors, but as of my Birmingham-Seattle flight yesterday I’ve caught up on Crusie’s backlist. I’ve got a few more Cornwells to get to, but the end is in sight there, too. (I haven’t had the self-discipline to read their books ONLY when I fly.)
    So. I need another author or two with a nice fat backlist. And I’m pretty much caught up on all the Wenchly books. (As for the usual recommendations I get when people hear I’m a Sharpe fan, I’ve already read Aubrey/Maturin, and I tried Flashman and they didn’t work for me.)

    Reply
  70. My husband always laughs at the sheer number of books I take with me on any vacation or trip to see family. My rule is a book per day. I know I won’t read them all, but that way I have a variety to choose from, whatever my mood happens to be.
    The toughest part is choosing which books go in my carry-on luggage. We have a 3-year-old, so a lot of our carry-on space goes to feeding and amusing her, and we also take the laptop and my husband’s spiffy big digital camera rather than risking checking them. So I have room for two books, tops. Those MUST be books by authors I trust to give me a good read, lest I be trapped at 30,000 feet with nothing but a badly written book, SkyMall, and an airline magazine. For the past year or two Jennifer Crusie and Bernard Cornwell have been my go-to airplane authors, but as of my Birmingham-Seattle flight yesterday I’ve caught up on Crusie’s backlist. I’ve got a few more Cornwells to get to, but the end is in sight there, too. (I haven’t had the self-discipline to read their books ONLY when I fly.)
    So. I need another author or two with a nice fat backlist. And I’m pretty much caught up on all the Wenchly books. (As for the usual recommendations I get when people hear I’m a Sharpe fan, I’ve already read Aubrey/Maturin, and I tried Flashman and they didn’t work for me.)

    Reply
  71. Jane O, CLARISSA had the same effect on me. I never expected to like it, then couldn’t put it down.
    Sherrie, you say the nicest things! One of the reasons I tend to read little historical romance these days is that internal editor. I can shut it off when reading other genres and subgenres but it’s dangerously alert with my own genre (as is the Why-Didn’t-I-Think-of-That demon), and it too often stifles the escapism I want from reading.
    Susan D/C, Thank you for reminding me about Alexander McCall Smith, whom I discovered a while back. That and the others are excellent suggestions.
    Readers, please don’t hestitate to make recommendations. As you’ve probably noticed, I’m not the only one here eager to discover a new (to me) author.

    Reply
  72. Jane O, CLARISSA had the same effect on me. I never expected to like it, then couldn’t put it down.
    Sherrie, you say the nicest things! One of the reasons I tend to read little historical romance these days is that internal editor. I can shut it off when reading other genres and subgenres but it’s dangerously alert with my own genre (as is the Why-Didn’t-I-Think-of-That demon), and it too often stifles the escapism I want from reading.
    Susan D/C, Thank you for reminding me about Alexander McCall Smith, whom I discovered a while back. That and the others are excellent suggestions.
    Readers, please don’t hestitate to make recommendations. As you’ve probably noticed, I’m not the only one here eager to discover a new (to me) author.

    Reply
  73. Jane O, CLARISSA had the same effect on me. I never expected to like it, then couldn’t put it down.
    Sherrie, you say the nicest things! One of the reasons I tend to read little historical romance these days is that internal editor. I can shut it off when reading other genres and subgenres but it’s dangerously alert with my own genre (as is the Why-Didn’t-I-Think-of-That demon), and it too often stifles the escapism I want from reading.
    Susan D/C, Thank you for reminding me about Alexander McCall Smith, whom I discovered a while back. That and the others are excellent suggestions.
    Readers, please don’t hestitate to make recommendations. As you’ve probably noticed, I’m not the only one here eager to discover a new (to me) author.

    Reply
  74. Jane O, CLARISSA had the same effect on me. I never expected to like it, then couldn’t put it down.
    Sherrie, you say the nicest things! One of the reasons I tend to read little historical romance these days is that internal editor. I can shut it off when reading other genres and subgenres but it’s dangerously alert with my own genre (as is the Why-Didn’t-I-Think-of-That demon), and it too often stifles the escapism I want from reading.
    Susan D/C, Thank you for reminding me about Alexander McCall Smith, whom I discovered a while back. That and the others are excellent suggestions.
    Readers, please don’t hestitate to make recommendations. As you’ve probably noticed, I’m not the only one here eager to discover a new (to me) author.

    Reply
  75. Jane O, CLARISSA had the same effect on me. I never expected to like it, then couldn’t put it down.
    Sherrie, you say the nicest things! One of the reasons I tend to read little historical romance these days is that internal editor. I can shut it off when reading other genres and subgenres but it’s dangerously alert with my own genre (as is the Why-Didn’t-I-Think-of-That demon), and it too often stifles the escapism I want from reading.
    Susan D/C, Thank you for reminding me about Alexander McCall Smith, whom I discovered a while back. That and the others are excellent suggestions.
    Readers, please don’t hestitate to make recommendations. As you’ve probably noticed, I’m not the only one here eager to discover a new (to me) author.

    Reply
  76. Jane George, my trip last spring to Vancouver gave me my first sight of the Pacific, but I have not yet experienced the beaches. Next time, I hope.
    Barbara, I’m going for Doomsday Book on your suggestion. In fact, I’m compiling a list from your suggestions. My sister had recommended the Dresden Files, too. Oh, and Sayers and Allingham are great old friends to take along. I like Ngaio Marsh, too.
    Susan Wilbanks, I don’t have any historial novel series to recommend but if you like mysteries, you might want to try Ashley Gardner’s Regency-set mysteries. I’ve tried other authors working in this setting but the books didn’t do it for me. It’s like your reaction to Flashman: We respond to certain author voices and outlooks and not to others, and it’s very individual.

    Reply
  77. Jane George, my trip last spring to Vancouver gave me my first sight of the Pacific, but I have not yet experienced the beaches. Next time, I hope.
    Barbara, I’m going for Doomsday Book on your suggestion. In fact, I’m compiling a list from your suggestions. My sister had recommended the Dresden Files, too. Oh, and Sayers and Allingham are great old friends to take along. I like Ngaio Marsh, too.
    Susan Wilbanks, I don’t have any historial novel series to recommend but if you like mysteries, you might want to try Ashley Gardner’s Regency-set mysteries. I’ve tried other authors working in this setting but the books didn’t do it for me. It’s like your reaction to Flashman: We respond to certain author voices and outlooks and not to others, and it’s very individual.

    Reply
  78. Jane George, my trip last spring to Vancouver gave me my first sight of the Pacific, but I have not yet experienced the beaches. Next time, I hope.
    Barbara, I’m going for Doomsday Book on your suggestion. In fact, I’m compiling a list from your suggestions. My sister had recommended the Dresden Files, too. Oh, and Sayers and Allingham are great old friends to take along. I like Ngaio Marsh, too.
    Susan Wilbanks, I don’t have any historial novel series to recommend but if you like mysteries, you might want to try Ashley Gardner’s Regency-set mysteries. I’ve tried other authors working in this setting but the books didn’t do it for me. It’s like your reaction to Flashman: We respond to certain author voices and outlooks and not to others, and it’s very individual.

    Reply
  79. Jane George, my trip last spring to Vancouver gave me my first sight of the Pacific, but I have not yet experienced the beaches. Next time, I hope.
    Barbara, I’m going for Doomsday Book on your suggestion. In fact, I’m compiling a list from your suggestions. My sister had recommended the Dresden Files, too. Oh, and Sayers and Allingham are great old friends to take along. I like Ngaio Marsh, too.
    Susan Wilbanks, I don’t have any historial novel series to recommend but if you like mysteries, you might want to try Ashley Gardner’s Regency-set mysteries. I’ve tried other authors working in this setting but the books didn’t do it for me. It’s like your reaction to Flashman: We respond to certain author voices and outlooks and not to others, and it’s very individual.

    Reply
  80. Jane George, my trip last spring to Vancouver gave me my first sight of the Pacific, but I have not yet experienced the beaches. Next time, I hope.
    Barbara, I’m going for Doomsday Book on your suggestion. In fact, I’m compiling a list from your suggestions. My sister had recommended the Dresden Files, too. Oh, and Sayers and Allingham are great old friends to take along. I like Ngaio Marsh, too.
    Susan Wilbanks, I don’t have any historial novel series to recommend but if you like mysteries, you might want to try Ashley Gardner’s Regency-set mysteries. I’ve tried other authors working in this setting but the books didn’t do it for me. It’s like your reaction to Flashman: We respond to certain author voices and outlooks and not to others, and it’s very individual.

    Reply
  81. Wow. I can tell why I hang out on this blog….
    Most of the authors y’all mentioned are my favourites.
    Vacations (before I started reading romance so voraciously) were about reading 40 new mysteries of different styles and types (and btw I think you’ll love Donna Leon). My romance collection is growing….but I still have more mysteries (6000 when I stopped keeping track…. I’m not adding to this much now, but some are ‘must haves’, like Dorothy Cannell’s new one, Withering Heights….)
    But on vacation, I ALWAYS supplement my ‘new’ books (now romances, generally) by taking a couple of reading copies of Georgette Heyer (any), Dorothy Sayers (Wimsey/Vane preferred), PG Wodehouse (any) and Arthur Ransome (Winter Holiday and We didn’t mean to go to Sea are my favs)…copies that were falling apart and that I intended to read again and discard after. These are for when my eyes are falling out and my brain has completely seized, but I can’t stop reading… or for the middle of the night when a bar conversation/confrontation is going on outside my hotel window (somehow colourful language seems so much more acceptable in a Brit accent? but it still keeps you awake!).
    Somehow – the old favs always seem to come home again….worse for wear, but still holding together (who really needs a cover?)

    Reply
  82. Wow. I can tell why I hang out on this blog….
    Most of the authors y’all mentioned are my favourites.
    Vacations (before I started reading romance so voraciously) were about reading 40 new mysteries of different styles and types (and btw I think you’ll love Donna Leon). My romance collection is growing….but I still have more mysteries (6000 when I stopped keeping track…. I’m not adding to this much now, but some are ‘must haves’, like Dorothy Cannell’s new one, Withering Heights….)
    But on vacation, I ALWAYS supplement my ‘new’ books (now romances, generally) by taking a couple of reading copies of Georgette Heyer (any), Dorothy Sayers (Wimsey/Vane preferred), PG Wodehouse (any) and Arthur Ransome (Winter Holiday and We didn’t mean to go to Sea are my favs)…copies that were falling apart and that I intended to read again and discard after. These are for when my eyes are falling out and my brain has completely seized, but I can’t stop reading… or for the middle of the night when a bar conversation/confrontation is going on outside my hotel window (somehow colourful language seems so much more acceptable in a Brit accent? but it still keeps you awake!).
    Somehow – the old favs always seem to come home again….worse for wear, but still holding together (who really needs a cover?)

    Reply
  83. Wow. I can tell why I hang out on this blog….
    Most of the authors y’all mentioned are my favourites.
    Vacations (before I started reading romance so voraciously) were about reading 40 new mysteries of different styles and types (and btw I think you’ll love Donna Leon). My romance collection is growing….but I still have more mysteries (6000 when I stopped keeping track…. I’m not adding to this much now, but some are ‘must haves’, like Dorothy Cannell’s new one, Withering Heights….)
    But on vacation, I ALWAYS supplement my ‘new’ books (now romances, generally) by taking a couple of reading copies of Georgette Heyer (any), Dorothy Sayers (Wimsey/Vane preferred), PG Wodehouse (any) and Arthur Ransome (Winter Holiday and We didn’t mean to go to Sea are my favs)…copies that were falling apart and that I intended to read again and discard after. These are for when my eyes are falling out and my brain has completely seized, but I can’t stop reading… or for the middle of the night when a bar conversation/confrontation is going on outside my hotel window (somehow colourful language seems so much more acceptable in a Brit accent? but it still keeps you awake!).
    Somehow – the old favs always seem to come home again….worse for wear, but still holding together (who really needs a cover?)

    Reply
  84. Wow. I can tell why I hang out on this blog….
    Most of the authors y’all mentioned are my favourites.
    Vacations (before I started reading romance so voraciously) were about reading 40 new mysteries of different styles and types (and btw I think you’ll love Donna Leon). My romance collection is growing….but I still have more mysteries (6000 when I stopped keeping track…. I’m not adding to this much now, but some are ‘must haves’, like Dorothy Cannell’s new one, Withering Heights….)
    But on vacation, I ALWAYS supplement my ‘new’ books (now romances, generally) by taking a couple of reading copies of Georgette Heyer (any), Dorothy Sayers (Wimsey/Vane preferred), PG Wodehouse (any) and Arthur Ransome (Winter Holiday and We didn’t mean to go to Sea are my favs)…copies that were falling apart and that I intended to read again and discard after. These are for when my eyes are falling out and my brain has completely seized, but I can’t stop reading… or for the middle of the night when a bar conversation/confrontation is going on outside my hotel window (somehow colourful language seems so much more acceptable in a Brit accent? but it still keeps you awake!).
    Somehow – the old favs always seem to come home again….worse for wear, but still holding together (who really needs a cover?)

    Reply
  85. Wow. I can tell why I hang out on this blog….
    Most of the authors y’all mentioned are my favourites.
    Vacations (before I started reading romance so voraciously) were about reading 40 new mysteries of different styles and types (and btw I think you’ll love Donna Leon). My romance collection is growing….but I still have more mysteries (6000 when I stopped keeping track…. I’m not adding to this much now, but some are ‘must haves’, like Dorothy Cannell’s new one, Withering Heights….)
    But on vacation, I ALWAYS supplement my ‘new’ books (now romances, generally) by taking a couple of reading copies of Georgette Heyer (any), Dorothy Sayers (Wimsey/Vane preferred), PG Wodehouse (any) and Arthur Ransome (Winter Holiday and We didn’t mean to go to Sea are my favs)…copies that were falling apart and that I intended to read again and discard after. These are for when my eyes are falling out and my brain has completely seized, but I can’t stop reading… or for the middle of the night when a bar conversation/confrontation is going on outside my hotel window (somehow colourful language seems so much more acceptable in a Brit accent? but it still keeps you awake!).
    Somehow – the old favs always seem to come home again….worse for wear, but still holding together (who really needs a cover?)

    Reply
  86. I just spent two days at a beach retreat a few hours south of Auckland, and it was wonderful (I totally understand why Tom Cruise stayed there when he was filming THE LAST SAMURAI). I had a view of the black sand beach from the windowseat, and I had Candice Hern’s LADY BE BAD and Tracy Grant’s SECRETS OF A LADY to entertain me. Pure bliss.

    Reply
  87. I just spent two days at a beach retreat a few hours south of Auckland, and it was wonderful (I totally understand why Tom Cruise stayed there when he was filming THE LAST SAMURAI). I had a view of the black sand beach from the windowseat, and I had Candice Hern’s LADY BE BAD and Tracy Grant’s SECRETS OF A LADY to entertain me. Pure bliss.

    Reply
  88. I just spent two days at a beach retreat a few hours south of Auckland, and it was wonderful (I totally understand why Tom Cruise stayed there when he was filming THE LAST SAMURAI). I had a view of the black sand beach from the windowseat, and I had Candice Hern’s LADY BE BAD and Tracy Grant’s SECRETS OF A LADY to entertain me. Pure bliss.

    Reply
  89. I just spent two days at a beach retreat a few hours south of Auckland, and it was wonderful (I totally understand why Tom Cruise stayed there when he was filming THE LAST SAMURAI). I had a view of the black sand beach from the windowseat, and I had Candice Hern’s LADY BE BAD and Tracy Grant’s SECRETS OF A LADY to entertain me. Pure bliss.

    Reply
  90. I just spent two days at a beach retreat a few hours south of Auckland, and it was wonderful (I totally understand why Tom Cruise stayed there when he was filming THE LAST SAMURAI). I had a view of the black sand beach from the windowseat, and I had Candice Hern’s LADY BE BAD and Tracy Grant’s SECRETS OF A LADY to entertain me. Pure bliss.

    Reply
  91. Isn’t Willis amazing? My memory will not hold names or titles, so I’m very bad at the recommendation thing. I know I’ve read most of what was mentioned above because I’m a reading slut. Reading is my tranquilizer. I have a book in my purse wherever I go and like Susan (I think it was), I make certain I carry authors I know I’ll enjoy on the plane, along with a couple of new ones. I read every evening to wind down, and even so, my TBR pile keeps mounting.
    And as much as I adore beaches and warm locations, I’m too ADHD to just sit still for days on end. I like to go places I can explore. Then I can mix exploring with kicking back and reading as much as I like. To heck with getting in the water. “G”

    Reply
  92. Isn’t Willis amazing? My memory will not hold names or titles, so I’m very bad at the recommendation thing. I know I’ve read most of what was mentioned above because I’m a reading slut. Reading is my tranquilizer. I have a book in my purse wherever I go and like Susan (I think it was), I make certain I carry authors I know I’ll enjoy on the plane, along with a couple of new ones. I read every evening to wind down, and even so, my TBR pile keeps mounting.
    And as much as I adore beaches and warm locations, I’m too ADHD to just sit still for days on end. I like to go places I can explore. Then I can mix exploring with kicking back and reading as much as I like. To heck with getting in the water. “G”

    Reply
  93. Isn’t Willis amazing? My memory will not hold names or titles, so I’m very bad at the recommendation thing. I know I’ve read most of what was mentioned above because I’m a reading slut. Reading is my tranquilizer. I have a book in my purse wherever I go and like Susan (I think it was), I make certain I carry authors I know I’ll enjoy on the plane, along with a couple of new ones. I read every evening to wind down, and even so, my TBR pile keeps mounting.
    And as much as I adore beaches and warm locations, I’m too ADHD to just sit still for days on end. I like to go places I can explore. Then I can mix exploring with kicking back and reading as much as I like. To heck with getting in the water. “G”

    Reply
  94. Isn’t Willis amazing? My memory will not hold names or titles, so I’m very bad at the recommendation thing. I know I’ve read most of what was mentioned above because I’m a reading slut. Reading is my tranquilizer. I have a book in my purse wherever I go and like Susan (I think it was), I make certain I carry authors I know I’ll enjoy on the plane, along with a couple of new ones. I read every evening to wind down, and even so, my TBR pile keeps mounting.
    And as much as I adore beaches and warm locations, I’m too ADHD to just sit still for days on end. I like to go places I can explore. Then I can mix exploring with kicking back and reading as much as I like. To heck with getting in the water. “G”

    Reply
  95. Isn’t Willis amazing? My memory will not hold names or titles, so I’m very bad at the recommendation thing. I know I’ve read most of what was mentioned above because I’m a reading slut. Reading is my tranquilizer. I have a book in my purse wherever I go and like Susan (I think it was), I make certain I carry authors I know I’ll enjoy on the plane, along with a couple of new ones. I read every evening to wind down, and even so, my TBR pile keeps mounting.
    And as much as I adore beaches and warm locations, I’m too ADHD to just sit still for days on end. I like to go places I can explore. Then I can mix exploring with kicking back and reading as much as I like. To heck with getting in the water. “G”

    Reply
  96. Loretta, I really enjoy Karen Ranney, the usual Garwood,can’t wait for the new historical,Enoch, K. Hawkins, a new one at least to me is Celeste Bradley, I really enjoyed her books, also Madeline Hunter, she is one of my favs. every one of her books are greatm my personal fav. is The Romantic..
    Even though I LOVE all the above authors, I Think on of the best Historicals I have read is The Keeper of the Dream by Penelope Williamson, its hard to find but really is the perfect book..
    Hope that helps…
    Tal

    Reply
  97. Loretta, I really enjoy Karen Ranney, the usual Garwood,can’t wait for the new historical,Enoch, K. Hawkins, a new one at least to me is Celeste Bradley, I really enjoyed her books, also Madeline Hunter, she is one of my favs. every one of her books are greatm my personal fav. is The Romantic..
    Even though I LOVE all the above authors, I Think on of the best Historicals I have read is The Keeper of the Dream by Penelope Williamson, its hard to find but really is the perfect book..
    Hope that helps…
    Tal

    Reply
  98. Loretta, I really enjoy Karen Ranney, the usual Garwood,can’t wait for the new historical,Enoch, K. Hawkins, a new one at least to me is Celeste Bradley, I really enjoyed her books, also Madeline Hunter, she is one of my favs. every one of her books are greatm my personal fav. is The Romantic..
    Even though I LOVE all the above authors, I Think on of the best Historicals I have read is The Keeper of the Dream by Penelope Williamson, its hard to find but really is the perfect book..
    Hope that helps…
    Tal

    Reply
  99. Loretta, I really enjoy Karen Ranney, the usual Garwood,can’t wait for the new historical,Enoch, K. Hawkins, a new one at least to me is Celeste Bradley, I really enjoyed her books, also Madeline Hunter, she is one of my favs. every one of her books are greatm my personal fav. is The Romantic..
    Even though I LOVE all the above authors, I Think on of the best Historicals I have read is The Keeper of the Dream by Penelope Williamson, its hard to find but really is the perfect book..
    Hope that helps…
    Tal

    Reply
  100. Loretta, I really enjoy Karen Ranney, the usual Garwood,can’t wait for the new historical,Enoch, K. Hawkins, a new one at least to me is Celeste Bradley, I really enjoyed her books, also Madeline Hunter, she is one of my favs. every one of her books are greatm my personal fav. is The Romantic..
    Even though I LOVE all the above authors, I Think on of the best Historicals I have read is The Keeper of the Dream by Penelope Williamson, its hard to find but really is the perfect book..
    Hope that helps…
    Tal

    Reply
  101. I’m glad to hear you are going to read some of Donna Leon’s books. I think she is outstandingly good. She conveys the atmosphere of Venice in a truly remarkable way, and her characters are memorable.

    Reply
  102. I’m glad to hear you are going to read some of Donna Leon’s books. I think she is outstandingly good. She conveys the atmosphere of Venice in a truly remarkable way, and her characters are memorable.

    Reply
  103. I’m glad to hear you are going to read some of Donna Leon’s books. I think she is outstandingly good. She conveys the atmosphere of Venice in a truly remarkable way, and her characters are memorable.

    Reply
  104. I’m glad to hear you are going to read some of Donna Leon’s books. I think she is outstandingly good. She conveys the atmosphere of Venice in a truly remarkable way, and her characters are memorable.

    Reply
  105. I’m glad to hear you are going to read some of Donna Leon’s books. I think she is outstandingly good. She conveys the atmosphere of Venice in a truly remarkable way, and her characters are memorable.

    Reply
  106. Alas, this summer is not a holiday one; too many other things happening. I have just finished Jilly Cooper’s latest “Wicked”. I have been reading her books about modern Rutminster since I was a teenager. Every three or so years she puts out another huge epic. Last summer I read through the entire Elizabeth Peters books about Amelia Peabody. I found them hilarious and compelling. None of my favourite authors can be held back for a holiday, they are read as soon as they arrive in the mail; all pre-ordered of course!

    Reply
  107. Alas, this summer is not a holiday one; too many other things happening. I have just finished Jilly Cooper’s latest “Wicked”. I have been reading her books about modern Rutminster since I was a teenager. Every three or so years she puts out another huge epic. Last summer I read through the entire Elizabeth Peters books about Amelia Peabody. I found them hilarious and compelling. None of my favourite authors can be held back for a holiday, they are read as soon as they arrive in the mail; all pre-ordered of course!

    Reply
  108. Alas, this summer is not a holiday one; too many other things happening. I have just finished Jilly Cooper’s latest “Wicked”. I have been reading her books about modern Rutminster since I was a teenager. Every three or so years she puts out another huge epic. Last summer I read through the entire Elizabeth Peters books about Amelia Peabody. I found them hilarious and compelling. None of my favourite authors can be held back for a holiday, they are read as soon as they arrive in the mail; all pre-ordered of course!

    Reply
  109. Alas, this summer is not a holiday one; too many other things happening. I have just finished Jilly Cooper’s latest “Wicked”. I have been reading her books about modern Rutminster since I was a teenager. Every three or so years she puts out another huge epic. Last summer I read through the entire Elizabeth Peters books about Amelia Peabody. I found them hilarious and compelling. None of my favourite authors can be held back for a holiday, they are read as soon as they arrive in the mail; all pre-ordered of course!

    Reply
  110. Alas, this summer is not a holiday one; too many other things happening. I have just finished Jilly Cooper’s latest “Wicked”. I have been reading her books about modern Rutminster since I was a teenager. Every three or so years she puts out another huge epic. Last summer I read through the entire Elizabeth Peters books about Amelia Peabody. I found them hilarious and compelling. None of my favourite authors can be held back for a holiday, they are read as soon as they arrive in the mail; all pre-ordered of course!

    Reply
  111. MJ, I love all your faves, but Arthur Ransome is a new name for me. Clearly, I am missing something, since others have mentioned him, so he’s going on the list, too.
    Kalen, your vacation sounds perfect. I would so love to visit New Zealand.
    Pat, reading’s my tranquilizer, too–what a great way of expressing it! Which is why I prefer HEA’s and crimes getting solved, and the world being set aright at the end.
    Tal, I’m adding your suggestions. Thank you.
    Ag Tigress, now I know I did the right thing in ordering three Donna Leon books.
    Oh, Sue, you reminded me of my backlog of Amelia Peabody stories.
    Looks like I’m going to need TWO beach vacations.

    Reply
  112. MJ, I love all your faves, but Arthur Ransome is a new name for me. Clearly, I am missing something, since others have mentioned him, so he’s going on the list, too.
    Kalen, your vacation sounds perfect. I would so love to visit New Zealand.
    Pat, reading’s my tranquilizer, too–what a great way of expressing it! Which is why I prefer HEA’s and crimes getting solved, and the world being set aright at the end.
    Tal, I’m adding your suggestions. Thank you.
    Ag Tigress, now I know I did the right thing in ordering three Donna Leon books.
    Oh, Sue, you reminded me of my backlog of Amelia Peabody stories.
    Looks like I’m going to need TWO beach vacations.

    Reply
  113. MJ, I love all your faves, but Arthur Ransome is a new name for me. Clearly, I am missing something, since others have mentioned him, so he’s going on the list, too.
    Kalen, your vacation sounds perfect. I would so love to visit New Zealand.
    Pat, reading’s my tranquilizer, too–what a great way of expressing it! Which is why I prefer HEA’s and crimes getting solved, and the world being set aright at the end.
    Tal, I’m adding your suggestions. Thank you.
    Ag Tigress, now I know I did the right thing in ordering three Donna Leon books.
    Oh, Sue, you reminded me of my backlog of Amelia Peabody stories.
    Looks like I’m going to need TWO beach vacations.

    Reply
  114. MJ, I love all your faves, but Arthur Ransome is a new name for me. Clearly, I am missing something, since others have mentioned him, so he’s going on the list, too.
    Kalen, your vacation sounds perfect. I would so love to visit New Zealand.
    Pat, reading’s my tranquilizer, too–what a great way of expressing it! Which is why I prefer HEA’s and crimes getting solved, and the world being set aright at the end.
    Tal, I’m adding your suggestions. Thank you.
    Ag Tigress, now I know I did the right thing in ordering three Donna Leon books.
    Oh, Sue, you reminded me of my backlog of Amelia Peabody stories.
    Looks like I’m going to need TWO beach vacations.

    Reply
  115. MJ, I love all your faves, but Arthur Ransome is a new name for me. Clearly, I am missing something, since others have mentioned him, so he’s going on the list, too.
    Kalen, your vacation sounds perfect. I would so love to visit New Zealand.
    Pat, reading’s my tranquilizer, too–what a great way of expressing it! Which is why I prefer HEA’s and crimes getting solved, and the world being set aright at the end.
    Tal, I’m adding your suggestions. Thank you.
    Ag Tigress, now I know I did the right thing in ordering three Donna Leon books.
    Oh, Sue, you reminded me of my backlog of Amelia Peabody stories.
    Looks like I’m going to need TWO beach vacations.

    Reply
  116. I have two recommendations and, in the interests of “if you like” disclosure, I also read Sayers, Allingham, Marsh, Elizabeth Peters, etc.
    Charlotte MacLeod’s Peter Shandy mystery series is very fun and quirky. They’re set in a fictional college town centered around Balaclava Agricultural College where Peter is a botany professor. MacLeod wrote several other mystery series, but I’ve only read Peter Shandy. The books have gone through several printings and some have atrocious covers, but don’t let that put you off. Peter meets his future wife in the first book, Rest You Merry.
    I love Ellis Peters’ Brother Cadfael series and have been trying to get to her other books. (The Heaven Tree Trilogy is another one that I’m saving for a long stretch of time.) Recently, I listened to an audio recording of Never Pick Up Hitch-Hikers and was delighted by her fresh take on the old-fashioned romantic suspense novel. The characters in those novels can usually be counted on to do stupid things, but Hitch-Hikers has sensible protagonists which gives added suspense since you’re waiting for the stupid behavior. And the “never pick up hitch-hikers” warning is advice to the villains.

    Reply
  117. I have two recommendations and, in the interests of “if you like” disclosure, I also read Sayers, Allingham, Marsh, Elizabeth Peters, etc.
    Charlotte MacLeod’s Peter Shandy mystery series is very fun and quirky. They’re set in a fictional college town centered around Balaclava Agricultural College where Peter is a botany professor. MacLeod wrote several other mystery series, but I’ve only read Peter Shandy. The books have gone through several printings and some have atrocious covers, but don’t let that put you off. Peter meets his future wife in the first book, Rest You Merry.
    I love Ellis Peters’ Brother Cadfael series and have been trying to get to her other books. (The Heaven Tree Trilogy is another one that I’m saving for a long stretch of time.) Recently, I listened to an audio recording of Never Pick Up Hitch-Hikers and was delighted by her fresh take on the old-fashioned romantic suspense novel. The characters in those novels can usually be counted on to do stupid things, but Hitch-Hikers has sensible protagonists which gives added suspense since you’re waiting for the stupid behavior. And the “never pick up hitch-hikers” warning is advice to the villains.

    Reply
  118. I have two recommendations and, in the interests of “if you like” disclosure, I also read Sayers, Allingham, Marsh, Elizabeth Peters, etc.
    Charlotte MacLeod’s Peter Shandy mystery series is very fun and quirky. They’re set in a fictional college town centered around Balaclava Agricultural College where Peter is a botany professor. MacLeod wrote several other mystery series, but I’ve only read Peter Shandy. The books have gone through several printings and some have atrocious covers, but don’t let that put you off. Peter meets his future wife in the first book, Rest You Merry.
    I love Ellis Peters’ Brother Cadfael series and have been trying to get to her other books. (The Heaven Tree Trilogy is another one that I’m saving for a long stretch of time.) Recently, I listened to an audio recording of Never Pick Up Hitch-Hikers and was delighted by her fresh take on the old-fashioned romantic suspense novel. The characters in those novels can usually be counted on to do stupid things, but Hitch-Hikers has sensible protagonists which gives added suspense since you’re waiting for the stupid behavior. And the “never pick up hitch-hikers” warning is advice to the villains.

    Reply
  119. I have two recommendations and, in the interests of “if you like” disclosure, I also read Sayers, Allingham, Marsh, Elizabeth Peters, etc.
    Charlotte MacLeod’s Peter Shandy mystery series is very fun and quirky. They’re set in a fictional college town centered around Balaclava Agricultural College where Peter is a botany professor. MacLeod wrote several other mystery series, but I’ve only read Peter Shandy. The books have gone through several printings and some have atrocious covers, but don’t let that put you off. Peter meets his future wife in the first book, Rest You Merry.
    I love Ellis Peters’ Brother Cadfael series and have been trying to get to her other books. (The Heaven Tree Trilogy is another one that I’m saving for a long stretch of time.) Recently, I listened to an audio recording of Never Pick Up Hitch-Hikers and was delighted by her fresh take on the old-fashioned romantic suspense novel. The characters in those novels can usually be counted on to do stupid things, but Hitch-Hikers has sensible protagonists which gives added suspense since you’re waiting for the stupid behavior. And the “never pick up hitch-hikers” warning is advice to the villains.

    Reply
  120. I have two recommendations and, in the interests of “if you like” disclosure, I also read Sayers, Allingham, Marsh, Elizabeth Peters, etc.
    Charlotte MacLeod’s Peter Shandy mystery series is very fun and quirky. They’re set in a fictional college town centered around Balaclava Agricultural College where Peter is a botany professor. MacLeod wrote several other mystery series, but I’ve only read Peter Shandy. The books have gone through several printings and some have atrocious covers, but don’t let that put you off. Peter meets his future wife in the first book, Rest You Merry.
    I love Ellis Peters’ Brother Cadfael series and have been trying to get to her other books. (The Heaven Tree Trilogy is another one that I’m saving for a long stretch of time.) Recently, I listened to an audio recording of Never Pick Up Hitch-Hikers and was delighted by her fresh take on the old-fashioned romantic suspense novel. The characters in those novels can usually be counted on to do stupid things, but Hitch-Hikers has sensible protagonists which gives added suspense since you’re waiting for the stupid behavior. And the “never pick up hitch-hikers” warning is advice to the villains.

    Reply
  121. Kalen, that is so lovely to hear! I hope the reading matter lived up to the settign (at least my half of it-I’m currently reading “Lady Be Bad” myself, so I know it’s a total treat). My ideal vacation invovles going ot the theater, preferably twice a day, so there isn’t a huge amount of reading time. I often travel with a writer friend (Penny Williamson, who will be very happy to hear Tal’s comment on “Keeper of the Dream”) and we do talk about our books but mostly in relation to the plays we’re seeing, so it never really feels like “work”. I have fond memories of first reading Anthony Trollope’s Palliser series on a Kaui beach on a family vacation. I think Dorothy Dunnett’s Lymond Chronciles or Dorothy Sayers’ Peter Wimsey mysteries of Margery Allingham’s Albert Campion mysteries or Ngaio Marsh’s Roderick Alleyn mysteries would make for fabuous vacation reading, especially if one had time to read a whole bunch of the books close together. Loretta, a friend who had recently been to Venice inroduced me to the Donna Leon books, and I love them!

    Reply
  122. Kalen, that is so lovely to hear! I hope the reading matter lived up to the settign (at least my half of it-I’m currently reading “Lady Be Bad” myself, so I know it’s a total treat). My ideal vacation invovles going ot the theater, preferably twice a day, so there isn’t a huge amount of reading time. I often travel with a writer friend (Penny Williamson, who will be very happy to hear Tal’s comment on “Keeper of the Dream”) and we do talk about our books but mostly in relation to the plays we’re seeing, so it never really feels like “work”. I have fond memories of first reading Anthony Trollope’s Palliser series on a Kaui beach on a family vacation. I think Dorothy Dunnett’s Lymond Chronciles or Dorothy Sayers’ Peter Wimsey mysteries of Margery Allingham’s Albert Campion mysteries or Ngaio Marsh’s Roderick Alleyn mysteries would make for fabuous vacation reading, especially if one had time to read a whole bunch of the books close together. Loretta, a friend who had recently been to Venice inroduced me to the Donna Leon books, and I love them!

    Reply
  123. Kalen, that is so lovely to hear! I hope the reading matter lived up to the settign (at least my half of it-I’m currently reading “Lady Be Bad” myself, so I know it’s a total treat). My ideal vacation invovles going ot the theater, preferably twice a day, so there isn’t a huge amount of reading time. I often travel with a writer friend (Penny Williamson, who will be very happy to hear Tal’s comment on “Keeper of the Dream”) and we do talk about our books but mostly in relation to the plays we’re seeing, so it never really feels like “work”. I have fond memories of first reading Anthony Trollope’s Palliser series on a Kaui beach on a family vacation. I think Dorothy Dunnett’s Lymond Chronciles or Dorothy Sayers’ Peter Wimsey mysteries of Margery Allingham’s Albert Campion mysteries or Ngaio Marsh’s Roderick Alleyn mysteries would make for fabuous vacation reading, especially if one had time to read a whole bunch of the books close together. Loretta, a friend who had recently been to Venice inroduced me to the Donna Leon books, and I love them!

    Reply
  124. Kalen, that is so lovely to hear! I hope the reading matter lived up to the settign (at least my half of it-I’m currently reading “Lady Be Bad” myself, so I know it’s a total treat). My ideal vacation invovles going ot the theater, preferably twice a day, so there isn’t a huge amount of reading time. I often travel with a writer friend (Penny Williamson, who will be very happy to hear Tal’s comment on “Keeper of the Dream”) and we do talk about our books but mostly in relation to the plays we’re seeing, so it never really feels like “work”. I have fond memories of first reading Anthony Trollope’s Palliser series on a Kaui beach on a family vacation. I think Dorothy Dunnett’s Lymond Chronciles or Dorothy Sayers’ Peter Wimsey mysteries of Margery Allingham’s Albert Campion mysteries or Ngaio Marsh’s Roderick Alleyn mysteries would make for fabuous vacation reading, especially if one had time to read a whole bunch of the books close together. Loretta, a friend who had recently been to Venice inroduced me to the Donna Leon books, and I love them!

    Reply
  125. Kalen, that is so lovely to hear! I hope the reading matter lived up to the settign (at least my half of it-I’m currently reading “Lady Be Bad” myself, so I know it’s a total treat). My ideal vacation invovles going ot the theater, preferably twice a day, so there isn’t a huge amount of reading time. I often travel with a writer friend (Penny Williamson, who will be very happy to hear Tal’s comment on “Keeper of the Dream”) and we do talk about our books but mostly in relation to the plays we’re seeing, so it never really feels like “work”. I have fond memories of first reading Anthony Trollope’s Palliser series on a Kaui beach on a family vacation. I think Dorothy Dunnett’s Lymond Chronciles or Dorothy Sayers’ Peter Wimsey mysteries of Margery Allingham’s Albert Campion mysteries or Ngaio Marsh’s Roderick Alleyn mysteries would make for fabuous vacation reading, especially if one had time to read a whole bunch of the books close together. Loretta, a friend who had recently been to Venice inroduced me to the Donna Leon books, and I love them!

    Reply
  126. Mary K, how could I forget Brother Cadfael? It’s funny about Charlotte McLeod. So many books–perfect for series nuts like me–and yet I’m not sure I’ve ever read one. But one of my sisters & I plan a buy-beach-books weekend, so that’s going on the list, too.
    Tracy, all the English mystery authors you mentioned are some of my favorite beach reads.
    I now have a 5 page list of series books, plus some standalones.
    With that and a couple of Terry Pratchett, I’m looking forward to reader’s paradise.

    Reply
  127. Mary K, how could I forget Brother Cadfael? It’s funny about Charlotte McLeod. So many books–perfect for series nuts like me–and yet I’m not sure I’ve ever read one. But one of my sisters & I plan a buy-beach-books weekend, so that’s going on the list, too.
    Tracy, all the English mystery authors you mentioned are some of my favorite beach reads.
    I now have a 5 page list of series books, plus some standalones.
    With that and a couple of Terry Pratchett, I’m looking forward to reader’s paradise.

    Reply
  128. Mary K, how could I forget Brother Cadfael? It’s funny about Charlotte McLeod. So many books–perfect for series nuts like me–and yet I’m not sure I’ve ever read one. But one of my sisters & I plan a buy-beach-books weekend, so that’s going on the list, too.
    Tracy, all the English mystery authors you mentioned are some of my favorite beach reads.
    I now have a 5 page list of series books, plus some standalones.
    With that and a couple of Terry Pratchett, I’m looking forward to reader’s paradise.

    Reply
  129. Mary K, how could I forget Brother Cadfael? It’s funny about Charlotte McLeod. So many books–perfect for series nuts like me–and yet I’m not sure I’ve ever read one. But one of my sisters & I plan a buy-beach-books weekend, so that’s going on the list, too.
    Tracy, all the English mystery authors you mentioned are some of my favorite beach reads.
    I now have a 5 page list of series books, plus some standalones.
    With that and a couple of Terry Pratchett, I’m looking forward to reader’s paradise.

    Reply
  130. Mary K, how could I forget Brother Cadfael? It’s funny about Charlotte McLeod. So many books–perfect for series nuts like me–and yet I’m not sure I’ve ever read one. But one of my sisters & I plan a buy-beach-books weekend, so that’s going on the list, too.
    Tracy, all the English mystery authors you mentioned are some of my favorite beach reads.
    I now have a 5 page list of series books, plus some standalones.
    With that and a couple of Terry Pratchett, I’m looking forward to reader’s paradise.

    Reply
  131. I bring ‘disposeable’ books with me on vacation. After losing a few OOP paperbacks and a library book I had to pay for, I switched to my current policy. 🙂
    I usually bring a mixture of old favorites that are almost falling apart, books donated by people who don’t want them back, and maybe one or two new purchases that I’m willing to risk losing. I include a Regency or two, at least one humorous contemporary, a chick list books and misc. romances for the rest. Now that it doesn’t matter if I lose one, so far they’ve all made it home safely with me each time. 🙂

    Reply
  132. I bring ‘disposeable’ books with me on vacation. After losing a few OOP paperbacks and a library book I had to pay for, I switched to my current policy. 🙂
    I usually bring a mixture of old favorites that are almost falling apart, books donated by people who don’t want them back, and maybe one or two new purchases that I’m willing to risk losing. I include a Regency or two, at least one humorous contemporary, a chick list books and misc. romances for the rest. Now that it doesn’t matter if I lose one, so far they’ve all made it home safely with me each time. 🙂

    Reply
  133. I bring ‘disposeable’ books with me on vacation. After losing a few OOP paperbacks and a library book I had to pay for, I switched to my current policy. 🙂
    I usually bring a mixture of old favorites that are almost falling apart, books donated by people who don’t want them back, and maybe one or two new purchases that I’m willing to risk losing. I include a Regency or two, at least one humorous contemporary, a chick list books and misc. romances for the rest. Now that it doesn’t matter if I lose one, so far they’ve all made it home safely with me each time. 🙂

    Reply
  134. I bring ‘disposeable’ books with me on vacation. After losing a few OOP paperbacks and a library book I had to pay for, I switched to my current policy. 🙂
    I usually bring a mixture of old favorites that are almost falling apart, books donated by people who don’t want them back, and maybe one or two new purchases that I’m willing to risk losing. I include a Regency or two, at least one humorous contemporary, a chick list books and misc. romances for the rest. Now that it doesn’t matter if I lose one, so far they’ve all made it home safely with me each time. 🙂

    Reply
  135. I bring ‘disposeable’ books with me on vacation. After losing a few OOP paperbacks and a library book I had to pay for, I switched to my current policy. 🙂
    I usually bring a mixture of old favorites that are almost falling apart, books donated by people who don’t want them back, and maybe one or two new purchases that I’m willing to risk losing. I include a Regency or two, at least one humorous contemporary, a chick list books and misc. romances for the rest. Now that it doesn’t matter if I lose one, so far they’ve all made it home safely with me each time. 🙂

    Reply
  136. Good policy! Though it’s not far from my home to the place at the Cape, and relatives go back and forth all the time, it’s too easy for books to get lost, so mine tend to be easy to replace.

    Reply
  137. Good policy! Though it’s not far from my home to the place at the Cape, and relatives go back and forth all the time, it’s too easy for books to get lost, so mine tend to be easy to replace.

    Reply
  138. Good policy! Though it’s not far from my home to the place at the Cape, and relatives go back and forth all the time, it’s too easy for books to get lost, so mine tend to be easy to replace.

    Reply
  139. Good policy! Though it’s not far from my home to the place at the Cape, and relatives go back and forth all the time, it’s too easy for books to get lost, so mine tend to be easy to replace.

    Reply
  140. Good policy! Though it’s not far from my home to the place at the Cape, and relatives go back and forth all the time, it’s too easy for books to get lost, so mine tend to be easy to replace.

    Reply
  141. “Three men in a boat” is perfect for a Wodehouse fan, plus it also has the synchronicity of being set on a holiday.
    The trouble with good books is they have to be read! So I always end up with the second-rate books on the holiday itself. The only way it works is if I discover a prolific author just beforehand. So, a boatload of Elizabeth Peters this year!

    Reply
  142. “Three men in a boat” is perfect for a Wodehouse fan, plus it also has the synchronicity of being set on a holiday.
    The trouble with good books is they have to be read! So I always end up with the second-rate books on the holiday itself. The only way it works is if I discover a prolific author just beforehand. So, a boatload of Elizabeth Peters this year!

    Reply
  143. “Three men in a boat” is perfect for a Wodehouse fan, plus it also has the synchronicity of being set on a holiday.
    The trouble with good books is they have to be read! So I always end up with the second-rate books on the holiday itself. The only way it works is if I discover a prolific author just beforehand. So, a boatload of Elizabeth Peters this year!

    Reply
  144. “Three men in a boat” is perfect for a Wodehouse fan, plus it also has the synchronicity of being set on a holiday.
    The trouble with good books is they have to be read! So I always end up with the second-rate books on the holiday itself. The only way it works is if I discover a prolific author just beforehand. So, a boatload of Elizabeth Peters this year!

    Reply
  145. “Three men in a boat” is perfect for a Wodehouse fan, plus it also has the synchronicity of being set on a holiday.
    The trouble with good books is they have to be read! So I always end up with the second-rate books on the holiday itself. The only way it works is if I discover a prolific author just beforehand. So, a boatload of Elizabeth Peters this year!

    Reply

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